Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Moths and Arctiids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful mith
Location: Southern California (Hemet)
June 10, 2016 7:45 pm
Found this guy today in Hemet California (Southern, inland desert area). He matched the stucco so well, I almost missed him.
I found the beautiful design of his wings just stunning.
What is he, and what does he look like as a catipillar?
Signature: Teresa DiPietro

Salt Marsh Moth

Salt Marsh Moth

Dear Teresa,
This delicate Tiger Moth is a Salt Marsh Moth,
Estigmene acrea.  The caterpillar is one of the Woolly Bears, and we believe this Woolly Bear is a Salt Marsh Moth Caterpillar.  According to BugGuide:  “Adult (imago): forewing white with about 20 small black spots scattered across the disk, and 5 larger black spots spaced along the costa. Males have dark yellow hindwings, those of females are mostly white (with 3 or 4 black blotches in both sexes).  Larva (caterpillar): highly variable, blond to brown to black, with long bristly hairs standing upright in dense tufts from orange or black tubercles; hairs longer at both ends of body, especially toward the rear end. Spiracles white. Moves very rapidly. Face mainly black with yellow down the center.”  Since your individual has white hindwings, she is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful bug
Location: 48118
June 9, 2016 2:47 pm
I saw this crawling at the base of a rose bush on June 9 2016 near Chelsea MI.
It’s very colorful but what is it?
Signature: Curious G

Eyed Tiger Moth

Eyed Tiger Moth

Dear Curious G,
This is a newly metamorphosed Giant Leopard Moth or Eyed Tiger Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia.  Once its wings expand, they will cover the colorful abdomen and the Giant Leopard Moth will be able to fly to seek out a mate.  Adult Giant Leopard Moths do not eat, surviving off the fat they stored as Woolly Bear Caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this Insect?
Location: Alberta Canada possibly Costa Rica
May 7, 2016 7:57 pm
We found this in a box of bananas that came from Costa Rica today and we cant figure out exactly what it is or if it came from there or here (Alberta Canada) Any help would be appreciated. The pic is the underside of it.
Signature: Kristy

Tiger Moth

Banana Moth

Dear Kristy,
This image has been open on our desktop for the past week as we have tried unsuccessfully to provide you with a species identification.  This looks to us like a Tiger Moth in the subtribe Ctenuchina to us.  We do not believe it is not a native species, but we wish you had been able to provide us with a dorsal view as most online images of moths are dorsal views.  We browsed through images from the subtribe Ctenuchina on BugGuide, but we could not find a conclusive match.  We will attempt to contact Lepidopterist Julian Donahue who is an expert in Tiger Moths to see if he can provide an ID.

Julian Donahue Responds
This is indeed a ctenuchid (or as currently classified, Erebidae: Arctiinae: tribe Arctiini, subtribe Ctenuchina): a fresh male Antichloris viridis Druce, newly emerged from its cocoon that accompanied bananas (its larval hostplant) imported from tropical America. In his 1975 paper Field reported examining specimens from numerous localities in the United States, three records from England, one from Germany, and two from British Columbia, Canada (Kaslo and Victoria). The native range of this species is from central or southern Mexico south through Central America to Venezuela, Colombia, and Ecuador.
This may be a new record for Alberta, however, so I am copying this to a couple of colleagues in that province.
Best wishes from the glorious Sonoran Desert, where the saguaros are now blooming on our property,
Julian

Thanks so much for the confirmation Julian.  We found an image of the ventral view on UK Moths and we found the common name Banana Moth used there as well as on Encyclopedia of Life.

Daniel;
I googled the information you gave me and that is exactly what it is!!  Thank you so much!
Kristy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Johannesburg, south africa
April 3, 2016 12:38 pm
Hi
Found this moth this morning 9am in Johannesburg south Africa. It’s Autumn here at the moment and the weather is moderately warm with temps in degrees Celsius of about 27. We live in a housing complex with a small garden and pets. The moth was on my net curtain and when I moved the curtain he headed outside into the garden.
Signature: Brigitte

Speckled Footman

Speckled Footman

Dear Brigitte,
Just last week we posted an image of a dead individual of this species of Tiger Moth in the genus
 Utetheisa from South Africa, and today we realized that the common name on iSpot is the very appropriate Speckled Footman, Utetheisa pulchella.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Snow Prince
Location: San Francisco Bay Area, CA
April 1, 2016 11:22 pm
Hello Bugman!
You answered an email I sent before about a moth, and so I thought I would ask again. I found this beauty while visiting my parents in the SF Bay Area. What kind of moth is he/she? It was such a beautiful creature. :)
Thanks for your help. You’re awesome!
Signature: Claire

Vestal Tiger Moth

Vestal Tiger Moth

Dear Claire,
This lovely moth is a Vestal Tiger Moth,
Spilosoma vestalis, and according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of various flowering trees, particularly oak.”  We believe this may be the first example of this species on our site.

That’s exciting! Thanks again, it made my day seeing the post on Facebook! 😊 Glad to contribute to moth documentation!
Claire

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Napier, Western Cape, South Africa
March 10, 2016 9:38 am
Daniel
… The second JPG is of a moth my wife found in the kitchen – again, a first for us. With that colouring we would (should) have noticed it if it’s a local species.
Thanks
Johann
Signature: Johann van der Merwe

Arctiid Moth

Arctiid Moth

Dear Johann,
We are going back through unanswered mail from March in an attempt to post some submissions our readers may enjoy.  This pretty little Arctiid Moth is in the genus
Utetheisa, and it is native to your area.  There are several nice images on iSpot.  The genus is not limited to South Africa.  We even have a North American species which is documented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination