Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Brown Moth
Location: Walkerton, Indiana
August 28, 2015 3:53 pm
I was out cleaning up brush around the house and I saw this moth sitting on my porch steps. Not sure what kind it is, but it is a nice looking one.
Signature: Edward

Underwing Moth

Underwing Moth

Dear Edward,
This Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala is a masterful example of camouflage.  The underwings are often brightly colored red, pink or orange with black stripes, but they are hidden when the moth rests, often on a tree trunk where it blends in perfectly with the bark.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big yellow butterfly
Location: Croatia
August 26, 2015 4:05 pm
Do you know what is the name of this beautiful butterfly?
Signature: Yellow butterfly

Japanese Silkmoth

Japanese Silkmoth

This is not a butterfly, but rather, a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae.  Our first matching image in researching its identity was found on Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa where it is identified as a Japanese Oak Silkmoth, Antheraea yamamai, and on SummitPost it states:  “Europe’s largest moth: Japanese Oak Silkmoth (Antheraea yamamai). Its wing span is 11-15 cm.  Originally it lived only in Japan, but it was imported into Europe I think in the middle of the 20th century. A few of them escaped from the farm where they were hosted, and since then it widespread in a few CEE countries, living on oak leaves.”  According to Stock Photo, it was:  “introduced in Europe for silk production.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Northern ct
August 24, 2015 7:31 pm
Found in derby ct , just curious , newbie to the bug world.
Signature: Andre

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Ailanthus Webworm Moth

Dear Andre,
In the past two weeks, we have identified numerous Ailanthus Webworm Moths, but because of time restrictions, we have not published those submissions.  Your images are quite nice, and since you are a newbie to our site, we decided to post your request in the hope it will help others to identify this lovely Ermine Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify this bug
Location: Myrtle Beach, SC
August 17, 2015 1:12 pm
These bugs are in my pantry, what are they? How do i get rid of them?
Signature: Nicky Levy

Indian Meal Moth

Indian Meal Moth

Dear Nicky,
This is an Indian Meal Moth, a common household pest that will infest a variety of stored grain products as well as spices and nuts.  Check the pantry and try to find the source of the infestation, which might be an old container of oatmeal or cornmeal.  If there is nothing in the pantry, check the bargain bag of pet food or bird seed.  The moths do not eat the grain products as adults.  Rather it is the larval form that does the damage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Great Tiger Moth
Location: Granby, Colorado
August 17, 2015 8:03 pm
This moth was on the side of our cabin at the C Lazy U guest ranch near Granby Colorado.
Beautiful, vibrant colors – it hung out all afternoon prior to a rain storm.
Very photogenic!
Signature: LGS

Great Tiger Moth

Great Tiger Moth

Dear LGS,
The Great Tiger Moth or Garden Tiger Moth,
Arctia caja, is a holarctic species, meaning it is found in Eurasia as well as North America.  According to BugGuide:  “This species, formerly common throughout the UK, has steadily declined over the past 20 years, with numbers falling by around 30%. There has been a general movement away from the south and toward the north, with climate change believed to be a contributing factor. Warm, wet winters and warm springs are followed by a decrease in the number of tiger moths the following summer (Conrad et al, 2002).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: help identifying moth
Location: Trinidad and Tobago (Caribbean)
August 16, 2015 12:55 pm
Hi bug man, I’d like some help identifying a moth that i’ve never seen before. I took this photo lastnight in Trinidad and tobago.
Signature: Prince Siu

Possibly Geometer Moth

Possibly Geometer Moth

Dear Prince Siu,
At first we thought this was a Geometer Moth in the family Geometridae, but the more we looked at it, the more we thought it might be in the family Erebidae because of its resemblance to a White Witch, the largest South American moth.  We are still leaning towards a Geometer Moth, but we have not been able to locate any matching images online.  We will continue to research this and we will also enlist the assistance of our readership.

Update:  August 17, 2015
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash indicating this looks like a member of the genus
Letis, we searched and found a similar looking moth from Ecuador on FlickR, which is good enough for us to eliminate the family Geometridae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination