Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ID
Location: Michigan
June 13, 2016 11:32 am
I am having issues id’ing this moth. We found them in upper Michigan in the pine barrens where the Kirtland’s warbler nests. I have narrowed it down to a possible black-banded orange (Epelis truncartaria)
Signature: Glenn

Black Banded Orange

Black Banded Orange

Dear Glenn,
In our opinion your identification is absolutely correct, after we compared your image to this image of a Black Banded Orange,
Epelis truncataria, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults fly during the day and are not known to be active at night.  Generally uncommon and local in the southern parts of its range; common and widespread across the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth with feathered antennae brown wings with a white stripe and brightly colored bottom wings
Location: Lincoln national park, New Mexico
June 17, 2016 8:05 pm
I found this bug at my summer can in the Lincoln national park in southwest New Mexico and I can not figure it out for the life of me.
Signature: idk what to put here

Zephyr Eyed Silkmoth

Zephyr Eyed Silkmoth

This is a Zephyr Eyed Silkmoth, Automeris zephyria, and according to BugGuide the “Texas Parks & Wildlife considers this to be a ‘Species of Greatest Conservation Need’ (SGCN)”  though all the submissions to our site as well as those posted to BugGuide are from New Mexico, generally at higher elevations.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Luna Moth
Location: Rockford, Mi
June 17, 2016 8:43 am
I have never seen this one before but when a co worker informed me I had to identify it! It’s a Luna Moth resting on the wall outside the back door.
Signature: LisaM

Male Luna Moth

Male Luna Moth

Dear LisaM,
Congratulations on your wonderful sighting.  The more feathery antennae indicate this Luna Moth is a male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this type of moth?
Location: Marietta, Georgia
May 29, 2016 7:49 am
Hello! I found this moth years ago in my basement. It was hanging from some type of silk.. Was dead when i found her 🙁 I have never been able to identify what she was.. Could you help me? Thank you!
Signature: Hannah Johns

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Dear Hannah,
This is a Small Eyed Sphinx,
Paonias myops, an identification you may verify on Sphingidae of the Americas where it states:  “Small-eyed Sphinx females call in the night flying males with an airbourne pheromone emitted from a gland at the posterior of the abdomen.  Both sexes rest with wings parallel to the resting surface, with the upper lobes of the hindwings protruding above the forewings.  The lower abdomen of the male (right) arcs upward toward the head, while the abdomen of the female hangs strait down on a vertical surface.”  The arched abdomen indicates your individual is a male.  The common name refers to the markings on the hidden underwings which are though to resemble eyes.  Since your image is a few years old, we are going to postdate your submission to go live to our site during our annual trip away from the office in early June.

Daniel,
Thank you so much!! How exciting to learn what *he* was after all these years. Your site is a fantastic resource, it is a wonderful thing that you all do. Thank you again, happy memorial day!
Hannah Johns

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth & eggs identification!
Location: bellingham, washington, usa
May 30, 2016 3:11 pm
hi! i found this moth laying eggs in my dorm building today. i live in bellingham, washington. i want to know what kind she is so that i can put her eggs somewhere safe where they’ll find something to eat- i know some moths only eat certain plants. please write back soon, i love moths and i want these babies to grow up safely. thank you!
Signature: tessa f.

Omnivorous Looper

Omnivorous Looper

Dear Tessa,
Eggs can be very difficult to identify, so having images of the female insect laying the eggs is one way to ensure the identity of the eggs.  This moth is an Omnivorous Looper,
Sabulodes aegrotata, a species found in the western states.  Here is a BugGuide image for verification.  According to BugGuide:  “The larvae feed on a large variety of herbacious and woody broad-leaved angiosperms. Plants in 27 familes have been reported as hosts, and the species’ feeding occasionally causes damage to to orchard trees such as avocado, citrus, and walnuts.”  Many moths that are general feeders do not concern themselves with laying eggs on an actual host plant as the young can forage once they hatch.  Because we will be away from the office for a spell in June, we are postdating your submissions as well as other postings to go live during our absence. 

Omnivorous Looper Lays Eggs

Omnivorous Looper Lays Eggs

Eggs of an Omnivorous Looper

Eggs of an Omnivorous Looper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth
Location: Northern Virginia
June 6, 2016 6:08 pm
can you identify this moth? seen in June, 2016
Signature: Sandra

Laudable Arches Moth

Laudable Arches Moth

Dear Sandra,
We were excited when we thought we identified your moth as a Collared Arches Moth,
Lacinipolia strigicollis, thanks to this BugGuide image, but alas, it is a species limited to western North America according to BugGuide.  We knew we were close so we investigated the genus, but according to BugGuide:  “Lafontaine & Schmidt (2010) listed 64 species of the genus Lacinipolia in America north of Mexico.”  Of the eastern species, only the Laudable Arches Moth, Lacinipolia laudabilis, is green and resembles your individual, so we are relatively sure that identification is correct, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are general feeder on herbaceous plants.”  Here are more images from Moth Photographers Group.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination