Currently viewing the category: "Pyralid and Snout Moths"
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Subject: Moth??
Location: Southern California
November 24, 2016 2:39 pm
My father showed me a picture of this insect. We think it is a moth but have been unable to determine what insect is this. We live in Southern California and the picture was taken in September on the border of Los Angeles and San Bernardino county. We see lots of interesting and familiar insects around here but we have never seen this one before or since.
Thank you!
Signature: Tracy O

Erythrina Borer

Erythrina Borer

Dear Tracy,
This distinctive moth is an Erythrina Borer,
Terastia meticulosalis, and according to BugGuide, it is a:  “Tropical species that ranges north to the US from Florida to California.”

Thank you so much for getting back to us so quickly. We are going to look further into this moth now that we have a name. We appreciate your help!!

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Subject: New Insect?
Location: Lima, Perú
August 10, 2016 1:10 pm
Hi I’m Luis Calle from Perú. I just came to Lima and before entering to my house I saw this little insect. I don’t know if it flies. Should I catch it? I have never seen this one before. I think it has 6 legs and 2 of them are in the front. It’s 2cm long , maybe 3cm. I forgot to mention that it has a sting like a scorpion, pointing to its body. Contact me if is needed.
Signature: Luis C.

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Dear Luis,
First we need to state that identifying insects from countries that do not have extensive web databases of creatures can be very difficult, and Peru is one such country.  Our first thought upon viewing the dorsal view you provided was that this might be a Fly in the order Diptera (only two wings visible in the image), possibly a Stilt Legged Fly in the family Neriidae, but once we opened the lateral view (thanks so much for including these two valuable views) we realized we were looking at a moth in the order Lepidoptera.  Our search for similar looking moths led us to BugGuide where we found the Eggplant Leafroller Moth, and though BugGuide indicates its range is “southern United States (Florida to California), south to Chile; …” we are quite confident your images represent a different species, but there is enough visual similarity for us to surmise they may be in the same family, the Crambid Snout Moth family Crambidae.  We tried briefly searching that possibility to no avail, including scanning Insetologia from nearby Brazil.  This Jade Scorpion Moth from Peru on Learn About Butterflies has a similar posture, but it is obviously a different species, and it is identified as being in the family Pyralidae, which is taxonomically included with the family Crambidae in the superfamily Pyraloidea.  Our time right now is running short, so we are posting your images and tagging it as unidentified, but classifying it as a Snout Moth, and perhaps one of our readers will write in with some suggestions.

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Possibly Crambid Snout Moth

Hi Daniel,
I have posted the moth i found on 4chan. It has some images that may help you.
Link: http://boards.4chan.org/an/thread/2187282/new-insect

 

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Subject: Pretty moth on my walk
Location: Longmont, CO (Near Boulder)
June 30, 2016 3:50 pm
Hello friend,
Thanks for always doing such a great job with this site. I follow you on Facebook avidly. 🙂 I saw this critter on my walk to work and was so intrigued by the “eyes” near its antennae and the beautiful pattern on its wings that I stopped and took a photo so I could send it to you.
Thanks for any information you can share. 🙂
Signature: Claire, who loves moths

Snout Moth

Alfalfa Webworm Moth

Dear Claire,
This is one of the Snout Moths in the family Pyralidae, which according to BugGuide has “681 species in our area” in North America, or Crambidae, which according to BugGuide has “861 species in 10 subfamilies in our area.”  Many species in the families look quite similar, though the markings on your individual are quite distinctive, though subtle.  We will continue to browse through BugGuide and the Moth Photographers Group in an attempt to identify your species. 

We now believe this is the Alfalfa Webworm, Loxostege cereralis, based on images posted to BugGuide where it states:  “larvae feed on alfalfa and a variety of other crops and weed species.”

As always, thank you so much your hard work! It is always really cool to know more about the area and the plants/animals that live in it! I have seen many more of these since I sent it to you, it must be the right time of year for them to thrive.
Claire

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Subject: Maine Moth?
Location: Houlton, ME
June 24, 2016 8:57 am
These little creatures never sit still. I was lucky yesterday with a zoom lens.
Signature: Mike from Maine

White Spotted Sable

White Spotted Sable

Dear Mike from Maine,
At first glance we thought this was an Eight Spotted Forrester, but we quickly realized there were subtle differences.  Your moth is a White Spotted Sable,
Anania funebris, and according to BugGuide it is:  “Often mistaken for an Eight-spotted Forester (Alypia octomaculata), which is considerably larger [no overlap in wingspan], has a total of only 8 spots on the wings, and has a prominent tuft of orange hair-like scales on its legs – the ‘leg warmers’ that Hannah refers to in her image of an Eight-spotted Forester.”  Of the White Spotted Sable, BugGuide notes:  “Habitat fields, open areas; adults often visit flowers during the day Season adults fly from May to July Food larvae feed on goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and Dyer’s Greenweed (Genista tinctoria).” 

Thank You, I really appreciate what you all do.  I will continue to look for new, and interesting insects up here in Northern Maine. 🙂

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Subject: Unknown moth
Location: Orange County, CA
November 26, 2015 7:17 pm
Hi. This moth was on my car window in early morning November. Irvine, So Calif. What is he??
Signature: JulieE

Erythrina Borer

Erythrina Borer

Dear JulieE,
Your image of an Erythrina Borer,
Terastia meticulosalis, is so much better than the one we took at of offices last October.  The Erythrina Borer is an unforgetable moth.

Thank you! I could not figure it out. It was truly wonderful!!!

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Erythrina Borer attracted to porch light
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
October 25, 2015
Upon walking out the front door this morning, we noticed this little Pyralid Moth that we recognized because of previous submissions.  There must be a coral tree nearby to have provided food for the caterpillars.

Erythrina Borer

Erythrina Borer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination