Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Moths and Arctiids"
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Subject: Unknown Costa Rican moth
Location: Sarapiqui, Costa Rica
January 16, 2015 3:40 pm
Hello! I am studying in Costa Rica for this semester (spring 2015) and came across this little guy outside of where we were staying for a few nights. I’ve been trying to identify it for over an hour, with no luck, which surprised me considering how distinct its markings are. Any ideas?
Signature: Lauren

Moth

Tiger Moth

Dear Lauren,
This really is a gorgeous Moth.  Red, green and blue are the primary colors of photography, and this lovely moth is a perfect poster moth for the medium.  We have just returned from a trip and we are swamped with unanswered mail.  We are posting your images Unidentified, and we will contact Lepidopterist Julian Donahue who has spent much time in Costa Rica to see if he can spare us some research, or at least point us in the right direction, but our initial impulse is that this might be an Owlet Moth in the family Noctuidae.

Moth

Tiger Moth

I’m not sure if it’s an owlet moth, since I’m having trouble narrowing it down from just the family, but I hope your Lepidopterist will be able to shed some light on this colorful moth!

We have not yet heard back from Julian.

Julian Donahue Responds
It’s a tiger moth in the genus Neonerita, but can’t put a name on the species.
Julian

Ed. NOte:  Our staff has not succeeded in locating any images online that look remotely like this Tiger Moth.

Lauren Responds
Thanks to your tip, I was able to figure out that this species is called Neonerita incarnata. Interestingly, there’s very little to no information on the web that I’ve been able to dig up – the few things I did find either had no information past the name or were written in Russian (I think). Hopefully I’ll be able to get my hands on an insect book, but I’m glad I know what it is!

Ed. NOte:  See Lepidoptera Pro where it is listed under the synonym Epimolis incarnata.  That name turns up some images on Papillons et Insectes du Monde and FlickR.

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Subject: Indonesian moth
Location: Indonesia
January 4, 2015 11:12 am
This pretty moth was in our bathroom at Wakatobi Dive Resort, on a small island off of Tomia (or Tomea), which is a slightly larger island off of southeast Sulawesi in Indonesia, in late December. Thanks for the help!
Signature: L. Sanford

Heliotrope Moth

Heliotrope Moth

Dear L. Sanford,
This diurnal Tiger Moth is a Heliotrope Moth,
Utetheisa pulchelloides, which we identified on this blog from Indonesia.  The same species is called a Crimson Speckled Footman on the Cook Islands Biodiversity site.  A very similar looking moth is identified as Utetheisa lotrix on The Papua Insects Foundation site.

Daniel,
Thanks for the id! That is exactly the moth I saw. One question though: I sent in two id requests at about the same time, and you replied to my second request with the id of the moth in the first. Were you able to check on the second moth? I totally understand if you don’t have the time or resources for the second, I just wondered if there was a mix-up and you missed my second picture. (Next time I will send both requests in the same message to avoid the confusion.)
Thanks again for your help!
Lindsay

Hi Lindsay,
You should limit submissions to a single species.  I have not had time to look at the second moth.  Also, you did not initiate with a new form, hence stacking the two requests together.

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Subject: Unidentified Flying Insect!

Location: Ocala, FL
November 25, 2014 7:39 am
Just saw this insect flying around outside and I have no idea what it is. Do you know? The wing markings are identical and the body looks like a house fly. Thanks
Signature: Wendy

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Dear Wendy,
The Polka Dot Wasp Moth is a common species in Florida that develops from Oleander Caterpillars that feed on the leaves of Oleander.

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Subject: Please identify this, insect
Location: Sierra Leone
November 24, 2014 9:57 am
Hello,
I’m currently based in Sierra Leone as part of a military op and have had the chance to take pics of a few bugs. I appreciate that you said you won’t be able to identify all pics, so I’ve narrowed it down to just one bug.
Signature: Na

Possibly Euchroma lethe

Possibly Euchroma lethe

Dear Na,
This is one of the diurnal Wasp Mimic Moths in the genus Euchroma, and we believe based on your location and this African Moths posting that it might be Euchroma lethe.  The species is pictured on a Palau stamp where it is given the common name The Basker and the stamp is reproduced on the Colnect site.

Thanks so much,
I’ve had a lot of people impressed by your speedy and knowledgable reply, not to mention, being able to impress two little boys, Francis and Ryan…
Candis

We are happy the youngsters were impressed.

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Subject: Beautiful Winged ?????
Location: South Florida
October 25, 2014 3:20 pm
Earlier today I discovered, thanks to your website, that the white weevils that have been eating our Blackbead, Bay Cedar and Hollies are non-native beetles from Sri Lanka. So when I was out watering this afternoon and saw this beautiful winged insect that I could not identify I immediately thought of your site.
It is very deep, somewhat iridescent blue with white spots on most of its body including underside and legs. It is bright red back at the end of its abdomen. The wing span appears to be about 1.75″ and it is sitting on my desert rose plant in South Florida, in Broward county.
Signature: OutGardening

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Dear OutGardening,
The Polka Dot Wasp Moth really is a pretty insect.  Its caterpillars feed on oleander.

Thank you very much Daniel! I would never have guessed it is a moth!
Gina

Hi again Gina,
Most people assume that all moths are small, dull colored, nocturnal creatures that eat clothes.  This diurnal Polka Dot Wasp Moth is brightly colored, and the species is also a very effective wasp mimic which provides it some protection against predators.

Hi Daniel,
From its wing shape and the iridescence color it reminded me of a dragonfly although when I first saw just the flash of white spots and red color I was excited thinking I had another atala butterfly. I’ve been hoping that our coonties would attract more atalas but so far have only seen one. But this moth is quite exciting and beautiful to watch in the garden, although I may not leave all her eggs on my little lone desert rose.
I’ve learned since starting our butterfly and native garden a few years ago, that there is such a variety of moths and that they seem to overlap in appearance and characteristics with the butterflies. Many butterflies I’m meeting in the garden appear more like what I used to think of as moths. It’s been an exciting journey into gardening, learning not only about native/invasive plants but the birds, butterflies and now into bugs! Today I was out picking the Sri Lanka weevils off some of our plants that have been so badly eaten by them, after learning from your site what those little white bugs were.
Thanks for providing a great resource and website! And your personal replies!
Gina

Thanks for your followup information Gina.  We did not know what an “atalas” was and upon looking it up on BugGuide, we learned that Eumaeus atala, the Atala Hairstreak, is endangered and it has caterpillars that feed on a native cycad known as a “coontie”.  Thanks so much for the education.  We hope you are able to provide us with an image of an Atala Hairstreak soon.  We are thrilled that you are learning about the interconnectivity of life forms, both plant and animal, in an ecosystem.

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Subject: What’s that ?
Location: Seen in Tampa, FL 9/28/2014 in town
September 28, 2014 4:02 pm
Hi bugman
What’s the bug on this picture ?
Thanks
Signature: Fred

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Dear Fred,
The Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth,
Empyreuma pugione, is one of the Tiger Moths that benefit from mimicry because they look like stinging Wasps.  This black bodied, orange winged beauty most closely resembles Spider Wasps, especially the Tarantula Hawks.  According to BugGuide:  “The spotted oleander caterpillar is a recent immigrant to the US from the Caribbean, first recorded in Florida in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, in February 1978.”

Tarantula Hawk with Prey

Tarantula Hawk with Prey

thank you for the info, now i know the name of what’s eating my plants in a caterpillar form… !
have a great day
Fred

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination