Currently viewing the category: "Owlet Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly, Moth or Bug?
Location: Somdet, Thailand
September 27, 2014 2:34 am
Just got this from my wife. It looks like a moth with crying children on its wings then when it opens its wings it appears to have a yellow praying mantis on it.
Signature: Mat Coleman

Owlet Moth:  Eudocima hypermnestra

Owlet Moth: Eudocima hypermnestra

Hi Mat,
Your insect is a moth, and we quickly identified it as
Eudocima hypermnestra thanks to an image on FlickR.  We located a second image on FlickR and then a posting on iNaturalist to verify the identification. 

Owlet Moth:  Eudocima hypermnestra

Owlet Moth: Eudocima hypermnestra

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Silver-Spotted fern moth
Location: Mancelona, MI
July 6, 2014 6:12 pm
Hello, all!
The Silver-Spotted Fern Moth (Callopistria cordata) is instantly recognizable by the reflective silver spots on the wings (they appear white here, of course). It’s orangeish to reddish brown, with a wingspan of 25-28 mm, according to Bugguide. As the name suggests, the larvae feed on ferns. Our area is absolutely stuffed with bracken ferns, so I’m sure I’ll be seeing more of these soon–this specimen, I spotted on July 5.
Signature: Helen

Silver Spotted Fern Moth

Silver Spotted Fern Moth

Hi Helen,
We have finally gotten around to posting your Silver Spotted Fern Moth image from the other day.  This really is a pretty Owlet Moth and we are linking to the BugGuide page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth in Northeastern NJ
Location: Verona, NJ
June 16, 2014 12:03 pm
Hello … Can you identify this lovely moth? Can’t find him in my field guides.
Thanks so much!
Have a lovely vacation…
Signature: Anne

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Hi Anne,
We did have a lovely time on holiday, but we know we will never be able to make a dent in the countless submissions that arrived in our absence.  Fortuitously, we selected your request from our backlog, and we have been obsessed with identifying this lovely moth.  We figured it was in the superfamily Noctuoidae, and we were correct.  We found
Cerma cerintha, the Tufted Bird Dropping Moth, on the Moth Photographers Group website, and we crosschecked that on BugGuide where we learned:  “larvae feed on leaves of plants in the rose family (Rosaceae) such as apple, cherry, hawthorn, peach, pear, plum, rose.”

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Welcome back…  I hope you can make a dent in the backlog…  yikes!
Wonderful!  Thank you so much…  I do have an apple tree, and roses in my yard, and the street trees on my block are cherry…
Be well  :-)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Moth
Location: Meridian MS
June 24, 2014 11:28 pm
I’m located in Meridian MS and saw this moth tonight. About 1 inch long and 3/8 of an inch to the ridge at the top of the wing. June 24th at 1am. I cannot locate it in my moth books.
You have helped me before and so I return to your knowledge again.
Thank you!
Signature: David Duncan

Wood Nymph

Wood Nymph

Dear David,
This is a Wood Nymph Moth in the genus
Eudryas, and they are very effective mimics of bird poop which would make them appear to be inedible for most predators.

Daniel,
Thank you once again! Funny thing about the “bird poop”, the individual who asked that I look at the moth stated he looked down at some bird poop on the handrail and it started crawling. Great disguise! Nothing more fascinating than the world of insects.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unusual bug
Location: Deeside Flintshire
May 24, 2014 8:55 am
Hi there
It’s pouring down with rain and I came home to find this very unusual bug that I have not seen before and intreague to know what it could be
Any help will be great
Thanks
Signature: Sarah woodward

Angle Shades Moth

Angle Shades Moth

Hi Sarah,
Though we were uncertain of the identity of this freshly metamorphosed moth whose wings have still not expanded to their full size, we quickly identified it as an Angle Shades Moth,
Phlogophora meticulosa, by matching it to this image on the Photography Obsession Gallery.  According to UK Moths:  “A highly distinctive and unusual moth, which rests with the wings folded longitudinally, looking very much like a withered autumn leaf.  The adults generally fly between May and October, in at least two generations, but can be found in any month The species is also a common migrant and can occur in large numbers at coastal locations.”  

Angle Shades Moth

Angle Shades Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth or Butterfly?
Location: Zimbabwe
January 29, 2014 7:00 am
Hey there,
Can you tell me what this is? Found in Zimbabwe, I’ve seen a few around, but can’t find them in any books.
Thanks.
Signature: Kate

Possibly Diurnal Tiger Moth

Astute Tiger

Dear Kate,
We believe this is a diurnal Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we are unable to verify that speculation with any documentation online.  We will try contacting our friend and Arctiid specialist Julian Donahue, however he is currently traveling and we are not certain when he will return.

Julian Donahue Provides a Correction and a lead to an Identification:  February 6, 2014
Hi Daniel,
Just returned from India yesterday.
The moth is indeed a beauty, but I suspect that it’s either a geometrid or maybe an agaristine noctuid.
Try checking with LepSoc Africa for help with this one. You can post the photo to their Facebook page for an ID (https://www.facebook.com/LepSocAfrica/). Their website is at: http://www.lepsoc.org.za/
The President is Steve Woodhall: send the photo to him if you don’t want to go through Facebook.
Julian

Dear Steve,
Julian Donahue suggested I contact you regarding this identification which I thought might be an Arctiid.  Do you recognize this lovely moth from Zimbabwe?  I run a pop culture website called What’s That Bug? and this image was sent in last week.  You can also view the posting if you want additional details.
Thank you for any help you are able to provide.
Daniel Marlos

Steve Woodall provides the identification:  Astute Tiger
Hi Daniel
This is Phaegorista agaristoides, the Astute Tiger (Noctuidae – Aganainae). It resembles the False Tiger moths that are in the Arctiinae (now a subfamily of Erebidae, in the Noctuoidea). Lepidopteran taxonomy and phylogeny is undergoing somewhat of a revolution right now and we can’t use the old families in Pinhey any more!
Kind regards
Steve

Thanks Steve.  Goodness, a revolution sounds so bellicose.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination