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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mothID please
Location: Hanoi, Vietnam
June 8, 2015 3:51 am
Guys
While at the Co Loa Citadel, Hanoi, May 2015, I was accosted by this gorgeous moth (and 10,000of his friends). I would really appreciate an ID a bit closer than “One of the Tiger Moth” spp.
Have a great day and keep smiling.
Signature: Fof

Diurnal Leaf Skeletonizing Moth

Diurnal Leaf Skeletonizing Moth

Dear Fof,
Our initial impression was the same as your thought that this is a Tiger Moth, but as we researched, we located a matching image on PhotoBucket identifying the species as
Phauda flammans, and we then located another image on FlickR of a mating pair.  Animal Diversity Web provided us with the family Zygaenidae, which are the Leaf Skeletonizing Moths, though it is actually the caterpillars that skeletonize the leaves.  This is a diurnal species of moth that flies during the day. 

Daniel, g’day
Wow! That was, to put it bluntly, spectacular not only the speed of response, but the ability to hit the nail bang on the head.
Thank you very much for your assistance with this ID.
Have a good day and keep smiling.
Fof

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Promethea, or Tulip Tree moth?
Location: Central North Carolina
June 7, 2015 5:18 am
Hi! I found these guys hanging out on my front window this morning. I know the one is a Rosy Maple moth, but I’m not sure about the other. I’ve been browsing photos of Promethea and Tulip Tree moths, but I can’t figure out how to tell them apart. What is she?
Signature: April

Tuliptree Silkmoth (right) and Rosy Maple  Moth

Tuliptree Silkmoth (right) and Rosy Maple
Moth

Hi April,
Both the Promethea Moth and the Tuliptree Silkmoth are in the same genus, so they look similar, but we believe this is a female Tuliptree Silkmoth which is pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of moth is this?
Location: State College, PA
June 2, 2015 5:15 am
Hi, I took this picture of a moth in State College, PA. Wondering what kind it is. Thanks!
Signature: Don

Cecropia Moth

Cecropia Moth

Dear Don,
We started getting images of Cecropia Moths,
Hyalophora cecropia, from various locations in the past month, beginning with southern sightings.  According to BugGuide:  “Populations of this species can be found across most of continental North America east of the Rocky Mountains.  Cecropia moths are recorded from the Maritime Prov. of Canada (Nova Scotia & PEI) south to central Florida and west across the Eastern Plains & e. Rockies.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bark-colored Moth
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
May 31, 2015 12:04 pm
Hello,
Nice bark-camouflaged moth with some color. I couldn’t find a comparable one on your site. Taken during the day, resting under a porch light. May 2015. Recognize it?
Signature: A Fan

Underwing Moth

Underwing Moth

Dear A Fan,
Your pretty moth is an Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala, and though we are not able to provide you with a definite species name, we believe it may be Catocala ilia.  We just took an image of a Walnut Underwing at our Mount Washington, Los Angeles offices, but unlike your image, we did not capture a flash of the brightly colored underwings.  As you have noted, the upper wings of an Underwing Moth are an effective bark camouflage, and the flashing red and black insect appears to vanish when the Underwing lands on the trunk of a tree.

Thanks for the genus name! I know the calos part comes from Greek, kalos (beautiful). I like the way it just sat there quietly. I assume it just rests during part of the day and is active at night.

Thanks for the etymology lesson.  The Underwings are nocturnal, and they are frequently attracted to lights.  If they are disturbed during the day, they will fly, which is why we explained about the brightly colored wings distracting the predator, who continues to search for a morsel of that color when in fact the Underwing has blended with its background once it has landed on a tree trunk or other concealing facade.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of moth is that
Location: Poland
May 31, 2015 12:48 pm
I found this moth ( I think it’s moth) today in my mom garden and I just wondering what kind of moth is that. Thank You Sylvia
Signature: Don’t matter

Lime Hawkmoth

Lime Hawkmoth

This beautiful Hawkmoth is a Lime Hawkmoth, Mimas tiliae, and according to the UK Moths site:  “A reasonably common species in the southern half of Britain, it was most frequent in the London area, where there are still extensive tree-lined avenues. In recent years its distribution has spread northwards and is now regularly found well into North Yorkshire and beyond.”

Lime Hawkmoth

Lime Hawkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Walnut Underwing Visits WTB?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
March 30, 2015 7:00 AM
Each year we get visits from Walnut Underwings, and it is always a very exciting sighting, though our native Noctuoid is considerably than the numerous Saturniids that are being submitted to our site.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination