Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Moths and Arctiids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: yellow european moth
Location: Centre/East of Sardinia, Italy
September 21, 2014 4:04 pm
Hi there bugman, my name’s Rossana, location Sardinia, East side, not in the coast but rather to thr centre of it.
Here is the moth I couldn’t identify through google. It is not, in my opinion, a leopard moth, since it is yellow rather than white. So who can it be?
Please let me know!
Btw, it was nice to find your site again after more than ten years! Congratulations, as it’s beautiful
Kind regards
Rossana
Signature: Rossana

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth

Hi Rossana,
Common names can create some confusion as often the same name is given to more than one species, and sometimes one species can have more than one common name.  The scientific binomial system is much more accurate, and it eliminates confusion when one species has a range that extends across countries that speak different languages.  We suspect the Leopard Moth you mentioned is
Zeuzera pyrinaYour moth is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, and we believe it might be Chelis maculosa which is pictured on Hants Moths.  Additional images can be found on Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa.  Another possibility is Cymbalophora pudica which can also be viewed on the Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Nepali moth
Location: Nepal
September 20, 2014 11:58 pm
Dear bugman,
here is a small day-flying moth taken in June, in the Kathmandu valley of Nepal. It’s about an inch long. Can you tell me what it is? It looks like a lady singing an aria.
Signature: Curious

Footman Moth

Footman Moth

Dear Curious,
The markings on the thorax of this Tiger Moth do indeed resemble the face of a woman with a mouth opened wide in song.  Having guessed correctly that the subfamily is Arctiinae, we quickly found a matching image on FlickR that is identified as a Footman Moth,
Barsine orientalis.  We then located an image on SinoBug that supports the initial identification, but we realized is was another view from the same location taken by the same photographer, so we decided to search for a unique verification.  We found verification on the Moths of Thailand site. 

Dear Daniel,
thank you so much for the quick reply and the accurate identification!
Mia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly, Moth or Something Else?
Location: Iron Station, NC
August 8, 2014 5:26 pm
My husband photographed this pretty creature late afternoon August 8th on our concrete sidewalk. Can you please tell us what this is?
Signature: Ridgerunner

Clymene Moth

Clymene Moth

Hi Ridgerunner,
This pretty Tiger Moth is commonly called a Clymene Moth
When it reveals its lovely orange underwings, the religious illusion many folks see in the wings is no longer apparent.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Santa Rosa, New Mexico, USA
July 31, 2014 9:22 pm
Hello. I was wondering just what sort of moth this is. It’s very unusual for the usual kinds of moths we get here and i thought it was really interesting, and strong when I went to pry it off the table! But it’s safely sitting on the porch out of the rain now. Please get back to me.
Signature: Jared Serrano

Clio Tiger Moth

Clio Tiger Moth

Hi Jared,
After a bit of searching, we were able to identify this as a Clio Tiger Moth,
Ectypia clio, thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on milkweed (Asclepias, Asclepiadaceae) and dogbane (Apocynum, Apocynaceae). Behr reported them on spreading dogbane (Apocynum androsaemifolium).”  We recall a recent posting with unknown caterpillars that resembled Tiger Moth Caterpillars feeding on milkweed, and now we are going to try to locate the posting to see if the caterpillars resemble the caterpillars of the Clio Tiger Moth posted to BugGuide

Clio Tiger Moth

Clio Tiger Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Alypia Forester Moth
Location: western Montana
July 28, 2014 2:04 pm
Can anyone ID this Alypia? I’ve gone through 4 different species, but the pattern of white patches does not match well to any of them. This photo was taken on July 28th, 2014 in western Montana. It was nectaring on Brassica weed flowers in open coniferous forest at approximately 3,400′.
Signature: Jeremy Roberts

Police Car Moth

Police Car Moth

Hi Jeremy,
While your moth bears a superficial resemblance to the Forester Moths in the genus
Alypia, the reason you had so much difficulty with a species identification is that your moth is in a different family.  This is a Police Car Moth, Gnophaela vermiculata,  According to BugGuide, the range is “southern British Columbia south to Oregon, northeastern Nevada, Utah, Colorado, and northern New Mexico” and it is found in “Typically foothills, mountain ranges, mid-elevations.”  As there are other similar looking members of the genus, we cannot say with 100% certainty that this is not a close relative of the Police Car Moth.

Thank you!  Indeed, I feel into a trap of my own making.  Police Car Moth it is.  And just in time for National Moth Week!
Thanks again for throwing down a rope.  I’m excited to plant some host plants in the yard now.
Cheers,
-Jeremy

You are most welcome Jeremy.  WTB? has co-sponsored a National Moth Week event with the MWHA in our local Elyria Canyon Park in 2012 and 2013, but that is not the ideal time for moth viewing in Southern California, so we are going rogue this year and having a local event when moths are more plentiful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some kind of moth
Location: Vermont
July 25, 2014 2:00 pm
Isn’t this unique?
Signature: MG

Clymene Moth

Clymene Moth

Dear MG,
More than one reader has commented that the pattern on the wings of the Clymene Moth,
Haploa clymene, resembles religious symbolism, more specifically a cross.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination