Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moth
Tue, Apr 14, 2009 at 6:54 PM
Just want to double check this is a “hawk moth”. We had a huge rain and this thing showed up on our screen. We live on Daytona Beach.
Thanks for your help!
Holly
Daytona Beach, Florida

Banded Sphinx

Banded Sphinx

Hi Holly,
We sometimes confuse two species.  We believe this is a Banded Sphinx, Eumorpha fasciatus, which can be viewed on Bill Oehlke’s excellent website.  The species we confuse it with is the Vine Sphinx, Eumorpha vitus, which can also ve viewed on Bill Oehlke’s excellent Website.  Our money is on the Banded Sphinx.  Yesterday we lost our internet connectivity and were unable to post any new letters.  Today we are running late and have a very long work day, 14 hours, so we are struggling to post your letter before driving (we usually take the train).

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this Queensland Moth?
Wed, Mar 18, 2009 at 9:44 PM
Hey there bugman!
I found this dude in the collar of one of my tee shirts that I had on the line today, and he gave me a little freight since I’ve not seen a moth as big as he is before. However, after my initial shock I decided to get him identified by you. After he’d had enough of the photo shoot he took off, possibly to find another collar to sleep in. He was about the size of my thumb and very fuzzy.
thanks bugman
Pseudo
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

Convolvulvus Hawk Moth

Convolvulvus Hawk Moth

Dear Pseudo,
We quickly located your moth on the Brisbane Insects Website and it is a Convolvulvus Hawk Moth, Agrius convolvuli.  We located much information on the species, including another website that indicates has a large range and migrates freely in Europe, Asia and Africa as well as Australia.  More information and photos can be found on the Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic website.

Convolvulvus Hawk Moth

Convolvulvus Hawk Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is this Beautiful Bug?
Wed, Mar 18, 2009 at 6:09 AM
When I first saw the Bug I thought it was a Big Green Grasshopper. It was about 4inch long 2 to 3 inches across, wider with its wing span. I took the picture’s at night, last May. The Bug was just sitting on the wall of the beach house I was renting in Costa Rica (Limon Provence) close too Boca del Rio Estrella on the Caribbean Sea.
Thank you for your Time,
Beach
Limon Provence, Costa Rica

Eumorpha phorbas

Eumorpha phorbas

Dear Beach,
Your moth is a Sphinx Moth or Hawk Moth in the family Sphingidae. The family name and Costa Rica led us to a website with many choices. At first, we thought your moth resembled the Gaudy Sphinx, so we decided to try members of the genus Eumorpha. We quickly discovered Eumorpha phorbas on the Costa Rican Sphingidae site. There were photos of mounted specimens, but no information on the site. We then searched the name and were led to Bill Oehlke’s excellent site with photos of live specimens and information. The species, which has no common name, ranges in Central and South America.  Oehlke writes:  “Eumorpha phorbas broods continuously with adults on the wing  every month of the year in Costa Rica and along the west coast of South America as far south as Bolivia.  Adults nectar at various  flowers. Eumorpha phorbas larvae probably feed upon grapes  (Vitaceae), dogbane (Apocynaceae), or evening primrose (Onagraceae)  families. ”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Moths in Iraq
Sat, Mar 14, 2009 at 12:24 AM
Hi there. These moths seems to come out at night especially when it rains. I am in north Iraq at the moment on an oil drilling rig. These moths are all over in the mornings but seem to dissappear as it get warmer. Would you know what they are and anything about them?
Craig
Chamchamal, Kurdistan – Iraq

Striped Hawkmoths

Striped Hawkmoths

Hi Craig,
Thanks for sending your amazing photographs. We were struck by the similarity of your moth to the Striped Morning Sphinx or Whitelined Sphinx, Hyles lineata, found throughout much of North and South America. We checked Bill Oehlke’s wonderful website and he writes: “A somewhat similar moth, Hyles livornica occurs in Eurasia and Africa.”

Striped Hawkmoths

Striped Hawkmoths

We then located a website that pictures and describes the Striped Hawkmoth, your species. The site indicates: “A noted migrant, generally found in open ground with few trees and shrubs, such as rough grazing land, parched hillsides and sand-dunes, or in vineyards. In semi-desert areas, huge numbers can build up during winter and spring, especially after heavy rains. An extremely active species, normally flying towards evening, when considerable numbers are often attracted to sweet-smelling flowers and to light. Pairing always takes place at dawn over a period of two or three hours. Thereafter, females can cover considerable distances whilst egg-laying. In southern Europe and North Africa, many are also active during daylight hours, especially when on migration. (See also Heinig (1981b).) ” We suspect the lights of the oil rig are attracting the great numbers of moths.

Hundreds of Striped Hawkmoths in Iraq

Hundreds of Striped Hawkmoths in Iraq

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Tobacco Moth
Thu, Feb 12, 2009 at 9:25 AM
Hi WTB, could you tell me how long it takes for the hornworm catepillar (which enjoys devouring our tomato vines in late summer) to “morph” into what we call the tobacco / hummingbird moth, which we love watching flock by the 100s to our flower beds in the evening.
Jay
Eastern Carolina

Carolina Sphinx or Five Spotted Hawk Moth

Carolina Sphinx

Hi Jay,
Either the Carolina Spinx, Manduca sexta, or the Five Spotted Hawk Moth, Manduca quinquemaculatus, would qualify for the name Tobacco Moth and the two are quite similar in appearance. Both are found in the Carolinas and the larvae of both feed on the same plants, including tomatos.  Your photos are of the Carolina Sphinx, at least the photo that depicts the individual with the six yellow spots on the abdomen. Pupation may be as short as a few weeks, or it may last throughout the winter in the colder portions of the species range. Your action photos are wonderful.

Carolina Sphinx

Carolina Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Butterfly Bird
Tue, Feb 10, 2009 at 8:41 PM
10/07/06 – Phoenix, Arizona – Just past sunset – I spotted this “butterfly / hummingbird”. I remember it quite large, about the size of my fist, maybe slightly smaller (although the pictures don’t justify that) and it’s wings were moving as fast as a hummingbird. It reminded me of a humming bird in every flying sense however, it had the face of a butterfly with large antennae and beautiful (thin) wings. It let me take numerous pictures before disappearing. In many of the pictures you can see it’s long straw -like tongue.
Still Amazed
Phoenix, Arizona

White Lined Sphinx

White Lined Sphinx

Dear Still Amazed,
This is a White Lined Sphinx or Striped Morning Sphinx, Hyles lineata, one of the Hawk Moths.  It is probably the most common Hawk Moth in North America and is found in all 48 lower states.  It is a common desert species and after a rainy year, thousands of caterpillars appear.  Those years, the adult moths are also quite plentiful.  The caterpillar feeds on many plants, but fuschia is a favorite.  The adult moths are often attracted to lights where they are found resting the following day.  Moths take nectar from many flowers, including the lantana in your photo, and honeysuckle.  Your action photos are spectacular.

White Lined Sphinx

White Lined Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination