Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Moths and Arctiids"
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Subject: Black and Whit Moth?
Location: Eastern PA (suburbs of Philadelphia)
July 8, 2014 6:32 pm
We saw this cool moth on the brick sidewalk outside of the Exton, PA Barnes and Noble. I love it’s black and white stripey legs. It reminded my kids of a Dalmatian dog. It was seen in early Spring.
Signature: Laura Toner

Giant Leopard Moth

Giant Leopard Moth

Hi Laura,
This beautiful and distinctive Tiger Moth is commonly called a Giant Leopard Moth or an Eyed Tiger Moth.

Thank you so much! I thought it looked like it had scary big eyes. Very interesting and beautiful. Happy summer! :)Laura Toner

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Subject: Wasp or moth?
Location: Northeast Florida (Jacksonville Beach)
June 25, 2014 6:36 am
I had six of these on my sunflowers yesterday around dusk. I live in northeast florida. They look sort of like polka dot wasp moths but I don’t see the signature red tail. Any ideas?
Signature: Melissa

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Dear Melissa,
The Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth,
Empyreuma pugione, and the Polka Dot Wasp Moth are classified in the same subtribe, and both are very effective wasp mimics.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly species
Location: Loch Eck, near Dunoon in Argyll
June 5, 2014 4:00 am
I saw this butterfly whilst out walking with my family by Loch Eck side which is close to Benmore gardens near Dunoon in Argyllshire, Scotland. I would appreciate it if anyone could help me to identify it as I have never seen this species in this area before.
Thanks
Signature: Marion Houston

Cinnabar Moth

Cinnabar Moth

Hi Marion,
Because of its bright colors and diurnal habits, the Cinnabar Moth,
Tyria jacobaeae, is easy to confuse for a butterfly.

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Subject: Type and countey of origin if possible
Location: South east asia
May 23, 2014 8:34 am
I found this beauty staying still for quite a long time.. dont want to catch it though.. love to know what species is this beauty from..
Signature: M.tux

Lichen Moth

Lichen Moth

Dear M. tux,
Your inquiry has us confused.  You did not get very specific in your location, and you are requesting the “countey of origin” which implies that you don’t know where the image was taken, yet your text implies you took the image.  At any rate, this is a Lichen Moth in the tribe Lithosiini and we believe we have correctly identified it as 
Cyana horsfieldi thanks to this posting on FlickR.  It is also pictured on the Moths of Borneo and on BioLib.

Thanks.. I took the picture at my country, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. I wanted to know the origin of the bug if possible, I mean from which country. I guess I did not understand the fields of the form actually, my bad. But thanks for identifying that bug for me

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug ID
Location: Lynnwood WA
May 26, 2014 5:35 pm
Bug landed on our window around 0800 may 26. Photo taken from inside through the glass.
Signature: Mary

Cinnabar Moth

Cinnabar Moth

Dear Mary,
Though BugGuide has no images of the underside of the wings, we are certain this is a Cinnabar Moth,
Tyria jacobaeae, a species, according to BugGuide, that was:  “Introduced from Europe as a control for introduced weedy Ragwort, the host plant for its caterpillars, which is toxic to livestock.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery Moth
Location: Delta, Utah
May 20, 2014 12:44 am
We saw a rather striking moth (by its antennae) in Delta, Utah (around 19 August) during daylight on the stucco wall outside our motel room. The moth was then blown off the wall by wind and fluttered to a nearby shrub, where I captured it and took the attached photo. I released the moth in a sheltered place (inside the foliage of another shrub) out of the high wind and where birds would not see it. The moth had geometric black triangles on white wings… it almost looked like an African batik fabric pattern. I haven’t seen another moth like it during our travels since then. When I rediscovered a photo, I thought I’d ask if you have any idea what it is? Thanks! Buggy Best Wishes,
Lori in Altadena, CA
Signature: Lori in Altadena, CA

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth

Hi Lori,
While we cannot provide an exact species name, we are relatively certain that your Tiger Moth is in the genus
GrammiaThere are numerous species that have similar wing patterns and they can be viewed on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination