Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: “Australian” Bagworm Moth
Location: Epsom, Auckland
March 14, 2014 2:54 pm
Never seen one before but I spotted and I think correctly identified an Australian Bag Moth yesterday 14 March 2014 in Epsom, Auckland
Signature: Lindsay

Bagworm Moth

Female Bagworm Moth

Dear Lindsay,
Thanks for submitting your photo of a flightless, female Bagworm Moth,
Cebysa leucotelus.  According to Nature Watch:  “It is found in New Zealand and the southern half of Australia (Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia).  The adult female moth has black wings with yellow wingtips and patches, but they do not expand properly, so she is not able to fly. The male has a similar pattern and colouring, but has no iridescence. His wings are fully developed and adult males can fly normally.  The larvae feed on lichen.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tarantula wasp in Miami?
Location: Miami Beach FL
March 13, 2014 11:55 am
Hey Bugman! I snapped this while walking down the street in South Beach (Miami, FL) this past January. It seems to match descriptions of tarantula wasps… although it just seems odd to me. Hope you can shed some light! Sorry about the poor res…
Signature: Jet Setter

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Dear Jet Setter,
Like the Blue-Green Wasp Mimic you submitted, this Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth,
Empyreuma pugione, is a wasp mimic in the Tiger Moth tribe Arctiini.  Tarantula Hawks often have black bodies with orange wings, and the aposematic or warning coloration alerts predators to the threat of bothering them, because the sting of a Tarantula Hawk is reported to be quite painful.  The docile and harmless moth benefits from the mimicry.  According to BugGuide:  “The spotted oleander caterpillar is a recent immigrant to the US from the Caribbean, first recorded in Florida in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, in February 1978.”  Since the Spotted Oleander Caterpillars feed on toxic oleander, the aposematic coloration might also be a warning not to eat this species as the toxins may be retained in the bodies of the moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: blue wasp / mimic in Peru
Location: Aguas Calientes, Peru
March 13, 2014 2:44 pm
Hey Bugman! I found this guy in Aguas Calientes, Peru (outside Machu Picchu) in late November the day after an incredible downpour. His / her gorgeous aquamarine wings (opaque) caught my eye – and I’m trying to decide if it was a spider wasp or a wasp mimic <http://www.learnaboutbutterflies.com/Amazon%20-%20Antichloris%20eriphia.htm>
I’m nearly certain based on how fuzzy he appears that it’s a mimic – but that could of course be due to my poor camera res…
Thanks!
Signature: Jet Setter

Blue-Green Wasp Mimic

Blue-Green Wasp Mimic

Dear Jet Setter,
The insect in your photo is definitely a moth that mimics wasps, and the link to the Blue-Green Wasp Mimic you provided appears to us to be the correct genus.  The Learn About Butterflies site indicates:  “The genus
Antichloris contains about 30 species characterised by having black wings and bodies that reflect a bluish or greenish sheen. Identification can be difficult because there are many very similar species in other genera including Timalus, Phaeosphecia, Poliopastea, Psoloptera and Macrocneme. It is possible to narrow down the search by paying close attention to the wing shape and venation, and to the markings on the head, thorax and abdomen. In Antichloris eriphia the thoracic markings are very distinctive, and there are 2 red spots behind the head – although these can only be seen when the moth extends its head forward when feeding.”  Exact species identification is most likely only possible if an expert (and that would NOT be us) inspects the actual specimen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Emerging moth
Location: Fort Myers, Florida
March 12, 2014 6:40 pm
Found this moth with wrinkled wings in my garden today, March 12, 2014. It is on the ground on mulch and amongst fallen leaves of a live oak . I live next to a wetland preserve of pine, cypress, and wax myrtle. Is it a newly emerged Imperial Moth? If so, how long does it take for the wings to fill out and the moth to fly away? It has been there about 10 hours. The body of this moth is huge! About 2.5 inches long – and fat as my index finger. Thought I would bring it into the screen porch to keep it safe from predators, but when I approached it with a piece of paper, it expelled a shot of liquid from its anus; so figured it was best to leave it alone!
Signature: Liz

Oakworm Moth

Oakworm Moth

Hi Liz,
We believe this is one of the Oakworm Moths in the genus
Anisota, and this photo of a newly emerged Pink Striped Oakworm Moth from BugGuide shows many similarities.  Adult Oakworm moths do not eat and they only live a few days, long enough to mate and lay eggs. 

Hi Daniel,
Thank you, looks like the moth that was there.  There was another one like the other moth in your photo, that seemed to be trying to mate with the one on the ground.
And the one I photographed appeared to be trying to lay eggs.  However, I will never know since she has disappeared from the garden overnight.  Thanks again, Liz

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Gaborone, Botswana
March 4, 2014 1:27 am
Hi
I photographed this moth in Gaborone, Botswana. First time to see it. Please help with ID.
Regards
Signature: Dian

Emperor Moth

Emperor Moth

Dear Dian,
This is an Emperor Moth in the genus
Heniocha, and according to African Moths as well as the World’s Largest Saturniidae site, Heniocha dyops, the Marbled Emperor, is found in Botswana.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can verify our identification as there are several moths in the same genus that look quite similar.  We have an image of Heniocha marnois from South Africa in our archives.  Bill might also want to post your image to his own comprehensive website.

Bill Oehlke Responds
Daniel,
It is a good match for Heniocha dyops,  better than for any of the other current Heniocha species. The marginal area has more grey in it than I have seen before in any Heniocha species, so I cannot guarantee that the population in Botswana is a species as yet undescribed, but I think more likely it is just a variant of dyops.
I will post it on the dyops page and see how it fits.
Thanks for thinking of me.
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hawk Moth
Location: Sydney
February 28, 2014 4:37 pm
Hi guys. In the past few weeks we’ve had a hawk moth on your from verandah (in northern Sydney NSW). Last night we had another similar one and i wanted to see if they were the same? I know one is a coequosa australisiae, not sure if maybe ones a female and the other a male? Or the same one thats matured? The plainer one is from 3 weeks ago and the orange one is from last night. Thanks!!
Signature: Libby

Hawkmoth:  Coequosa australasiae

Hawkmoth: Coequosa australasiae

Hi Libby,
Both of your moths are the same species, and your identification is correct.  They are both
Coequosa australasiae.  Hawkmoths tend to be long lived as moths go, and they might even both be the same individual.  Like many moths, Coequosa australasiae has underwings that are more brightly colored than the upper wings which serve as camouflage.  You can see a matching image on Csiro.

Hawkmoth:  Coequosa australisiae

Hawkmoth: Coequosa australisiae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination