Currently viewing the category: "Noctuoids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Witch Moth?
Location: Los Angeles, California
November 18, 2016 8:07 pm
I took a picture of what I think may be a Black Witch moth. It was resting on my patio screen door this afternoon. I have never seen a moth that large. Its wing span was about 4 inches tip to tip.
Signature: Pat K.

Black Witch

Black Witch

Dear Pat,
Congratulations on your Black Witch sighting, though we believe you may have underestimated its size. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful moth
Location: Northeastern Caribbean
November 15, 2016 6:52 pm
I think this is a moth just wondering the name
Signature: Daniel

Heiroglyphic Moth

Heiroglyphic Moth

Dear Daniel,
This pretty Owlet Moth is commonly called a Heiroglyphic Moth,
Diphthera festiva.  In addition to being found in the Caribbean, it is also found in the southeast portions of North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant Leopard Moth
Location: Silver spring, md
November 12, 2016 8:55 pm
Just loved the blue irredescence on this black ringed polka dot white moth. My daughter found him in the middle of our lawn, maybe he fell out of the silver maple tree – who knows.
Signature: Divya

Giant Leopard Moth

Giant Leopard Moth

Dear Divya,
The spots on this Giant Leopard Moth or Eyed Tiger Moth contrast so beautifully with the striped clothing in the image you sent.  Like many Tiger Moths, the Giant Leopard Moth does not feed as an adult.

Thanks!! I would actually love a dress in giant leopard moth print 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of insect is this?
Location: St. Augustine FL
November 12, 2016 8:26 am
My Brother in law has had this guy in his garage for a few days. It has basically stayed right where it landed and has not moved. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Thank You, Jay

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Dear Jay,
The Polka Dot Wasp Moth,
Syntomeida epilais, is a relatively common species in Florida because the caterpillars feed on the leaves of oleander, which is cultivated extensively in home gardens in the area.  This harmless species derives protection because it mimics stinging wasps, and wary predators will leave it be.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth in Jakarta
Location: Jakarta
October 30, 2016 5:41 pm
Hi. This guy/gal was hanging on our patio wall in Jakarta, Indonesia, in late October. Any idea what it’s called?
Love your site. Thanks!
Signature: BT

Fruit Piercing Moth

Fruit Piercing Moth

Dear BT,
While we did not find an exact visual match online, we did find several similar looking moths which makes us feel pretty confident this is a Fruit Piercing Moth in the subfamily Calpinae, similar to these images on this Bengkulu Blog or this image from the Papua Insect site.  It seems to most closely resemble
Eudocima (Adris) prolai from the Papua Insect site.

Fruit Piercing Moth

Fruit Piercing Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  October 13, 2016
We are also finding Painted Tiger Moths at our porch light in Mount Washington, Los Angeles, so it is fair to say they are currently flying in Southern California.

Subject: Strange creature
Location: Soquel Ca
October 11, 2016 7:07 pm
What the heck is it??? 2 heads!!!
Signature: Eve

Mating Painted Tiger Moths

Mating Painted Tiger Moths

Dear Eve,
The reason there are two heads is that one head belongs to the larger female on the right and the other to the male.  This is a mating pair of Painted Tiger Moths, a relatively common California species that is most common in winter months.

wow you are awesome to get back to me thank you! , I just figured it out!!!! how embarrassing!!!!!  as one has left and eggs are in the place, so funny I really thought it was a 2 headed thing  and not a couple!!!! jeez are they good for the garden?  Thanks again

The larva of the Painted Tiger Moth is a Woolly Bear that is a general feeder that is quite fond of weeds, so one could argue that though the adults do not eat and do not pollinate plants, the caterpillars can help keep back weeds.  The diet of the caterpillars is described on BugGuide as:  “Larvae are generalists of low herbacious plants.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination