Currently viewing the category: "Underwing Moths and Fruit Piercing Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 17, 2016 6:48 PM
Each year we look forward to the first appearance of a Walnut Underwing at our office.  We were pleasantly surprised by this especially gorgeous individual earlier in the week.  Perhaps we will try to get a good image with the colorful underwings revealed the next time it comes to the porch light.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth, needs ID
Location: kunfunadhoo, maldives
December 31, 2015 11:56 pm
hi, my name is adil and im on eco resort in the maldives, Sonevafushi, we are trying to identify and map the bio diversity of the island and as local resources on the matter limited we are having trouble identifying these insects. Maldives is in oriental region weather is sunny for most of the year, the moth in question was found at night outside near a light
Signature: adil

Fruit Piercing Moth

Fruit Piercing Moth

Dear Adil,
We believe this is a Fruit Piercing Moth in the family Erebidae, though we have not been able to locate an exact match from Maldives.  Oz Animals has a very similar looking individual that is found in Australia.

hi Daniel,
Thank you for your reply. I thought that it was a fruit piercing moth as well but i have been contradicting answers from a few other sources, another species which looks quite a lot like this one is also found in Maldives and i was told that this might be a Thyas coronata. The resemblance is making it hard to accurately ID the species, your thoughts?

The Moths of Borneo site has a nice image of Thyas coronata that looks very close to your individual, and it belongs to the tribe Ophiusini in the family Erebidae.  That might be the correct identification. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Awesome moth
Location: Hudson valley New York
September 15, 2015 5:06 pm
Saw this red butterfly fly past me and land and I noticed it didn’t land like a normal butterfly and upon further inspection it wasn’t a butterfly at all or red. It was an all como’d out moth. Please identify this for me it really took me by surprise and really intrigued me.
Signature: Stephen bock

Underwing Moth

Underwing Moth

Dear Stephen,
You are correct that this is a moth.  Underwing Moths in the genus
Catocala often have brightly colored underwings in alternating stripes of red, pink or orange and black.  The brightly colored underwings are revealed in flight, but when the moth lands, the bark-mimic upper wings blend in with tree trunks, effectively camouflaging the Underwing Moth from predators who are searching for brightly colored prey.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown Moth
Location: Walkerton, Indiana
August 28, 2015 3:53 pm
I was out cleaning up brush around the house and I saw this moth sitting on my porch steps. Not sure what kind it is, but it is a nice looking one.
Signature: Edward

Underwing Moth

Underwing Moth

Dear Edward,
This Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala is a masterful example of camouflage.  The underwings are often brightly colored red, pink or orange with black stripes, but they are hidden when the moth rests, often on a tree trunk where it blends in perfectly with the bark.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bark colored moth
Location: Fair Harbor, Fire Island, New York
July 27, 2015 5:37 am
I’ve seen a few of these medium sized moths in Fire Island, NY. They stay on our cedar shingled house during the day unless disturbed.
Signature: Alison Sazinger

Underwing Moth

Underwing Moth

Dear Alison,
This is some species of Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala.  Just last night, we posted a few images taken at our own porch light of a Walnut Underwing that visited our porch light.  We are not certain of your species.  According to BugGuide:  “Lafontaine & Schmidt (2010) listed 101 species of the genus Catocala in America north of Mexico.  Powell & Opler (2009) reported 110 species in all of North America, and about 230 worldwide. ”  The common name Underwing refers to the brightly colored underwings which are hidden when the moth is resting.  The upper wings of Underwing moths blend in perfectly with tree bark when the moth is resting, and a burst of color results when the disturbed moth takes flight.  A predator continues to search for the bright colors and easily overlooks the camouflaged moth.

Thank you for responding h so fast. I’ve never noticed them here before and now they seem common. When it flew I only saw dark brown.
Is the bright park on the dorsal side?
I’ll google the genus.
Thanks!
Alison Salzinger

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Underwing on the Welcome Mat

Underwing on the Welcome Mat

Subject:  Walnut Underwing visits WTB?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 26, 2015 9:29 PM
We never tire of visits from Walnut Underwings, and we have had more sightings this year than we can ever remember in a season.  We finally got a peep at those brightly colored underwings that give this Noctuoid its common name.

Under side of an Underwing

Under side of an Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination