Currently viewing the category: "Noctuoids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Alypia Forester Moth
Location: western Montana
July 28, 2014 2:04 pm
Can anyone ID this Alypia? I’ve gone through 4 different species, but the pattern of white patches does not match well to any of them. This photo was taken on July 28th, 2014 in western Montana. It was nectaring on Brassica weed flowers in open coniferous forest at approximately 3,400′.
Signature: Jeremy Roberts

Police Car Moth

Police Car Moth

Hi Jeremy,
While your moth bears a superficial resemblance to the Forester Moths in the genus
Alypia, the reason you had so much difficulty with a species identification is that your moth is in a different family.  This is a Police Car Moth, Gnophaela vermiculata,  According to BugGuide, the range is “southern British Columbia south to Oregon, northeastern Nevada, Utah, Colorado, and northern New Mexico” and it is found in “Typically foothills, mountain ranges, mid-elevations.”  As there are other similar looking members of the genus, we cannot say with 100% certainty that this is not a close relative of the Police Car Moth.

Thank you!  Indeed, I feel into a trap of my own making.  Police Car Moth it is.  And just in time for National Moth Week!
Thanks again for throwing down a rope.  I’m excited to plant some host plants in the yard now.
Cheers,
-Jeremy

You are most welcome Jeremy.  WTB? has co-sponsored a National Moth Week event with the MWHA in our local Elyria Canyon Park in 2012 and 2013, but that is not the ideal time for moth viewing in Southern California, so we are going rogue this year and having a local event when moths are more plentiful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some kind of moth
Location: Vermont
July 25, 2014 2:00 pm
Isn’t this unique?
Signature: MG

Clymene Moth

Clymene Moth

Dear MG,
More than one reader has commented that the pattern on the wings of the Clymene Moth,
Haploa clymene, resembles religious symbolism, more specifically a cross.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black and Whit Moth?
Location: Eastern PA (suburbs of Philadelphia)
July 8, 2014 6:32 pm
We saw this cool moth on the brick sidewalk outside of the Exton, PA Barnes and Noble. I love it’s black and white stripey legs. It reminded my kids of a Dalmatian dog. It was seen in early Spring.
Signature: Laura Toner

Giant Leopard Moth

Giant Leopard Moth

Hi Laura,
This beautiful and distinctive Tiger Moth is commonly called a Giant Leopard Moth or an Eyed Tiger Moth.

Thank you so much! I thought it looked like it had scary big eyes. Very interesting and beautiful. Happy summer! :)Laura Toner

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Silver-Spotted fern moth
Location: Mancelona, MI
July 6, 2014 6:12 pm
Hello, all!
The Silver-Spotted Fern Moth (Callopistria cordata) is instantly recognizable by the reflective silver spots on the wings (they appear white here, of course). It’s orangeish to reddish brown, with a wingspan of 25-28 mm, according to Bugguide. As the name suggests, the larvae feed on ferns. Our area is absolutely stuffed with bracken ferns, so I’m sure I’ll be seeing more of these soon–this specimen, I spotted on July 5.
Signature: Helen

Silver Spotted Fern Moth

Silver Spotted Fern Moth

Hi Helen,
We have finally gotten around to posting your Silver Spotted Fern Moth image from the other day.  This really is a pretty Owlet Moth and we are linking to the BugGuide page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth in Northeastern NJ
Location: Verona, NJ
June 16, 2014 12:03 pm
Hello … Can you identify this lovely moth? Can’t find him in my field guides.
Thanks so much!
Have a lovely vacation…
Signature: Anne

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Hi Anne,
We did have a lovely time on holiday, but we know we will never be able to make a dent in the countless submissions that arrived in our absence.  Fortuitously, we selected your request from our backlog, and we have been obsessed with identifying this lovely moth.  We figured it was in the superfamily Noctuoidae, and we were correct.  We found
Cerma cerintha, the Tufted Bird Dropping Moth, on the Moth Photographers Group website, and we crosschecked that on BugGuide where we learned:  “larvae feed on leaves of plants in the rose family (Rosaceae) such as apple, cherry, hawthorn, peach, pear, plum, rose.”

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Tufted Bird Dropping Moth

Welcome back…  I hope you can make a dent in the backlog…  yikes!
Wonderful!  Thank you so much…  I do have an apple tree, and roses in my yard, and the street trees on my block are cherry…
Be well  :-)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Date:  June 27, 2014
Most every year, we get at least one visit from a Walnut Underwing, and since the endangered California Black Walnut Trees in the yard are growing nicely, we hope we will see an increase in the moth population.  About a week ago, a tattered individual was on the porch light and for the past several days, this beauty has been seen at night and is generally on the screen door the next morning.  Last night, a huge commotion in the kitchen turned out to be our feisty feline Boris trying to catch this Walnut Underwing which was on the other side of the glass window.  Thought it landed with its underwings visible, it flew before we could get the camera.  These dorsal and ventral (somewhat showing the patterns on the underwings) views will have to suffice for now.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination