Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this
Location: Pacific Palisades CA 90272
June 21, 2016 6:07 pm
Can you tell me what this is? Never seen one
Signature: Doesn’t matter

Great Ash Sphinx

Great Ash Sphinx

We verified the identity of your Great Ash Sphinx, Sphinx chersis, thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

Great Ash Sphinx

Great Ash Sphinx

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this type of moth?
Location: Marietta, Georgia
May 29, 2016 7:49 am
Hello! I found this moth years ago in my basement. It was hanging from some type of silk.. Was dead when i found her :( I have never been able to identify what she was.. Could you help me? Thank you!
Signature: Hannah Johns

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Dear Hannah,
This is a Small Eyed Sphinx,
Paonias myops, an identification you may verify on Sphingidae of the Americas where it states:  “Small-eyed Sphinx females call in the night flying males with an airbourne pheromone emitted from a gland at the posterior of the abdomen.  Both sexes rest with wings parallel to the resting surface, with the upper lobes of the hindwings protruding above the forewings.  The lower abdomen of the male (right) arcs upward toward the head, while the abdomen of the female hangs strait down on a vertical surface.”  The arched abdomen indicates your individual is a male.  The common name refers to the markings on the hidden underwings which are though to resemble eyes.  Since your image is a few years old, we are going to postdate your submission to go live to our site during our annual trip away from the office in early June.

Daniel,
Thank you so much!! How exciting to learn what *he* was after all these years. Your site is a fantastic resource, it is a wonderful thing that you all do. Thank you again, happy memorial day!
Hannah Johns

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a four tooth mason wasp ?
Location: Montreal (Quebec, Canada)
June 4, 2016 7:56 pm
Hello M. Bugman,
I live in Montréal (Québec, Cananda), south east of the Olympic Stadium. My appartment is on the top floor of a three-story building. I have five hanging flower baskets around my front balcony. This afternoon (June 4, 2016) I picked up my camera to get a picture of what I was convinced was a hummingbird feeding in my hanging flower baskets. The “bird” did not stop flying, going from flower to flower, from one basket to another. It did not buzz like a bee or a wasp, the flight was silent. Looking more closely at the picture it appears to be an insect. After searching on the internet, I suspect it might be a four tooth mason wasp. So far it appears that this type of wasp has not been seen often north of southern Ontario. Despite the lack of clarity of the picture, can you identify this insect ? Thank you for your help.
Signature: Josee Desmeules

Nessus Sphinx

Nessus Sphinx

Dear Josee,
This is one of the diurnal Sphinx Moths in the family Sphingidae, and the species that fly during the day are frequently mistaken for hummingbirds, hence the common name Hummingbird Moth.  We believe your species is the Nessus Sphinx,
Amphion floridensis, which you can find profiled on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Moth
Location: Collierville, TN 38017
May 31, 2016 9:13 pm
Hello,
Found this beautiful fellow outside my house in Collierville, TN. Thought at first he was a Lime Hawk, but while the colors are similar, the patterns differ. Then, too, this is far from the Lime Hawk natural range. This photo was taken at night with artificial lighting. I’ll try to get a daylight shot tomorrow a.m., if he’s still there.
Thanks!
Signature: Nature’s Appreciative Spectator

Pandorus Sphinx

Pandorus Sphinx

Dear Nature’s Appreciative Spectator,
Your beauty is a Pandorus Sphinx, a North American species, unlike the Lime Hawkmoth, which is native to Europe, though we did report a North American sighting of a Lime Hawkmoth many years ago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of moths are these?
Location: East Coulee Alberta
May 27, 2016 8:26 pm
These two were spotted east of Drumheller Alberta. Im curious what they are called.
Signature: Curious Kim

Mating Modest Sphinxes

Mating Modest Sphinxes

Dear Curious Kim,
We turned to the Sphingidae of the Americas site to verify the identity of your mating Sphinx Moths, and we have determined that they are mating Modest Sphinxes,
Pachysphinx modesta, and we are amused at their seemingly immodest behavior.  The species is also called the Poplar Sphinx, and it resembles a closely related species, Pachysphinx occidentalis, which has been “delisted” on the species from Alberta page of Sphingidae of the Americas.  Interestingly the species page on Sphingidae of the Americas still states:  “Pachysphinx occidentalis occidentalis, the Big Poplar Sphinx (Wing span: 5 1/8 – 5 7/8 inches (13 – 15 cm)), flies in riparian areas and suburbs from Alberta and North Dakota west to eastern Washington; south to Texas, Arizona, southern California, and Baja California Norte.”  We will attempt to contact Bill Oehlke to see if he can provide a conclusive identification and perhaps indicate why the second species was “delisted.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: large moth
Location: Sheffield england
May 26, 2016 8:08 am
Hi as my son played in the garden he shouted for us to look at his leg and there was this big giant like moth clung onto his trousers I uploaded the pic on another site but it says its a brown bat unless that’s the name off that type of moth I don’t think its a brown bat as it would be far to small and it was 15:00 hours when it was out can you identify what it may be
Signature: sarah

Eyed Hawkmoth

Eyed Hawkmoth

Dear Sarah,
We have identified your Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae as an Eyed Hawkmoth,
Smerinthus ocellata, thanks to the UK Moths site where it states:  “Fairly well distributed throughout England and Wales, this species has a sombre, camouflaged appearance at rest, but if provoked, flashes the hindwings, which are decorated with intense blue and black ‘eyes’ on a pinkish background.  The adults fly from May to July, inhabiting woodland and suburban localities.”  If you look closely at one of your images, you can see the “eyes” on the colorful hindwings barely visible.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination