Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: id a “hummingbird moth”
Location: Central Nebraska
August 26, 2014 5:04 pm
Could you please identify this “moth”?
Signature: Amateur photo “bug”

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Amateur photo “bug”,
This is a nice action image of a Whitelined Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Location: Evanston, IL
August 25, 2014 10:47 am
Here is a photo I captured in our school garden one summer about five years ago. Just a few weeks ago I saw two more of these moths in our garden but did not have my camera on me. Don’t think, however, I could get better than this.
Signature: Lynn Hyndman

Snowberry Clearwing

Snowberry Clearwing

Hi Lynn,
We believe you have misidentified this diurnal sphinx moth, and that it is
Hemaris diffinis, the Snowberry Clearwing or Bumblebee Moth, not a Hummingbird Clearwing.  The two species look quite similar as they are in the same genus, but the Snowberry Clearwing is slightly smaller and has black legs, not light legs like the Hummingbird Clearwing.  The Sphingidae of the Americas site has an excellent image with both species for comparison.  Your image is quite nice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sphinx Moth ?
Location: Middle Tennessee
August 23, 2014 10:46 am
My husband spotted this at work. I was sure it was a type of Sphinx Moth until I looked on your site and saw the others did not have long antennas. Can you enlighten me on what type of moth this may be?
Signature: Sarah P.

Elm Sphinx

Elm Sphinx

Hi Sarahm
This appears to us to be an Elm Sphinx or Four Horned Sphinx,
Ceratomia amyntor.  You can read more about the Elm Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website where it states:  “Ceratomia amyntor adults fly as a single brood in a wide variety of forested and open habitats in the northern portions of their range from June-July. There are two broods further south, and Vernon A. Brou confirms five broods in Louisiana from March-October.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Orange Bee like bug
Location: Maine
August 19, 2014 7:30 am
This bug was seen flitting about a group of flowers. It was the size of a large bumble bee, and moved as such. It was Orange colored on the back half, and greyish on the front half. The wings in the photos looked more butterfly like. It had fairly long antenna and tongue. It looked like a cross between a bee and a hummingbird.
Found flitting about medium sized white clustered flowers within a few yards of the shore of a Maine fresh water lake.
The photos were taken by my sister, and she will be sending me larger copies soon, but I attached what I have so far.
Signature: J from Maine

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Dear J from Maine,
This is a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth,
Hemaris thysbe, a diurnal Sphinx Moth.  We don’t need larger copies, but since one image looks like it was taken from a television screen and the other is just plain blurry, it you have sharper images with more clarity, we would love to post those instead.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you identify this?
Location: South central Mississippi
August 18, 2014 8:46 pm
Found this on shop door in south central Mississippi in August.
Signature: Dawn

Pandorus Sphinx

Pandorus Sphinx

Hi Dawn,
This gorgeous moth is a Pandorus Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: hummingbird moth
Location: Savage, MN (Scott County)
August 3, 2014 10:03 am
Can you tell me what kind of hummingbird moth this is? I’ve seen him two consecutive days in the wildflowers behind our house in Minnesota. Thanks for your help. (The second photo isn’t very clear but shows a bit more of his coloring.)
Signature: Sue H

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hummingbird Clearwing

Hi Sue,
You are correct that this is a Hummingbird Clearwing,
Hemaris thysbe, and it is a lovely image, with just enough wing movement to show it is beating the wings and to provide a feeling of movement while “freezing” the body.  See Sphingidae of the Americas for additional information on the Hummingbird Clearwing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination