Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flightless moth in back yard
Location: Norfolk, VA
July 5, 2013 1:51 pm
Hello, just curious about this moth. It was about 8cm long and seemed to be walking across my back yard. I had a hard time identifying it so far and I hoped you could help!
Thanks for your time.
Signature: aaron

Carolina Sphinx:  Recently Eclosed

Carolina Sphinx: Recently Eclosed

Dear Aaron,
This is a recently eclosed Carolina Sphinx, Manduca sexta, and its wings haven’t expanded.  The caterpillars feed on the leaves of tomato and other plants and they burrow underground to pupate.  Upon emergence, they dig to the surface and find a safe place where their wings can expand and harden, enabling the moths to fly.  You may read more about the Carolina Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

Wow! Thanks so much for responding, so cool!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hemaris question
Location: Cleveland National Forest in Riverside County at about 2000 feet.
July 5, 2013 12:40 pm
I presume this is a Hemaris species. I took the photos in the Cleveland National Forest in Riverside County at about 2000 feet. What species is this in Southern California?
Signature: Doug

Bee Hawk Moth

Bee Hawk Moth

Hi Doug,
According to the Sphingidae of the Americas website, the only species of
Hemaris that lives in California is Hemaris thetis, the Bee Hawk Moth.  Bill Oehlke gives this explanation:  “Those Sphingidae west of the continental divide (western Montana, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Nevada, Utah, California, Arizona, western Wyoming, western Colorado, western New Mexico), previously thought to be H. diffinis are now determined to be the recently elevated species, Hemaris thetis. It is my understanding that the moths described as H. senta also belong to H. thetis as thetis was described (Boisduval, 1855) before senta was described [Strecker, 1878].”  Your photos are quite stunning.  We are copying Bill Oehlke as he may want to record your sighting and he may ask for permission to use your images on his comprehensive site as well.

Bill Oehlke confirms identification
Hi Daniel,
As far as I know the information you quoted is still current and accurate. It looks like Hemaris thetis to me.
My Riverside County thumbnail checklist is at
http://www.silkmoths.bizland.com/caRiversidesph.htm
I wish Doug’s permission to post the image, credited to him, on the Riverside page.
Bill Oehlke

Bee Hawk Moth

Bee Hawk Moth

Thanks for the information!
You are welcome to go ahead and post the images.
If you need a more specific location, the photo was taken along the road towards Blue Jay Campground, off Highway 74.
Best regards,
Doug

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Is This?
Location: Malaysia
July 4, 2013 3:58 am
Good day, I am just curious about this bug founded in my city, more precisely on the staircase of my school compound. wondering what was it thanks.
Signature: Msian

Death's Head Hawkmoth

Death’s Head Hawkmoth

Hi Msian,
This moth is a Death’s Head Hawkmoth in the genus
Acherontia.  There are three known species that all look quite similar, but that have different ranges.  We believe your moth is Acherontia styx, and you may read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic website.

Death's Head Hawkmoth

Death’s Head Hawkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this bug
Location: Mio, MI
July 2, 2013 6:20 pm
Me and the wife would appreciate to know what is this bug. Found on this plant near our house in Mio, MI
Signature: Paul Heist

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Paul,
The diurnal Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Hemaris thysbe, is frequently confused for a hummingbird when it is seen hovering over flowers.
  See Sphingidae of the Americas for additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this moth
Location: northeast Pennsylvania
July 2, 2013 5:16 pm
Found this moth in northeast pa on brick wall. What is it.
Signature: mantis

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Dear mantis,
Your moth is a Small Eyed Sphinx, Paonias myops, and you can read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Canadian Sphinx moth?
Location: Gardiner, Maine
June 16, 2013 5:30 am
Heya Bugman,
I saw this yesterday, and I’m pretty sure it’s a sphinx moth, but I’m a casual bug gal, so I don’t know which type. Do you?
Gardiner, Maine, sitting on the side of a building along Route 24, which parallels the Kennebec River.
It was late morning, probably 10:30 or so, on a sunny day, temps in the low 70’s, June 15, 2013. I’ve got a request out to my invert guy in Maine, but I thought you might like to see the photos too.
Just found your site, it looks great!
Signature: Lisa

possibly Poecila Sphinx

Elm Sphinx

Dear Lisa,
This is a recently eclosed Sphinx Moth and its wings have not fully expanded.  Because the wings are not ready for flight, we are uncertain of the exact identity, but we believe this is a species related to the Canadian Sphinx known as the Poecila Sphinx,
Sphinx peocila.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas website:  “The outer wing fringes are checkered black and white on the forewing, and are almost pure white (lightly checked with grey) on the hindwing. The forewing is dark gray with diffuse black and gray wavy lines with a series of black dashes ending at the wing tip, and a white cell spot. The white cell spot readily distinguishes poecila from canadensis. The hindwing is brownish gray with a wide black border and a black median line.”  Your individual has a prominent white cell spot.  We wish the underwings were visible.  We will contact Bill Oehlke for confirmation on this Sphinx Moth.  Let us know what your invert guy has to say.

Detail of Sphinx Moth

Detail of Elm Sphinx Moth

Bill Oehlke Provides a Correction:
Daniel,
It is
Ceratomia amyntor that has not inflated its wings. They are reported
throughout Maine.
Bill Oehlke

Possibly Poecila Sphinx

Elm Sphinx

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination