Currently viewing the category: "Tiger Moths and Arctiids"
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Subject: Great Tiger Moth
Location: Granby, Colorado
August 17, 2015 8:03 pm
This moth was on the side of our cabin at the C Lazy U guest ranch near Granby Colorado.
Beautiful, vibrant colors – it hung out all afternoon prior to a rain storm.
Very photogenic!
Signature: LGS

Great Tiger Moth

Great Tiger Moth

Dear LGS,
The Great Tiger Moth or Garden Tiger Moth,
Arctia caja, is a holarctic species, meaning it is found in Eurasia as well as North America.  According to BugGuide:  “This species, formerly common throughout the UK, has steadily declined over the past 20 years, with numbers falling by around 30%. There has been a general movement away from the south and toward the north, with climate change believed to be a contributing factor. Warm, wet winters and warm springs are followed by a decrease in the number of tiger moths the following summer (Conrad et al, 2002).”

Norman Gems, Marieke Bruss, Kissiah Aiken, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Ann Levitsky, Jessica M. Schemm liked this post
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Subject: local name and scientific name
Location: Modasa,Gujarat,India
August 7, 2015 4:58 am
Respected Sir,
I have taken this pic at my home but i didn’t recognize this moth so pls help me
Signature: manthan mehta

Sandalwood Defoliator

Sandalwood Defoliator

Dear Manthan,
This is a diurnal Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, a group that has undergone considerable reclassification in recent years.  We found a matching image posted to India Nature Watch that is identified as
Amata passalis, the Sandal Defoliator.  India Biodiversity calls the species a Wasp Moth, which is a more general name for a group that is similarly classified.  iNaturalist classifies the species in the tribe Syntomini, a group collectively called the Wasp Moths or Handmaiden Moths.  ResearchGate has a technical paper where the species is called the Sandalwood Defoliator.  So the scientific name is Amata passalis, and potential common names in order of increasing specificity are Tiger Moth, Wasp Moth or Handmaiden Moth, and the common species name is the Sandalwood Defoliator.  There may be a more local name in your area.

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Subject: Brazil Wasp Moth (Dinia?)
Location: Fenix, Parana State, Brazil
July 29, 2015 4:10 am
I found a moth similar to the one in my picture, though clearly a different species, here:
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2013/04/07/wasp-moth-from-brazil/
The photo I am submitting was taken on the 1st August 2008 in Parana State near the town of Fenix, close to the Ivai river. This one has a slimmer body and a yellow bar across the thorax, but is superficially otherwise similar.
Signature: Patrick

Wasp Mimic Moth

Wasp Mimic Moth

Dear Patrick,
We agree that your moth looks very similar to the
Dinea species you found in our archives, and we also found a similar looking Ctechunid on Project Noah, but it is only identified to the subtribe Ctenuchina.  Perhaps Cesar Crash who runs a sister site in Brazil, Insetologia, will recognize this lovely Wasp Mimic.

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Subject: Fly, Moth…??
Location: Lone Tree, Iowa
July 19, 2015 9:30 pm
Hi~ I took this pic in July in Lone Tree, Iowa (Louisa County). He was on a Milkweed flower in my field.
Signature: Sue

Yellow Collared Scape Moth

Yellow Collared Scape Moth

Dear Sue,
Your milkweed is being pollinated by a Yellow Collared Scape Moth, Cisseps fulvicollis, which we verified with this image on BugGuide.  Just as you observed, according to BugGuide, they are commonly found in:  “Fields with flowers. Adults commonly seen visiting flowers during the day; adults also fly at night, and are attracted to light.”

Thank you So much!!!  I searched til my eyes were bleary…I didn’t know what category to look in~~he didn’t look like a ‘moth’ to me!  Thanks again!!!

The Yellow Collared Scape Moth and many of its close relatives, including the Polka Dot Wasp Moth and the Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth, are very effective wasp mimics that derive a degree of protection by resembling stinging insects.

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Subject: Moth ID
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C. Canada
June 30, 2015 1:43 pm
This moth was seen in Prince Rupert, B.C. Canada on May 24, 2015
If you know it’s name I’d be so happy!
Thanks
Signature: Thank you…Clees

Hickory Tussock Moth

Spotted Tussock Moth

Dear Clees,
At first we thought this was a Hickory Tussock Moth, but according to BugGuide:  “In Canada, this species is found only in Nova Scotia, Quebec, and Ontario. Several in New Brunswick in 2006.”  We looked at related species in the genus, and now we have concluded that this is a lookalike relative, the Spotted Tussock Moth,
Lophocampa maculata.  According to BugGuide, it is found:  “across southern Canada, western US, south in Appalachians to South Carolina, Kentucky.”

Hickory Tussock Moth

Spotted Tussock Moth

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Subject: Please identify
Location: Nelspruit, South Africa
May 19, 2015 3:11 am
I found this butterfly this morning but have not been able to identify it yet
Signature: Nicolette

Milkweed Butterfly

Snouted Tiger Moth

Dear Nicolette,
We believe this is a Milkweed Butterfly in the subfamily Danaiae, but we wish your image had more detail because it does not appear that your individual has clubbed antennae.  Your individual appears to be dead, so it is possible the ends of the antennae have been damaged.  We browsed unsuccessfully through iSpot, and though we did not locate any exact matches, we did observe a similarity to butterflies in the genus
Amauris, and the closest match we could find is Amauris ochlea, the Novice, which is pictured on BioDiversity Explorer.  We are not fully confident that is a correct identification, and we are still troubled by the lack of a clubbed end on the antennae on your image.  Perhaps one of our readers will steer us in another direction.

Correction:  Snouted Tiger Moth
South African entomology student Michelle sent us a comment identifying this as a moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, in the genus Nyctemera.  Following that lead, we found this image of a Snouted Tiger Moth, Nyctemera leuconoe, on iSpot.  We suspect there is some mimicry involved here as Milkweed Butterflies are distasteful, and the Snouted Tiger Moth probably derives some protections from resembling one.  The same species is called a White Bear on iNaturalist.

Dear Daniel,
Found an id at last- its a white bear moth – Family: arctiidae
Thank you for taking the time to help me in my search to id!
Regards
Nicolette

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