Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

moth like black and white bug
August 8, 2009
My cat found this bug today and tried to bring it inside, I’ve looked all over the internet and can’t figure out what it is.
Patti K.
Phoenix, AZ

Northern Ash Sphinx

Northern Ash Sphinx

Hi Patti,
This is a Northern Ash Sphinx or Great Ash Sphinx, Sphinx chersis, and it is newly metamorphosed, which may be why you had difficulty identifying it.  The caterpillar pupates underground, and once it “hatches” it needs to dig to the surface.  It is vulnerable at that point, which is probably why your cat found it.  You can see more images and get more information on Bill Oehlke’s wonderful website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Large moth
August 7, 2009
Hello,
I saw this big moth clinging to a cedar tree in my yard last June. It was about 4 inches long.
Phil Norton
Oshkosh

Waved Sphinx

Waved Sphinx

Hi PHil,
This is a Waved Sphinx, Ceratomia undulosa.  You may read about it on Bill Oehlke’s wonderful website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What’s that moth?
August 6, 2009
We have identified several moths this past week feeding on our four o’clocks, (well, WTB did). Achemon, clear wing hummingbird, and banded sphinx. What is this moth? Thanks and keep up the good work, love your site!
Jennifer & Gary
Lakeland, FL

Carolina Sphinx

Carolina Sphinx

Hi Jennifer and Gary,
If you researched the moths in your garden on our site, you did the identification.  This is a Carolina Sphinx, Manduca sexta, one of two species (the other being the Tobacco Sphinx, Manduca quinquemaculata) with caterpillars that feed on Tomato plant leaves.  These caterpillars are sometimes called Tomato Hornworms.  You may read more about your Carolina Sphinx on Bill Oehlke’s awesome website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Can you identify this insect?
August 5, 2009
Bees are regular visitor to our Bee Balm flowers. Today we saw what we thought was a small humming bird, but the pictures reveal six legs. It is larger than a bubble bee, and flies like a humming bird. It is August in Wisconsin.
Paul Sanders
Waukesha, Wisconsin

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hi Paul,
Diurnal Sphinx Moths in the genus Hemaris are often confused for hummingbirds, hence the common name of Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Hemaris
thysbe.

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth? Approx 2 1/2 inches high
August 3, 2009
Hi! Hope you can help Identify this moth hanging out on the wall outside our door in Biddeford, Maine. Approx 2 1/2 inches high. House is surrounded by woods, a lot of pines. I’ve searched through sphynx moth info, but couldn’t find anything that seemed to match! Thanks!
Suzie in Maine
Biddeford Maine

Blinded Sphinx

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Suzie,
Your moth is a Blinded Sphinx, Paonias excaecata, and you may read more about the species on Bill Oehlke’s awesome website.  We are currently working on our book chapter tentatively titled Entomology and Etymology and we are quite intrigued with how insects get their common and scientific names.  This is known as the Blinded Sphinx because there are no “pupils” in the “eyespots” on the lower wings which are not visible in your photo.  Many moths have these eyespots.  If a bird or other predator disturbs the resting moth, it will reveal the lower wings with the spots and hopefully startle the predator into thinking the prey is much larger than it really is and that it is possibly about to eat the predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Strange Moth found in Michigan
July 31, 2009
I found this moth while on vacation in the upper peninsula of Michigan and had to photograph it. This was during the summer. Since the photos were taken a few years ago, I don’t remember the exact size, but I estimate it to be around 1.5 inches long. I’ve been trying to find it online and so far I think it’s either some kind of sphinx moth, or a silk moth, but I’m having trouble identifying it. Any ideas?
Kevin
Crystal Falls, Michigan (Upper Peninsula)

One Eyed Sphinx

Twin Spotted Sphinx

Hi Kevin,
We just posted an image of a One Eyed Sphinx a few minutes ago, and this is a closely related species, the Twin Spotted Sphinx, Smerinthus jamaicensis.  Here is how Bill Oehlke distinguishes the two species from one another:  “Smerinthus jamaicensis closely resembles Smerinthus cerisyi, but jamaicensis is much smaller with larger blue patches on more vibrant and deeper purple in the lower wings. Also note the complete (i.e. outer margin to outer margin) off-white arc just below the forewing apex. In S. cerisyi the lower portion of the arc does not return to the outer margin.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination