Currently viewing the category: "Owlet Moths"
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Subject: Looper Moth on Sedum at Mom’s?
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
September 21, 2016 3:52 pm
Greetings, WTB Volunteers!
My Test Message went through! WooHoo! So I’m hoping this query I’ve been trying forever to send will make it as well.
Our Autumn flowers are beginning to bloom, which of course includes sedum. While most sedum are not native to MN, Dad had a fondness for them so several varieties are in Mom’s garden. Like prairie liatris, sedum are pollinator magnets. Late one afternoon at the end of August 2016, I was taking photos and noticed a moth I’ve not seen before. Gorgeous thing, which of course does not necessarily mean it’s an insect we want around. Years ago I a very large and absolutely stunning moth in my garden near the iris. (I took pictures I can send if you like). I put two and two together and discovered it was the adult of the Iris Borer. Beautiful markings, reminiscent of Native American cave paintings! Still, not a moth one wants if one hopes to grow iris!
Anyway, this most recent “new” moth has the outline of a star on its back with two prominent spots along the lower edges of the star. In profile, it has prominent ridges with arise from its shoulders and back. Quite stunning to see, and was feasting quite happily on the sedum blossoms. Even the bees did not deter this moth!
I’ve not seen a moth such as this, certainly not to photograph, so I’m excited to add this to my sightings list! The little bit of research I’ve been able to do gets me as far as a possible Looper Moth, but then I get stuck. So many Looper Moths! Can you help me narrow it down?
Blessings one and all!
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Looper Moth

Looper Moth

Dear Wanda,
We are not going to be much help.  So many Looper Moths in the Subfamily Plusiinae, which is well represented on BugGuide, look very similar.  Some possibilities are that it is in the genus Autographa, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Looper Moth

Looper Moth

Well, Daniel, that helps explain why I was having difficulty with an ID. I’ll just refer to it as “Looper Moth A” until I have more information!
Thanks so much, Daniel.
Blessings,
Wanda

Looper Moth

Looper Moth

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Subject: Large brown moth with orange `eyes’ on upper wings
Location: Goa, India
September 20, 2016 1:20 am
Hello Bugman,
I am here to Bug you again.
This large brown moth with almost pea-size orange `eyes’ on the upper part of the wings flew in. Actually, I have seen them before but only a few days ago thought I need to know what it is. I hope you can be of help!
Thanks
Signature: Sucheta Potnis

Indian Owl Moth

Indian Owl Moth

Dear Sucheta,
We believe we have correctly identified this Indian Owl Moth,
Erebus macrops, thanks to images on India Nature Watch and Biodiversity India.

Hello,
Thanks very much for the quick ID!
Best regards,
Sucheta
Goa, India

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A Beautiful something…
Location: Hardeeville South Carolina
September 17, 2016 9:41 am
Hello Mr.Bugman! My brother told me about your page after I asked him if he had ever seen the bug in my picture. My name is Brittany, I work at a self storage facility out in the middle of nowhere. Every morning as I check the property and there are so many bugs outside. I think they must be attracted by the lights on the property at night. I always take pictures if i find new ones for my “collection”. I can normally identity them via google but this one has me stumped! This i am guessing was some type of moth, as after i took the picture he/she flew away. I know you are a busy bugman but I would love to find out what this beautiful somthing was. Thank you for your time!
Signature: -Brittany

Heiroglyphic Moth

Hieroglyphic Moth

Dear Brittany,
This lovely little Owlet Moth is commonly called a Hieroglyphic Moth,
Diphthera festiva, and we don’t think that common name needs any explanation.

Awesome! Thank you so much I cant wait to tell my brother!
p.s. What a perfect name!

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Subject: Stink bug or moth?
Location: Philadelphia, Pa
September 12, 2016 5:42 am
I found this lovely insect clinging to my back door last week. I asked my friends to identify it for me because I wasn’t sure. Most said it was a stink bug but there were a adamant few who said it was a moth. What say you? I’d appreciate your input. Thanks so much.
Signature: Barb Ward

Sallow Moth

Sallow Moth

Dear Barb,
This is a moth, not a Stink Bug, and we are confident it is a Sallow Moth in the genus
Feralia based on images posted to BugGuide, but we are not certain of the species.

Thanks so much for getting back to me so quickly.  There was somewhat of a debate on this.  You cleared it up.
With much appreciation,
Barb
I really enjoy your site and your Facebook page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth probably, but maybe butterfly?
Location: N. Central Saskatchewan, Canada
August 30, 2016 8:04 pm
I have googled this until my eyes went googly!
This probably moth was fluttering in an awkward moth type way, visiting flowers during the daytime yesterday. I am located in N. Central Saskatchewan Canada
I was curious as to what sort of moth it is, if it is indeed a moth. I’ve never seen one before and now have 20 or more people actively googling images and descriptions to no avail. Do you have any idea what it is?
Signature: Tami Z

I have found the ID of this moth so you may ignore my request and thank you for your effort!  It was ID’d as a celery looper moth.  It might be a bit out of it’s range but it was a warm winter. Thank you!

Celery Looper Moth

Celery Looper Moth

Dear Tami,
Thanks for getting back to us with a correct identification of your Celery Looper Moth,
Anagrapha falcifera.  We are pleased to be able to post your wonderful image that matches this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on large variety of low plants: beet, blueberry, cabbage, carrot, celery, clover, corn, lettuce, plantain, Viburnum species. Adults nectar on flowers of various herbaceous plants” and “Adults are active day and night, and are attracted to light.”  You were quite lucky having a team of 20 helping you with the identification.  Sometimes identifications can be quite time-consuming.

Thank you for the follow up. You`re right – ID can be really time consuming but what a fun challenge!
It was a first for me, but when you start googling grey and brown moths you realize how may firsts are yet to come!

Indeed, many moths are brown or drab in color, and many look very similar, which is why we often stop at a general family identification.  The fact that this moth was observed flying during the day is an unusual characteristic, and searching with the term diurnal early may have yielded quicker results.

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Subject: Confused About This Moth
Location: Northeast Ohio
August 15, 2016 3:56 pm
Hi! My son found this large moth in our yard, and all of our research indicates that it is Orange Underwing Moth, but that same research places this species in the UK, and we’re in Northeast, Ohio.
Can you help us ID it? Thank you!
Signature: Colleen

Underwing

Underwing

Hi Colleen,
Your Underwing is in the genus
Catocala, a large genus with many similar looking species.  We believe it might be a Sweetheart Underwing, Catocala amatrix, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on leaves of several species of poplar (Populus spp.) and Black Willow (Salix nigra).”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination