Currently viewing the category: "Noctuoids"
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Subject: What’s that ?
Location: Seen in Tampa, FL 9/28/2014 in town
September 28, 2014 4:02 pm
Hi bugman
What’s the bug on this picture ?
Thanks
Signature: Fred

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth

Dear Fred,
The Spotted Oleander Caterpillar Moth,
Empyreuma pugione, is one of the Tiger Moths that benefit from mimicry because they look like stinging Wasps.  This black bodied, orange winged beauty most closely resembles Spider Wasps, especially the Tarantula Hawks.  According to BugGuide:  “The spotted oleander caterpillar is a recent immigrant to the US from the Caribbean, first recorded in Florida in Boca Raton, Palm Beach County, in February 1978.”

Tarantula Hawk with Prey

Tarantula Hawk with Prey

thank you for the info, now i know the name of what’s eating my plants in a caterpillar form… !
have a great day
Fred

 

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Subject: Butterfly, Moth or Bug?
Location: Somdet, Thailand
September 27, 2014 2:34 am
Just got this from my wife. It looks like a moth with crying children on its wings then when it opens its wings it appears to have a yellow praying mantis on it.
Signature: Mat Coleman

Owlet Moth:  Eudocima hypermnestra

Owlet Moth: Eudocima hypermnestra

Hi Mat,
Your insect is a moth, and we quickly identified it as
Eudocima hypermnestra thanks to an image on FlickR.  We located a second image on FlickR and then a posting on iNaturalist to verify the identification. 

Owlet Moth:  Eudocima hypermnestra

Owlet Moth: Eudocima hypermnestra

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Subject: yellow european moth
Location: Centre/East of Sardinia, Italy
September 21, 2014 4:04 pm
Hi there bugman, my name’s Rossana, location Sardinia, East side, not in the coast but rather to thr centre of it.
Here is the moth I couldn’t identify through google. It is not, in my opinion, a leopard moth, since it is yellow rather than white. So who can it be?
Please let me know!
Btw, it was nice to find your site again after more than ten years! Congratulations, as it’s beautiful
Kind regards
Rossana
Signature: Rossana

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth

Hi Rossana,
Common names can create some confusion as often the same name is given to more than one species, and sometimes one species can have more than one common name.  The scientific binomial system is much more accurate, and it eliminates confusion when one species has a range that extends across countries that speak different languages.  We suspect the Leopard Moth you mentioned is
Zeuzera pyrinaYour moth is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, and we believe it might be Chelis maculosa which is pictured on Hants Moths.  Additional images can be found on Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa.  Another possibility is Cymbalophora pudica which can also be viewed on the Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa.

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Subject: Nepali moth
Location: Nepal
September 20, 2014 11:58 pm
Dear bugman,
here is a small day-flying moth taken in June, in the Kathmandu valley of Nepal. It’s about an inch long. Can you tell me what it is? It looks like a lady singing an aria.
Signature: Curious

Footman Moth

Footman Moth

Dear Curious,
The markings on the thorax of this Tiger Moth do indeed resemble the face of a woman with a mouth opened wide in song.  Having guessed correctly that the subfamily is Arctiinae, we quickly found a matching image on FlickR that is identified as a Footman Moth,
Barsine orientalis.  We then located an image on SinoBug that supports the initial identification, but we realized is was another view from the same location taken by the same photographer, so we decided to search for a unique verification.  We found verification on the Moths of Thailand site. 

Dear Daniel,
thank you so much for the quick reply and the accurate identification!
Mia

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Subject: Please Identify
Location: San Antonio, TX 78229
September 15, 2014 2:05 pm
I suspect this is a moth? I found it on my car when I left work on Sunday September 14th around 11:30pm. I live in San Antonio, Texas and I saw it in the 78229 zip code. Let me know if you need more information.
Thank you
Signature: Ray Silva

Black Witch

Black Witch

Hi Ray,
This spectacular moth is a Black Witch,
Ascalapha odorata, a species that has naturalized in the southernmost parts of the U.S., but most individuals migrate north from Mexico during the fall months.  See BugGuide for additional information.

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Subject: Moth
Location: San Fernando, CA
August 22, 2014 5:31 pm
Friend found this in his home in San Fernando, CA. It’s huge
Signature: J Lytle

Black Witch

Black Witch

Dear J Lytle,
This impressive moth is a Black Witch, and they are found in the American neotropics.  They are a common species in Mexico and each year at the end of summer, individuals fly north, some reaching as far north as Alaska.  Though they are unable to naturalize in the northern climes, larvae have been found in Southern California, though most sightings in the continental US are of migrants.  This individual is a male Black Witch.

Thanks so much for the information. I have a copy of Hogue’s Insects of the LA Basin, and the Black Witch photo didn’t look like this, but all your sources do!
Best,
Jeanie Lytle

The illustration in Hogue is a female Black Witch.

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