Currently viewing the category: "Nests"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these little guys?
Location: Austin, TX
May 9, 2015 11:38 am
Hi Bugman,
We found this “nest” high up in our bathroom attached to a wall. Underneath it in the bath tub were a bunch of dead little worm looking things. We cleaned it up and wiped it down last night before going to sleep, but could not get a tiny amount of the black stuff off the wall. Sure enough, over night, the “nest” grew back to it’s prior size and once again the bathtub was full of the bugs. What is this and how should we get rid of it? Thanks!
Signature: Kate

Evidence of Termites

Evidence of Termites

Dear Kate,
You have Termites.  See this image on All Experts which resembles your “nest”.
  Here is another similar looking image from BugGuide.

Termites

Termites

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Spider’s Nest??
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 7, 2015 11:16 PM
Hello Daniel,
I need your help to identify a scary nest in my garden.  It is dangling from a trailing geranium that hangs from the rear deck.  Perfect ventilation!  At first, I thought it might become a small bird’s nest but it has not evolved for over a week.  I was bitten by a spider three weeks ago, in our bedroom (its was inside of my p j pants!)  As a result, I was on antibiotics and it took over two weeks to heal.
Then a while later, Gerard killed a small spider in the bedroom.  I kept the body and will show it to you when I see you next week.
Anyway, tell me what I am “nurturing” in my geranium!
Have a good night,
Monique

Hummingbird Nest

Hummingbird Nest

Good Morning Monique,
Your confusion is understandable.  Hummingbirds use spider’s webs to construct their tiny nests.  Perhaps this nest was abandoned, or perhaps the young Hummingbirds have already left the nest, or perhaps the eggs have not yet been laid.  Several years ago a Hummingbird built a nest in our large carob overhanging the street causing us to postpone tree trimming, but alas, the nest was abandoned.

Julian Donahue comments
And the BioSCAN person who picked up our Malaise trap samples last week spotted a similar nest on our cup of gold vine (Solandra maxima) overhanging the driveway–first hummingbird nest I’ve seen on our property. Probably an Allen’s Hummingbird, now our more common species.
Did a little checking and learned some new stuff about this bird: nesting season is October – May or June, and a single female may lay four or five clutches of eggs (two eggs per clutch) in a single season, often using the same nest over again. Like most moms, she does all the work.
These factoids and many others at: http://phoebeallens.com/facts.html
Julian

Mt. Washington Homeowners Alliance, Sarah Pruitt, Lisa Hoffman, Kathy Lynn Douglass, Laura Lindler, Katie Pasulka Casas, Lori Ledeboer, Alisha Bragg, Christina Sargent, Lesa Joel DeCuir, Sue Dougherty, Megan Rivera-Franceschi, Kristi E. Lambert, Jessica M. Schemm, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mud Nest – Australia
Location: Hawkesbury region, NSW, Australia
December 30, 2014 2:29 pm
Hey Bugman,
Thought you might like to see this nest I came across the other day on my property in Hawkesbury, NSW, Australia.
Clearly some kind of mud-wasp, we get a lot around here, although I have never seen a nest this size (only single ones). The funnel entry/exit points are a work of art.
Didn’t see the inhabitants, and quite happy about that actually, but isn’t it beautiful?
Any idea on the actual identity of the builders?
Signature: Tracy

Termite Nest we believe

Termite Nest we believe

Dear Tracy,
We do not believe this is a Wasp Nest.  Instead, we are leaning toward a Termite Nest.  There are some images on the Brisbane Insect website of Termite Nests in the genus
Microcerotermes, and the site states:  “Those large mud nests on trees as shown in photos are common in Brisbane Eucalypt forest. They the the termite nests. They are usually 3-4 meters above ground. These termites have mud tunnels to connect to the ground near the base of the tree. They also have a networks of tunnels underground. It is interesting to note that these termites seldom do any damage to the tree. The termites may have a little chewing around the nest on bark but for the most part the trees are fine. On the tree trunk there are only a few mud tunnels.”  An image on the Ian King Pest Control site looks even more like your images.

Possibly Termite Nest

Possibly Termite Nest

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue planar spidernet chile
Location: Osorno, Chile
December 18, 2014 2:30 am
Hallo bugman,
can you identify the spider which produced this
horizontally spanned blue chaotic net near the Osorno in Chile in December?
Unfortunately, the spider was absent.
Greetings
Signature: Joachim

Unknown Spider Web

Unknown Spider Web

Dear Joachim,
Thanks so much for sending a higher resolution image.  We have not been able to determine the identity of the spider that created this web, but we are posting the image and many times our readers write in to contribute to the identification process.  Hopefully we will be able to provide you with an identification in the future.
  Can you provide us with any additional information.  Was it near a body of water.  We seem to have a recollection of horizontal webs near streams, but we are still attempting to locate those sources.

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Subject: stumped…
Location: mojave desert, southern california
September 7, 2014 4:59 pm
I just bought some land in southern California about 5 miles outside of Boron. We were returning from working the land and I stopped to pee…saw this perfectly circular hole in the ground surrounded by pebbles and stuff that seemed to be cemented together. The hole itself was about an inch across and seemed to be coated with very dense web down it’s sides. The cemented pebbles and such looked like it would be hard to the touch but it was flexible. I took some pictures and though maybe whatever lived there would pop out but nothing showed. Is this an abandoned trapdoor spider lair or what? I am curious!!
Signature: John Roush

What made the hole???

What made the hole???

Hi John,
We have to use reverse elimination here, and we know it is not a Crayfish hole, and we don’t believe it to be a Trapdoor Spider hole or a Wolf Spider hole.
  WE are going to post it and classify it as an unsolved Mystery.

What's That Hole???

What’s That Hole???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stinging flying insect.
Location: Mesa Arizona
August 18, 2014 1:26 pm
I was stung today by these lovely little guys, when I went to insect identification and clicked Arizona, I however was at a loss to find them! The nest is smaller than a baseball and they’re probably only 1 1/2 inches in length (not that I got close enough to measure) I was wondering if you could help my figure out just who’s living in my hedge bush!
Signature: Lynn

Paper Wasp Nest

Paper Wasp Nest

Dear Lynn,
These are Paper Wasps in the genus
Polistes, and they are social wasps that build nests.  Generally, solitary wasps are not aggressive, but social wasps will defend the nest.  With that said, Paper Wasps are not as aggressive as Yellowjackets or Hornets, but they will still defend the nest.  We believe your individuals are Polistes flavus based on images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination