Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Titan Sphinx moth
While trying to find out what this moth was, we noticed you didn’t have a picture of it on your moth page. My students originally thought it was a hummingbird, then a bee, and finally a moth was suggested. My classes were able to identify it as a Titan Sphinx, Aellopos titan . This was found in the farthest northwest corner of Minnesota, which made it hard to identify because it is not normally here. This will be one of my biggest goals in life, being on your site. The only thing better would be to win a Nasty Reader Award. You have a great reference site.
Respectfully,
Gary D. Taylor
Science Teacher
Tri-County High School

Titan Sphinx

Titan Sphinx

Hi Gary,
Thank you so much for contributing a new species, the Titan Sphinx or White-Banded Day Sphinx, Aellopos titan, to our website. We are linking to Bill Oehlke’s fabulous website in order to provide more information on this species. We just transitioned to our new format this weekend, and we had numerous technical difficulties. We are happy we decided to sort through two day old mail to find post worthy letters. We seriously cannot imagine you ever achieving the infamy of our Nasty Reader Award since your correspondence is so gracious. We will be copying Bill Oehlke on this response as he will probably want to add this unusual sighting to his own website, and he will probably request permission to use your image as well. Bill Oehlke can also verify that the identification is correct.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Sphinx/Hawkmoth
I know you are incredibally busy. You previuosly helped me identify mournful sphinx moths that feed on flowers in my backyard and hover like hummingbirds. I have a new photo of a gaudy sphinx I’ve attached. Can you please tell me the difference between hawk moths and sphinx moths? Do all sphinx moths hover like hummingbirds? Are there hawk moths in Central Florida?Thanks,
Tobey Barr

Gaudy Sphinx Moth

Gaudy Sphinx Moth

Hi Tobey,
Thanks so much for your gorgeous photo of a Gaudy Sphinx. To answer your question, Sphinx Moths and Hawk Moths are the same, but it is a local preference. In the U.S. we say Sphinx and Brits call them Hawk Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mournful sphinx??
Central Florida, photo taken 9.3.08.
Is this a mournful sphinx?  It drinks from my pentas in the evening and hovers like a hummingbird.  I’ve always called them hummingbird hawk moths.  They come in pairs, and one is darker than the other.  They are 1-1.5" tip to tail. Thanks,
Tobey Barr

Hi Tobey,
In our opinion, you are correct with your identification of a Mournful Sphinx, Enyo lugubris. You can read more about this wide ranging Sphinx on Bill Oehlke’s website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Oleander Hawk Moth
This moth was photographed in Oklahoma in August 2008.  From what I have read on your site, this is primarily a Mediterranean moth, except it has been found in Hawaii.  Is it unusual to be found in the center of the United States?
DANIEL B. BAUMANN, P.E.

Hi DANIEL,
While an Oleander Hawkmoth would be quite unusual in Oklahoma, your own Pandorus Sphinx, Eumorpha pandorus, is not so strange. You can read up on them on Bill Oehlke’s wonderful website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Overkill: Sphinx Moth sprayed to death!!!
(08/15/2008) is it as dangerous as it looks?
Hi,
my little brother saw this bug upside down on our porch in Italy. He killed it with wasp spray, so it’s all wet, which might make it a little harder to recognize. I hope you can still get an idea of what it is… Thanks a lot!
Esther

Sphinx Moth Exterminated

Sphinx Moth Exterminated

Hi Ester,
If ever the word “overkill” could be used regarding the use of pesticides, your photo ranks a close third after the global use of DDT and the statewide spraying of Malathion against the Med Fly in California in the 1980s. It appears your brother used an entire spray can of foaming pesticide to dispatch one harmless Sphinx Moth. This is textbook unnecessary carnage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I have no idea what kind of bug this is
My name is Kathleen and I live in Pasadena, Texas. I found this bug outside my house on a tent in the backyard. I asked friends if they knew what kind of bug it was, and none of them knew. They also said they had never seen a bug like this before. Oddly enough, I saw another one like that the other night in my backyard. If you could please tell me what kind of bug it is, I would appreciate it. Its become a mystery to us all. Thank you,
Kathleen

Hi Kathleen,
You can now impress your friends with the name of an insect that begins and ends with the letter X. This is a Xylophanes tersa, the Tersa Sphinx. We are copying Bill Oehlke on this reply so he can add your location information to his comprehensive species distribution data.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination