Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this? Is it a butterfly?
July 31, 2009
I have been wondering if this is just some kind of butterfly. I found this in my backyard. I thought it was just a leaf, but the only tree I have in my yard is a pine tree. It is summer time as well, so there are not many dead leaves around right now, which is what this looks like.
Do you have any ideas what this could be?
Kristina
New Mexico

Achemon Sphinx

Achemon Sphinx

Hi Kristina,
This is a moth, not a butterfly.  It is an Achemon Sphinx, Eumorpha achemon, and you may read more about it on Bill Oehlke’s wonderful website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Please help identify moth
July 25, 2009
I found this moth on my screen and am wondering if you could help identify it.
Anita
Southern Vermont

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Hi Anita,
Your moth is known as a Small Eyed Sphinx, Paonias myops.  It is so named because the underwings which are not visible in your photo have eyespots.  According to Bill Oehkle’s awesome website:  “Small-eyed Sphinx females call in the night flying males with an airbourne pheromone emitted from a gland at the posterior of the abdomen.  Both sexes rest with wings parallel to the resting surface, with the upper lobes of the hindwings protruding above the forewings.  The lower abdomen of the male (right) arcs upward toward the head, while the abdomen of the female hangs strait down on a vertical surface.
”  That means your specimen is a female.  We are copying Bill Oehlke on this response so he can add your sighting to the comprehensive data he is compiling on North American Sphinx Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth
July 25, 2009
I found what I believe to be a moth of some type. I don’t remember seeing one like before and was unable to identify it from your website. It was approx. two inches long and had the appearance of being covered with fur.
Richard
North Middle Tennessee, USA

Tersa Sphinx

Tersa Sphinx

Hi Richard,
This is a Tersa Sphinx, Xylophanes tersa
, one of the most aerodynamically engineered of the Sphinx Moths in the family Sphingidae, a family characterized by its members’ powerful flight capabilities.  You can read more about the Tersa Sphinx on Bill Oehlke’s awesome website.  We will be copying Bill on this response so he can add your sighting to the comprehensive data he is compiling on members of this family.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

New For Me
July 23, 2009
I saw this on a plant that my sister bought. It was there for the better part of a day. I never saw this before. I think it is a moth, but that’s all I can figure, and I can’t find its likeness anywhere.
Buzz
Warwick, NY

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Virginia Creeper Sphinx

Hi Buzz,
We have been getting numerous images of Sphinx Moths this summer, as we do every summer, but this is the first image of a Virginia Creeper Sphinx, Darapsa myron, this year.  You may read more on Bill Oehlke’s awesome website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what is this moth?
July 22, 2009
I was on vacation a few days ago, and i came across this beautiful lepidopterid. I’ve had a hard time identifying it, so i was hoping to find an answer here. Thanks!
Rob
Saratoga County, New York

Wild Cherry Sphinx

Wild Cherry Sphinx

Hi Rob,
While it is not as colorful as other members in the family Sphingidae, this Wild Cherry Sphinx, Sphinx drupiferarum, has lovely markings.  According to Bill Oehlke’s awesome website:  “Sphinx drupiferarum larvae hide in the day and feed primarily on cherry, plum, and apple at night.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Big Fuzzy Brown Moth
July 21, 2009
I finally got my first bug ID request through…(I think my picture resolutions were too big).
And now I just want to share a couple pictures of what I think is one of those hummingbird or sphinx moths, but I’m really not sure.
I’ve only seen them flying and this one had a leg broken off :( and seemed pretty clumsy. He had a wingspan of about 3in or so. VERY furry thorax (as you’ll see in one pic), huge eyes and long antennae, and orange spots down the sides of his abdomen.
I found him on my backyard deck. I took him out to a huge butterfly bush that they like to hang around and hope he made it ok! But I’m moving soon and couldn’t bring him in to care for him. :S I figured he’d probably be better in his environment anyway. :)
Thanks for your awesome website! I’ve been amusing myself reading the Nasty Reader Awards. Lol.
Bethany
Santa Fe, NM

Five Spotted Hawkmoth

Five Spotted Hawkmoth

Hi Bethany,
Your moth is a Five Spotted Hawkmoth, Manduca quinquemaculata, one of two species whose caterpillars feed on the leaves of tomato plants and related solanaceous plants and are collectively known as Tomato Hornworms.  You can read more about the Five Spotted Hawkmoth on Bill Oehlke’s awesome website.  We are happy to hear that our Nasty Reader Awards amuse you since we were just “chastised” by our most recent recipient, Creeped Out, for writing things on our site that had nothing to do with identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination