Currently viewing the category: "Underwing Moths and Fruit Piercing Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some kind of catocala moth?
Location: Troy, VA
August 3, 2016 9:11 am
After doing a search, I’m pretty sure this is a catocala moth, what kind eludes me. It’s lovely, whatever it is, and it was quite obliging by showing its underwings.
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Large Yellow Underwing

False Underwing

Dear Grace,
Though the common name Underwing is shared by your moth as well as the Underwings in the genus
Catocala, your individual is actually a False Underwing, Allotria elonympha, which we identified on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on a variety of deciduous trees, such as Black Gum (Nyssa sylvatica), hickories, walnuts.”  Black Gum is also the only host listed for The Hebrew you just submitted, so we are speculating there is at least one growing nearby.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing flashes its colors in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 10, 2016 10:30 PM
Though we have managed to get images of Walnut Underwings several times each year, getting a good glimpse at the gorgeously marked underwings responsible for the common name is not that easy.  This beauty was quite cooperative tonight.  After startling it when we walked out onto the porch to dump a pot full of water into the garden, it remained “posing” on the ground until we had time to run for the camera and we got a few images using the on-camera flash.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth ID
Location:  San Juan Del Sur, Nicaragua
July 4, 2016
San Juan Del Sur nica
Taken by Kryss Castle in Nicaragua.
Allison Jones

Melipotis fasciolaris

Melipotis fasciolaris

Dear Allison,
We first located a matching image to Kryss’ Moth on The Moth Photographers Group where it is identified as Melipotis fasciolaris.  We cross checked that name on BugGuide and found this image of the male.  We learned on BugGuide that this species is sexually dimorphic, meaning males and females look like different species, and that is has the common name Bewitching Melipotis.  It ranges from the Southern US to Uruguay.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 30, 2016
This Walnut Underwing was fluttering around the light last night and it was resting on the wall this morning.  We wonder if this is the same individual we posted last month.  The wings are a bit tattered, indicating this is not a freshly eclosed moth.  Underwings are long lived moths, in the scheme of things.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 17, 2016 6:48 PM
Each year we look forward to the first appearance of a Walnut Underwing at our office.  We were pleasantly surprised by this especially gorgeous individual earlier in the week.  Perhaps we will try to get a good image with the colorful underwings revealed the next time it comes to the porch light.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth, needs ID
Location: kunfunadhoo, maldives
December 31, 2015 11:56 pm
hi, my name is adil and im on eco resort in the maldives, Sonevafushi, we are trying to identify and map the bio diversity of the island and as local resources on the matter limited we are having trouble identifying these insects. Maldives is in oriental region weather is sunny for most of the year, the moth in question was found at night outside near a light
Signature: adil

Fruit Piercing Moth

Fruit Piercing Moth

Dear Adil,
We believe this is a Fruit Piercing Moth in the family Erebidae, though we have not been able to locate an exact match from Maldives.  Oz Animals has a very similar looking individual that is found in Australia.

hi Daniel,
Thank you for your reply. I thought that it was a fruit piercing moth as well but i have been contradicting answers from a few other sources, another species which looks quite a lot like this one is also found in Maldives and i was told that this might be a Thyas coronata. The resemblance is making it hard to accurately ID the species, your thoughts?

The Moths of Borneo site has a nice image of Thyas coronata that looks very close to your individual, and it belongs to the tribe Ophiusini in the family Erebidae.  That might be the correct identification. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination