Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug or bee
Location: Belleville, PA in a flower garden
July 28, 2014 4:20 pm
This bug flies like a bee, it is all around my flowers and acts like a bee. I have never saw it until this year. It is yellow, then green, then black. Sometimes the yellow and green are reversed.
Signature: Deb

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hummingbird Clearwing

Dear Deb,
You need an extremely fast shutter speed, in excess of 1/1000 second, to freeze the wings of this Hummingbird
Clearwing, Hemaris thysbe, a diurnal species of Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  Another member of the genus, Hemaris diffinis, is smaller and is called the BumbleBee Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large dark reddish bee with two white stripes on abdomen
Location: Queens, NY
July 27, 2014 8:59 am
I saw this guy enjoying the flowers at a Home Depot in Queens, NY. It was difficult for me to get this shot as it was extremely fast moving. I almost thought it was a small hummingbird out of the corner of my eye, When I looked closer I noticed it was an insect. I can’t find anything that looks like it on Google.
I uploaded a video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkYvP9FqovQ
Signature: Jon

Nessus Sphinx

Nessus Sphinx

Dear Jon,
Even though your image is not critically sharp, there are enough features for us to determine that this Sphinx Moth in the family Sphingidae is a Nessus Sphinx,
Amphion floridensis.  Diurnal members of the family, which also include the Hummingbird Clearwing Moth and the Whitelined Spinx (which is actually more crepuscular than diurnal) are frequently mistaken for hummingbirds.  More information on the Nessus Sphinx is available on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

That’s exciting. It’s funny I’ve lived on the east coast all my life and I’ve never seen one. :)
That’s definitely it. Thanks!

In order to observe Diurnal Sphinx Moths, you would need to be near proper habitat, including flowering plants that produce nectar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Winged insect looks like tree bark
Location: Edom, Texas
July 26, 2014 11:34 am
Found this gorgeous creature outside my house today. Never seen anything like it.
Signature: Trixie in Texas

Blinded Sphinx

Blinded Sphinx

Dear Trixie,
This beautiful Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecatus, gets its common name because the eyespots on the underwings, hidden in your image, do not appear to have pupils as there is no dark spot in the center.  You may read more about the Blinded Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mystery Moth.
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
July 26, 2014 10:48 am
Hello! Found this fairly large moth in my mothers backyard, hanging out on the fence, early evening. I have no idea what it is!
Signature: -Auraus

Laurel Sphinx

Laurel Sphinx

Dear Auraus,
This lovely moth is a Laurel Sphinx,
Sphinx kalmiae, and we identified it thanks to the comprehensive database on the Sphingidae of the Americas site where it states:  “In Canada, Sphinx kalmiae is single-brooded with most adults on the wing in June and July. In New Jersey and Connecticut and states of that latitiude, the Laurel Sphinx is double-brooded (late May-June flight and then again in July-August). There are as many as six broods in Louisiana with the first brood appearing in early to mid April.”  We are grateful that you were able to obtain an image that reveals the underwings.

Laurel Sphinx

Laurel Sphinx

Ah hah! Thank you so much for the identification. :) It was actually very happy to sit in my hand and pose for photos. Getting it to leave was the trick. ;)
-Danijela

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Panogena lingens found by Ilija Klejmjonov in Madagascar
Location: Madagascar, by Ilija Klejmjonov
July 8, 2014 4:01 pm
Dear Bugman,
As to our Coelonia fulvinotata… A confusion led to a spectacular new finding! When looking for some pictures of Coelonia fulvinotata, which were often found and commented within this nice site, as a model for a drawing, on the web, I accidentally found a slightly different caterpillar, guiding me to the blogsite of Ilija Klejmjonov, http://adderley.livejournal.com/150820.html?mode=reply#add_comment; as he breeded it at home and documented its metamorphosis with the pictures of the pupa and the moth, the emerged moth is obviously a Panogena lingens, and not the supposed Coelonia fulvinotata (to which one can be led by some confusing drawing of the moth, resembling to both species – but without this confusion I would never have found this caterpillar). Thus we have the first insight of the larval stages of a Panogena species, which were not yet known. Ilija Klejmjonov has found this caterpillar on a potted plant of Duranta erecta (Verbenaceae), a non native plant in Madagascar, it was difficult to assign, as imported ornamental plant originating from the southern new world. The documented pupa shows some similarity with those from the genus Lintneria. The revealment of an African (and Madagascan) secret… (Nothing own to attach except a picture of a tentative design by coloured pencils)
Nicest wishes,
Bostjan Dvorak
Signature: Bostjan Dvorak

Panogena lingens

Panogena lingens

Dear Bostjan,
We are sorry for the lengthy delay in responding.  Thanks so much for providing us with your wonderful drawing documenting the stages of life for
Panogena lingens of Madagascar.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth identification
Location: ear Halfmoon Bay on the Sunshine Coast in BC
July 19, 2014 2:26 pm
Hi There. This moth came to visit us one evening in late June. It was quite beautiful! About 7 cm across from wing tip to wing tip. Can you tell us what it is?
Thank you
Signature: Jackie

Sphinx Moth:  Smerinthus ophthalmica

Sphinx Moth: Smerinthus ophthalmica

Hi Jackie,
We confirmed the identity of your Sphinx Moth as
Smerinthus ophthalmica thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas website.  Alas, you moth does not have a common name, though Sphinx Moth and Hawkmoth are names to describe the members of the family.  According to Pacific Northwest Moths:  “They are nocturnal and come to light.  This species is common at porch lights.  The mouthparts are reduced and the moths do not feed as adults.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination