Currently viewing the category: "Noctuoids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing flashes its colors in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 10, 2016 10:30 PM
Though we have managed to get images of Walnut Underwings several times each year, getting a good glimpse at the gorgeously marked underwings responsible for the common name is not that easy.  This beauty was quite cooperative tonight.  After startling it when we walked out onto the porch to dump a pot full of water into the garden, it remained “posing” on the ground until we had time to run for the camera and we got a few images using the on-camera flash.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is This Little Guy?
Location: South Western Wisconsin
July 10, 2016 8:25 am
Hello!
I found this bug on my door handle outside of my home. I’ve yet to find out what kind of bug it is and I’m very curious as I have never seen such a weird looking insect.
Thank you for you time!
Signature: Sincerely, Alli J.

Litter Moth

Litter Moth

Dear Alli J.,
The first time we received an image of such a long legged moth, we were totally stumped until a reader wrote in that it was a Litter Moth in the genus
Palthis.  Interestingly, though there a many images for the genus on BugGuide, very few show the front legs extended, and this BugGuide image is the closest we can find that looks like your individual.  Moth Photographers Group also has images, but none show the legs extended as in your image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth ID
Location:  San Juan Del Sur, Nicaragua
July 4, 2016
San Juan Del Sur nica
Taken by Kryss Castle in Nicaragua.
Allison Jones

Melipotis fasciolaris

Melipotis fasciolaris

Dear Allison,
We first located a matching image to Kryss’ Moth on The Moth Photographers Group where it is identified as Melipotis fasciolaris.  We cross checked that name on BugGuide and found this image of the male.  We learned on BugGuide that this species is sexually dimorphic, meaning males and females look like different species, and that is has the common name Bewitching Melipotis.  It ranges from the Southern US to Uruguay.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Knights Templar Bug
Location: 36.13°N 78.66°W (Elev. 341 ft)
July 4, 2016 12:09 pm
Last Sunday, 26th June, I walked out on my patio sidewalk to get in my card to go to Mass. As I past by some of my bedding plants, I looked down and saw this bug on one of my Rudbeckia flowers. I was really taken by it and have no doubt why it was there. You see, I am Franciscan by nature and belong to the Catholic Secular Franciscan Order. Can you identify the bug for me? I have been calling it the “Knights Templar Bug”, since its image reminds me of one of the shield a Templar Knight would carry.
Signature: Louis Coker

Clymene Moth

Clymene Moth

Dear Louis,
You are not the first person who has written to us after noticing religious symbolism in the markings of the Clymene Moth.

Wow, that was quick, but I guess if you are a bug expert, it would be easy to identify given its unique markings.  Many thanks for solving the mystery.
Louis Coker

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
June 30, 2016
This Walnut Underwing was fluttering around the light last night and it was resting on the wall this morning.  We wonder if this is the same individual we posted last month.  The wings are a bit tattered, indicating this is not a freshly eclosed moth.  Underwings are long lived moths, in the scheme of things.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful mith
Location: Southern California (Hemet)
June 10, 2016 7:45 pm
Found this guy today in Hemet California (Southern, inland desert area). He matched the stucco so well, I almost missed him.
I found the beautiful design of his wings just stunning.
What is he, and what does he look like as a catipillar?
Signature: Teresa DiPietro

Salt Marsh Moth

Salt Marsh Moth

Dear Teresa,
This delicate Tiger Moth is a Salt Marsh Moth,
Estigmene acrea.  The caterpillar is one of the Woolly Bears, and we believe this Woolly Bear is a Salt Marsh Moth Caterpillar.  According to BugGuide:  “Adult (imago): forewing white with about 20 small black spots scattered across the disk, and 5 larger black spots spaced along the costa. Males have dark yellow hindwings, those of females are mostly white (with 3 or 4 black blotches in both sexes).  Larva (caterpillar): highly variable, blond to brown to black, with long bristly hairs standing upright in dense tufts from orange or black tubercles; hairs longer at both ends of body, especially toward the rear end. Spiracles white. Moves very rapidly. Face mainly black with yellow down the center.”  Since your individual has white hindwings, she is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination