Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Luna Moth in Vermont
Location: Windham, Vermont
June 25, 2014 7:23 am
I know it is a luna moth, but I have never seen one in Vermont! Sighted in Windham, VT on June 25th, 2014.
Signature: Sarah

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Hi Sarah,
Thanks so much for sending in your image of a Luna Moth in Vermont.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Moth
Location: Meridian MS
June 24, 2014 11:28 pm
I’m located in Meridian MS and saw this moth tonight. About 1 inch long and 3/8 of an inch to the ridge at the top of the wing. June 24th at 1am. I cannot locate it in my moth books.
You have helped me before and so I return to your knowledge again.
Thank you!
Signature: David Duncan

Wood Nymph

Wood Nymph

Dear David,
This is a Wood Nymph Moth in the genus
Eudryas, and they are very effective mimics of bird poop which would make them appear to be inedible for most predators.

Daniel,
Thank you once again! Funny thing about the “bird poop”, the individual who asked that I look at the moth stated he looked down at some bird poop on the handrail and it started crawling. Great disguise! Nothing more fascinating than the world of insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Moth
Location: Bourne, Lincolnshire ( 52:46.3518N 0:23.4989W) England
June 24, 2014 12:44 pm
I photographed this moth in my kitchen before carefully putting it outside. I have trawled loads of web sites but failed to identify it.
My garden backs onto the local woodland, and we get hosts of moths that I can’t identify. But I have never seen anything like this before.
Any Idea?
Signature: Bob Harvey

Geometrid Moth

Blood-Vein

Hi Bob,
This lovely moth is in the family Geometridae, and we believe we have correctly identified it as a Blood-Vein,
Timandra comae, thanks to the UK Moths site where it states:  “This attractive moth is fairly common in the southern counties of England and Wales, but scarcer further north and in Ireland.  The adult rests with the wings held in such a position that the reddish cross-lines of the fore and hind wings form a continuous band. The fringes are also suffused with pink.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Glen Burnie
Location: Northern Virginia
June 15, 2014 7:06 pm
We saw this on our garage. We’ve never seen anything like it before
Signature: Bensons

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear Bensons,
This male Luna Moth is arguably the most beautiful North American moth.  It is definitely the most unique North American Moth.  The feathery antennae indicate that this is a male Luna Moth.

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Moth
Location: Seattle, WA
June 17, 2014 8:54 pm
Hi!
We took these pictures on the deck of our apartment building a few days ago. Since yesterday the moth has come inside the building and is now perched on our apartment door frame. It hasn’t moved in 24 hours. What is this gorgeous moth? Should we be worried about its stillness?
Signature: Thanks – Lasara

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Dear Lasara,
Your moth is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth that we have identified as
Smerinthus ophthalmica on the Sphingidae of the Americas website where we learned that it “closely resembles Smerinthus cerisyi, and until recently (2010) had been synonymized with cerisyi.”  So, though this moth was not unknown in the Pacific Northwest, it has recently been reclassified as a new species.  The slender curved abdomen indicates this is a male.  Often moths rest a few days after metamorphosis and we do not believe you need to worry.

Sphinx Moth

Sphinx Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mysterious moth that molted and got smaller?
Location: Pennsylvania
June 19, 2014 5:06 pm
Yesterday when I got to my office, there was a 1.5″ wide brown moth attached to the screen door. It was pretty cool looking, so I took a picture. It stayed there all day as people came and went, without so much as a flutter. The next day when I got to work and looked at the door, I saw the smaller yellow/orange moth attached in the exact same spot. It hung around for a bit, and then was gone; I’m guessing that it got bored and flew off. I’m wondering if they are the same bug that molted or somehow changed from the large brown into the smaller yellow? Or is it just a pure coincidence that they were both at the exact same spot? It’s got me pretty intrigued, and I keep looking around the internet and can’t seem to find any information. Thanks!
Signature: Jeremy S.

Spotted Apatelodes

Spotted Apatelodes

Dear Jeremy,
What an interesting question you have posed.  You are under a misconception that moths (and possibly butterflies) will molt.  Molting is a process undergone by the immature caterpillars, and the final molt occurs when the adult moth emerges or ecloses from the pupa.  The large moth you saw originally is a Spotted Apatelodes.  We are not certain of the identity of the smaller orange moth, but it may be in the family Geometridae.

Possibly Geometrid Moth

Inverted Y Slug Moth

Correction:  June 28, 2014
Thanks to a comment from Ben, we now believe this is an Inverted Y Slug Moth,
Apoda y-inversum, based on images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination