Currently viewing the category: "Hummingbird Moths, Sphinx Moths or Hawk Moths"
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Subject: Insect in AZ
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
January 20, 2015 1:15 pm
I have 2 different photos that were taken in Scottsdale, AZ in Dec 2014. I think they are moths. These insects were gone the next day and have not been seen since. They were on our home and close to our grapefruit tree.
Signature: Stan

Obscure Sphinx

Obscure Sphinx

Dear Stan,
We believe these are Obscure Sphinxes,
Erinnyis obscura, or another species in the same genus.  The scalloped wing edges are distinctive.  This image on BugGuide looks very close, and additional images are on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.  We have written to Sphingidae expert Bill Oehlke for confirmation.

Obscure Sphinx

Obscure Sphinx

Bill Oehlke confirms genus, and provides options for species
Daniel,
They certainly appear to be Erinnyis species and could be obscura (note spelling). They could also be E. domingonis. I think there is some disagreement as to whether or not obscura and domingonis are synonymous or distinct species. I also could not rule out variation of E. ello. I would have to see hindwings in order to be more posititve. Markings on the thorax do not seem to be a positive match for any of the three species I mention. My first choice, if I had to make one, would be Erinnyis obscura.
Bill

One more thing Bill.  I was linking to the other species on your site and E. domingonis is not listed in Arizona.
Do you think that might still be a possibility?
Daniel

Good point! E. domingonis, if it is a valid species, would  very unlikely be found in Arizona as closest location so far to AZ is Texas. The other two, though, are known from Arizona.

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Subject: what bug is this
Location: Central Java, Indonesia
January 20, 2015 8:42 am
Found this in my in-law’s garden
Signature: ADP

Coffee Bean Hawkmoth

Coffee Bean Hawkmoth

Dear ADP,
This is a diurnal Sphinx Moth known as the Coffee Bean Hawkmoth,
Cephanodes hylas, and it is found in Africa, Asia and Australia.   Here is an image from India Nature Watch.

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Subject: Interesting moth
Location: Tortola in the Caribbean
January 9, 2015 4:06 pm
This came in through an open door about 8pm last night. (2 hours after dark). It is about 1 1/2 inches in length. We were unable to see any markings but what an interesting end to the abdomen! Can you identify this for us please?
Signature: Limin’

Mournful Sphinx

Mournful Sphinx

Dear Limin’,
Though your image is lacking in critical highlight detail, the form of this Mournful Sphinx,
Enyo lugubris, is quite unmistakable.  Your Mournful Sphinx, which followed this beautiful Pacific Green Sphinx, is member of the family Sphingidae with caterpillars called Hornworms, that we have posted today.

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Subject: Green moth
Location: Gilroy CA: Watsonville Road near Uvas Creek
January 17, 2015 3:11 pm
I rescued this green moth from our cat last night. I’ve never seen one like it. It was around 10 PM, high scattered clouds, and about 65° out.  My cat was chasing the green moth, which I was able to catch and release. I’ve never seen anything like it.
Signature:  Bob

Pacific Green Sphinx

Pacific Green Sphinx

Dear Bob,
This gorgeous moth is a Pacific Green Sphinx or Bear Sphinx,
 Proserpinus lucidus.  According to the Sphingidae of the Americas:  “adults fly as a single brood from late January to March and nectar at flowers. Moths can be spotted much earlier (mid December) in more southerly locations (San Diego, California; Mexico) when weather conditions are right. ”   Because you were kind enough to rescue this Pacific Green Sphinx from your cat, who we imagine was a bit miffed and missing out on a thrilling toy, we are tagging your submission with the Bug Humanitarian Award.

Pacific Green Sphinx

Pacific Green Sphinx

Hi Daniel,
Thanks—that was quick!  I just made a $25 donation to <whatsthatbug.com> to show my appreciation.
Keep up the good work.
Sincerely,
Bob Crane

Thanks so much for your generosity Bob.

You’re sure welcome.  I saw that you have a book published with some great reviews, so I ordered 2, one for my grandkids and one for me.  Quite a price range, from about $7 to $80!
Thanks to the Internet it was pretty easy to have my moth identified.  I took entomology in college, but I can’t imagine identifying the moth like we did in the olden days, trudging to the library, looking at numerous books, taking pictures, having the film developed….
Bob

Hi again Bob,
You are correct that I did write The Curious World of Bugs, and though it was well reviewed, it did not become a best seller, hence there was but a single printing.  I guess the high price means it is becoming collectable.  Perhaps there will be a second printing if there is a demand.  Digital imaging and cellular telephones that have the capablity of taking images and distributing images on the internet has changed the face of research.

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Subject: ID moth?
Location: Jerusalem, Israel
December 29, 2014 6:50 pm
Hi Bugman,
I photographed this bug on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem in November this year. At first we thought it was a hummingbird but upon looking at the photo, I think it is some kind of moth. Can you identify it?
Cheers,
Signature: Steve Blake

Diurnal Hawkmoth:  Macroglossum stellatarum

Diurnal Hawkmoth: Macroglossum stellatarum

Dear Steve,
This diurnal Hawkmoth appears to be
Macroglossum stellatarum based on this image on Israel’s Nature Site and the one on TrekNature.

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Subject: cool moth
Location: Manila, Philippines
November 30, 2014 11:29 am
Hi bugman! Saw this inside my room. I wonder if it is harmful or not.
Signature: Daryll

Green Pergasa Hawkmoth

Green Pergasa Hawkmoth

Dear Daryll,
We quickly identified your harmless Hawkmoth as a Green Pergasa Hawkmoth,
Pergasa acteus, thanks to the Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic website.

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