Currently viewing the category: "Noctuoids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ID
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C. Canada
June 30, 2015 1:43 pm
This moth was seen in Prince Rupert, B.C. Canada on May 24, 2015
If you know it’s name I’d be so happy!
Thanks
Signature: Thank you…Clees

Hickory Tussock Moth

Spotted Tussock Moth

Dear Clees,
At first we thought this was a Hickory Tussock Moth, but according to BugGuide:  “In Canada, this species is found only in Nova Scotia, Quebec, and Ontario. Several in New Brunswick in 2006.”  We looked at related species in the genus, and now we have concluded that this is a lookalike relative, the Spotted Tussock Moth,
Lophocampa maculata.  According to BugGuide, it is found:  “across southern Canada, western US, south in Appalachians to South Carolina, Kentucky.”

Hickory Tussock Moth

Spotted Tussock Moth

Alisha Bragg, Juliett Moth, Ann Levitsky, Mike Coughlin, Lauren Fay, Kyla Gunter Gatlin, Heather Duggan-Christensen liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bark-colored Moth
Location: Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA
May 31, 2015 12:04 pm
Hello,
Nice bark-camouflaged moth with some color. I couldn’t find a comparable one on your site. Taken during the day, resting under a porch light. May 2015. Recognize it?
Signature: A Fan

Underwing Moth

Underwing Moth

Dear A Fan,
Your pretty moth is an Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala, and though we are not able to provide you with a definite species name, we believe it may be Catocala ilia.  We just took an image of a Walnut Underwing at our Mount Washington, Los Angeles offices, but unlike your image, we did not capture a flash of the brightly colored underwings.  As you have noted, the upper wings of an Underwing Moth are an effective bark camouflage, and the flashing red and black insect appears to vanish when the Underwing lands on the trunk of a tree.

Thanks for the genus name! I know the calos part comes from Greek, kalos (beautiful). I like the way it just sat there quietly. I assume it just rests during part of the day and is active at night.

Thanks for the etymology lesson.  The Underwings are nocturnal, and they are frequently attracted to lights.  If they are disturbed during the day, they will fly, which is why we explained about the brightly colored wings distracting the predator, who continues to search for a morsel of that color when in fact the Underwing has blended with its background once it has landed on a tree trunk or other concealing facade.

Alisha Bragg, Sue Dougherty, Alfonso Moreno, Maryann Struman, Juliett Moth, Talya Martinez Cho, Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Walnut Underwing Visits WTB?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
March 30, 2015 7:00 AM
Each year we get visits from Walnut Underwings, and it is always a very exciting sighting, though our native Noctuoid is considerably than the numerous Saturniids that are being submitted to our site.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify
Location: Nelspruit, South Africa
May 19, 2015 3:11 am
I found this butterfly this morning but have not been able to identify it yet
Signature: Nicolette

Milkweed Butterfly

Snouted Tiger Moth

Dear Nicolette,
We believe this is a Milkweed Butterfly in the subfamily Danaiae, but we wish your image had more detail because it does not appear that your individual has clubbed antennae.  Your individual appears to be dead, so it is possible the ends of the antennae have been damaged.  We browsed unsuccessfully through iSpot, and though we did not locate any exact matches, we did observe a similarity to butterflies in the genus
Amauris, and the closest match we could find is Amauris ochlea, the Novice, which is pictured on BioDiversity Explorer.  We are not fully confident that is a correct identification, and we are still troubled by the lack of a clubbed end on the antennae on your image.  Perhaps one of our readers will steer us in another direction.

Correction:  Snouted Tiger Moth
South African entomology student Michelle sent us a comment identifying this as a moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, in the genus Nyctemera.  Following that lead, we found this image of a Snouted Tiger Moth, Nyctemera leuconoe, on iSpot.  We suspect there is some mimicry involved here as Milkweed Butterflies are distasteful, and the Snouted Tiger Moth probably derives some protections from resembling one.  The same species is called a White Bear on iNaturalist.

Dear Daniel,
Found an id at last- its a white bear moth – Family: arctiidae
Thank you for taking the time to help me in my search to id!
Regards
Nicolette

Kevin Trejo, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New to us critter
Location: Reston, Virginia
May 17, 2015 7:42 pm
While visiting family in Reston, Virginia, on Mothers Day 2015, we spotted this on the patio door. None of us had seen anything like it before, but knew we could count on WTB to enlighten us. Many thanks in advance.
Signature: Curious

Eight Spotted Forrester

Eight Spotted Forrester

Dear Curious,
This through the glass view provides a very interesting perspective on the Eight Spotted Forrester,
Alypia octomaculata, a diurnal Owlet Moth.  MOBugs has a very nice narrative on the Eight Spotted Forrester.

Stacey Haza, Maryann Struman, Jaye Ridet, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Alisha Bragg, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: black and white bug
Location: Louisiana
May 13, 2015 7:56 pm
I saw this bug outside of my house i thought it was a really awesome moth but i got closer and now i dont know what it is. It is really awesome looking.
Signature: -Mir

Giant Leopard Moth

Giant Leopard Moth

Dear Mir,
You encountered and Eyed Tiger Moth or Giant Leopard Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia.

Stacey Haza, Alisha Bragg, Annette Hollenbush, Sue Dougherty, Donna Paslay, William Boyd, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Kathleen O'Dwyer, Kyla Gunter Gatlin, Jessica M. Schemm, Ana Šorc, Em-Jill Holohan, Jaye Ridet, Maryann Struman, Sylvia Kartika liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination