Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fantastic hawkmoth(?)
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
May 18, 2013 7:56 pm
Hello bugfolk,
My coworker and I found this gorgeous mothy hiding out from the rain in a greenhouse just a few days past. We’re located in the middle Tennessee area. I was hoping to find out more about it–it looks like it’s in the Sphingidae family.
Thanks bunches!
Signature: Critter Crazy

Achemon Sphinx

Achemon Sphinx

Dear Critter Crazy,
This lovely moth is an Achemon Sphinx and we hope you had an opportunity to see its pretty pink underwings which are hidden while the moth is at rest.  You can read more about the Achemon Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this thing?
Location: Pittston PA
May 10, 2013 5:38 am
Found in NE Pennsylvania near Pittston along the Susquehanna River playing in the mud
Signature: don’t matter

Abbott's Sphinx

Abbott’s Sphinx

Dear don’t matter,
This Sphinx Moth appears to be an Abbott’s Sphinx, however, your photo is lacking in critical detail for us to be certain.  You may read more about the Abbott’s Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website and you can find out more information on National Moth Week events in your area by visiting the National Moth Week website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Caterpillar mystery answered
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
May 8, 2013 12:56 am
Hi there
I while ago I asked about a caterpillar that I found. For the life of me I could not find out what it was, but was convinced it would turn into some kind of hawk/sphinx moth.
Luckily a few days later it started to pupate and I figured I would just wait and see what it would turn into. I finally have my answer.
This gorgeous little critter is a silver striped (aka vine) hawk moth – and he is beautiful!
I have been blessed to find 6 different hawk/sphinx moth species in my garden (johannesburg, south africa) and can now add this little guy to my sightings.
So excited :-)
Signature: Bug lover – Cait Beling

Silver Striped Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Silver Striped Hawkmoth Caterpillar

Dear Cait,
We are terribly sorry if you submitted your identification of the Hornworm to us and we did not respond.  We have a very tiny staff.  Thanks so much for including photos of two stages of the life cycle of the South African Silver Striped Hawkmoth,
Hippotion celerio.  More information on the Silver Striped Hawkmoth can be found on the Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic website.  Also, congratulations on your successful rearing of the adult moth.  Did you get to witness any of the eclosion process?  Do you have a photo of the pupa to include in the posting?

Silver Striped Hawkmoth

Silver Striped Hawkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Another unusual moth by by back door
Location: Duncan BC
May 5, 2013 9:11 pm
In 2007 a very large moth appeared at my back door, stayed for five days and then disappeared. Two days ago, this one …. about half the size… appeared in the same place. When I look for Vancouver island moths, I see some White Underwing Moths, but this does not seem to be the same.
Signature: Sharon Jackson

One Eyed Sphinx

One Eyed Sphinx

Dear Sharon,
If you disturb this moth and it reveals its underwings with the eyespots, you will understand why it is called a One Eyed Sphinx.  You can read more about the One Eyed Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  Because of your thoughtful sign, we are awarding you with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

One Eyed Sphinx

One Eyed Sphinx

Thank you! Thank you! I am honoured. I thought it had gone this morning, but it is over on the side wall, further away from the door.
Sharon


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Ribgwood, NJ
May 5, 2013 12:17 pm
I found this moth that appears to have a horn on ots back. Peculiar!
Signature: Christy

Lettered Sphinx

Lettered Sphinx

Hi Christy,
Though your photo is blurry, we believe we have correctly identified your moth as a Lettered Sphinx,
Deidamia inscriptum, thanks to photos posted on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  The site states:  “Males rest with the typical strong curve to the abdomen,” which indicates your individual is a male.  Did you by chance mean Ringwood, New Jersey?

Hello. I am so sorry. Yes, Ringwood.
Sorry it is blurry. I was trying to get close without it flying away. I think it is still there. Very cool!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found a moth, found your site, now to find out what it is!
Location: Richmond, VA, USA
April 25, 2013 2:01 pm
Hi there!
I found this fella today in the 5th floor stairwell of a parking deck in downtown Richmond, VA. I thought he was fairly big (until seeing some of the very large bugs on this site!); maybe about 3” wide, average-sized lady-hand included for scale. He seemed like he might have had an injured leg, and a little difficulty crawling. I figured he probably would rather be outside than in an under-construction parking deck, so relocated him to a tree (hopefully he hasn’t gotten eaten by a bird.. but he seemed to have pretty decent camouflage.)
Any idea what sort of moth this is? Thanks!
Signature: kira

Elm Sphinx

Elm Sphinx

Dear Kira,
This is one of the Sphinx Moths or Hawkmoths in the family Sphingidae, and we believe it is an Elm Sphinx or Four Horned Sphinx,
Agrius amyntor, based on photos posted to the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Elm Sphinx

Elm Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination