Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mystery moth
Location: Hoquiam, Washington, The United States
July 11, 2011 4:54 pm
My 9 year old daughter Phoenix caught this specimen. She tells me it’s not in Acorn and Sheldon’s ”Bugs of Washington and Oregon”. Can anyone identify this moth?
Signature: Kelly & Phoenix Fire Hogaboom

Spotted Tussock Moth

Dear Kelly and Phoenix Fire,
This is a Spotted Tussock Moth,
Lophocampa maculata, and though it is a far ranging species, the closest matching image we could find on bugGuide was also from Washington.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What Kind of Moth is This?
Location: Sidney, Maine
July 11, 2011 4:02 pm
I’ve been trying to attract moths to my porch light to photograph for the last month and a half or so, and most of the moths showing up have been ones I’ve seen before, except for this one. It showed up at just before 7PM on July 8th 2011, and I have no clue as to what it is, do you have any ideas?
Signature: Steve

Pearly Wood Nymph

Hi Steve,
This is either a Pearly Wood Nymph,
Eudryas unio, or a closely related species in the same genus.  The Wood Nymph moths are very effective at mimicking bird droppings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Weird bug
Location: 40° 54’ N/ 90° 17’ W
July 10, 2011 3:23 pm
I was wondering if you knew what kind of bug this is.. I live in central Illinois and It’s summer time. This bug was on my staircase outside and I have never seen anything like it.
Signature: Sincerely, Curious

Mating Imperial Moths

Dear Curious,
These are mating Imperial Moths.  The male on the bottom is the smaller, more purple member of the pair.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Trinidad Moths
Location: Trinidad
July 10, 2011 1:35 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found your homepage by chance when I tried to identify 3 very large moths we saw two weeks ago in Trinidad.
No1 is probably a white witch (picture taken at Asa Nature Lodge); No2 should be a Rothschildia taken at the ladies restroom in the visitor Centre of the Caroni swamps. No3 is a large silkmoth (at least 10cm wingspan)we had at the Radio and Tropospheric Scatter Station at Morne Bleu (670m high in the northern range). It would be nice, if you could help me with identification and/or confirmation of the three species.
Signature: Harald (Heidelberg, Germany)

White Plagued Sphinx Moth

Hi again Harald,
Your third moth from Trinidad is a Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae, not a Giant Silkmoth.  Alas we could not locate it on the Sphingidae of the Americas Trinidad page.  We decided to try the Venezuelan page of Sphingidae of the Americas and we quickly found the White Plagued Sphinx,
Manduca albiplaga, a perfect match and it includes the shocking statement:  “This species has been found only once in the United States, in Kansas.”  We are going to contact Bill Oehlke and we expect he may request permission to post your photo on his excellent website as well.  He may even want your photo of Rothschildia lebeau amacurensis.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you very much for the great job! It will be a pleasure for us to give permission to post the pictures I sent you. I tried to downsize the files so if you would like to receive one of the files in a better resolution, please let me know. I will attach another picture of a second animal of the White Plagues Sphinx we took at the same location to this email. Since I did not want to flood your request form I did not include it in the request. Nevertheless, since you think the pictures might be of interest for people working in this field I am happy to share it with you.
Best regards and greetings from Heidelberg,
Harald

White Plagued Sphinx Moth

Hi again Harald,
We are very happy to include the new photo of the White Plagued Sphinx in the original posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Trinidad Moths
Location: Trinidad
July 10, 2011 1:35 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found your homepage by chance when I tried to identify 3 very large moths we saw two weeks ago in Trinidad.
No1 is probably a white witch (picture taken at Asa Nature Lodge); No2 should be a Rothschildia taken at the ladies restroom in the visitor Centre of the Caroni swamps. No3 is a large silkmoth (at least 10cm wingspan)we had at the Radio and Tropospheric Scatter Station at Morne Bleu (670m high in the northern range). It would be nice, if you could help me with identification and/or confirmation of the three species.
Signature: Harald (Heidelberg, Germany)

Rothschildia vanschaycki

Hi again Harald,
We learned on the World’s Largest Saturniidae Site that your Giant Silkmoth is
Rothschildia lebeau amacurensis.  Your specimen appears to be a male of a subspecies of Rothschildia lebeau which is also found in VenezuelaThe Encyclopedia of Life website has a photo of the female.

Correction:  March 15, 2013
Daniel,
Based on 2012 Entomo-Satsphingia journal, the Rothschildia on  the following page
Is Rothschildia vanschaycki, described in 2012.
Bill Oehlke
I will shortly be sending another Rothschildia update.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Trinidad Moths
Location: Trinidad
July 10, 2011 1:35 pm
Dear Bugman,
I found your homepage by chance when I tried to identify 3 very large moths we saw two weeks ago in Trinidad.
No1 is probably a white witch (picture taken at Asa Nature Lodge); No2 should be a Rothschildia taken at the ladies restroom in the visitor Centre of the Caroni swamps. No3 is a large silkmoth (at least 10cm wingspan)we had at the Radio and Tropospheric Scatter Station at Morne Bleu (670m high in the northern range). It would be nice, if you could help me with identification and/or confirmation of the three species.
Signature: Harald (Heidelberg, Germany)

White Witch

Dear Harald,
WE are positively thrilled to have received your marvelous photos from Trinidad, but since the three moths represent three different families (and three categories in our archives) we are going to split them up into distinct postings.  We are starting with the White Witch,
Thysania agrippina, a spectacular species that has the largest wingspan of any New World moth, and according to some experts, the greatest wingspan of any moth in the world.  The specimen you photographed is in such pristine condition, it is probably making collectors who visit our site salivate with desire, however, we would much rather see a living individual than a perfect specimen mounted in a collection.  We will make the subsequent postings later in the day.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination