Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange one in AL
Location: East Alabama
September 18, 2013 8:40 am
My son found this beautiful creature on his car seatbelt in the Anniston, AL area. I’ve never seen one like this before, any ideas? I’m thinking some sort of moth/butterfly judging by the legs. Thanks!
Signature: Ann

Tersa Sphinx

Tersa Sphinx

Hi Ann,
This aerodynamic moth is a Tersa Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White-Lined Sphinx at Night
Location: Naperville, IL
September 14, 2013 7:17 pm
Hi Daniel~
I’ve never seen one of these beautiful moths until a few evenings ago. Since then, I’ve seen them a number of times, feeding from buddleia, zinnias, and hibiscus trees, usually at dusk. And I can’t tell you how many friends saw them and mentioned them to me as well, wondering what they were. I had to use a flash because there was just no way to capture its colorful wings without it.
All the best to you!
Signature: Dori Eldridge

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Hi Dori,
Your stunning photo has frozen the rapidly beating wings of this lovely Whitelined Sphinx.  Upon watching them feed, it is easy to understand why they are often confused for hummingbirds.  Because the caterpillars are able to feed on a large variety of plants, the Whitelined Sphinx is found in all 48 lower states as well as Canada, and it might be the most common Sphinx Moth in North America.  Populations of Whitelined Sphinxes tend to rise and fall depending upon the year, and when conditions are ideal in the southwest, there are huge explosions in the populations of both the caterpillars and the adults.  Zinnias are wonderful flowers to plant when you want to attract butterflies and other pollinating insects.

Thank you, Daniel! I agree with your statement about zinnias. I have seen more new species of pollinators this year all over my back yard where I planted lots of zinnias this past spring. And hummingbirds are also fans of them. Have a lovely weekend!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth
Location: Page Arizona
September 7, 2013 9:46 am
Hey Bugman, I was walking out my front doorband found this guy.
Signature: Matthee

Big Poplar Sphinx

Big Poplar Sphinx

Dear Matthee,
This appears to be a Western Poplar Sphinx or Big Poplar Sphinx,
Pachysphinx occidentalis.  You can read more about the Big Poplar Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Australian Hawk moth!
Location: Herberton, Atherton Tablelands, Queensland, AU
September 4, 2013 7:23 pm
Hi, I was recently studying abroad in Australia and came across this beautiful hawk moth! I was staying outside of Herberton in Queensland, AU (which is a dry sclerophyll forest), and going on a night spotlighting trip when we spotted this beautiful moth in the beam of our spotlight. It climbed up onto me, and fluttered around my face, and was an all-around magical experience, but I haven’t been able to identify it down to the species! The closest I have found are Gnathothlibus erotus and Hippotion scrofa, but neither have the correct wing shape or the dark line down the thorax that my moth had. Any help in identifying him would be greatly appreciated!
Signature: Kristin

Coequosa australasiae

Coequosa australasiae

Hi Kristin,
In a matter of minutes, we found your moth identified as Coequosa australasiae on Csiro
where the physical traits you mentioned are obvious in the image of a mounted specimen.  The images on Butterfly House are not as close, but there is still a strong resemblance.  The Australian Museum also has a nice image.  The uncropped version of your photograph has to be one of the finest Buggy Accessories photos we have ever received.

Buggy Accessory:  Coequosa australasiae

Buggy Accessory: Coequosa australasiae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large GORGEOUS green mothlike insect
Location: Charlottesville, VA
August 30, 2013 5:57 pm
This was clinging to the doorframe of my tobacconist in Charlottesville, VA, today around 10. The clerk said it had been there when she came in to open the shop, and she’d seen another one recently. As I watched, it moved its legs just enough to indicate it wasn’t dead, but otherwise it didn’t seem responsive — given the date, it’s presumably at the end of its lifespan. The photos were taken with an iPhone 5. At first glance, it looks like a moth or butterfly, but the antennae seem to be missing, the legs are all weird, and the body doesn’t really look right either.
I think that’s all the vital data, so I’ll go on to say OH MY GAWD THAT IS GORGEOUS. It’s obviously forest camo, (at first glance, the clerk actually thought it was a leaf), but that kind of shading is something I’d usually associate with fungi or seashells, rather than something that’s just trying to be inconspicious.
Signature: Dave Harmon

Subject: Second follow-up on my “Ask WTB” submission (Pandora sphinx)
August 30, 2013 6:44 pm
And having finally thought to seach for “Sphinx” itself, on page 16 or so I find the Pandora Moth, which exactly matches the pattern.
Signature: Dave Harmon

Pandora Sphinx

Pandora Sphinx

Hi Dave,
We see by your followup letter that you have already identified your Pandorus Sphinx.  Your letter is very entertaining.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this
Location: Southwest Missouri
August 22, 2013 4:58 pm
I was wondering what kind of bug this is? I live in southwest Missouri and found it outside on the wall. I have never seen this type before and wanted to know if it bites or could be poisonous too. Any help would be great. Thank you!
Signature: Michele

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Hi Michele,
This harmless moth is a Small Eyed Sphinx, Paonias myops.  It does not bite and it is not poisonous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination