Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen this till NOW
Location: Conroe, Texas
May 9, 2014 11:10 pm
I woke up on morning at about 9-10AM the day looked foggy as if it had showered the night before. I let my dogs out my backdoor and I see this orange insect attached to the outer side of the glass of door. I looked closer at it and it looked furry/fuzzy had two white antennae flipped back towards it sides almost. I noticed it had 3 black legs on one side from the point of view I held. Which would mean it had 6 black legs in total. I looked towards its bottom and it looked like it had wings but not the butterfly kind but the beetle kind (short and tucked in) No Idea what it is but it has been bothering me. I posted it in social media and have yet to find an answer as to what the insect is.
Signature: Brandi Hernandez

Southern Flannel Moth

Southern Flannel Moth

Hi Brandi,
When social media fails you, turn to What’s That Bug?  This is a Southern Flannel Moth,
Megalopyge opercularis, and we verified our identification on BugGuide.  The stinging caterpillars of the Southern Flannel Moth which are called Asps, are more commonly encountered than the adult moths.

Wow! Y’all are quick! Thank You! Finally I can rest. Who knew touching them when they’re just caterpillars can be venomous though they look harmless because of their fuzzy appearance.
Thank You!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Bug
Location: West Frankfort, Illinois
May 6, 2014 5:00 pm
Hi ~
This is a bug in my friends house. She lives in Illinois. It does have a mouth because it was eating wasps.
Can you help?
Signature: Thank you! Anne Woods

Male Luna Moth

Male Luna Moth

Dear Anne,
This is a male Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae, and we are relatively certain it is a Luna Moth, and because of the feathery antennae, we believe this to be a male Luna Moth.  We got tremendous amusement from your letter because of your friend’s claim that it was eating wasps.  We are also amused that you made a point of stating that it does have a mouth, which implies that there is some reason to believe it doesn’t have a mouth.  According to all the material we have ever read regarding members of the family Saturniidae, “Adults do not feed” as is stated on BugGuide.  According to Encyclopedia Britannica:  “Adults have reduced, or vestigial, mouthparts, and many never feed.”  We were surprised to read that because based on that statement, some members of the family might feed.  We decided to dig deeper to search for reputable websites that confirm what we have known for many years.  According to the Study of Northern Virginia Ecology website which was developed for use by elementary age students in Northern Virginia to learn more about their local ecology:  “Adult Luna Moths don’t eat; in fact, they don’t even have a mouth.”  According to the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences:  “They don’t feed at all as adults and instead depend on food they store as caterpillars to survive.”  According to Live Science:  “The adult Luna moth, for instance, doesn’t even have a mouth.”  According to the Habitat Herald Newsletter of the Loudoun Wildlife Conservancy:  “Luna Moths have no mouths, so they do not eat in this stage.”  We are also wondering why your friend would be circulating an image from this angle, because though it is still an interesting image, a dorsal view is ideal for displaying the beauty of the Luna Moth, which many people consider the loveliest North American insect.  Please ask your friend to provide any documentation of this Luna Moth eating wasps, because that image is sure to rock the world of biology to its very core.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Holy Moth
Location: Atlanta, GA
May 5, 2014 6:52 pm
Hi bugman,
Love the site use it all the time to identify critters, thanks you that!
One day i was outside my back door and i saw this Moth (i guess).The fact that i was praying at the time really surprised me. I’m still taking it as a sign from God But…
I wanted to know it’s name, although i have already named it the Cross Moth, and how common are these types of moths,because I haven’t seen one since,?
So would love to hear from ya!
Signature: Kash

Clymene Moth

Clymene Moth

Dear Kash,
You are not the first person to have interpreted the appearance of a Clymene Moth as a sign of divine intervention.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mexican Tiger Moth
Location: Southern California
May 3, 2014 3:14 pm
Hello – my grandson and I found what we believe is a Mexican Tiger Moth in El Segundo right at the beach.
Signature: Barb

Mexican Tiger Moth

Mexican Tiger Moth

Hi Barb,
We agree that this is a Mexican Tiger Moth,
Notarctia proxima, and you can locate additional information on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting pink and yellow moth
Location: Northeast Tennessee
May 2, 2014 9:21 pm
I’ve seen these fluffy cotton candy-colored moths around the area before, but I’ve never been able to get a good picture of one until now. I’ve always wondered what kind of moth they are.
Signature: Erin

Rosy Maple Moth

Rosy Maple Moth

Hi Erin,
People often write to us comparing the coloration of a Rosy Maple Moth to sweets and other confections, most commonly sherbet.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Phillipino butterfly
Location: Manilla, Philippines
April 28, 2014 3:50 am
Hello Bugman,
My brother is working in the Philippines, and he found this gorgeous butterfly in the entrance to his office building today. The quality isn’t great, it was taken with his cell phone but you can still see details.
I was wondering if you could help me give it a name.
Thanks, and continue your wonderful work! This is really a wonderful website!
Signature: Ben, from Israel

Hi again Bugman,
I found it! Turns out it’s a tropical swallowtail moth, Lyssa zampa, and not a butterfly.
Feel free to post it on your website,
Ben

Swallowtail Moth

Swallowtail Moth

Hi Ben,
Thanks for forwarding your brother’s image of a Tropical Swallowtail Moth, and thanks for the compliment as well.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination