Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mating Cecropia Moth
Location: North of Indianapolis
May 21, 2011 7:10 pm
Just a picture to add to your collections. Found in Indianapolis 5/20/11. Sooo pretty. I came to you to find out what they were :-)
Signature: Cynthia

Mating Cecropia Moths

Hi Cynthia,
Our Bug Love page hasn’t had a really sexy photo in a few months.  Thanks for sending photos of this positively gorgeous amorous pair to add to our archives.

Mating Cecropia Moths

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Strange moth like bug on window screen
Location: Mokena, Illinois
May 21, 2011 8:43 pm
We found this bug attached to our screen window. It looks a bit like a moth, but has what appears to be a stinger attached to its butt. We are from Mokena, Illinois and the temperature is about 75 and humid.
Signature: Thank you, Brian Smith

Small Eyed Sphinx

Hi Brian,
Your impression that this looked like a moth was correct.  It is a Small Eyed Sphinx,
Paonias myops, so named because of the eyespots on the underwings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

White Lined Sphinx Moth
Location: Nebraska
May 18, 2011 4:14 pm
Hey! I just found your site and love it, thought I might contribute a little bit. Here is a little friend, what I think is a white lined sphinx moth. It was a warm Nebraska night when this little fellow landed on me and decided to start posing. It stayed on me for about an hour, even as I was walking around and taking pictures. It was a pretty cool experience. Eventually I had to take it off and it just flew away into the night!
Signature: Peter

Whitelined Sphinx

Hi Peter,
We are terribly amused with your photos of a Whitelined Sphinx,
Hyles lineata, one of the commonest members of its family and also one of the widest ranging.  The Whitelined Sphinx may be encountered across North America.

Whitelined Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What the heck?
Location: South Dakota kitchen floor
May 18, 2011 8:34 am
I found this on the floor. At first I thought it was something off a sunflower but found this worm looking thing inside.
Signature: Please help

Unknown Thing

We are baffled as to how to even categorize this thing.  There are not enough visible characteristics except to say that it resembles a grub or maggot, but being in that casing is quite curious.  Furthermore, why are there two of them?  The casing looks fibrous and hemplike, or possibly like fur.  Do you perhaps have a house pet with similar looking hair?  We are going to feature your photo in the hopes that our readership is able to provide some information.

Karl solves the Mystery
Mysterious Encased Grublike Thing – May 18, 2011
Hi Daniel and Please help:
Your mysterious objects look to me like the mature, presumably overwintered, seedheads of burdock (Arctium sp.). If so, the little grubs are likely the larvae of the Burdock Seedhead Moth (Metzneria lappella), a variety of microlepidoptera in the family Gelechiidae. The larvae feed on the developing seedheads, then overwinter as larvae and pupate within the seedhead in the spring. Burdock is very common here in southern Manitoba and in the fall the seedheads are typically very heavily infested with these little guys. Perhaps they hitched a ride into your home on someone’s clothing, or maybe a dog. Burdocks were originally Eurasian species but they have been naturalized in North America for a very long time. I suspect the same goes for the Burdock Seedhead Moth. Regards.  Karl

Wow Karl,  that was an impressive identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Peacock Moth?
Location: Hamilton, Ohio U.S.A.
May 18, 2011 7:13 am
I found this beautiful moth hanging out on my sidewalk this spring. I live in Southwestern Ohio. A friend suggested that it was a peacock moth, but do these moths live in Ohio? The pictures I see online of peacock moths are not as colorful as this one. What is it?
Signature: L. Mills

Polyphemus Moth

Dear L. Mills,
This beautiful creature is a Polyphemus Moth and it appears to be winking.  The eyespots on the underwings are an effective form of protective coloration.  A predator might mistake this tasty morsel for a larger creature upon being startled by the sudden appearance of a large pair of eyes.  The Polyphemus Moth has the greatest range of all of the Giant Silkmoths in North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth found in central Pa
Location: trout run pennsylvania cascade township
May 17, 2011 3:21 am
what is this thing. I have seen it 2 times both at night. It is dead now on the 2nd night.it has a big white body. I’m in a wooded area in north central Pennsylvania.
Signature: Ann Smith

Luna Moth

Dear Ann,
Each year we track the northward emergence of the Luna Moths, and your Pennsylvania encounter is the most northern sighting we have received thus far this year.

thank you dan. I watched this moth all night it was raining most of the Night and I honestly thought it was dying. It didn’t die .I went to see it around 6 am it was shaking alot .I checked on it all night and then at 6:15 am it was gone.  If anyone gets a chance to see this luna moth they are very pretty in color. awesome sighting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination