Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth, needs ID
Location: kunfunadhoo, maldives
December 31, 2015 11:56 pm
hi, my name is adil and im on eco resort in the maldives, Sonevafushi, we are trying to identify and map the bio diversity of the island and as local resources on the matter limited we are having trouble identifying these insects. Maldives is in oriental region weather is sunny for most of the year, the moth in question was found at night outside near a light
Signature: adil

Fruit Piercing Moth

Fruit Piercing Moth

Dear Adil,
We believe this is a Fruit Piercing Moth in the family Erebidae, though we have not been able to locate an exact match from Maldives.  Oz Animals has a very similar looking individual that is found in Australia.

hi Daniel,
Thank you for your reply. I thought that it was a fruit piercing moth as well but i have been contradicting answers from a few other sources, another species which looks quite a lot like this one is also found in Maldives and i was told that this might be a Thyas coronata. The resemblance is making it hard to accurately ID the species, your thoughts?

The Moths of Borneo site has a nice image of Thyas coronata that looks very close to your individual, and it belongs to the tribe Ophiusini in the family Erebidae.  That might be the correct identification. 

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Subject: Can you identify please?
Location: 14°53′54″ N and 15°40′00″ N and longitudes 73°40′33″ E and 74°20′13″ E.
December 13, 2015 9:03 pm
Hi,
I am back once again for a request to identify some lovely bugs. I live in Goa. India. It is a smallest state in India – located on the west coast.
Goa i/ˈɡoʊ.ə/ is a state located in the South western region of India; it is bounded by the state of Maharashtra to the north, and by Karnataka to the east and south, while the Arabian Sea forms its western coast. It is India’s smallest state by area and the fourth smallest by population.
Goa is a former Portuguese province; the Portuguese overseas territory of Portuguese India existed for about 450 years until it was annexed by India in 1961.[4][5]
Goa is visited by large numbers of international and domestic tourists each year for its beaches, places of worship and world heritage architecture. It also has rich flora and fauna, owing to its location on the Western Ghats range, which is classified as a biodiversity hotspot.
Goa encompasses an area of 3,702 km2 (1,429 sq mi). It lies between the latitudes 14°53′54″ N and 15°40′00″ N and longitudes 73°40′33″ E and 74°20′13″ E. Most of Goa is a part of the coastal country known as the Konkan, which is an escarpment rising up to the Western Ghats range of mountains, which separate it from the Deccan Plateau. The highest point is the Sonsogor, with an altitude of 1,167 metres (3,829 ft). Goa has a coastline of 101 km (63 mi).
Signature: Sucheta Potnis

Wasp Moth

Wasp Moth

Dear Sucheta,
Because you have multiple species included in your submission, we need to separate them for posting purposes.  Your first attachment, the most colorful of the three moths, is a Wasp Moth in the tribe Euchromiini, and we believe it is
Euchromia polymena.  Wasp Moths get their common name as many members of the tribe are excellent mimics of stinging insects, though they are themselves harmless.  They are also diurnal in habit.  This image from TrekNature supports our identification.  We will be postdating your submission to go live during our holiday absence from the office later in the month.

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Subject: Salta Moths
Location: Salta, Argentina
December 15, 2015 10:26 am
Brown banded moth.
Signature: JC

Moth

Moth

Hi again Julio,
We are guessing that this might be a moth in the family Geometridae.

Daniel,
Thank you. I will send you another one now. A more colourful one so that your readership enjoys it!!! Good w-e. Regards. JC

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Subject: Royal Moth?
Location: Panama, Central America
December 17, 2015 9:37 pm
Can you identify this moth., about 4″ wing span. In Boquete Panama, elev 4500’… Tropical cloud forest. Thx!
Signature: Curious clare

Automeris hamata

Automeris hamata

Dear Curious Clare,
This is not a Royal Moth, but a Giant Silkmoth in the subfamily Hemileucinae, known as the Buck and Io Moth family in North America.  We believe we have correctly identified your moth as
Automeris hamata on the World’s Largest Saturniidae Site, a member’s only site, and it is also pictured on the Fauna of Paraguay site.  Many members of the genus have pronounced eyespots on the underwings that are hidden when the moth is at rest, but revealed if the moth is disturbed by a predator.  A bird thinking it might be about to eat a tasty moth would be surprised into perceiving a potentially larger predator with enormous eyes, providing a defense mechanism for the moth.  We will check with Bill Oehlke to verify our identification as there are many similar looking members of the genus. We suspect Bill may request permission to post your images on his site as well, and we hope you provide that permission.

Automeris hamata

Automeris hamata

Yes, that is hamata.
Thanks for thinking of me. Would be great to get the date.
Bill

Daniel, thank you! This is so cool to have a resource such as yours ….I scanned and scanned sites but could find no exact match so thanks again. Of course, Bill may use the photos …no credit necessary.
Happy Holidays!

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Subject: beetle
Location: Dominican Repulic
December 18, 2015 6:27 am
I took this picture of this very interesting looking beetle. I wonder if you can help me identify it.
Signature: Chris

Hieroglyphic Moth

Hieroglyphic Moth

Dear Chris,
This lovely little Owlet Moth,
Diphthera festiva, is commonly called a Hieroglyphic Moth because of the complex pattern on its wings.

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Subject: Zimbabwean Moth
Location: Africa, Zimbabwe
December 15, 2015 8:15 am
hello bugman
cannot identify this beautiful specimen we found today in harare, zimbabwe…
thank you for helping my 6 year old son distinguish it!
vivienne
Signature: Cool Bug man

Giant Silk Moth

Giant Silk Moth:  Gonimbrasia macrothyris

Dear Vivienne,
We believe we have correctly identified your Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae as
Gonimbrasia (Nudaurelia) macrothyris on the member’s only World’s Largest Saturniidae Site and we then researched that name and located a beautiful image on Todd Amacker’s Favorite FlickR Photos.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to verify the identification and we suspect he may request permission to post your image on his site as well.

Thank you so much Daniel!  Happy to share image… you can see true ‘size’ when there’s a reference, even if it is a 6 year olds hand!

Bill Oehlke Responds
Hi Daniel,
It is either macrothyris or something undescribed but very closely related.
Please see if you can get a date and more precise location and permission for me to post with credit to photographer. I would need photographer’s name to credit image properly.
Thanks,
Bill

I’m the Photographer, is hand of A 6 year old not an adult 😊 would love if they use my image!!
Exact location, umwinsidale, Harare, Zimbabwe – taken yesterday 15th December
Thank u again for all your help
Vivienne Croisette

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination