Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Napier, Western Cape, South Africa
March 10, 2016 9:38 am
Daniel
… The second JPG is of a moth my wife found in the kitchen – again, a first for us. With that colouring we would (should) have noticed it if it’s a local species.
Thanks
Johann
Signature: Johann van der Merwe

Arctiid Moth

Arctiid Moth

Dear Johann,
We are going back through unanswered mail from March in an attempt to post some submissions our readers may enjoy.  This pretty little Arctiid Moth is in the genus
Utetheisa, and it is native to your area.  There are several nice images on iSpot.  The genus is not limited to South Africa.  We even have a North American species which is documented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Which Tiger Moth Is This
Location: Sonoma County California
March 27, 2016 7:34 pm
Having trouble identifying this particular Tiger Moth. Can you help?
Signature: Wayne Ball

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth

Dear Wayne,
Your Tiger Moth is in the genus
Grammia, and many species in this genus look very similar.  We believe this may be Grammia ornata which is reported from Sonoma County on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: catfood insects
Location: North central Florida
March 27, 2016 5:52 am
Hi, lately I’ve noticed some kind of insect or something around the catfood bowl. They arrange around a solitary piece of catfood in a flower petal fashion. At first I thought some type of silverfish, but these don’t have any noticeable antennae or feet. I thought they must move extremely slowly, but recently I noticed some move. They appear to gather around a piece of wayward dry catfood for days. When I first saw them, they were completely around a piece of catfood and it looked like (from a distance) a plastic flower or something, so I picked one of them up. They almost cotton-like to the touch. Any ideas?
Signature: //Dan

Case Bearing Moth Larvae eating cat food.

Case Bearing Moth Larvae eating cat food.

Dear Dan,
We are amazed that the organized manner in which these Case Bearing Moth larvae are eating cat food.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Trinidad Moth
Location: Trinidad & Tobago
March 27, 2016 9:32 am
I found this moth (I suspect it might be a Notodontidae) on the verandah roof of the Asa Wright Nature Centre in Trinidad on 11 March 2016. Could you possibly identify it please?
Regards
Signature: John Perry

Possibly Silkmoth

Possibly Silkmoth

Dear John,
We do not believe this is a Prominent Moth in the family Notodontidae.  Your moth reminds us very much of the North American Spotted Apatelodes, one of the Silkmoths in the family Bombycidae, but we have not had any luck locating a matching image on the internet.  We will continue to research your request, and we will also enlist the assistance of our readership. 

Thanks very much. Prominent was just a guess as it looks vaguely similar to the ones we have here in the UK. I would be very interested to know the results of your research.
Regards
John

Julian Donahue responds
Hi Daniel,
Try Mimallonidae.
Julian

Despite Julian’s suggestion that we research Sack-Bearer Moths from the family Mimallonidae, a family also represented on BugGuide, we have not had any luck with a species.  The family is well represented on Discover Life, but no images match the submitted image.  We did however locate this pdf  on ttfnc entitled On the Number of Moths (Lepidoptera) that Occur in Trinidad and Tobago by Matthew J. W. Cock, and we suspect we may find the answer there if we hunt more.  We will attempt to contact the author, Matthew J.W. Cock for assistance.

Hi again Daniel
Having just looked up Spotted Apatelodes on the web and seen some pics, it reminds me of a moth pic I took at the same place and time as the one I submitted. I attach a very poor pic of it.  I can’t find any evidence that Spotted Apatelodes is found in Trinidad – but it might be closely related.
Regards
John

Same or Different Species???

Same or Different Species???

Thanks for the update John,
This new image does support our initial impression that your moth may be in the family Bombycidae, and we wonder if both of your images are the same species.  When conditions are right, moths (and other insects) from the same species emerge simultaneously which benefits the species as individuals have a better chance of locating a mate.  Since your two images were taken “at the same place and time” we suspect they are the same species as there are similarities in the overall structure, though the markings are not evident on the second image.  Hopefully Matthew J. W. Cock will respond to our request after we located his contact information on the internet.

Julian Donahue supplies additional information
Mimallonidae used to be called Lacosomidae.
But on second thought, and after reviewing the attached PDF (where you can see images of mimallonids–they all pretty much look alike), I think that this moth is a geometrid (forewing cubitus vein appears to be 3-branched).
Here’s the attachment!  15465-5006-1-PB
Julian

Thanks Julian,
I have also written to Matthew J.W. Cock who wrote this article.

Matthew J.W. Cock responds
Dear Daniel
This is a male of what I am calling Apatelodes nina (Stoll) sp. (Apatelodidae).  However, this is a genus and family that needs revision with many undescribed species, so things may change when further work is done.
Kind regards, Matthew

Thank you for your help.  I’m impressed at the speed of your replies!
Regards
John

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: spaceship-like moth
Location: West Windsor, NJ
March 21, 2016 9:26 am
Hi,
I took a picture of this moth on a leaf of my fig tree last spring/summer (can’t remember exactly). I live in an area in central New Jersey that has a decent amount of trees.
Please let me know if you know what it is!
Thanks!
Signature: nate

Dot Lined White

Dot Lined White

Dear Nate,
This Dot Lined White,
Artace cribraria, is a member of the Lappet Moth family.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of oak (Quercus), cherry (Prunus), and rose (Rosa).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Injured moth outside a building
Location: Melbourne Florida
March 20, 2016 9:39 am
Hello, a few month back I took a picture of a moth siting on the side of a building. It had an injury on one of its wings. I was hoping you could identify it for me.
Signature: Travis

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Travis,
The magnificent Polyphemus Moth is found across the continental North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination