Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Winnipeg, canada
July 6, 2016 12:05 pm
Moth
Signature: Chris

Waved Sphinx

Waved Sphinx

Hi Chris,
Your moth is a Waved Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mediterranean Spurge Hawk Moth Hyles nicaea
Location: From Southern Europe to Central Asia
July 4, 2016 4:23 am
Dear Daniel,
today I’d like to contribute another interesting hawkmoth caterpillar by a slightly older drawing – that of the Mediterranean Spurge Hawkmoth (Hyles nicaea) from southern Europe; though not from the New World, the asian and european species of the genus Hyles probably represent a relatively young neotropic branch of the Macroglossinae subfamily with a miocene transition to the Old World. A few amazing parallels in coloration and behaviour of these species can be noticed – to those of the Dilophonotini from the other continent; the striking colour pattern, physiognomy and habitus make them look very similar to members of the Pseudosphinx and Isognathus kinds (though they are officially not directly connected to them!) – and indeed many of them feed on very poisonous plants, making themselves unpalatable for most birds and other animals. And then, they also show a tendency for some gregarious behaviour in their younger instars… a very unusual characteristic for Old World Sphingidae. — Hyles nicaea is a quite big animal (compared with H. euphorbiae and other members), but its larvae live on poisonous Euphorbiaceae as well; their colour pattern could be associated with that of the orca-whale. The species’ living area is highly split into different biogeographical regions – making it difficult to define their real requirements on climate and landscape… and presenting quite some puzzles; they can be found along mediterranean coasts, or in high altitudes above 2000 m. I could occasionally observe them in the Karst area along the northern Adriatic coast. They pupate under stones or in other shelter, within a few provisional silk files. — Only a few information can be found on larvae of the New World – species (eg. H. annei, H. calida, H. wilsoni), and I didn’t see any picture of their caterpillars so far.
Many Thanks and Wishes for the great site, and a nice Independence day!
Bostjan
Signature: Bostjan Dvorak

Hornworm:  Hyles nicaea

Hornworm: Hyles nicaea

Dear Bostjan,
Thank you so much for allowing us to publish your latest drawing.  The information you provided is so interesting considering that a North American species,
Hyles lineata, has an edible caterpillar that appears in such large numbers in southwestern desert habitats that Native Americans used them for their highly nutritious qualities.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hawk-eyed moth CA look a like?
Location: Near the coast in Southern California (Malibu maybe??)
July 2, 2016 5:00 pm
Hello bugman!
Let me first say that I’ve followed this website for years and it’s always gotten me what I needed :) I am a California native but am living overseas currently, and a friend sent me this photo of this beautiful moth!! Apparently it lost a fight with a yellow jacket so picked up the body, not entirely sure where in southern California they were. They’re OK with calling it “the moth” but I want to know more! I did a quick search and it seems to have the same sort of eyespots as the Hawk Eyed Moth but the abdomen is different and I’m not sure if they’re found in Southern California. They may have been near the coast, as well? Let me know what you can find… Thanks! :)
Signature: Noelani

One Eyed Sphinx

One Eyed Sphinx

Dear Noelani,
Thanks so much for the compliment.  We believe this is a One Eyed Sphinx, Smerinthus cerisyi, which according to The Sphingidae of the Americas site is found in “the southern regions of all Canadian provinces (all of B. C. and Alberta) and in northern border states south into northern Indiana, Pennsylvania, Ohio. The One-eyed Sphinx is also found along the U.S. west coast to southern California, eastward to the Rockies and into western New Mexico north to western North Dakota. Specimens have also been taken in Illinois and as far south as Missouri in central U.S.”  We would not want to rule out that it might be the closely related Smerinthus ophthalmica, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas:  “Smerinthus ophthalmica, (forewing length: 34-47mm) closely resembles Smerinthus cerisyi, and until recently (2010) had been synonymized with cerisyi.”

Hi Daniel,
Wow, thanks so much for the fast reply! I’ve sent it to my mates now… Thanks again for your expertise :) also, does your site accept donations? I would love to help how I can if you need it

You are most welcome.  There is a donation link above our name on the home page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moths
Location: South West New Mexico
June 25, 2016 12:10 pm
What is this large (about 6″, 15.24cm across) moth?
Signature: Susana Murphy

Big Poplar Sphinx

Big Poplar Sphinx

Dear Susana,
This lovely moth is most likely a Big Poplar Sphinx,
Pachysphinx occidentalis, based on images posted to the Sphingidae of the Americas site, though we would not rule out that it might be the closely related Modest Sphinx, Pachysphinx modesta, also pictured on Sphingidae of the Americas and also found in New Mexico.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this
Location: Pacific Palisades CA 90272
June 21, 2016 6:07 pm
Can you tell me what this is? Never seen one
Signature: Doesn’t matter

Great Ash Sphinx

Great Ash Sphinx

We verified the identity of your Great Ash Sphinx, Sphinx chersis, thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

Great Ash Sphinx

Great Ash Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this type of moth?
Location: Marietta, Georgia
May 29, 2016 7:49 am
Hello! I found this moth years ago in my basement. It was hanging from some type of silk.. Was dead when i found her :( I have never been able to identify what she was.. Could you help me? Thank you!
Signature: Hannah Johns

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Dear Hannah,
This is a Small Eyed Sphinx,
Paonias myops, an identification you may verify on Sphingidae of the Americas where it states:  “Small-eyed Sphinx females call in the night flying males with an airbourne pheromone emitted from a gland at the posterior of the abdomen.  Both sexes rest with wings parallel to the resting surface, with the upper lobes of the hindwings protruding above the forewings.  The lower abdomen of the male (right) arcs upward toward the head, while the abdomen of the female hangs strait down on a vertical surface.”  The arched abdomen indicates your individual is a male.  The common name refers to the markings on the hidden underwings which are though to resemble eyes.  Since your image is a few years old, we are going to postdate your submission to go live to our site during our annual trip away from the office in early June.

Daniel,
Thank you so much!! How exciting to learn what *he* was after all these years. Your site is a fantastic resource, it is a wonderful thing that you all do. Thank you again, happy memorial day!
Hannah Johns

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination