Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Moths and Arctiids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Leopard Moth
Location: Silver spring, md
November 12, 2016 8:55 pm
Just loved the blue irredescence on this black ringed polka dot white moth. My daughter found him in the middle of our lawn, maybe he fell out of the silver maple tree – who knows.
Signature: Divya

Giant Leopard Moth

Giant Leopard Moth

Dear Divya,
The spots on this Giant Leopard Moth or Eyed Tiger Moth contrast so beautifully with the striped clothing in the image you sent.  Like many Tiger Moths, the Giant Leopard Moth does not feed as an adult.

Thanks!! I would actually love a dress in giant leopard moth print 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of insect is this?
Location: St. Augustine FL
November 12, 2016 8:26 am
My Brother in law has had this guy in his garage for a few days. It has basically stayed right where it landed and has not moved. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Thank You, Jay

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Dear Jay,
The Polka Dot Wasp Moth,
Syntomeida epilais, is a relatively common species in Florida because the caterpillars feed on the leaves of oleander, which is cultivated extensively in home gardens in the area.  This harmless species derives protection because it mimics stinging wasps, and wary predators will leave it be.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  October 13, 2016
We are also finding Painted Tiger Moths at our porch light in Mount Washington, Los Angeles, so it is fair to say they are currently flying in Southern California.

Subject: Strange creature
Location: Soquel Ca
October 11, 2016 7:07 pm
What the heck is it??? 2 heads!!!
Signature: Eve

Mating Painted Tiger Moths

Mating Painted Tiger Moths

Dear Eve,
The reason there are two heads is that one head belongs to the larger female on the right and the other to the male.  This is a mating pair of Painted Tiger Moths, a relatively common California species that is most common in winter months.

wow you are awesome to get back to me thank you! , I just figured it out!!!! how embarrassing!!!!!  as one has left and eggs are in the place, so funny I really thought it was a 2 headed thing  and not a couple!!!! jeez are they good for the garden?  Thanks again

The larva of the Painted Tiger Moth is a Woolly Bear that is a general feeder that is quite fond of weeds, so one could argue that though the adults do not eat and do not pollinate plants, the caterpillars can help keep back weeds.  The diet of the caterpillars is described on BugGuide as:  “Larvae are generalists of low herbacious plants.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: One Left!
Location: Lion Gulch Trail Lyons CO
October 11, 2016 3:33 pm
Birdwatcher here, spent the better part of a lovely snowy afternoon identifying butterflies I’ve picked up along the way. I’m down to one critter, a moth I think, and no matter how general or specific I make my searches, and on all the websites, have I found my answer.
Attached is a photo of said critter, taken July 25, 2010 at Lion Gulch Trail outside of Lyons, CO.
Any information is appreciated, have a wonderful evening!
Signature: Tina Toth

Police Car Moth

Police Car Moth

Dear Tina,
This is a Police Car Moth,
Gnophaela vermiculata, and you can verify its identity on BugGuide where its habitat is listed as “Typically foothills, mountain ranges, mid-elevations” and “Adults fly during the day in late summer, July-August.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Adults feed during the day on nectar of herbaceous flowers such as thistle (Cirsium spp.) and goldenrod (Solidago spp.)” and since your individual is nectaring on Goldenrod, we are thrilled to be able to tag this posting with Goldenrod Meadow.

Outstanding! On top of just being happy to know what it is, I love the name! I’m thrilled too, and thank you ever so much!
Tina

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly, Southern California ID?
Location: Santa Cruz Island, CA
September 1, 2016 1:44 pm
Hello
Found this butterfly in a collection with no ID.
Sorry for the one and only picture.
Any chance of an ID?
Signature: Geoff

Lichen Moth

Lichen Moth

Dear Geoff,
What is the origin of this collection?  Are you certain the specimen was from Santa Cruz Island?  We are curious as there is no label on the specimen.  This is a Lichen Moth in the tribe Lithosiini.  It resembles
Lycomorpha regulus which is reported from California on BugGuide but Lycomorpha fulgens is also reported from California according to BugGuide.

Hello Daniel
Yes, this was collected on Santa Cruz Island, I was working organizing the Herbarium Collection for the UCSB SCI reserve, the same room has the Bug collection also. This was in one of the Lepidoptera cases I was cleaning.
I can get a better picture next time. Is there any diagnostic characters I should focus on to tell the two apart?
I will look for any other unknowns next time Im out there.
Let me know if any of you bug guys are out this way and I can see about getting out to Island?
Thanks for your help.
Geoffrey

Hi again Geoffrey,
We don’t know that we are going to be able to provide you with exact diagnostic information.  According to BugGuide, of
Lycomorpha regulus:  “Closely related to L. fulgens, and L. grotei.”  Your island offer is highly tempting, but alas, we have just begun a new semester teaching and our free time has evaporated.

Hello Daniel

Not a problem, I understand about volunteer time constraints and the details of parsing out moth spp.
I work at UCSB in IT at the Bren School, so I understand what happens when the students come back.
I volunteer at the Islands during the quite times. Please see the links below for the future and keep us in mind when out west.
For what school do you work for?
http://nrs.ucsb.edu/
http://nrs.ucsb.edu/our-reserves/santa-cruz-island
Thank you again Geoffrey

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Knights Templar Bug
Location: 36.13°N 78.66°W (Elev. 341 ft)
July 4, 2016 12:09 pm
Last Sunday, 26th June, I walked out on my patio sidewalk to get in my card to go to Mass. As I past by some of my bedding plants, I looked down and saw this bug on one of my Rudbeckia flowers. I was really taken by it and have no doubt why it was there. You see, I am Franciscan by nature and belong to the Catholic Secular Franciscan Order. Can you identify the bug for me? I have been calling it the “Knights Templar Bug”, since its image reminds me of one of the shield a Templar Knight would carry.
Signature: Louis Coker

Clymene Moth

Clymene Moth

Dear Louis,
You are not the first person who has written to us after noticing religious symbolism in the markings of the Clymene Moth.

Wow, that was quick, but I guess if you are a bug expert, it would be easy to identify given its unique markings.  Many thanks for solving the mystery.
Louis Coker

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination