Currently viewing the category: "Noctuoids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp or Moth in Costa Rica
Location: Golfito, Costa Rica
January 29, 2015 1:03 pm
Hello Bugman,
I found this insect around midnight on our concrete drive on the edge of the rainforest. The metallic blue and gold abdomen and the red head parts along with those wing were quite striking. Any ideas on what it could be? Thanks.
Signature: Ocho Verde

Wasp Moth

Wasp Moth

Dear Ocho Verde,
You are correct that this is a wasp mimic moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we are having a bit of difficulty with a species identification.  It reminds us of the Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth,
Empyreuma affinis, and we suspect it might be in the same genus.  We will contact lepidopterist Julian Donahue to see if he can provide an identification.

Julian Donahue provides correction.
Nowhere near that, but it is a ctenuchid. Without access to the collection, after checking references at hand there are several possibilities, but from what I can gather it looks most like Poliopastea mirabilis (type locality: Colombia), but I wouldn’t take that to the bank without actually examining the specimen and comparing it to specimens in the collection.
Sorry I can’t be more definite, but I’ve run out of time. (I can tell you that this species doesn’t occur in French Guiana, whose ctenuchids have recently been monographed and illustrated.)
Julian

Amy Gosch, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I think this is a moth
Location: Eastern Pennsylvania
January 23, 2015 9:37 am
This photo was taken summer of 2012 Allentown, Pa. The bug flew onto the deck, stayed long enough for a quick photo op, and flew away. The red color is the wings. We have searched for years for it’s identification. Hope you can help.
Signature: Nancy B.

Wood Nymph Moth

Wood Nymph Moth

Hi Nancy,
This moth is an Owlet Moth in the genus
Eudryas, and members of the genus are commonly called Wood Nymph Moths, though the are also called Bird Poop Moths as they are such effective mimics which helps them to avoid being eaten by birds or other predators.

Kristi E. Lambert liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Arachnis picta but green?
Location: Jamul, CA
January 16, 2015 10:04 pm
Hello. I found this moth outside & I’m curious about it. It looks just like a painted tiger moth (Arachnis picta) but it’s green like a lichen. Is this a different species or just a color variation? I see the standard painted tiger moths a lot in the fall but sometimes I see these green ones too.
Sorry the lighting is a little yellowish & doesn’t quite do it justice.
Signature: -Becky

Sallow Moth

Sallow Moth

Dear Becky,
We made an attempt to remove some of the yellow lighting, but the lovely green coloration of this Sallow Moth was not correctly reproduced.

Thank you for getting back to me!
Fortunately the same kind of moth came back tonight and I got a better picture by shining a flashlight on it. Does this help?

Mossy Sallow Moth

Mossy Sallow Moth

Thanks Becky,
This is a much nicer image of a Mossy Sallow Moth in the genus Feralia.  BugGuide pictures several similar looking species.

 

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Costa Rican moth
Location: Sarapiqui, Costa Rica
January 16, 2015 3:40 pm
Hello! I am studying in Costa Rica for this semester (spring 2015) and came across this little guy outside of where we were staying for a few nights. I’ve been trying to identify it for over an hour, with no luck, which surprised me considering how distinct its markings are. Any ideas?
Signature: Lauren

Moth

Tiger Moth

Dear Lauren,
This really is a gorgeous Moth.  Red, green and blue are the primary colors of photography, and this lovely moth is a perfect poster moth for the medium.  We have just returned from a trip and we are swamped with unanswered mail.  We are posting your images Unidentified, and we will contact Lepidopterist Julian Donahue who has spent much time in Costa Rica to see if he can spare us some research, or at least point us in the right direction, but our initial impulse is that this might be an Owlet Moth in the family Noctuidae.

Moth

Tiger Moth

I’m not sure if it’s an owlet moth, since I’m having trouble narrowing it down from just the family, but I hope your Lepidopterist will be able to shed some light on this colorful moth!

We have not yet heard back from Julian.

Julian Donahue Responds
It’s a tiger moth in the genus Neonerita, but can’t put a name on the species.
Julian

Ed. NOte:  Our staff has not succeeded in locating any images online that look remotely like this Tiger Moth.

Lauren Responds
Thanks to your tip, I was able to figure out that this species is called Neonerita incarnata. Interestingly, there’s very little to no information on the web that I’ve been able to dig up – the few things I did find either had no information past the name or were written in Russian (I think). Hopefully I’ll be able to get my hands on an insect book, but I’m glad I know what it is!

Ed. NOte:  See Lepidoptera Pro where it is listed under the synonym Epimolis incarnata.  That name turns up some images on Papillons et Insectes du Monde and FlickR.

Julieta Stangaferro, Katie Harvey, Jessica Sory, Kristi E. Lambert, Rachel Mouldey, Melissa Leigh Cooley, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Indonesian moth
Location: Indonesia
January 4, 2015 11:18 am
This moth was seen about 7:00 am in late December near Wakatobi Dive Resort on a small island off of Southeast Sulawesi in Indonesia. It was on a concrete path in the sun vibrating its wings (warming itself up maybe?). Thanks for the help.
Lindsay

Owl Moth

Owl Moth

Dear Lindsay,
This is an Owl Moth in the genus
Erebus, possibly Erebus nyctaculis based on the image on Butterfly House and the range which includes Northern Australia, the Philippines and Indonesia.

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Indonesian moth
Location: Indonesia
January 4, 2015 11:12 am
This pretty moth was in our bathroom at Wakatobi Dive Resort, on a small island off of Tomia (or Tomea), which is a slightly larger island off of southeast Sulawesi in Indonesia, in late December. Thanks for the help!
Signature: L. Sanford

Heliotrope Moth

Heliotrope Moth

Dear L. Sanford,
This diurnal Tiger Moth is a Heliotrope Moth,
Utetheisa pulchelloides, which we identified on this blog from Indonesia.  The same species is called a Crimson Speckled Footman on the Cook Islands Biodiversity site.  A very similar looking moth is identified as Utetheisa lotrix on The Papua Insects Foundation site.

Daniel,
Thanks for the id! That is exactly the moth I saw. One question though: I sent in two id requests at about the same time, and you replied to my second request with the id of the moth in the first. Were you able to check on the second moth? I totally understand if you don’t have the time or resources for the second, I just wondered if there was a mix-up and you missed my second picture. (Next time I will send both requests in the same message to avoid the confusion.)
Thanks again for your help!
Lindsay

Hi Lindsay,
You should limit submissions to a single species.  I have not had time to look at the second moth.  Also, you did not initiate with a new form, hence stacking the two requests together.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Kathleen O'Dwyer, Michelle Turner, Kristi E. Lambert, Rick Smith, Mike Coughlin liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination