Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
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Subject: What is this insect?
Location: Bangalore, India
February 16, 2015 7:54 am
This picture was sent to me by one of my friends. I have never seen an insect like this. To me it appears to be a moth but i’m totally naive in this. But i was interested in finding out this little guy’s name. So i searched the internet and found your website good. Can you please tell about it.???
Signature: Shubhojeet

Oleander Hawkmoth from India

Oleander Hawkmoth from India

Dear Shubhojeet,
You are correct that this is a moth, more specificially an Oleander Hawkmoth.

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Subject: Hummingbird or Bee Hawk Moth
Location: SE Queensland, Australia
February 10, 2015 10:18 pm
Hello bug people
love your work. My name is Sandra, I leave in Australia, South East Queensland. I have recently had the immense pleasure of photographing a hummingbird-like moth. It was so much like a hummingbird, just incredible and unfortunately we do no have them in Ozland. I am finding it very difficult to ID and the only species that is claimed to live in Australia is Cephonodes sp. However, I think it looks more like Macroglossum stellatarum found in China and other places.
What do you guys think?
I want to write an article on it for Pollinator Link (https://pollinatorlink.wordpress.com/). Thank you so much for any help you can give me.
Signature: Sandra Tuszynska

Diurnal Hawkmoth

Diurnal Hawkmoth

Dear Sandra,
We believe we have identified your diurnal Hawkmoth as
Macroglossum micacea based on images posted to Butterfly House where it states:  “The adult moths of this species have dark brown forewings sometimes with indistinct paler bands across them. They have even darker brown hind wings with two yellow areas by the inner margin. The moths have a wingspan of about 5 cms.”  Little other information is provided and the site does not indicate the species flies during the day.  The Sphingidae Taxonomic Inventory shows Queensland as the only part of Australia where sightings have been reported.  Since they are in the same genus, the similarity to Macroglossum stellatarum is understandable.  It is also pictured on the Papua Insects Foundation.  Most online images are of mounted specimens, and we are thrilled to be able to post your excellent action photos of this lovely diurnal Hawkmoth.

Diurnal Hawkmoth

Diurnal Hawkmoth

Hi Daniel
This is really awesome! Thank you so much for your help and speedy reply. I have lots of pics of crazy beautiful looking other creatures I would love to ID and share. I am sure I will post some more when the time comes.
Thanks again for your most awesome service.
Sandra

Macroglossum micacea

Macroglossum micacea

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Subject: Lovely Moth!
Location: Miami, FL
January 26, 2015 3:22 pm
Hello!
I hope you can help me identify this lovely little moth. I have spent a couple of hours searching until I found your site. I have looked through the pages of Sphinx moths and can not seem to match the markings to the one I found. I have never seen any kind of Sphinx moth inperson being in the city and was so intrigued at how amazing these moths look. I started a backyard garden and have discovered all kinds of interesting bugs. This one quite a beautiful creature indeed!
Signature: Kristi

Streaked Sphinx

Streaked Sphinx

Dear Kristi,
Your moth is a Streaked Sphinx,
Protambulyx strigilis, one of the most streamlined and aerodynamic looking species in a family that is characterized by those physical features.  The Streaked Sphinx is a neotropical species that frequently strays north to Florida, perhaps due to global warming.  You can read more about the Streaked Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

Thanks so much! I was not expecting but hoping for a response. You guys are awesome. Appreciate it! Have a great weekend

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Subject: Insect in AZ
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
January 20, 2015 1:15 pm
I have 2 different photos that were taken in Scottsdale, AZ in Dec 2014. I think they are moths. These insects were gone the next day and have not been seen since. They were on our home and close to our grapefruit tree.
Signature: Stan

Obscure Sphinx

Obscure Sphinx

Dear Stan,
We believe these are Obscure Sphinxes,
Erinnyis obscura, or another species in the same genus.  The scalloped wing edges are distinctive.  This image on BugGuide looks very close, and additional images are on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.  We have written to Sphingidae expert Bill Oehlke for confirmation.

Obscure Sphinx

Obscure Sphinx

Bill Oehlke confirms genus, and provides options for species
Daniel,
They certainly appear to be Erinnyis species and could be obscura (note spelling). They could also be E. domingonis. I think there is some disagreement as to whether or not obscura and domingonis are synonymous or distinct species. I also could not rule out variation of E. ello. I would have to see hindwings in order to be more posititve. Markings on the thorax do not seem to be a positive match for any of the three species I mention. My first choice, if I had to make one, would be Erinnyis obscura.
Bill

One more thing Bill.  I was linking to the other species on your site and E. domingonis is not listed in Arizona.
Do you think that might still be a possibility?
Daniel

Good point! E. domingonis, if it is a valid species, would  very unlikely be found in Arizona as closest location so far to AZ is Texas. The other two, though, are known from Arizona.

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Subject: what bug is this
Location: Central Java, Indonesia
January 20, 2015 8:42 am
Found this in my in-law’s garden
Signature: ADP

Coffee Bean Hawkmoth

Coffee Bean Hawkmoth

Dear ADP,
This is a diurnal Sphinx Moth known as the Coffee Bean Hawkmoth,
Cephanodes hylas, and it is found in Africa, Asia and Australia.   Here is an image from India Nature Watch.

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Subject: Interesting moth
Location: Tortola in the Caribbean
January 9, 2015 4:06 pm
This came in through an open door about 8pm last night. (2 hours after dark). It is about 1 1/2 inches in length. We were unable to see any markings but what an interesting end to the abdomen! Can you identify this for us please?
Signature: Limin’

Mournful Sphinx

Mournful Sphinx

Dear Limin’,
Though your image is lacking in critical highlight detail, the form of this Mournful Sphinx,
Enyo lugubris, is quite unmistakable.  Your Mournful Sphinx, which followed this beautiful Pacific Green Sphinx, is member of the family Sphingidae with caterpillars called Hornworms, that we have posted today.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination