Currently viewing the category: "Lappet Moths"
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Subject: moth identification
Location: new milford,pa 18834 northeastern pennsylvania
February 23, 2014 6:34 pm
i recently took a close up photo of this white and black hairy moth on my tent at a campground in new milford pennsylvania.my site was in a somewhat heavily wooded location within the campgrounds .it was probably september or october,but im thinking it was most likely september.
i’ve been camping and hiking in this region but ive never seen presumably a moth like this ever.ive tried researching it online but the closest thing i can see that resembles this moth is a prominent moth.but there are many prominent moths that do not have pictures of them.
hoping that with these photos i took of the moth in question can be identified.
the moth in the photos are the same single moth which was about the size of a quarter.
Signature: chris leitch

Tolype

Tolype

Hi Chris,
Your moth is actually a Lappet Moth in the genus
Tolype, but we are not certain of the species.  You can read more about the genus Tolype on BugGuide where it is noted that the adults flight time “varies according to species; adults fly from April to December in the south; mostly August and September in the north.”

Thank You Daniel for that quick response.much appreciated.are you by any chance aware of any online identification sites where i could perhaps do future moth identifications by sorting according to color and other characteristics?it would make things so much easier.
thank you,
chris leitch

Hi again Chris,
We like BugGuide and the Moth Photographers Group for North American species.

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Subject: I love this website.
Location: Ashland, Oregon
February 17, 2014 7:53 am
Hello again, Daniel! I hope this letter finds you well. :) I was just going through some old photos from last summer in Oregon and wanted to share them with you (a wooly moth, ants on a peony flower, and a yellow jacket in my cabin. ) I think I have the last two photos identified correctly, but just wanted to include them because I like the photos. The first one, however, I’m not really sure about. I love this little guy though, in my mind he looks like a sweet little sheep or maybe a strange new Star Wars character.
Signature: Rachel

Forest Tent Caterpillar Moth

Forest Tent Caterpillar Moth

Hi again Rachel,
We believe we have correctly identified your yellow moth as a Forest Tent Caterpillar Moth,
Malacosoma disstria, and it took far less time than we anticipated.  The first matching photo we found was on the Wanderin Weeta blog, but alas, the moth is not identified.  We then turned to BugGuide and guessed correctly with the Lappet Moth and Tent Caterpillar family Lasiocampidae.  We were searching for an image shot at the same angle as yours, and this female Forest Tent Caterpillar Moth on BugGuide looks like a good match, except for the antennae, but male moths have more developed antennae so they can locate the female through her pheromones.  This image of a male Forest Tent Caterpillar Moth on BugGuide has antennae like your individual.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae feed on leaves of alder, basswood, birch, cherry, oak, poplar, willow.”  

 

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Subject: Moth id request
Location: Cancun Mexico
February 11, 2014 10:27 am
Spotted this cool moth near Cancun Mexico Feb 4, 2014.
Signature: John

Furry Mexican Moth

Furry Mexican Moth

Dear John,
This is truly an amazing moth, and we haven’t had any luck identifying it.  We are not dismayed, because we believe a moth this distinctive will be identified soon by one of our readers if we cannot discover its identity ourselves.

Possibly Lasiocampid or Megalopygid

Possibly Lasiocampid or Megalopygid

Based on our familiarity with other members in their respective families, we believe this resembles a Flannel Moth of the Megalopygidae or a Lappet Moth of the Lasiocampidae.  We are also going to try to contact Julian Donahue to see if he has a clue to the family.

Thanks Daniel
Some pretty good moth-ers are hitting a brick wall on this one. Surprising since you would think this beauty would of attracted some attention. I am not discouraged though. Thanks for your efforts.

What's That Moth???

What’s That Moth???

Julian Donahue Responds
It’s a lasiocampid. Don’t have time to picture-book it in Seitz.
jpd

 

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Subject: Gastropacha Quercifolia moth from Italy + issue with the website
Location: Mediterranean
September 9, 2013 8:27 am
Hi bugman,
We found this moth in an island in the Mediterranean.
I did some digging online and I think this may be in the Lasiocampidae family, Gastropachinae (or Tribe Gastropachini) sub-family, Quercifolia or Populifolia genera (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastropacha_quercifoliahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastropacha_populifolia).
By the way, there seems to be an issue with the website. On Chrome the last posting is of September 1st. On Internet Explorer the webiste is all weird and messed-up. On Firefox everything seems fine.
Thanks!
Ciao
Signature: Saverio

Poplar Lappet Moth

Poplar Lappet Moth

Dear Saverio,
Thanks for submitting your photo of this Lappet Moth in the genus
Gastropacha.  It really does look like a dried leaf.  We contacted our webmaster and this is his suggestion for your website issue:  “Can you ask him to refresh his page and check again? I have cleared the caches and I hope that fixed it. It looks fine to me, but I can only see it on my iPad at the moment.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth identification
Location: Buxton, NC October 28, 2011
October 28, 2011 10:23 am
What moth is this?
Signature: Tory

Tolype

Hi Tory,
Please excuse our very tardy response.  This moth is a member of the Tent Caterpillar and Lappet Moth family Lasiocampidae, and it is in the genus
Tolype.  The species are rather difficult to distinguish from one another, and BugGuide has some helpful information.

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Yellow moth
Location: Sri Racha, Chonburi, Thailand
February 12, 2011 10:28 pm
I recently collected some large, hairy yellow striped caterpillars for my grade 3 Science class. One of them has just emerged from its cocoon as a yellow moth about 3 centimeters in length. When I googled ”yellow moth”none of the images showed a moth quite like this one.
Signature: Alan Walmsley

Possibly Lappet Moth Caterpillar

Hi Alan,
Both your caterpillar and the adult moth remind us of the North American Lappet Moths in the family Lasiocampidae, and even more specifically, those in the genus
Phyllodesma.  Here is a comparison photo of a North American caterpillar from BugGuide, and here is an adult moth also from BugGuide.  Though the coloration is quite different, the manner in which the moth holds its underwings in relation to the upper wings is strikingly similar.  Again, this is just a guess, and we hope to be able to provide you with additional information on our own as well as through reader contributions.

Lappet Moth

We immediately tried a search of the family in Thailand and found a Moths of Borneo website, and on Plate 6, and there is an image of a mounted specimen identified as a female Trabala ganesha that looks remarkably like your moth.  Here is a photo from the Foto Biodiversitas Indonesia website and an even better match are these images of Trabala vishnou from Thailand on this Taxonomy website: http://193.166.3.2/pub/sci/bio/life/insecta/lepidoptera/ditrysia/bombycoidea/lasiocampidae/trabala/index.html.

Lappet Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination