Currently viewing the category: "Lappet Moths"
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Subject: Bird Dropping Moth?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
October 23, 2014 9:39 pm
Hello, I spotted this moth near the garage when I returned home today. It was clinging to the Malvaviscus arboreus for hours. I haven’t had any luck in finding its genus or species. I’m guessing that it’s a Bird Dropping Moth, for obvious reasons. :-D
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Tolype

Tolype

Hi Ellen,
Your moth does resemble bird droppings.  There is a moth that is commonly called a Bird Dropping Moth and our readers frequently write in that Wood Nymphs in the genus
Eudryas resemble bird droppings, but neither is your moth which is in the genus Tolype and has no common name.  Seems looking like bird droppings is a good way to protect against getting eaten.

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Tent Caterpillar Moth

Tent Caterpillar Moth

Subject: Moth
Location: Northwestern NM
October 8, 2014 11:05 am
Saw a lot of these at a gas station, folded like little tents until I rousted one for a picture.
Signature: Brent

Hi Brent,
In our opinion, this looks like one of the Tent Caterpillar Moths in the genus
Malacosoma, and there are several species pictured on BugGuide.  The only doubt is that BugGuide indicates:  “adults in late spring and early summer.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pretty moth?
Location: Memphis, Tn
October 7, 2014 2:57 pm
Hi Bugman,
Love your site. We found this guy on the porch and was wondering what kind of moth this was.
Thanks ,
Carol
Memphis, TN
Signature: Carol

Unknown Moth

Unknown Moth

Dear Carol,
We wish you had a dorsal view of this pretty moth as it is giving us some difficulty.  At first we thought it might be a Lappet Moth in the family Lasiocampidae, but we couldn’t find any matches on BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our readers can assist with the identification.

unknown Moth

unknown Moth

We wrote to Julian Donahue who promptly wrote back with the following identification.

Julian Donahue identifies Dot-Lined White
Right on with Lasiocampidae. It’s Artace cribrarius.
Because the wings are somewhat translucent, I suspect that the greenish tinge is an artifact of lighting or photography.
More photos and distribution map at: http://mothphotographersgroup.msstate.edu/species.php?hodges=7683
Julian

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Subject: What’s this moth?
Location: East Hartford, ct
September 26, 2014 12:12 pm
I tried to find it. Help!
Signature: Entomolnot

Tolype

Tolype

Dear Entomolnot,
Your moth is a Lappet Moth in the genus
Tolype.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy Moth
Location: Little Switzerland, NC
August 3, 2014 5:23 pm
Dear Bugman,
I had the pleasure of seeing several of these lovely, fuzzy moths while in the Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina. I would love to know what they are. Thank you for your wonderful website.
Signature: MothsRock

Dot Lined White

Dot Lined White

Dear MothsRock.
We were struck with the resemblance to other moths we are frequently asked to identify from the genus
Tolype, and we quickly identified this Dot Lined White Moth, Artace cribrarius, on BugGuide as they are both in the subfamily Macromphaliinae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: American Lappet Moth
Location: Mancelona, MI
June 27, 2014 8:06 pm
This lovely (sometimes) orange moth allows its hindwing to peep out like a bedskirt from beneath its forewing. Found him/her hanging around on the dining hall screen door about a week ago after a warm night here in northern lower Michigan. According to Bugguide, the American Lappet Moth (Phyllodesma americana) has a wingspan of 29 to 49 mm.
Signature: Helen

American Lappet Moth

American Lappet Moth

Hi Helen,
Thanks so much for doing all the research on this American Lappet Moth and for providing such a high quality image for posting to our site.  BugGuide also states that the scientific name,
Phyllodesma americana:  “refers to the leaf-mimicing shape of the wings, and perhaps the pale bands on the forewing and hindwing.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination