Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Glen Burnie
Location: Northern Virginia
June 15, 2014 7:06 pm
We saw this on our garage. We’ve never seen anything like it before
Signature: Bensons

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear Bensons,
This male Luna Moth is arguably the most beautiful North American moth.  It is definitely the most unique North American Moth.  The feathery antennae indicate that this is a male Luna Moth.

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Moth
Location: Seattle, WA
June 17, 2014 8:54 pm
Hi!
We took these pictures on the deck of our apartment building a few days ago. Since yesterday the moth has come inside the building and is now perched on our apartment door frame. It hasn’t moved in 24 hours. What is this gorgeous moth? Should we be worried about its stillness?
Signature: Thanks – Lasara

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Dear Lasara,
Your moth is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth that we have identified as
Smerinthus ophthalmica on the Sphingidae of the Americas website where we learned that it “closely resembles Smerinthus cerisyi, and until recently (2010) had been synonymized with cerisyi.”  So, though this moth was not unknown in the Pacific Northwest, it has recently been reclassified as a new species.  The slender curved abdomen indicates this is a male.  Often moths rest a few days after metamorphosis and we do not believe you need to worry.

Sphinx Moth

Sphinx Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mysterious moth that molted and got smaller?
Location: Pennsylvania
June 19, 2014 5:06 pm
Yesterday when I got to my office, there was a 1.5″ wide brown moth attached to the screen door. It was pretty cool looking, so I took a picture. It stayed there all day as people came and went, without so much as a flutter. The next day when I got to work and looked at the door, I saw the smaller yellow/orange moth attached in the exact same spot. It hung around for a bit, and then was gone; I’m guessing that it got bored and flew off. I’m wondering if they are the same bug that molted or somehow changed from the large brown into the smaller yellow? Or is it just a pure coincidence that they were both at the exact same spot? It’s got me pretty intrigued, and I keep looking around the internet and can’t seem to find any information. Thanks!
Signature: Jeremy S.

Spotted Apatelodes

Spotted Apatelodes

Dear Jeremy,
What an interesting question you have posed.  You are under a misconception that moths (and possibly butterflies) will molt.  Molting is a process undergone by the immature caterpillars, and the final molt occurs when the adult moth emerges or ecloses from the pupa.  The large moth you saw originally is a Spotted Apatelodes.  We are not certain of the identity of the smaller orange moth, but it may be in the family Geometridae.

Possibly Geometrid Moth

Inverted Y Slug Moth

Correction:  June 28, 2014
Thanks to a comment from Ben, we now believe this is an Inverted Y Slug Moth,
Apoda y-inversum, based on images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Denver, CO
June 21, 2014 3:16 pm
These were on my fence, about 3″ across.
Signature: Mtnwanderer

Mating Big Poplar Sphinxes

Mating Big Poplar Sphinxes

Dear Mtnwanderer,
These appear to be mating Big Poplar Sphinxes,
Pachysphinx occidentalis, and you can verify that on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large, black and brown moth
Location: Guadalajara, Mexico
June 22, 2014 1:29 pm
What kind of moth is this?
It was photographed in June 2013, during the daytime, in Guadalajara, Mexico.
The tiles are 9 cm square so the wing tip to wing tip measurement is about 12 cm.
It appeared to be asleep when photographed. It did not react to movement in its vicinity nor to the camera flash. Later it disappeared so it was either alive and flew away or it was taken away by something. It was located in an interior patio, so few animals except birds had access to bother it.
Signature: Will

Typhon Sphinx

Typhon Sphinx

Hi Will,
Thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas website, we have identified your Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae as the Typhon Sphinx,
Eumorpha typhon.  This is the first image of an adult moth from this species we have posted to our site, though in 2013, we did post several images of the caterpillar of a Typhon Sphinx from Mexico.  The Typhon Sphinx has been reported from southern Arizona and New Mexico as well.

Daniel,
Thank you very much for the response. I spent quite a bit of time looking for it without success.
Regards,
Will

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Venice, FL
June 24, 2014 7:46 am
Wondering if someone knows what this is. It’s about as long as your pinky finger
Signature: Thanks, Suzanne

Newly Eclosed Oakworm Moth

Newly Eclosed Oakworm Moth

Dear Suzanne,
We have just returned from the office after a ten day hiatus and we have hundreds of unanswered identification requests.  We think the only way to approach this tremendous backlog is to choose one letter per day from our absence and try to catch up to the best of our ability.  Your letter is the first we are responding to.  This is a freshly eclosed Oakworm Moth from the genus
Anisota, and its wings have not yet reached the fully functional size, which often takes several hours.  Before the wings expand, many moths resemble caterpillars.  Here is a photo from BugGuide for comparison.

Why —- THANKS!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination