Currently viewing the category: "Owlet Moths"
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Subject: Moth or Butterfly?
Location: Zimbabwe
January 29, 2014 7:00 am
Hey there,
Can you tell me what this is? Found in Zimbabwe, I’ve seen a few around, but can’t find them in any books.
Thanks.
Signature: Kate

Possibly Diurnal Tiger Moth

Astute Tiger

Dear Kate,
We believe this is a diurnal Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we are unable to verify that speculation with any documentation online.  We will try contacting our friend and Arctiid specialist Julian Donahue, however he is currently traveling and we are not certain when he will return.

Julian Donahue Provides a Correction and a lead to an Identification:  February 6, 2014
Hi Daniel,
Just returned from India yesterday.
The moth is indeed a beauty, but I suspect that it’s either a geometrid or maybe an agaristine noctuid.
Try checking with LepSoc Africa for help with this one. You can post the photo to their Facebook page for an ID (https://www.facebook.com/LepSocAfrica/). Their website is at: http://www.lepsoc.org.za/
The President is Steve Woodhall: send the photo to him if you don’t want to go through Facebook.
Julian

Dear Steve,
Julian Donahue suggested I contact you regarding this identification which I thought might be an Arctiid.  Do you recognize this lovely moth from Zimbabwe?  I run a pop culture website called What’s That Bug? and this image was sent in last week.  You can also view the posting if you want additional details.
Thank you for any help you are able to provide.
Daniel Marlos

Steve Woodall provides the identification:  Astute Tiger
Hi Daniel
This is Phaegorista agaristoides, the Astute Tiger (Noctuidae – Aganainae). It resembles the False Tiger moths that are in the Arctiinae (now a subfamily of Erebidae, in the Noctuoidea). Lepidopteran taxonomy and phylogeny is undergoing somewhat of a revolution right now and we can’t use the old families in Pinhey any more!
Kind regards
Steve

Thanks Steve.  Goodness, a revolution sounds so bellicose.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this moth?
Location: Berkshire, UK
January 8, 2014 4:29 am
A friend found this in his greenhouse (in Berkshire, UK) just before Christmas. If not for the striped legs, I’d have been thinking pine-tree lappet or similar. Can anyone help?
Signature: Clive Richards

The Herald

The Herald

Our Autoreply
Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Identified by Helen Argent on the UK Moth site: The Herald (Scoliopteryx libatrix)
Many thanks, anyway
Clive Richards

Hi Clive,
Thanks for providing us with this identification of The Herald.  Your request was on our back burner.  According to UK Moths:  “Quite a spectacular species, this colourful moth overwinters as an adult, and as a result, can be one of the last species to be seen in one year, and one of the first in the next. It is also sometimes found hibernating inside barns and outbuildings.  The adults are attracted to both light and sugar, and the species is fairly common and well distributed over much of Britain, though it is less common in Scotland.  The larvae feed on willow (Salix) and poplar (Populus).” 

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Subject: Unusual Moth
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
January 6, 2014 12:32 pm
I found this beautiful moth in the garden and I’ve never seen one like it before. I would love to know what type it is. It’s about 2,5cm long and the body is about 1cm wide.
Signature: Rain

Cherry Spot

Cherry Spot

Hi Rain,
At first we thought this little beauty was a Tiger Moth, but we have been fooled by imposters in the past, so we also looked at Owlet Moths.  After a bit of searching, we have matched it to a mounted specimen on African Moths and identified it as a Cherry Spot,
Diaphone eumela, (Stoll, 1781).  We found an image of a living specimen on Project Noah where it was bequeathed the honor of Moth of the Month this past November on Facebook.  We really love the common name Cherry Spot.

Cherry Spot

Cherry Spot

Thank you so much!  It’s always interesting knowing the names of the bugs we see :-)
Regards
Trish

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large moth in Costa Rica
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
October 28, 2013 4:58 pm
My daughter took this picture of a 5-inch-wingspan moth resting on a window in central Costa Rica (near Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve). This was taken today (end of October). The picture has been rotated 90 degrees counterclockwise. You can see part of the head on top.
Closest I found on an identification site was a ”black-witch moth” but the pattern seems a bit off.
Signature: Tomas Moran

Owl Moth from Costa Rica

Owl Moth from Costa Rica

Dear Tomas,
This Owl Moth,
Thysania zenobia, is a gorgeous specimen.  We wonder if a bird took a piece out of its wing.  You can verify our identification on Project Noah.

Thank you, Daniel!!
Yes, I noticed two pieces gone on the right side and thought the same.
Went to project Noah but landed on someone else’s picture.  Not sure how to “verify”.   I will try again to figure it out.
Thanks for your work
Tomas Moran
Palo Alto CA

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Minneapolis, MN
May 24, 2013 2:33 pm
I found this rather attractive black & white moth hanging out on a footpath on my way to work.
This is near the University of MN in Minneapolis. We’re having a cool/cold/late spring this year and this particular day was cold and overcast.
My limited-skill attempts to identify it have led me nowhere.
Signature: Darren Abbey

Grapevine Epimenis

Grapevine Epimenis

Hi Darren,
This is an exciting submission for us as it is an underrepresented species for our site.  We quickly identified this distinctive Owlet Moth as a Grapevine Epimenis,
Psychomorpha epimenis, thanks to BugGuide where we learned:  “The common name is unusual in that it contains the species epithet; the normal practice is to use the genus name, as in ‘Grapevine Psychomorpha.’”  There is only a hint of red showing on the underwings, but some of the photos on BugGuide show a striking large red patch that is hidden in your image.

In retrospect, there were grape vines growing adjacent to the trail where this was found.
Darren

Providing the larval food plants is one of the surest ways to attract specific butterflies and moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White Witch Moths from Ecuador
Location: Loja, Ecuador
April 29, 2013 5:38 pm
One day I visited the local Soccer stadium of Loja, Ecuador, and had the luck of finding these beautiful Moths lining the walls. I’m assuming that they were attracted to the stadium’s lights during the match the night before.
If my identification is correct, these are White Witch moths, Thysania agrippina. Thought I didn’t know this at the time, this species is known for having the largest wingspan of any moth or butterfly in the world. Hope you like the pictures!
Signature: Eric

Owl Moth

Owl Moth

Hi Eric,
Your guess on the species is close, but not exact.  The lighter moth is an Owl Moth,
Thysania zenobia.  It is in the same genus as the White Witch, but it is a considerably smaller moth.  You may read more about the Owl Moth on the Texas Entomology website or on BugGuide.  The photo with numerous darker moths illustrates Black Witches, Ascalapha odorata.  There is much lore associated with Black WitchesYou can read more on BugGuide.

Black Witches

Black Witches

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination