Currently viewing the category: "Noctuoids"
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Subject: Brazil Wasp Moth (Dinia?)
Location: Fenix, Parana State, Brazil
July 29, 2015 4:10 am
I found a moth similar to the one in my picture, though clearly a different species, here:
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2013/04/07/wasp-moth-from-brazil/
The photo I am submitting was taken on the 1st August 2008 in Parana State near the town of Fenix, close to the Ivai river. This one has a slimmer body and a yellow bar across the thorax, but is superficially otherwise similar.
Signature: Patrick

Wasp Mimic Moth

Wasp Mimic Moth

Dear Patrick,
We agree that your moth looks very similar to the
Dinea species you found in our archives, and we also found a similar looking Ctechunid on Project Noah, but it is only identified to the subtribe Ctenuchina.  Perhaps Cesar Crash who runs a sister site in Brazil, Insetologia, will recognize this lovely Wasp Mimic.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bark colored moth
Location: Fair Harbor, Fire Island, New York
July 27, 2015 5:37 am
I’ve seen a few of these medium sized moths in Fire Island, NY. They stay on our cedar shingled house during the day unless disturbed.
Signature: Alison Sazinger

Underwing Moth

Underwing Moth

Dear Alison,
This is some species of Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala.  Just last night, we posted a few images taken at our own porch light of a Walnut Underwing that visited our porch light.  We are not certain of your species.  According to BugGuide:  “Lafontaine & Schmidt (2010) listed 101 species of the genus Catocala in America north of Mexico.  Powell & Opler (2009) reported 110 species in all of North America, and about 230 worldwide. ”  The common name Underwing refers to the brightly colored underwings which are hidden when the moth is resting.  The upper wings of Underwing moths blend in perfectly with tree bark when the moth is resting, and a burst of color results when the disturbed moth takes flight.  A predator continues to search for the bright colors and easily overlooks the camouflaged moth.

Thank you for responding h so fast. I’ve never noticed them here before and now they seem common. When it flew I only saw dark brown.
Is the bright park on the dorsal side?
I’ll google the genus.
Thanks!
Alison Salzinger

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Underwing on the Welcome Mat

Underwing on the Welcome Mat

Subject:  Walnut Underwing visits WTB?
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 26, 2015 9:29 PM
We never tire of visits from Walnut Underwings, and we have had more sightings this year than we can ever remember in a season.  We finally got a peep at those brightly colored underwings that give this Noctuoid its common name.

Under side of an Underwing

Under side of an Underwing

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Subject: Fly, Moth…??
Location: Lone Tree, Iowa
July 19, 2015 9:30 pm
Hi~ I took this pic in July in Lone Tree, Iowa (Louisa County). He was on a Milkweed flower in my field.
Signature: Sue

Yellow Collared Scape Moth

Yellow Collared Scape Moth

Dear Sue,
Your milkweed is being pollinated by a Yellow Collared Scape Moth, Cisseps fulvicollis, which we verified with this image on BugGuide.  Just as you observed, according to BugGuide, they are commonly found in:  “Fields with flowers. Adults commonly seen visiting flowers during the day; adults also fly at night, and are attracted to light.”

Thank you So much!!!  I searched til my eyes were bleary…I didn’t know what category to look in~~he didn’t look like a ‘moth’ to me!  Thanks again!!!

The Yellow Collared Scape Moth and many of its close relatives, including the Polka Dot Wasp Moth and the Scarlet Bodied Wasp Moth, are very effective wasp mimics that derive a degree of protection by resembling stinging insects.

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Subject: Male Black Witch Moth
Location: Frisco, TX
July 19, 2015 5:21 am
I don’t remember if I sent these in before, but I thought your team would appreciate this beauty! A male (I believe) black witch moth landed in my yard one day and allowed me to measure and photograph him. If I didn’t know any better I’d think he was posing!
Signature: Rachel

Male Black Witch

Male Black Witch

Hi Rachel,
We have been receiving numerous Black Witch sighting comments, including some from Colorado.  Your image of this male is wonderful because of the use of scale.  We will feature the posting in the hope it will allow others to identify the Black Witch moths that are currently migrating north from Mexico.

Ann Levitsky, Richard Aston, Jerry Green, Kitty Heidih, Jessica M. Schemm, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Moira LeBlanc liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 10, 2015
Summer is the time of year the Walnut Underwings visit our porch light, and we already sighted a more tattered individual earlier this year, but this beauty spent the entire day resting on the wooden siding.  The next night it was fluttering at the light.  We were concerned that it was not going about its normal activities, so we captured it and released it to a darker part of the garden.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination