Currently viewing the category: "Nests"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stinging flying insect.
Location: Mesa Arizona
August 18, 2014 1:26 pm
I was stung today by these lovely little guys, when I went to insect identification and clicked Arizona, I however was at a loss to find them! The nest is smaller than a baseball and they’re probably only 1 1/2 inches in length (not that I got close enough to measure) I was wondering if you could help my figure out just who’s living in my hedge bush!
Signature: Lynn

Paper Wasp Nest

Paper Wasp Nest

Dear Lynn,
These are Paper Wasps in the genus
Polistes, and they are social wasps that build nests.  Generally, solitary wasps are not aggressive, but social wasps will defend the nest.  With that said, Paper Wasps are not as aggressive as Yellowjackets or Hornets, but they will still defend the nest.  We believe your individuals are Polistes flavus based on images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: This is the Stuff of Nightmares
Location: Boquete, Panama
June 1, 2014 8:12 am
Hi Bugman!
I live in Boquete, Panama and found this nest in the tree outside my house. I know that insects are fun and interesting, but the sight of this nest gives me the creeps. Can you tell me what kind of creature builds such a nest and feels that they can hang out by my porch like they own the place?
Signature: ~Cate

Hornet Nest

Hornet Nest

Hi Cate,
This appears to be a Hornet Nest, but we cannot make out individual insects well enough in your image to provide an exact identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hornet nest
Location: Anniston, AL
May 13, 2014 11:07 am
Found one just getting started under my eaves.
Signature: Rick

Hornet Nest

Hornet Nest

Hi Rick,
Thank you for sending this image of what is most likely a queen Bald Faced Hornet beginning to construct her nest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orchid bee?
Location: Royal palm beach florida
March 11, 2014 1:21 pm
I believe is orchid bee, do not have pic of actual bee, have had over a year now. he is quite interesting
Signature: Toni

What's Nesting in the Bird House???

What’s Nesting in the Bird House???

Dear Toni,
We are presuming that you attached two images of a bird house because the creature in question has nested inside the bird house.  Your letter did not describe the creature, which you have stated is a Bee.  The Orchid Bee,
Euglossa dilemma, is a bright green bee that is often seen hovering near blossoms.  If the Bee you have had for over a year is not bright green, it is not the Orchid Bee.  We have received another report of Green Orchid Bees nesting in an abandoned birdhouse, but Bumble Bees will also nest in a birdhouse.  Only the female Orchid Bee builds the nest, so you should use the pronoun “she” when referring to your creature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of nest is this
Location: Hudson, NH
February 15, 2014 12:33 pm
I found these today in the slots in my window were my screen would go. I only have half screens so the top never has anything in it.
Signature: Angela

Nest of a Grass Carrying Wasp

Nest of a Grass Carrying Wasp

Dear Angela,
We believe this is the nest of a Grass Carrying Wasp in the genus
Isodontia.  According to BugGuide:  “Females make nests in a tree, hollow stem or other cavity, divide into sections and close with grass. They provision with Orthoptera (Tettigoniidae, Gryllidae)” and “These wasps commonly make their nest in the narrow track found above outer windows.”  We cannot tell if the nest in your photo has been provisioned with Crickets.  The female Grass Carrying Wasp paralyzes the cricket which remains immobile, but alive, as the wasp larva feeds upon it.

Update and Question:  April 18, 2014
Subject: Grass-carrying wasp
April 17, 2014 1:32 pm
When in the spring/summer is best to clean out old grass carrying wasp nests allowing them to emerge as happy, healthy adults?
Signature: Dee Maack

Nice question Dee.  This is speculation on our part.  Based on information on Grass Carrying Wasps that is available on BugGuide:  “Taken from the Internet Reference below (Penn State): The adult wasps emerge from their cocoons in early summer, mate, and the females locate a suitable nest site. She collects blades of grass and grass and hay stems to line the nest cavity. The wasp can be seen flying through the air with the blades trailing beneath her. She lands at the hole and enters, pulling the blade in behind her. After the nest is prepared, she hunts for tree crickets (i.e., Oecanthus sp.), captures and paralyses them with her sting, and transports them to the nest. She deposits eggs in the nest and the emerging larvae will feed on the living, but immobile crickets. When the larvae reach the appropriate size (in 4–6 days at 70–75° F.), they spin a cocoon and pupate. The adult wasps emerge in 2–3 weeks. In Pennsylvania, Isodontia mexicana typically produce two generations per year.”  We would suggest mid to late June as a time to consider clearing out nests from the previous year, however, if you notice pupae as you are cleaning out the windows, you may want to delay the clearance a few more weeks.  We have added your question to a recent posting on the nests of Grass Carrying Wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Are these Hornets?
Location: Methuen, MA
October 20, 2013 6:55 am
Hi Bugman! My 9 -year old daughter spotted this this morning, it’s larger than a football and very well made. Can you please tell me what we are dealing with here? We have three small children.
Signature: Mamacyn

Hornets Nest

Hornets Nest

Dear Mamacyn,
This is indeed a Hornets Nest, and it most likely belongs to Bald Faced Hornets.  Since it is October and the first freeze of the year is not long off, we wouldn’t advise you to take any action as the colony will die with the coming winter.  Hornets do not reuse a nest.  The mated queens will hibernate and begin building new colonies in new locations in the spring.  Hornets are generally not aggressive unless the nest is threatened, so this nest was probably active the entire summer and its inhabitants were content to cohabitate with you and your family to neither species’ detriment.

Thank you Daniel!  I will advise everyone to keep away until we know that they have abandoned the nest.  I’d love to keep it, it’s so pretty.
Thank you again!!
Take care,
Cynthia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination