Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Moth
Location: Seattle, WA
June 17, 2014 8:54 pm
Hi!
We took these pictures on the deck of our apartment building a few days ago. Since yesterday the moth has come inside the building and is now perched on our apartment door frame. It hasn’t moved in 24 hours. What is this gorgeous moth? Should we be worried about its stillness?
Signature: Thanks – Lasara

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Smerinthus ophthalmica

Dear Lasara,
Your moth is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth that we have identified as
Smerinthus ophthalmica on the Sphingidae of the Americas website where we learned that it “closely resembles Smerinthus cerisyi, and until recently (2010) had been synonymized with cerisyi.”  So, though this moth was not unknown in the Pacific Northwest, it has recently been reclassified as a new species.  The slender curved abdomen indicates this is a male.  Often moths rest a few days after metamorphosis and we do not believe you need to worry.

Sphinx Moth

Sphinx Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Denver, CO
June 21, 2014 3:16 pm
These were on my fence, about 3″ across.
Signature: Mtnwanderer

Mating Big Poplar Sphinxes

Mating Big Poplar Sphinxes

Dear Mtnwanderer,
These appear to be mating Big Poplar Sphinxes,
Pachysphinx occidentalis, and you can verify that on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large, black and brown moth
Location: Guadalajara, Mexico
June 22, 2014 1:29 pm
What kind of moth is this?
It was photographed in June 2013, during the daytime, in Guadalajara, Mexico.
The tiles are 9 cm square so the wing tip to wing tip measurement is about 12 cm.
It appeared to be asleep when photographed. It did not react to movement in its vicinity nor to the camera flash. Later it disappeared so it was either alive and flew away or it was taken away by something. It was located in an interior patio, so few animals except birds had access to bother it.
Signature: Will

Typhon Sphinx

Typhon Sphinx

Hi Will,
Thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas website, we have identified your Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae as the Typhon Sphinx,
Eumorpha typhon.  This is the first image of an adult moth from this species we have posted to our site, though in 2013, we did post several images of the caterpillar of a Typhon Sphinx from Mexico.  The Typhon Sphinx has been reported from southern Arizona and New Mexico as well.

Daniel,
Thank you very much for the response. I spent quite a bit of time looking for it without success.
Regards,
Will

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify this moth please
Location: Barrie, Ontario
June 7, 2014 5:23 pm
This moth flew into my garage today. I live in Barrie, Ontario. It’s body is about an inch long and it is about 2″ wide. What is it?
Signature: Thanks, Aerin

Abbott's Sphinx

Abbott’s Sphinx

Dear Aerin,
We believe your Sphinx Moth is an Abbott’s Sphinx,
Sphecodina abbottii, and you may compare your individual to the images on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  Though we have no shortage of images of the caterpillars of the Abbott’s Sphinx on our site, the only other image of the moth dates to 2006.

Thank you for identifying my bug! This is another picture I was able to get before I safely moved it outside. It did very much mimic a bee when it was buzzing around the window trying to get out. I am glad to know it isn’t an enemy of my vegetable garden! And very interesting that you haven’t had a picture of this moth since 2006!
Thanks again!
Aerin

Abbott's Sphinx

Abbott’s Sphinx

Hi again Aerin,
Thanks for sending another image.  Just so you know, we are postdating your submission to go live during our absence from the office next week as our regular readers have come to expect daily updates from us.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this beauty hawk moth and why do they shake their wings?
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
June 11, 2014 9:16 am
Hi guys. I’ve previously found a blinded sphinx hawk moth in the same area where just today I saw this unassuming beauty. It was sleeping? When I brushed up against it by accident with my lens, it fell into my hands, started walking on my arm,and then it’s wings shook like it was trying to fly, but couldn’t. Was it cold, and needing to warm up to flee the scene – or was it a warning? It looked in perfect health. I put it gently back on the wall, and it continued its wing shaking. Thank you kindly in advance.
Signature: Maggie M.

Waved Sphinx

Waved Sphinx

Dear Maggie,
We believe we have correctly identified your Hawkmoth as a Waved Sphinx,
Ceratomia undulosa, thanks to images posted to the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  We have observed the behavior you describe, though we cannot provide a definitive answer regarding why moths flutter. 

Thank you so much for the quick reply.  You guys rock. :)
Maggie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth?
Location: Germantown MD
June 10, 2014 5:56 am
I found this bug on a potted plant while relocating our belongings. Upon first glance I thought that it was a dead leaf on the plant, but upon closer examination, I found otherwise. When I attempted to have it crawl onto my finger, it immediately began to expel a white substance from it rear end. This was not a small set of droplets, but powerful stream.
Is this just a moth without formed wings?
Signature: Steve

Freshly Eclosed Sphinx Moth

Freshly Eclosed Elm Sphinx Moth

Dear Steve,
This is a freshly eclosed Sphinx Moth, and when butterflies or moths emerge from the pupal state, their wings are wet and shriveled.  They eventually fill with hemolymph, the insect blood, and harden.  Sometimes, for various reasons including injury, the wings never fully expand.  We cannot say for certain, but it most closely resembles and Elm Sphinx,
Ceratomia amyntor, to us.  Compare your image to the ones of fully expanded wings posted on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.  We will try to check with Bill Oehlke to see if he can verify that identification.

Bill Oehlke Confirms
Hi Daniel,
Yes, Ceratomia amyntor, the Elm Sphinx
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination