Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Moths and Arctiids"
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Subject: bug in Key Largo
Location: Key Largo, Fl. 33037
March 11, 2015 2:18 pm
Dear Mr. Bugman,
I found this bug in my chicken house. Could you please give an ID?
Signature: treelady6

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Dear treelady6,
This Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth,
Empyreuma pugione, is a very effective wasp mimic.  According to BugGuide:  “The spotted oleander caterpillar is a recent immigrant to the US from the Caribbean, first recorded in Florida in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, in February 1978.”

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Subject: Moth laying eggs
Location: Spring Hill, Florida
February 22, 2015 10:53 am
My friend sent me this interesting photo of a beautiful moth laying eggs on her car cover. I have tried Google and the only thing I can find close to it is the Leopard moth.. but I am confused because this moth has red.. and I can not find any moth that looks like this at all?
Signature: Tina

Eyed Tiger Moth laying Eggs

Eyed Tiger Moth laying Eggs

Dear Tina,
Your identification of a Giant Leopard Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia, is correct, and the species is also known as an Eyed Tiger Moth.  The reddish mark on the thorax is an area where the scales have worn away, revealing the exoskeleton.  Here is an image from BugGuide of an individual with a similar bare spot on the thorax.

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Subject: Multicolored one!!!
Location: Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico.
February 4, 2015 12:22 pm
Hello!
I am hoping you can help me identify this bug, I believe it is kind of a moth but I am not totally positive. I found it last Sunday in a protected forest area nearby. I was walking in a trail in the middle of the woods when the little multicolored body got my attention and pictured it.
Keep up the good work with your great site.
Signature: Magno

Tiger Moth

Princely Tiger Moth

Dear Magno,
This is a magnificently colored Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae.  We believe we have identified it as a Princely Tiger Moth,
Chrysocale principalis, thanks to images on Texas Entomology, including a mounted specimen from Jalisco.  FlickR has an image of a mating pair of Princely Tiger Moths and Naturalista has a nice image as well.  

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Subject: Wasp or Moth in Costa Rica
Location: Golfito, Costa Rica
January 29, 2015 1:03 pm
Hello Bugman,
I found this insect around midnight on our concrete drive on the edge of the rainforest. The metallic blue and gold abdomen and the red head parts along with those wing were quite striking. Any ideas on what it could be? Thanks.
Signature: Ocho Verde

Wasp Moth

Wasp Moth

Dear Ocho Verde,
You are correct that this is a wasp mimic moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we are having a bit of difficulty with a species identification.  It reminds us of the Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth,
Empyreuma affinis, and we suspect it might be in the same genus.  We will contact lepidopterist Julian Donahue to see if he can provide an identification.

Julian Donahue provides correction.
Nowhere near that, but it is a ctenuchid. Without access to the collection, after checking references at hand there are several possibilities, but from what I can gather it looks most like Poliopastea mirabilis (type locality: Colombia), but I wouldn’t take that to the bank without actually examining the specimen and comparing it to specimens in the collection.
Sorry I can’t be more definite, but I’ve run out of time. (I can tell you that this species doesn’t occur in French Guiana, whose ctenuchids have recently been monographed and illustrated.)
Julian

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Subject: Unknown Costa Rican moth
Location: Sarapiqui, Costa Rica
January 16, 2015 3:40 pm
Hello! I am studying in Costa Rica for this semester (spring 2015) and came across this little guy outside of where we were staying for a few nights. I’ve been trying to identify it for over an hour, with no luck, which surprised me considering how distinct its markings are. Any ideas?
Signature: Lauren

Moth

Tiger Moth

Dear Lauren,
This really is a gorgeous Moth.  Red, green and blue are the primary colors of photography, and this lovely moth is a perfect poster moth for the medium.  We have just returned from a trip and we are swamped with unanswered mail.  We are posting your images Unidentified, and we will contact Lepidopterist Julian Donahue who has spent much time in Costa Rica to see if he can spare us some research, or at least point us in the right direction, but our initial impulse is that this might be an Owlet Moth in the family Noctuidae.

Moth

Tiger Moth

I’m not sure if it’s an owlet moth, since I’m having trouble narrowing it down from just the family, but I hope your Lepidopterist will be able to shed some light on this colorful moth!

We have not yet heard back from Julian.

Julian Donahue Responds
It’s a tiger moth in the genus Neonerita, but can’t put a name on the species.
Julian

Ed. NOte:  Our staff has not succeeded in locating any images online that look remotely like this Tiger Moth.

Lauren Responds
Thanks to your tip, I was able to figure out that this species is called Neonerita incarnata. Interestingly, there’s very little to no information on the web that I’ve been able to dig up – the few things I did find either had no information past the name or were written in Russian (I think). Hopefully I’ll be able to get my hands on an insect book, but I’m glad I know what it is!

Ed. NOte:  See Lepidoptera Pro where it is listed under the synonym Epimolis incarnata.  That name turns up some images on Papillons et Insectes du Monde and FlickR.

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Subject: Indonesian moth
Location: Indonesia
January 4, 2015 11:12 am
This pretty moth was in our bathroom at Wakatobi Dive Resort, on a small island off of Tomia (or Tomea), which is a slightly larger island off of southeast Sulawesi in Indonesia, in late December. Thanks for the help!
Signature: L. Sanford

Heliotrope Moth

Heliotrope Moth

Dear L. Sanford,
This diurnal Tiger Moth is a Heliotrope Moth,
Utetheisa pulchelloides, which we identified on this blog from Indonesia.  The same species is called a Crimson Speckled Footman on the Cook Islands Biodiversity site.  A very similar looking moth is identified as Utetheisa lotrix on The Papua Insects Foundation site.

Daniel,
Thanks for the id! That is exactly the moth I saw. One question though: I sent in two id requests at about the same time, and you replied to my second request with the id of the moth in the first. Were you able to check on the second moth? I totally understand if you don’t have the time or resources for the second, I just wondered if there was a mix-up and you missed my second picture. (Next time I will send both requests in the same message to avoid the confusion.)
Thanks again for your help!
Lindsay

Hi Lindsay,
You should limit submissions to a single species.  I have not had time to look at the second moth.  Also, you did not initiate with a new form, hence stacking the two requests together.

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