Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
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Subject: Indiana Moth
Location: Northern Indiana
May 27, 2014 1:51 pm
I am having trouble identifying a moth that was found. Maybe you can help guide me in the right direction.
Signature: Ashlee Haviland

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Hi Ashlee,
Your moth is a Small Eyed Sphinx,
Paonias myops, and your image is much clearer than the Small Eyed Sphinx image we posted yesterday.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a moth???
Location: western suburbs of Chicago, IL
May 25, 2014 10:29 pm
Can you tell me what kind of bug this is? moth??
Signature: vebes

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Dear vebes,
This is  Small Eyed Sphinx, a moth in the family Sphingidae.  More information is available on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Fresno California
May 26, 2014 12:59 am
Found this in the garage and have no idea what it is..I know one thing it’s huge!
Signature: Lisa

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Hi Lisa,
This is a Whitelined Sphinx, one of the most common, larger moths found in arid regions of North America.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Oak Moth?
Location: Yorkville, CA
May 25, 2014 9:19 am
I am in northern California and saw this moth yesterday in the early evening. Is it fully developed? Is it an oak moth?
Signature: Margot

One Eyed Sphinx

One Eyed Sphinx

Dear Margot,
This is not an Oak Moth.  It is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the genus
Smerinthus.  Historically, we would have identified this as a One Eyed Sphinx, Smerinthus cerisyi, but recent taxonomical changes have recognized a new species on the West coast with no common name, Smerinthus ophthalmica.  According the the Sphingidae of the Americas:  “Smerinthus ophthalmica, (forewing length: 34-47mm) closely resembles Smerinthus cerisyi, and until recently (2010) had been synonymized with cerisyi. … S. ophthalmica flies across southern British Columbia and southern Alberta into southwestern Saskatchewan. In the United States it can be found in Washington, Oregon and northern and central California eastward into Idaho, western Montana, western Wyoming and northern Nevada and northern Utah. … It is impossible to distinguish female ophthalmica from female cerisyi without examination of DNA, but male ophthalmica are noticeably distinct:  the forewing outer margin of ophthalmica is smoothly scalloped while that of cerisyi is more sharply/irregularly scalloped;  the lower edge of the grey apical patch in ophthalmica runs almost straight to the first vein, while in cerisyi the same edge is notched with a slight return toward the outer margin;  the pm line of opthalmica consists largely of two diffuse arcs while the same line in cerisyi is a series of shadowed projections;  the pink suffusion on the hindwing of ophthalmica is more reduced (tanner) toward the outer margin than in cerisyi.”  The lavae of both species feed on the leaves of willow, aspen and cottonwood, not oak.

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Subject: Moth NW CT
Location: NW Connecticut
May 21, 2014 8:28 am
Wondering if this is a Spotted Apatelode?
Signature: Lori Welles

One Eyed Sphinx

One Eyed Sphinx

Hi Lori,
Though your moth superficially resembles a Spotted Apatelodes, they are not even in the same family.  Your Sphinx Moth from the family Sphingidae is a One Eyed Sphinx,
Smerinthus cerisyi, and you can read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  The pretty pink underwings with their distinctive eyespots are not visible in your images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pandorus sphinx moth
Location: ISRAEL
May 10, 2014 1:27 pm
Hello,
Yesterday I spotted a very unusual bug. Turns out to be a pandorus sphinx moth.
Spotted in midday on a car tire. By what I read it is native to North America and here is my question: I live in Israel! Have you heard of these moths migrating such long distances? Is it something I should be worried about and report to the authorities if it isn’t native to this region?
I hope the picture came out clear. I photographed it from my other camera. Is this indeed the pandorus sphinx moth?
Thank you
Signature: Tina

Oleander Hawkmoth

Oleander Hawkmoth

Hi Tina,
This is not a Pandorus Sphinx, however, it is a moth in the same family Sphingidae.  Your moth is an Oleander Hawkmoth.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for your prompt response.
There are oleander flowers in the area so that could be why it’s here.
And thank you for solving my little “mystery”.
Tina

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination