Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Is This?
Location: Malaysia
July 4, 2013 3:58 am
Good day, I am just curious about this bug founded in my city, more precisely on the staircase of my school compound. wondering what was it thanks.
Signature: Msian

Death's Head Hawkmoth

Death’s Head Hawkmoth

Hi Msian,
This moth is a Death’s Head Hawkmoth in the genus
Acherontia.  There are three known species that all look quite similar, but that have different ranges.  We believe your moth is Acherontia styx, and you may read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic website.

Death's Head Hawkmoth

Death’s Head Hawkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this bug
Location: Mio, MI
July 2, 2013 6:20 pm
Me and the wife would appreciate to know what is this bug. Found on this plant near our house in Mio, MI
Signature: Paul Heist

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Paul,
The diurnal Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, Hemaris thysbe, is frequently confused for a hummingbird when it is seen hovering over flowers.
  See Sphingidae of the Americas for additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Whats this moth
Location: northeast Pennsylvania
July 2, 2013 5:16 pm
Found this moth in northeast pa on brick wall. What is it.
Signature: mantis

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Dear mantis,
Your moth is a Small Eyed Sphinx, Paonias myops, and you can read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Canadian Sphinx moth?
Location: Gardiner, Maine
June 16, 2013 5:30 am
Heya Bugman,
I saw this yesterday, and I’m pretty sure it’s a sphinx moth, but I’m a casual bug gal, so I don’t know which type. Do you?
Gardiner, Maine, sitting on the side of a building along Route 24, which parallels the Kennebec River.
It was late morning, probably 10:30 or so, on a sunny day, temps in the low 70’s, June 15, 2013. I’ve got a request out to my invert guy in Maine, but I thought you might like to see the photos too.
Just found your site, it looks great!
Signature: Lisa

possibly Poecila Sphinx

Elm Sphinx

Dear Lisa,
This is a recently eclosed Sphinx Moth and its wings have not fully expanded.  Because the wings are not ready for flight, we are uncertain of the exact identity, but we believe this is a species related to the Canadian Sphinx known as the Poecila Sphinx,
Sphinx peocila.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas website:  “The outer wing fringes are checkered black and white on the forewing, and are almost pure white (lightly checked with grey) on the hindwing. The forewing is dark gray with diffuse black and gray wavy lines with a series of black dashes ending at the wing tip, and a white cell spot. The white cell spot readily distinguishes poecila from canadensis. The hindwing is brownish gray with a wide black border and a black median line.”  Your individual has a prominent white cell spot.  We wish the underwings were visible.  We will contact Bill Oehlke for confirmation on this Sphinx Moth.  Let us know what your invert guy has to say.

Detail of Sphinx Moth

Detail of Elm Sphinx Moth

Bill Oehlke Provides a Correction:
Daniel,
It is
Ceratomia amyntor that has not inflated its wings. They are reported
throughout Maine.
Bill Oehlke

Possibly Poecila Sphinx

Elm Sphinx

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: No clue what this is!
Location: Central NY
June 14, 2013 5:22 pm
Today this ”bug” was flying around some flowers at my in-laws. At least 6 of us approached this without it being spooked while we observed it and tried to figure out what it was. Sorry if this picture isn’t clear enough. It flies exactly like a hummingbird but has the body of what looks like a bee or a moth. It was moving flower to flower and was inserting something into each flower like a hummingbird would. We live in Central NY and none of us has ever seen anything like this. Any insight would be appreciated! Thank you!
Signature: Michele from NY

Hummingbird Moth

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Dear Michele from NY,
This is some species of diurnal Sphinx Moth, possibly a member of the genus Hemaris which includes the Hummingbird Clearwing and the Snowberry Clearwing or Bumblebee Moth.  For more on the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth, you can read the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  You need a faster shutter speed like 2000 to “freeze” the blurring of the wings.

Snowberry Clearwing

Hummingbird Clearwing from our archives

Thank you so much! I will have to let everyone else know! It was so interesting to look at. I’m very surprised none of us have seen one before since they are indigenous to eastern US.  I will have to bring my camera over to get better pictures!(we used a camera phone before) Again, thank you so much for your help.
Michele


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified moth, from Maracaibo, Venezuela.
Location: Maracaibo, Venezuela
June 2, 2013 10:16 pm
Hey, this guy flew into my room tonight. I’m used to Black witches poping in every now and then but I had never seen one like this. Both the stripe/collor pattern and the shape of the wings were quite distinctive. I was wondering if you could help me identify what kind of moth it is. (Sorry for the poor quality of the photos, but even in spite of it I think the main details can be picked out).
Signature: mudo

Banded Sphinx

Banded Sphinx

Dear mudo,
Most of our reports of Banded Sphinxes, Eumorpha fasciatus, are from North America, but we verified on the Sphingidae of the Americas website that it does range to South America including Venezuela.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination