Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
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Subject: Yikes big moth or what?
Location: Lake Stevens, WA
May 2, 2016 11:53 am
Identify please is this a sphinx or moth or freak of nature ? 😜
Lake Stevens wa lived in WA my entire life this is creepy cool.
Signature: Stephanie

Sphinx Moth: Smerinthus ophthalmica

Sphinx Moth: Smerinthus ophthalmica

Dear Stephanie,
This is indeed a Sphinx Moth, albeit one with no common name.  We identified it as
Smerinthus ophthalmica on Sphingidae of the Americas, and verified that ID on BugGuide.  This species was quite recently determined to be distinct from the One Eyed Sphinx, and we would not completely rule out that as the correct identification.

Wowwwww
Totally cool they are bigger over here too 2 nd summer I’ve seen them at my house they came outta nowhere I have a wetland behind so it’s very cool.

The nearby wetlands makes perfect sense because according to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on Salicaceae including willows (Salix spp.), cottonwoods (Populus spp.), and quaking aspen (P. tremuloides)” and willow grows in wet areas.

Haaaa haaaa I have willow in my yard and there’s cotton woods in wetland that’s funny.
They are really magnificent HUGE. I did a double take when I saw him I thought was fake :)
But they seem harmless could they be damaging to my trees then?
I am just blown away by him. I’ve seen some weirdo bugs these last couple years and being I’m 42 and lived in same county forever and never seen them it’s a little shocking to see things that look like prehistoric critters

The caterpillars eat the leaves and we seriously doubt there would be so many caterpillars as to defoliate your trees.  In our opinion, they are doing no damage to the trees.

Cool ty
If never spray anyway I’m not a creepy crawler fan but it’s harmful to the vast wildlife I have. I just leave them be in peace. Don’t worry I won’t kill it :)
I only kill spiders if they enter my turf and is bigger than a me haaaa Haaa
Wetland I get some monsters I do spray outside to deter them but once in awhile I get a sneaker I’m aware they are in my home but if I don’t have to I won’t kill it I will scoop him up and back out.
I wouldn’t kill the moth he’s pretty cool and I think it’s a rare treat I got to actually see him chilling out in the sun

 

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Subject: Xanthopan morgani caterpillar drawing
Location: Afrotropical area
May 1, 2016 4:08 pm
Dear Daniel,
today I’d like to contribute a drawn sketch of Xanthopan larva and pupa, which are seldom found and seen and have not yet been shown to public as photographs for quite some decennies now, a kind of mystery considering the role and popularity of the famous moth in contexts of coevolution theories and orchid pollination – and the fact that it is spread in the entire African rainforest zone including Madagascar, and not rare at all, according to reported findings of adults… Maybe it will inspire or help somebody to catch sight of one on leafs or on a twig of an Annona plant (Annona squamosa, A. muricata, A. reticulata and other Custard apple- relatives and a few vines (Xylopia, Uvaria) from the Annonaceae-family, on which the larvae reportedly feed, or eventually another plant species not yet known as its foodplant… ); it is blue-green with whitish lateral stripes and slightly hairy, similar to the neotropical Neococytius caterpillars…
Best Thanks and wishes for the wonderful and helpful site,
Bostjan
Signature: Bostjan Dvorak

Sketch of Xanthopan by Bostjan Dvorjak

Sketch of metamorphosis of  Xanthopan morgani by Bostjan Dvorak

Thanks so much Bostjan for allowing us to post your wonderful drawings of this marvelous moth whose existence was theorized by Charles Darwin many years before it was actually discovered since the great evolutionary theorist hypothesized such a moth must exist to pollinate the orchid from Madagascar with a blossom possessing a ten inch throat.  Darwin knew only a Sphinx Moth would have a proboscis long enough to extract the nectar.  We had to correct the perspective of your images and we also increased the contrast.  We hope our digital enhancements meet with your approval.  We hope that one day one of our readers will supply us with the images you so long to see.  The coiled sheath for the proboscis is amazing.

Sketch of larva and pupa of Xanthopan morgani by Bostjan Dvorak

Sketch of larva and pupa of Xanthopan morgani by Bostjan Dvorak

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help me identify this monster moth
Location: Brisbane, Australia in autumn
April 19, 2016 12:26 am
Hi bugman,
I finished work the other day and stumbled upon this moth on a stair. I was wondering if you could please help me identify it as I have never seen an insect quite so large in my life.
P.s. If this is an undiscovered species I would like it to be called the Margotmoth
Signature: Sincerely Margot, aka the founder of the Margotmoth

Hawkmoth: Coequosa australasiae

Hawkmoth: Coequosa australasiae

Dear Margot,
First we do not have the authority to name newly discovered species.  There is a lengthy process for determining a name.  Your moth is not new to science, nor to our website.  Your Hawkmoth is
Coequosa australasiae.  You may read more about the species on Butterfly House.

Hawkmoth from Australia

Hawkmoth from Australia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible Sphinx Moth
Location: Pensacola, FL
April 10, 2016 7:19 pm
Last night my husband and I were in the garage when we saw this guy on the ceiling. After doing some Internet searching I came to the conclusion that this may be a Sphinx Moth. And he is still hanging out in our garage this evening. If it is a sphinx moth I would like to know what type and any other info about this guy. So, any ideas?
Signature: Bridget

Tersa Sphinx

Tersa Sphinx

Dear Bridget,
You are quite correct that this is a Sphinx Moth.  More specifically, it is a Tersa Sphinx, a species common in Florida.

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Subject: Moth
Location: Lancaster CA
April 10, 2016 12:48 pm
Hello
Is this a carpenter worm moth?
Signature: Lesley

Northern Ash Sphinx, we believe

Northern Ash Sphinx

Dear Lesley,
Though it resembles the Australian Wood Moths, this is actually a Sphinx Moth or Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  We believe it is the Northern Ash Sphinx or Great Ash Sphinx,
Sphinx chersis, which is profiled on the Sphingidae of the Americas site, but there are several other similar looking members of the genus Sphinx pictured on the website’s California page, and we would not rule them out.  We will contact Bill Oehlke to see if we can get a definitive identification from him.

Bill Oehlke concurs
Daniel,
Sphinx chersis, possibly an aberration or less commonly seen form. Lines on thorax and wings seem especially thick, checkered fringes are missing and some other features are reduced in their contrast to rest of wing. I had to look at it carefully. It probably has not flown yet.
Bill Oehlke

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Macon, Ga
March 19, 2016 6:05 am
My friend took this picture last night, March 18, 2016, around 10 pm on her kitchen window in east Macon, GA across the street from Ocmulgee National Monument. I told her I thought that it had recently hatched so not fully extended.
Can you tell what kind of moth this is?
Thanks so much.
Bty it was taken with a Nikon Coolpix P530.
Signature: Barbara Edwards

Small Eyed Sphinx

Small Eyed Sphinx

Dear Barbara,
This gorgeous moth is a Small Eyed Sphinx,
Paonias myops, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “Small-eyed Sphinx females call in the night flying males with an airbourne pheromone emitted from a gland at the posterior of the abdomen.  Both sexes rest with wings parallel to the resting surface, with the upper lobes of the hindwings protruding above the forewings.  The lower abdomen of the male (right) arcs upward toward the head, while the abdomen of the female hangs strait down on a vertical surface.”  This moth being presumably attracted to a light in the window, and the position of the abdomen indicates your individual is a male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination