Currently viewing the category: "Noctuoids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful mith
Location: Southern California (Hemet)
June 10, 2016 7:45 pm
Found this guy today in Hemet California (Southern, inland desert area). He matched the stucco so well, I almost missed him.
I found the beautiful design of his wings just stunning.
What is he, and what does he look like as a catipillar?
Signature: Teresa DiPietro

Salt Marsh Moth

Salt Marsh Moth

Dear Teresa,
This delicate Tiger Moth is a Salt Marsh Moth,
Estigmene acrea.  The caterpillar is one of the Woolly Bears, and we believe this Woolly Bear is a Salt Marsh Moth Caterpillar.  According to BugGuide:  “Adult (imago): forewing white with about 20 small black spots scattered across the disk, and 5 larger black spots spaced along the costa. Males have dark yellow hindwings, those of females are mostly white (with 3 or 4 black blotches in both sexes).  Larva (caterpillar): highly variable, blond to brown to black, with long bristly hairs standing upright in dense tufts from orange or black tubercles; hairs longer at both ends of body, especially toward the rear end. Spiracles white. Moves very rapidly. Face mainly black with yellow down the center.”  Since your individual has white hindwings, she is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful bug
Location: 48118
June 9, 2016 2:47 pm
I saw this crawling at the base of a rose bush on June 9 2016 near Chelsea MI.
It’s very colorful but what is it?
Signature: Curious G

Eyed Tiger Moth

Eyed Tiger Moth

Dear Curious G,
This is a newly metamorphosed Giant Leopard Moth or Eyed Tiger Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia.  Once its wings expand, they will cover the colorful abdomen and the Giant Leopard Moth will be able to fly to seek out a mate.  Adult Giant Leopard Moths do not eat, surviving off the fat they stored as Woolly Bear Caterpillars.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth
Location: Northern Virginia
June 6, 2016 6:08 pm
can you identify this moth? seen in June, 2016
Signature: Sandra

Laudable Arches Moth

Laudable Arches Moth

Dear Sandra,
We were excited when we thought we identified your moth as a Collared Arches Moth,
Lacinipolia strigicollis, thanks to this BugGuide image, but alas, it is a species limited to western North America according to BugGuide.  We knew we were close so we investigated the genus, but according to BugGuide:  “Lafontaine & Schmidt (2010) listed 64 species of the genus Lacinipolia in America north of Mexico.”  Of the eastern species, only the Laudable Arches Moth, Lacinipolia laudabilis, is green and resembles your individual, so we are relatively sure that identification is correct, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are general feeder on herbaceous plants.”  Here are more images from Moth Photographers Group.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Madison, Wisconsin area
June 6, 2016 6:56 pm
Hello! I’m from the Madison, Wisconsin area, and I found this moth (butterfly??) while I was gardening. He has 3 legs and cant walk or fly. What kind of moth/butterfly is he?
Signature: Hannah

Large Yellow Underwing

Large Yellow Underwing

Dear Hannah,
Though it is a very pretty moth, the Large Yellow Underwing, , is an Invasive Exotic species that according to BugGuide, was:  “Introduced from Europe to Nova Scotia in 1979, this species has since spread north to the Arctic Ocean, west to the Pacific, and south to the Gulf of Mexico.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth to be identified
Location: Botswana
May 23, 2016 4:34 am
Photographed this Moth at Kubu Island in Southern Botswana. Kabul Island is situated in the Makgadikgadi Salt Pans. The Moths wingspan/width when not in flight was between 2.5 – 3 Inches wide. Any help will be appreciated.
Signature: Tony Camacho

Cream Striped Owl Moth

Cream Striped Owl Moth

Dear Tony,
We believe we have correctly identified you stunning moth as a Cream Striped Owl Moth,
Cyligramma latona, thanks to images posted to iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 17, 2016 6:48 PM
Each year we look forward to the first appearance of a Walnut Underwing at our office.  We were pleasantly surprised by this especially gorgeous individual earlier in the week.  Perhaps we will try to get a good image with the colorful underwings revealed the next time it comes to the porch light.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination