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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Iris Borer Moth
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
September 24, 2016 4:09 pm
Greetings, Daniel!
I mentioned an Iris Borer Moth I saw years ago. Back in 2013 I still had Flag Iris growing in my Rain Garden. As I weeded, I found rotting rhizomes, large larva and numerous pupae, all of which got tossed into the yard for later raking up and taking to compost. The robins were quite happy with the feasts they found in the “weeds” I was pulling up! I even got a couple photos of robins with the grubs in their beaks!
Well, that summer I decided no more iris for me in my garden. Just before that decision, I was working in a section when I saw this large moth. It was resting at the base of an iris plant so I had my suspicions as to what it was. An absolutely gorgeous moth as I previously mentioned, with patterns reminiscent of Native American Cave Paintings or even petroglyphs. Being me, I took several photos from a couple angles to use for possible identification (this was before I discovered your awesome website!). And of course my suspicions were confirmed.
So here are three of my best photos of an Iris Borer Moth, taken September 2013. Enjoy!
Blessings,
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Iris Borer Moth

Iris Borer Moth

Dear Wanda,
Your excellent images of an Iris Borer Moth,
Macronoctua onusta, are a noteworthy addition to our archives as this represents a new species for our site.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae bore into iris plants and feed on the rhizomes”

Iris Borer Moth

Iris Borer Moth

Wow, a new species for your archives! That’s fabulous!
This gorgeous moth I photographed was holding on to the base of an upright iris leaf so the moth was facing up (the pictures should be vertical rather than horizontal). I remember when I took the photo wondering how many people even get to see an adult Iris Borer Moth. People who want to grow iris are going to remove the larvae before they get to the pupae stage whenever possible, so the number of adults is not likely to be substantial. Then again, adult females can lay hundreds of eggs which keeps the population going …
I’m glad I could help your archives grow, Daniel.
Blessings,
Wanda

Thanks Wanda,
We rotated the images because all images on our site are horizontal, and to orient them vertically, we would have had to reduce the magnification.

Gotcha …

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Subject: Looper Moth on Sedum at Mom’s?
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
September 21, 2016 3:52 pm
Greetings, WTB Volunteers!
My Test Message went through! WooHoo! So I’m hoping this query I’ve been trying forever to send will make it as well.
Our Autumn flowers are beginning to bloom, which of course includes sedum. While most sedum are not native to MN, Dad had a fondness for them so several varieties are in Mom’s garden. Like prairie liatris, sedum are pollinator magnets. Late one afternoon at the end of August 2016, I was taking photos and noticed a moth I’ve not seen before. Gorgeous thing, which of course does not necessarily mean it’s an insect we want around. Years ago I a very large and absolutely stunning moth in my garden near the iris. (I took pictures I can send if you like). I put two and two together and discovered it was the adult of the Iris Borer. Beautiful markings, reminiscent of Native American cave paintings! Still, not a moth one wants if one hopes to grow iris!
Anyway, this most recent “new” moth has the outline of a star on its back with two prominent spots along the lower edges of the star. In profile, it has prominent ridges with arise from its shoulders and back. Quite stunning to see, and was feasting quite happily on the sedum blossoms. Even the bees did not deter this moth!
I’ve not seen a moth such as this, certainly not to photograph, so I’m excited to add this to my sightings list! The little bit of research I’ve been able to do gets me as far as a possible Looper Moth, but then I get stuck. So many Looper Moths! Can you help me narrow it down?
Blessings one and all!
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Looper Moth

Looper Moth

Dear Wanda,
We are not going to be much help.  So many Looper Moths in the Subfamily Plusiinae, which is well represented on BugGuide, look very similar.  Some possibilities are that it is in the genus Autographa, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Looper Moth

Looper Moth

Well, Daniel, that helps explain why I was having difficulty with an ID. I’ll just refer to it as “Looper Moth A” until I have more information!
Thanks so much, Daniel.
Blessings,
Wanda

Looper Moth

Looper Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large brown moth with orange `eyes’ on upper wings
Location: Goa, India
September 20, 2016 1:20 am
Hello Bugman,
I am here to Bug you again.
This large brown moth with almost pea-size orange `eyes’ on the upper part of the wings flew in. Actually, I have seen them before but only a few days ago thought I need to know what it is. I hope you can be of help!
Thanks
Signature: Sucheta Potnis

Indian Owl Moth

Indian Owl Moth

Dear Sucheta,
We believe we have correctly identified this Indian Owl Moth,
Erebus macrops, thanks to images on India Nature Watch and Biodiversity India.

Hello,
Thanks very much for the quick ID!
Best regards,
Sucheta
Goa, India

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A Beautiful something…
Location: Hardeeville South Carolina
September 17, 2016 9:41 am
Hello Mr.Bugman! My brother told me about your page after I asked him if he had ever seen the bug in my picture. My name is Brittany, I work at a self storage facility out in the middle of nowhere. Every morning as I check the property and there are so many bugs outside. I think they must be attracted by the lights on the property at night. I always take pictures if i find new ones for my “collection”. I can normally identity them via google but this one has me stumped! This i am guessing was some type of moth, as after i took the picture he/she flew away. I know you are a busy bugman but I would love to find out what this beautiful somthing was. Thank you for your time!
Signature: -Brittany

Heiroglyphic Moth

Hieroglyphic Moth

Dear Brittany,
This lovely little Owlet Moth is commonly called a Hieroglyphic Moth,
Diphthera festiva, and we don’t think that common name needs any explanation.

Awesome! Thank you so much I cant wait to tell my brother!
p.s. What a perfect name!

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Subject: Stink bug or moth?
Location: Philadelphia, Pa
September 12, 2016 5:42 am
I found this lovely insect clinging to my back door last week. I asked my friends to identify it for me because I wasn’t sure. Most said it was a stink bug but there were a adamant few who said it was a moth. What say you? I’d appreciate your input. Thanks so much.
Signature: Barb Ward

Sallow Moth

Sallow Moth

Dear Barb,
This is a moth, not a Stink Bug, and we are confident it is a Sallow Moth in the genus
Feralia based on images posted to BugGuide, but we are not certain of the species.

Thanks so much for getting back to me so quickly.  There was somewhat of a debate on this.  You cleared it up.
With much appreciation,
Barb
I really enjoy your site and your Facebook page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly, Southern California ID?
Location: Santa Cruz Island, CA
September 1, 2016 1:44 pm
Hello
Found this butterfly in a collection with no ID.
Sorry for the one and only picture.
Any chance of an ID?
Signature: Geoff

Lichen Moth

Lichen Moth

Dear Geoff,
What is the origin of this collection?  Are you certain the specimen was from Santa Cruz Island?  We are curious as there is no label on the specimen.  This is a Lichen Moth in the tribe Lithosiini.  It resembles
Lycomorpha regulus which is reported from California on BugGuide but Lycomorpha fulgens is also reported from California according to BugGuide.

Hello Daniel
Yes, this was collected on Santa Cruz Island, I was working organizing the Herbarium Collection for the UCSB SCI reserve, the same room has the Bug collection also. This was in one of the Lepidoptera cases I was cleaning.
I can get a better picture next time. Is there any diagnostic characters I should focus on to tell the two apart?
I will look for any other unknowns next time Im out there.
Let me know if any of you bug guys are out this way and I can see about getting out to Island?
Thanks for your help.
Geoffrey

Hi again Geoffrey,
We don’t know that we are going to be able to provide you with exact diagnostic information.  According to BugGuide, of
Lycomorpha regulus:  “Closely related to L. fulgens, and L. grotei.”  Your island offer is highly tempting, but alas, we have just begun a new semester teaching and our free time has evaporated.

Hello Daniel

Not a problem, I understand about volunteer time constraints and the details of parsing out moth spp.
I work at UCSB in IT at the Bren School, so I understand what happens when the students come back.
I volunteer at the Islands during the quite times. Please see the links below for the future and keep us in mind when out west.
For what school do you work for?
http://nrs.ucsb.edu/
http://nrs.ucsb.edu/our-reserves/santa-cruz-island
Thank you again Geoffrey

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination