Currently viewing the category: "Prominent Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sphinx Moth?
Location: DT6 4HP. United Kingdom
April 13, 2016 11:17 am
Found this lovely moth today. Spent all day resting on the stone fence support. Can only find similar ones on American sites. We are in West Bay , Dorset UK
Signature: No

Puss Moth

Puss Moth

Thanks to the UK Moths site, we are confident this is a Puss Moth, Cerura vinula, and the site states:  “Named after the cat-like appearance of the adult moth, this species is fairly common throughout most of Britain.”

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much!  The kids will be very interested.  A very handsome moth it was too!
Regards,
Dolly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting Moth
Location: Lindenwold, NJ
August 14, 2015 5:32 am
Hello Bugman,
I saw an interesting moth, on the concrete, at the train station in Lindenwold, NJ in Camden County. I grew up in this region and can’t remember seeing a moth like this. I looked online, but I could find info on a moth that looks like this.
Thanks,
Leah
Signature: Doesn’t matter

White Furcula Moth

White Furcula Moth

Dear Leah,
We thought your moth resembled a
Tolype, but after searching through Lappet Moth images and other families on BugGuide, we shifted strategies, and went to the Moth Photographers Group where we found you White Furcula Moth, Furcula borealis.  Once we had a name, we easily located the species on BugGuide where it is classified as a Prominent Moth.  The only other image on our site of a White Furcula Moth was submitted nine years ago.

Daniel,
You rock! Thanks for the information.
Have a great weekend!
Leah

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ?
Location: Clisson, France
April 23, 2015 9:18 am
I spotted this beauty last summer, during Hellfest Open Air Festival (06 / 20-21-22 / 2014) in Clisson, France.
It landed on our tente on the first day, and almost not move for 3 days, despite the sun and the rain.
When we folded the tente, it flew away and landed on the top of a tree.
It was about 5-6 cm long, without antennae, it had hairy and soft paws.
I live in Nantes, near Clisson, and I’ve never seen that kind of bug before.
Does anyone ever seen the same beauty ? What is its species ?
Thank you so much for your help.
Signature: Fleur

Tiger Moth we believe

Lesser Puss Moth

Dear Fleur,
WE believe that this is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we cannot be certain.  We have attempted to search the UK Moths site because we don’t know of a French resource, and we have not had any luck with the identification.

Update:  April 25, 2015
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash of Insetologia, we now know that this is Cerura ermine, a Prominent Moth in the family Notodontidae, and that it is called a Lesser Puss Moth according to the Lepidoptera Breeders Association.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Oval-based Prominent Moth
Location: Mancelona, MI
July 6, 2014 6:30 pm
The Oval-based prominent moth (Peridea basitriens) is overall a rather dull gray. What makes it stand out are the oval/almond shaped rings/patches that surround its fluffy ruff. It almost makes it look like a stained-glass window. Thus says Bugguide: it has a wingspan of 3-3.5 cm, and it appears to occur here and there throughout the Easter US. I saw several last night, so moth-hunters here in Michigan, keep an eye out for this nifty moth!
Signature: Helen

Oval Based Prominent Moth

Oval Based Prominent Moth

Hi Helen,
Thanks for sending your image of an Oval-Based Prominent Moth.  We are linking to the BugGuide page.

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Subject: Black Rimmed Prominent
Location: Mancelona, MI
June 29, 2014 5:37 pm
This distinctly-patterned moth is the Black Rimmed Prominent (Pheosia rimosa). It can be found throughout North America. Evidently there’s another color morph, with a darker pattern, that was formerly considered a different species–you can see it on Bugguide. The young feed on aspen and willows. This adult showed up on a window after a warm late-June night.
Signature: Helen

Black Rimmed Prominent

Black Rimmed Prominent

Hi again Helen,
Thanks for continuing to provide moth images lacking in our archives.  According to BugGuide:  “”Caterpillar resembles young hornworm caterpillars. Color may be yellow, lavender, pink, green, brown or nearly black. Skin is very shiny. Black horn on last abdominal segment and hard red-edged anal plate.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White-Spotted Prominent
Location: Mancelona, MI
June 27, 2014 7:48 pm
This absurdly lovely moth is the Nadata gibbosa, or White-spotted prominent. (It’s not the Nadata oregonensis–Michigan is well out of the range of that look-alike.) This particular one was perched on a bracken fern in a deciduous forest. Yet another of our many recent visitors here just outside Mancelona, Michigan. It’s about 3.8-5.9 cm–thus says Bugguide.
Signature: Helen

White Spotted Prominent Moth

White Dotted Prominent Moth

Hi again Helen,
We fully appreciate the time investment that goes into identifying the incredibly diverse number of brown moths that can be found in North America, and we often never drill down to the species level when we write back to people, hence many moths on our site are identified only to the family level because that is all that time allows.  Thanks again for the research and the excellent image of
Nadata gibbosa, which according to BugGuide is commonly called the White Dotted Prominent Moth, not the White Spotted Prominent Moth as you have indicated.  BugGuide also states it is called the Green Oak Caterpillar Moth. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination