Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Moths and Arctiids"
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Subject: A Ctenucha moth?
Location: Panajachel, Guatemala
February 3, 2016 1:15 pm
I’m a Canadian living in Panajachel, Guatemala, in the Western Highlands near Lake Atitlan. We found this beautiful moth on our porch today mid-afternoon on a very sunny day. He was very lively! Did not want to sit still for a picture.
Black and red wing, very bright iridescent blue body.
Am I correct in thinking this is a type of Ctenucha moth?
Signature: Cristel

Ctenuchid

Ctenuchid

Dear Cristel,
You are correct that this Tiger Moth is in the subtribe Ctenuchina, and we believe that it is in the genus
Cyanopepla based on the image posted to Emtomofausac Insectos de Guatemala and the image on Neotropical Lepidoptera that is identified as  Cyanopepla bella, though we are not fully convinced that is the correct species.  We located several members of the genus online that look very similar, but none have the bold, unbroken red marking on the forewing.  We will contact Arctiinae expert Julian Donahue to see if he can provide a species.

Ctenuchid

Ctenuchid

Julian Donahue Responds
Locality?? Also, hindwing markings important in this genus.
I may be able to come up with a name if I know the locality.
Julian

Thanks Julian.  The location is “Panajachel, Guatemala, in the Western Highlands near Lake Atitlan.”

Sorry, Daniel. It looks very familiar, and I’m pretty sure there’s an identified specimen of this in the LACM collection that you can check out.
Otherwise, without the hindwing I can’t be positive about anything else, although I think you have the right genus.
Good luck,
Julian

Gangamela ira (Druce, 1896).jpg

Gangamela ira (Druce, 1896).jpg

As luck would have it, I think I’ve come close.
This is the original figure of Gangamela ira (Druce, 1896), described from Panama, which, it has been noted, is virtually identical to the figure of Cyanopepla beata Rothschild, 1912, also described from Panama.
At present, the two taxa remain as separate species in separate genera! If they are the same species, then the Druce name would have priority, but that still leaves the proper generic placement in question.
Note that your Guatemalan specimen has much more blue on the inner margin of the forewing, and may, in fact, be something completely different. But this is the closest I can come for now.
Hurray for the bobcat; we’re still waiting to see one here on our property, although we’ve seen them on some local birding walks!
Julian

Wow, thank you so much!
I looked through all the pictures I had taken, even the blurry ones, to see if I got a shot of the hindwing but no luck. :(
I’ve been blogging about my time in Guate and I think I will post this conversation up as a topic of interest to anyone looking for bug identification.
Thanks again!
Cristel

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Subject: Can you identify please?
Location: 14°53′54″ N and 15°40′00″ N and longitudes 73°40′33″ E and 74°20′13″ E.
December 13, 2015 9:03 pm
Hi,
I am back once again for a request to identify some lovely bugs. I live in Goa. India. It is a smallest state in India – located on the west coast.
Goa i/ˈɡoʊ.ə/ is a state located in the South western region of India; it is bounded by the state of Maharashtra to the north, and by Karnataka to the east and south, while the Arabian Sea forms its western coast. It is India’s smallest state by area and the fourth smallest by population.
Goa is a former Portuguese province; the Portuguese overseas territory of Portuguese India existed for about 450 years until it was annexed by India in 1961.[4][5]
Goa is visited by large numbers of international and domestic tourists each year for its beaches, places of worship and world heritage architecture. It also has rich flora and fauna, owing to its location on the Western Ghats range, which is classified as a biodiversity hotspot.
Goa encompasses an area of 3,702 km2 (1,429 sq mi). It lies between the latitudes 14°53′54″ N and 15°40′00″ N and longitudes 73°40′33″ E and 74°20′13″ E. Most of Goa is a part of the coastal country known as the Konkan, which is an escarpment rising up to the Western Ghats range of mountains, which separate it from the Deccan Plateau. The highest point is the Sonsogor, with an altitude of 1,167 metres (3,829 ft). Goa has a coastline of 101 km (63 mi).
Signature: Sucheta Potnis

Wasp Moth

Wasp Moth

Dear Sucheta,
Because you have multiple species included in your submission, we need to separate them for posting purposes.  Your first attachment, the most colorful of the three moths, is a Wasp Moth in the tribe Euchromiini, and we believe it is
Euchromia polymena.  Wasp Moths get their common name as many members of the tribe are excellent mimics of stinging insects, though they are themselves harmless.  They are also diurnal in habit.  This image from TrekNature supports our identification.  We will be postdating your submission to go live during our holiday absence from the office later in the month.

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Subject: Moth picture collection
Location: Salta, Argentina
December 15, 2015 4:36 am
Dear WTB,
I have hundreds of pictures of moths from Salta, Argentina waiting for identification as I am not able to do it. Any advice? Would you be interested? I have pics classified by colour and all with a ruler in cm for scale. If interested we could collaborate or perhaps you know people that are interested?
Many thanks and kind regards.
Julio de Castro
Signature: Julio

Red Spot Wasp Mimic Moth

Red Spot Wasp Mimic Moth

Dear Julio,
That is quite some task you have on your hands and we can’t help but to wonder why you would have so many unidentified moth images from such a specific location.  Please provide us some information regarding the origin of this collection of images.  Are they your images?  Why were they taken?  Are they part of a bigger collection that includes identified species?  We try, often unsuccessfully, to post at least five new submissions each day, and if your collection numbers 200 moth images, it would take us well over a month to post them all, and that would mean ignoring all our other submissions.  Winter is rapidly approaching us in the northern hemisphere, and each year we experience a significant drop in identification requests with January and February marking our slowest months, though we also experience an increase in submissions from Australia, South Africa and other southern hemisphere locations at that time.  We cannot promise you that we can identify all your images, but we are quite curious if you send them one moth at a time, using our standard submission form each time, and provide any relevant information on the specimen while it was alive.  Our readership especially likes to see images of colorful and exotic species, and plain brown moths are often very difficult for us to identify as we have no formal training in taxonomy.  Also be aware that we will be away from the office for the holidays between December 21 and January 2, and at that time we will not be responding to any emails during that time.
Now that we have stated all that, we are pleased that we have identified your diurnal Wasp Moth in the tribe Euchromiini as the Red Spot Wasp Mimic Moth,
Cosmosoma teuthras, by first matching an image on the Lepidopteres de Pitangui au Minas Gerais site and then double checking that ID on the Moths of the Amazon and Andes site where it states:  “Cosmosoma teuthras is found from Mexico to Venezuela, and throughout Amazonia and the eastern Andes as far south as Bolivia. …  This is a cloudforest species found at elevations between about 500-2000m.”  We see on Google Maps that Salta is just south of the Bolivia border, and we are well aware that insects do not respect international borders, so the Moths of the Amazon and Andes site should revise their range on the Red Spot Wasp Mimic Moth.

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for your kind and fast reply. Many thanks for identifying the moth for me. I only included it because the form would not let me advance without an image!!! in any case it is an interesting wasp that I only saw last year in Salta and I thought it wasa kind of a moth!.
Regarding the reason for the picture collection, I bought a small farm in the Yungas area of Salta province. The area is known as “El Gallinato” and there is still quite a bit of wildlife around, including butterflies and moths. For security reasons we leave a neon light on in our verandah and I noted that every morning there were many moths, beetles and other insects. Being a (former?) scientist and nature lover, I started to photograph them every morning! At the beginning it was hard work as there were many “new” species. As time went by, things became easier as repetitions started to occur and now my job is much easier as I probably find 1-2 a day.
As I commute from Zimbabwe and Salta (to avoid the winters), I can only find the moths that hatch let’s say between December and June of each year so I am not able to detect those appearing during the winter although I guess that there are fewer.
Regarding the type of moths, there are all sorts and what I have done in my complete ignorance and with the purpose of saving myself some work, was to group them by colour and by whether they fold the wings or not! Yes, I know, a very amateur way of doing things but I do not like taxonomy!!!
All pictures I have from Salta  are from my farm with a few exceptions of some I may have collected on the entry road but these are mainly butterflies (maybe moths that look like butterflies? or wasps?).
I take your offer and will start posting you moths when I can and then see if you find them interesting. I believe that it is but I will lea ve the final decision to you. In any case, it will keep u busy during your winter “diapause”!!! I will send you another one now and wait for your reply before I flood you with pictures, if u think this is OK.
Thanks again and kind regards.
JC

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Ed. Note:  We really want to answer this query, but we don’t know where to begin our research.  These appear to be some species of Tiger Moth.

Subject: Insect tipe
Location: Lawn
November 22, 2015 2:15 am
I have found this insect in my garden can you please help me to identify this insect?
Signature: Kobus slabbert

Moths

Moths

Where is your lawn?  New Jersey?  Cairo?  Sydney??????

I sory it is bela bela in South Africa
Groete

Moths

Moths

Thanks for providing a location.  Your images are not of the highest quality, but these appear to be diurnal moths.  We searched through the two most obvious groups:  the subfamily Agaristinae on iSpot, the tribe Ctenuchiini on iSpot and the family Zygaenidae also on iSpot, and though there were many similar moths, none had the combination of red head, red legs, dark wings and light spots that your individuals have.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with this ID.

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Subject: Strange bug
Location: Kokomo Indiana
November 15, 2015 10:29 am
I found this bug outside my house and want to know what it is, I have never seen it before.
Signature: Allysha

Yellow Collared Scape Moth

Yellow Collared Scape Moth

Dear Allysha,
According to BugGuide, the Yellow Collared Scape Moth,
Cisseps fulvicollis,:  “Adults fly from May to October or first hard frost” which explains this late season sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: red moth
Location: St. francisville, La.
November 15, 2015 10:11 am
Photographed (on glass) 11-12-15 at St. Francisville, La. 70775
Signature: John

Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth

Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth

Hi John,
Congratulations on actually recognizing this as a moth.  The Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth is a very effective mimic of a stinging insect, which helps it to avoid being eaten by some predators.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination