Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful moths!
Location: Sylmar, CA
February 22, 2014 12:19 pm
Hi there, I recently found a large moth resting on the sidewalk on my way home and snapped a picture because I hadn’t seen a pattern like it before. Then the next day a saw another! I’ve become obsessed with finding them now! Thanks to your website I know now that they were Striped Morning Spinx. I thought you might enjoy the pictures! Great website!
Signature: New moth hunter

Striped Morning Sphinx

Striped Morning Sphinx

Dear New moth hunter,
We have a Striped Morning Sphinx or Whitelined Sphinx,
Hyles lineata, on our front porch at this moment, and another smaller individual was on the screen door Thursday night.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ??
Location: Wollongong, NSW, Australia
February 20, 2014 3:58 am
I’ve lived here for 30 years and have seen this insect for the first time. It is summer here.
Signature: Cheryle

Sphinx Moth:  Theretra queenslandi

Sphinx Moth: Theretra queenslandi

Dear Cheryle,
This is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, and it is in the genus
Theretra.  There are several species that look quite similar, but we believe this is Theretra queenslandi, which is found in New South Wales according to Butterfly House

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth?
Location: los Angeles, ca
February 12, 2014 12:01 pm
Hi, I was wondering if you could identify this bug. It’s not like any other moth I’ve seen and wonder if it’s a moth at all?
Signature: crazy moth

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear crazy moth,
The Whitelined Sphinx is a common moth in the Los Angeles area.  It is a species that thrives in desert areas of the Southwest and when conditions are right, Whitelined Sphinxes can be attracted in great numbers to lights.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Very strange asian bug
Location: South Vietnam
February 7, 2014 7:21 am
Hi! I live in Vietnam and found this flying around one day! It finally stopped and I got a good picture before it flew away. Nobody can figure out what it is; it looks like a bee crossed with a dragon fly to me but I assume that would be technically impossible 😉
Please tell me what it is! It’s been haunting me ever since!
Location: South vietnam, climate very hot and humid. The bug was seen in the playground of the school I work at and we are in the biggest city in Vietnam. River nearby.
Thanks a lot!
Signature: Sonia

Coffee Hawkmoth

Coffee Hawkmoth

Dear Sonia,
This is actually a diurnal or day flying moth in the family Sphingidae, the Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoths.  Day flyng species are sometimes confused for hummingbirds when in flight, so they are also called Hummingbird Moths.  Your individual is
Cephonodes hylas, which we found named the Coffee Hawk Moth on Butterfly House.  The Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic site has additional information.

Wow, thank you very much! I am very surprised that it is actually so common in Asia, and certainly hadn’t thought it had anything to do with a moth!
Thanks a lot for your quick response :-)
Sonia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: help me to identify this moth
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
January 9, 2014 3:29 am
hello there..
This morning around 11 am, i found a giant moth (size around 10cm long) stick on my clothes
he has big round black eyes, lot of hair on his wings and body, and he is quite heavy..
I never seen something like this before around my house
I am really curious and exciting about kind of this moth
I hope you will help me identified this moth..
thank you :)
Signature: Cilla

Sphinx Moth

Sphinx Moth:  Agrius convolvuli

Hi Cilla,
This is a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae, but we are having a bit of trouble determining the species.  We decided not to give up just yet and we found a matching image on FlickR of
Agrius convolvuli, and we verified that on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic which states:  “Adults rest during the day on any solid surface, especially tree-trunks, fences, telegraph poles or bare earth. With wings folded roof-like over the body, they resemble a piece of weathered grey wood and are hence difficult to detect. Sometimes pairs can be found in such locations, but most, having paired towards midnight, part before dawn.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a hummingbird moth?
Location: Edenvale, Gauteng, South Africa
January 2, 2014 10:01 am
Hi bugman,
My dog first spotted this beautiful creature crawling amongst ground cover in my garden. I think it may be a hummingbird moth but I’m not sure because it doesn’t seem able to fly. I let it crawl onto my hand and then placed it in a high position, off the ground for safety. My husband thinks that it may have just hatched from its cacoon because the thinner wings under the ornate ones are crinkled.
Would love to hear your thoughts…
Signature: Chantelle Browne

Death's Head Hawkmoth

Death’s Head Hawkmoth

Hi Chantelle,
In the most broad sense, this is a Hummingbird Moth, which is a common name given to the moths in the family Sphingidae, though Hawkmoths and Sphinx Moths tend to be more commonly used.  The name Hummingbird Moths is generally used for the diurnal members of the family that fly during the day and are easily confused with hummingbirds.  This is actually a very famous moth in its own right.  It is a Death’s Head Hawkmoth,
Acherontia atropos, and it gained a degree of notoriety when it was used to illustrate posters for the thriller Silence of the Lambs.  The common name refers to the pattern on the thorax which is thought to resemble a human skull.  More information on the Death’s Head Hawkmoth can be found on the Natural History Museum website.  Your husband is correct.  This is a recently eclosed adult that probably emerged from the ground near where it was located.  The plant in the photo appears to be a jasmine, which is one of the larval food plants for the Death’s Head Hawkmoth Caterpillar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination