Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Lancaster CA
April 10, 2016 12:48 pm
Hello
Is this a carpenter worm moth?
Signature: Lesley

Northern Ash Sphinx, we believe

Northern Ash Sphinx

Dear Lesley,
Though it resembles the Australian Wood Moths, this is actually a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  We believe it is the Northern Ash Sphinx or Great Ash Sphinx,
Sphinx chersis, which is profiled on the Sphingidae of the Americas site, but there are several other similar looking members of the genus Sphinx pictured on the website’s California page, and we would not rule them out.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if we can get a definitive identification from him.

Bill Oehlke concurs
Daniel,
Sphinx chersis, possibly an aberration or less commonly seen form. Lines on thorax and wings seem especially thick, checkered fringes are missing and some other features are reduced in their contrast to rest of wing. I had to look at it carefully. It probably has not flown yet.
Bill Oehlke

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Macon, Ga
March 19, 2016 6:05 am
My friend took this picture last night, March 18, 2016, around 10 pm on her kitchen window in east Macon, GA across the street from Ocmulgee National Monument. I told her I thought that it had recently hatched so not fully extended.
Can you tell what kind of moth this is?
Thanks so much.
Bty it was taken with a Nikon Coolpix P530.
Signature: Barbara Edwards

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Dear Barbara,
This gorgeous moth is a Small Eyed Sphinx,
Paonias myops, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “Small-eyed Sphinx females call in the night flying males with an airbourne pheromone emitted from a gland at the posterior of the abdomen.  Both sexes rest with wings parallel to the resting surface, with the upper lobes of the hindwings protruding above the forewings.  The lower abdomen of the male (right) arcs upward toward the head, while the abdomen of the female hangs strait down on a vertical surface.”  This moth being presumably attracted to a light in the window, and the position of the abdomen indicates your individual is a male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sphinx Moth
Location: Fort Myers, FL
February 22, 2016 7:47 am
Found this moth at 9:30AM on February 22, 2016. Believe it is a sphinx moth per posts. Wanted to share for your records.
Signature: JP

Fig Sphinx

Fig Sphinx

Dear JP,
Your Sphinx Moth is a Fig Sphinx,
Pachylia ficus.  According to BugGuide, there are:  “Several flights throughout the year in the tropics, peninsular Florida, and South Texas.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify this moth like giant insect
Location: Tamil nadu INDIA
February 10, 2016 12:52 am
Please find the insects details . i found it in my apartments in INDIA
Signature: Vishal

Oleander Hawkmoth

Oleander Hawkmoth

Dear Vishal,
This beautiful moth is the wide ranging Oleander Hawkmoth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth identification
Location: Mid-Michigan
January 13, 2016 2:16 pm
I found this moth in my laundry tub in the late Summer/Fall. It was found in mid-Michigan. Our home is located in the countryside and boardered by a creek.
Signature: Charli

Walnut Sphinx

Walnut Sphinx

Dear Charli,
This impressive moth is a Walnut Sphinx.  You can read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

Thank you so much for your quick response. I will tell others about your website!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hidden Beauty
Location: Miami Lakes, FL
January 5, 2016 4:24 pm
Found this amazing bug in my front yard while doing the yard work. I mistook it for some leaves. I have never seen such a bug. I have trolled this sight yet haven’t found a match. What really struck me about this bug was the lack of antenna ‘s and those large black eyes. Please help me identify.
Signature: Local bug lover

Ficus Sphinx

Fig Sphinx

Dear Local bug lover,
Your images of a Fig Sphinx,
Pachylia ficus, are absolutely stunning and they really nicely illustrate how well camouflaged the moth can be with fallen leaves.  It has been several years since we posted a new image of an adult Ficus Sphinx on our site, though we have many recent caterpillar images.  The Ficus Sphinx is reported from Texas and Florida, and the caterpillars feed on the leaves of Ficus or fig trees.  More information on the Fig Sphinx can be found on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

Ficus Sphinx

Fig Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination