Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tropical Swallowtail Moth
Location: Near Buona Vista MRT
May 21, 2014 7:40 am
Hi, just to let you know, we live on the 36th floor of an apartment block near Buona Vista MRT, we’ve got 3 Tropical Swallowtail Moths on our balcony and one flying around inside!
Signature: Sue

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Hi Sue,
Our original posting of a Tropical Swallowtail Moth a few days ago has generated much interest, but your image is only the second we have received this year of this magnificent moth.  Our featured posting has generated 20 Comments and 138 Facebook “likes” at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Elephant Moth
Location: Southeast-USA
May 20, 2014 6:47 pm
This moth showed up this morning and stayed all day in the same location. I am just wondering what kind it is. It resembles an elephant to me. What’s your thoughts?
Signature: Wayne

Spotted Apatelodes

Spotted Apatelodes

Hi Wayne,
Your moth is a Spotted Apatelodes, and we agree that its curved abdomen does resemble the trunk of an elephant.  Could you please provide a more specific location?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery Moth
Location: Delta, Utah
May 20, 2014 12:44 am
We saw a rather striking moth (by its antennae) in Delta, Utah (around 19 August) during daylight on the stucco wall outside our motel room. The moth was then blown off the wall by wind and fluttered to a nearby shrub, where I captured it and took the attached photo. I released the moth in a sheltered place (inside the foliage of another shrub) out of the high wind and where birds would not see it. The moth had geometric black triangles on white wings… it almost looked like an African batik fabric pattern. I haven’t seen another moth like it during our travels since then. When I rediscovered a photo, I thought I’d ask if you have any idea what it is? Thanks! Buggy Best Wishes,
Lori in Altadena, CA
Signature: Lori in Altadena, CA

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth

Hi Lori,
While we cannot provide an exact species name, we are relatively certain that your Tiger Moth is in the genus
GrammiaThere are numerous species that have similar wing patterns and they can be viewed on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  Please submit images of Tropical Swallowtail Moths using our Ask What’s That Bug? link.

Subject: What’s that moth?
Location: Singapore
May 18, 2014 10:54 pm
Three of the same variety of moths flew into my house on the 16th floor last night at 9pm. I live in Singapore (South East Asia). It’s large, about 21cm wide. While I have had moths visiting before, I’ve never had three visitors of the same kind, especially since I live in a very densely populated housing area. Does this particular species travel in groups? The photos I have attached are pictures of the same moth from different angles.
Signature: Sodaprincess

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Tropical Swallowtail Moth

Dear Sodaprincess,
This Tropical Swallowtail Moth,
Lyssa zampa, is a species found throughout Southeast Asia.  According to Habitat News which last reported significant sightings in 2010:  “In May 2005, Singapore witnessed the widespread occurrence of adult Lyssa zampa, the large, nocturnal white-striped moth known variously as the ‘Tropical Swallowtail Moth’ and the ‘Giant Uranid Moth’. I recalled incidents from my youth when these large moths used to appear seasonally in Singapore on damp nights. Veteran biologist Kok Oi Yee, agreed, saying the moth used to appear in large numbers in Singapore back in the 1960’s and she was sure it used to happened between May to July.  Not in recent years though. With urbanisation reducing forest cover and the number of areas near forests in Singapore, perhaps it is not surprising there are fewer observations of large numbers of moths. This outbreak had us discussing the climate and the food plant, reportedly a species of Endospermum but we could not say much beyond speculation.”  Large numbers of Tropical Swallowtail Moths appear cyclically, and in certain years there are significant population explosions resulting in numerous sightings.  Otterman Speaks reported a sighting this past April.

Some Questions about the Tropical Swallowtail Moth
May 20, 2014 9:45 pm
Good day,
1) I would just like to know how do you tell the difference between a male and female
tropical swallowtail moth Lyssa zampa  (Lepidoptera: Uraniidae) ?
2) Do males and females have different period where they emerge from their chryslis?
3) What do they feed on?
Thank you,
Signature: Hui Min

Dear Hui Min,
We have added your questions to the featured posting of the Tropical Swallowtail Moth.  We have already gotten several comments, including a report that about thirty individual were sighted at The National Library Building in Singapore.  We will attempt to research your questions.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this beautiful creature?
Location: Long Beach, CA
May 17, 2014 11:06 am
Hi Dan!
I found this little guy in my tire when I went to go move my car. I thought it was dead and brought it inside, but it’s alive! It looks like an owl, it’s so pretty but I don’t know what it is.
Thanks a bunch!
-Bettina :)
Signature: Beautifully Befuddled by This Bug

Tiger Moth

Salt Marsh Moth

Dear Beautifully Befuddled Bettina,
This little bit of loveliness is a Tiger Moth commonly called the Virginian Tiger Moth
, Spilosoma virginica.  Though the yellow abdomen is quite distinctive on this dazzlingly white moth, very few of the images on BugGuide showcase that feature, except this image on BugGuide with the wing being held by fingers.  In that sense, your image displaying the abdomen is an internet rarity.  Despite the misleading name, the Virginian Tiger Moth is found across the country from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific Ocean.  I hope you are well Bettina.  

Tiger Moth

Salt Marsh Moth

Correction:  Salt Marsh Moth, Estigmene acrea
Thanks to a comment from Nick, we realized we had misidentified this Salt Marsh Moth, Estigmene acrea.  More information on the Salt Marsh Moth is available on BugGuide.

Tiger Moth

Salt Marsh Moth

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Camouflaged leaf butterfly
Location: Charlotte, NC
May 13, 2014 5:00 pm
I’m very curious as to the species of this outstanding specimen.
Signature: C Tubman

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear C Tubman,
This gorgeous creature is a male Luna Moth, and your image is only the second we have received this year.  Typically, we begin receiving Luna Moth images in February from Texas and Florida, and as spring warmth moves north, we begin to get reports from higher latitudes.  By late May and early June, we hear of sightings in Maine and Canada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination