Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mothra behind my house?
Location: Calgary, Alberta
May 18, 2016 10:03 pm
I spotted this grey moth sitting against my house. It’s huge. I couldn’t measure it, but I can safely guess it’s 2 inches in length (from the top of it’d head to tip of the wings). Possibly more, but not less. It is may 18th, and it has been a hot dry spring, and a very mild winter (comparatively). I’ve never seen anything like it here. I’ve never seen a moth this big outside of a moth and butterfly exhibit!
I’m so curious as to what it is (and why it’s in my yard??? What do it’s larvae eat?).
Signature: Regards, Sheila

Northern Ash Sphinx

Northern Ash Sphinx

Dear Sheila,
Your moth is one of the Sphinx Moths or Hawkmoths in the family Sphingidae, and we identified it as a Northern Ash Sphinx,
Sphinx chersis, thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas site where it states “Larval hosts are ash, lilac, privet, cherry, and quaking aspen.”  If there was a light nearby, it may have been attracted to the light at night.

wow, thank you so much for the quick response! I’m pleased to know it won’t try to make off with my 2 year old. 😛
best,
Sheila

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTB
Location: Fishing Creek, MD USA
May 17, 2016 9:00 pm
HI, can you identify? It’s 1 inch long
Signature: Mike F.

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Dear Mike,
This is a Small Eyed Sphinx,
Paonias myops, and if you disturb it so that it reveals its underwings, you would see the markings that give this species its common name.  Eyespots on underwings are a defense mechanism that might frighten of a predator like a bird that might perceive a threat from a much larger creature with large “eyes.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: grasshopper?
Location: Kakata, Liberia, west Africa
May 14, 2016 11:20 pm
This beautiful insect landed on our door and stayed a while. It flies. A science teacher here thought it was a grasshopper, but we’re wondering as it doesn’t seem to have those “hopper” legs. Thanks!
Signature: Lynn

Oleander Hawkmoth

Oleander Hawkmoth

Dear Lynn,
You were correct to doubt the science teacher.  This is an Oleander Hawkmoth, a member of a distinctly different insect order than a Grasshopper.  The normal range of the Oleander Hawkmoth has increased sigfnificantly with the cultivation of oleander as a flowering garden shrub.

Oleander Hawkmoth

Oleander Hawkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pandorus Sphinx Moth
Location: Forney, TX
May 10, 2016 8:58 am
Found this guy hanging outside my building in Forney, TX. S/he was so pretty that I had to go back out and take a pic.
Signature: Mel

Pandorus Sphinx

Pandorus Sphinx

Dear Mel,
We are very excited to post your image of a Pandorus Sphinx, one of our beautiful native Hawkmoths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orlando florida
Location: Orlando florida
May 8, 2016 12:24 pm
Was planting tulips when we saw this guy on the screen house. We weren’t sure it he was dead so we tapped the screen and he flew a little lower. Speculating a type of moth.
Signature: Cassandra

Tersa Sphinx

Tersa Sphinx

Dear Cassandra,
This aerodynamic wonder is a Tersa Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yikes big moth or what?
Location: Lake Stevens, WA
May 2, 2016 11:53 am
Identify please is this a sphinx or moth or freak of nature ? 😜
Lake Stevens wa lived in WA my entire life this is creepy cool.
Signature: Stephanie

Sphinx Moth: Smerinthus ophthalmica

Sphinx Moth: Smerinthus ophthalmica

Dear Stephanie,
This is indeed a Sphinx Moth, albeit one with no common name.  We identified it as
Smerinthus ophthalmica on Sphingidae of the Americas, and verified that ID on BugGuide.  This species was quite recently determined to be distinct from the One Eyed Sphinx, and we would not completely rule out that as the correct identification.

Wowwwww
Totally cool they are bigger over here too 2 nd summer I’ve seen them at my house they came outta nowhere I have a wetland behind so it’s very cool.

The nearby wetlands makes perfect sense because according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on Salicaceae including willows (Salix spp.), cottonwoods (Populus spp.), and quaking aspen (P. tremuloides)” and willow grows in wet areas.

Haaaa haaaa I have willow in my yard and there’s cotton woods in wetland that’s funny.
They are really magnificent HUGE. I did a double take when I saw him I thought was fake :)
But they seem harmless could they be damaging to my trees then?
I am just blown away by him. I’ve seen some weirdo bugs these last couple years and being I’m 42 and lived in same county forever and never seen them it’s a little shocking to see things that look like prehistoric critters

The caterpillars eat the leaves and we seriously doubt there would be so many caterpillars as to defoliate your trees.  In our opinion, they are doing no damage to the trees.

Cool ty
If never spray anyway I’m not a creepy crawler fan but it’s harmful to the vast wildlife I have. I just leave them be in peace. Don’t worry I won’t kill it :)
I only kill spiders if they enter my turf and is bigger than a me haaaa Haaa
Wetland I get some monsters I do spray outside to deter them but once in awhile I get a sneaker I’m aware they are in my home but if I don’t have to I won’t kill it I will scoop him up and back out.
I wouldn’t kill the moth he’s pretty cool and I think it’s a rare treat I got to actually see him chilling out in the sun

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination