Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Canadian Sphinx moth?
Location: Gardiner, Maine
June 16, 2013 5:30 am
Heya Bugman,
I saw this yesterday, and I’m pretty sure it’s a sphinx moth, but I’m a casual bug gal, so I don’t know which type. Do you?
Gardiner, Maine, sitting on the side of a building along Route 24, which parallels the Kennebec River.
It was late morning, probably 10:30 or so, on a sunny day, temps in the low 70’s, June 15, 2013. I’ve got a request out to my invert guy in Maine, but I thought you might like to see the photos too.
Just found your site, it looks great!
Signature: Lisa

possibly Poecila Sphinx

Elm Sphinx

Dear Lisa,
This is a recently eclosed Sphinx Moth and its wings have not fully expanded.  Because the wings are not ready for flight, we are uncertain of the exact identity, but we believe this is a species related to the Canadian Sphinx known as the Poecila Sphinx,
Sphinx peocila.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas website:  “The outer wing fringes are checkered black and white on the forewing, and are almost pure white (lightly checked with grey) on the hindwing. The forewing is dark gray with diffuse black and gray wavy lines with a series of black dashes ending at the wing tip, and a white cell spot. The white cell spot readily distinguishes poecila from canadensis. The hindwing is brownish gray with a wide black border and a black median line.”  Your individual has a prominent white cell spot.  We wish the underwings were visible.  We will contact Bill Oehlke for confirmation on this Sphinx Moth.  Let us know what your invert guy has to say.

Detail of Sphinx Moth

Detail of Elm Sphinx Moth

Bill Oehlke Provides a Correction:
Daniel,
It is
Ceratomia amyntor that has not inflated its wings. They are reported
throughout Maine.
Bill Oehlke

Possibly Poecila Sphinx

Elm Sphinx

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: No clue what this is!
Location: Central NY
June 14, 2013 5:22 pm
Today this ”bug” was flying around some flowers at my in-laws. At least 6 of us approached this without it being spooked while we observed it and tried to figure out what it was. Sorry if this picture isn’t clear enough. It flies exactly like a hummingbird but has the body of what looks like a bee or a moth. It was moving flower to flower and was inserting something into each flower like a hummingbird would. We live in Central NY and none of us has ever seen anything like this. Any insight would be appreciated! Thank you!
Signature: Michele from NY

Hummingbird Moth

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Dear Michele from NY,
This is some species of diurnal Sphinx Moth, possibly a member of the genus Hemaris which includes the Hummingbird Clearwing and the Snowberry Clearwing or Bumblebee Moth.  For more on the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, you can read the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  You need a faster shutter speed like 2000 to “freeze” the blurring of the wings.

Snowberry Clearwing

Hummingbird Clearwing from our archives

Thank you so much! I will have to let everyone else know! It was so interesting to look at. I’m very surprised none of us have seen one before since they are indigenous to eastern US.  I will have to bring my camera over to get better pictures!(we used a camera phone before) Again, thank you so much for your help.
Michele


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified moth, from Maracaibo, Venezuela.
Location: Maracaibo, Venezuela
June 2, 2013 10:16 pm
Hey, this guy flew into my room tonight. I’m used to Black witches poping in every now and then but I had never seen one like this. Both the stripe/collor pattern and the shape of the wings were quite distinctive. I was wondering if you could help me identify what kind of moth it is. (Sorry for the poor quality of the photos, but even in spite of it I think the main details can be picked out).
Signature: mudo

Banded Sphinx

Banded Sphinx

Dear mudo,
Most of our reports of Banded Sphinxes, Eumorpha fasciatus, are from North America, but we verified on the Sphingidae of the Americas website that it does range to South America including Venezuela.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this some sort of Sphynx moth?
Location: Crested Butte, CO
May 24, 2013 11:40 pm
Found this guy on an early sunrise solo photography walk in the summer of July, 2008. He was on the ground in the dirt, probably on his way out and I decided to pick him up and put him on some plant life nearby so he wouldn’t get squashed. I found the colors so edgy and interesting. Hope these can help your collections!
Signature: Breanna

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Hi Breanna,
You are correct.  This is a Whitelined Sphinx,
Hyles lineata, and it is currently featured on our homepage banner since adults are currently flying in Southern California.  This is a wide ranging species that is reported from all 48 lower states in North America.  Your submission is being postdated to go live on our site during our absence in early June so that there are uninterrupted daily updates.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautifully patterned sphinx moth
Location: New Braunfels, Texas
May 31, 2013 4:19 pm
I came across this beautifully patterned sphinx moth-I am not sure what species- at work today. I love sphinx moths because of their often spectacular wing patterns and their willingness to be still for photos. If you can provide me with a species ID that’s be great although I am gunna post to bugguide as well. I hope you enjoy the photo. Sorry the quality isn’t the greatest. I had only my phone with me. Thanks again for a wonderful service!
Signature: Michael

Vine Sphinx

Vine Sphinx

Hi Michael,
Since you are also posting to BugGuide, you probably already know that this is a Vine Sphinx,
Eumorpha vitis, which we identified on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  Once things are posted to BugGuide, there is a large network of folks who can assist.  Our tiny editorial staff does all postings to our site, so we have fewer examples of each species. We see that BugGuide has already provided your answer. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fantastic hawkmoth(?)
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
May 18, 2013 7:56 pm
Hello bugfolk,
My coworker and I found this gorgeous mothy hiding out from the rain in a greenhouse just a few days past. We’re located in the middle Tennessee area. I was hoping to find out more about it–it looks like it’s in the Sphingidae family.
Thanks bunches!
Signature: Critter Crazy

Achemon Sphinx

Achemon Sphinx

Dear Critter Crazy,
This lovely moth is an Achemon Sphinx and we hope you had an opportunity to see its pretty pink underwings which are hidden while the moth is at rest.  You can read more about the Achemon Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination