Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large moth
Location: South Indianapolis
August 8, 2014 8:54 am
This large (7″ wingspan) moth showed up on our patio and spent a couple days hanging out. I live in an industrial area just outside of downtown Indianapolis. This was the week of August 4, 2014.
He wasn’t afraid of anyone getting close to him, so I was able to get some good photos.
Normally, all you can see are his main wings. Only when he starts to feel threatened does he expose his lower wings (and eyespots).
I’ve looked at hundreds of pictures of moths, but couldn’t find any that matched its unique markings. The closest I could find was a Cecropia.
Signature: Ben Mc

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Ben Mc,
Like the Cecropia Moth, this Polyphemus Moth is one of the Giant Silkmoths in the family Saturniidae.  Many moths in the family were given names that reference mythology, and Polyphemus was a one-eyed cyclops that figures into the Odyssey, the story of the journey of Ulysses, also known as Odysseus.

Daniel-
WOW! Thanks for getting back so quickly. I never realized how many moths there really were. And they’re not just those grey little things that eat your clothes!
Thanks for being such a great resource-
Ben Mc

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Imperial Moth
Location: St. Louis, MO
August 6, 2014 2:13 pm
I found a bug on the front door of a warehouse. I had planned on visiting your site for identification – the cover image happened to be the same critter.
Are these guys having a good year? I’ve never seen one before.
Signature: chrisv

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Hi chrisv,
We cannot say that there are more Imperial Moth sightings than usual this year, though insect sightings do tend to be cyclical, with some years producing more individuals than other years.  This is the peak season for Giant Silk Moth sightings in North America, and each year we get numerous identification requests for members of the family Saturniidae in July and August, though sightings occur from spring through fall.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow moth
Location: SE Pennsylvania
August 6, 2014 6:02 am
My dog was “playing” with this moth this morning, so I moved it off the ground to where she couldn’t reach it. We’re in south east Pennsylvania, and its wingspan is roughly 4 inches. It has a “hairy” yellow head, and has a short, stout body about the circumference of one’s thumb. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Ron B.

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Hi Ron B.,
This is a female Imperial Moth.  Females have more yellow while male Imperial Moths have more darker markings.  The sexual dimorphism is obvious when one is lucky enough to observe a mating pair of Imperial Moths.  Like other members of the Giant Silkmoth Family Saturniidae, Imperial Moths do not feed as adults as they do not have functional mouthparts.  They live long enough to mate and lay eggs.  Hopefully rescuing this gal from your dog will allow her to procreate.  For your kindness to one of the lower beasts, we are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Thank you, Daniel, for taking the time to help me know what kind of moth my dog found. She is doing fine resting high up on a fence post, waiting for the sun to go down. Thanks again…
Ron

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: butterfly
Location: Sg. Congkak, selangor, Malaysia
August 5, 2014 12:58 am
Please help to id this butterfly
Signature: Prem

Translucent Moth

Translucent Moth

Dear Prem,
This is not a butterfly.  It is a Moth.  At first, we thought it had white-tipped wings, but closer inspection reveals that the tips of the wings protrude beyond the leaf the Moth is resting on, and the backlighting has illuminated the wing tips.  We cannot provide a species, genus or family name at this time, so we are posting your image as unidentified.  Your moth looks similar to this moth from Gabon, West Africa that is posted to Paxon’s Fauna site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: hummingbird moth
Location: Savage, MN (Scott County)
August 3, 2014 10:03 am
Can you tell me what kind of hummingbird moth this is? I’ve seen him two consecutive days in the wildflowers behind our house in Minnesota. Thanks for your help. (The second photo isn’t very clear but shows a bit more of his coloring.)
Signature: Sue H

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Sue,
You are correct that this is a Hummingbird Clearwing,
Hemaris thysbe, and it is a lovely image, with just enough wing movement to show it is beating the wings and to provide a feeling of movement while “freezing” the body.  See Sphingidae of the Americas for additional information on the Hummingbird Clearwing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy Moth
Location: Little Switzerland, NC
August 3, 2014 5:23 pm
Dear Bugman,
I had the pleasure of seeing several of these lovely, fuzzy moths while in the Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina. I would love to know what they are. Thank you for your wonderful website.
Signature: MothsRock

Dot Lined White

Dot Lined White

Dear MothsRock.
We were struck with the resemblance to other moths we are frequently asked to identify from the genus
Tolype, and we quickly identified this Dot Lined White Moth, Artace cribrarius, on BugGuide as they are both in the subfamily Macromphaliinae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination