Currently viewing the category: "Hooktips and False Owlet Moths"
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Moth species?
Location: southern indiana
September 7, 2011 9:57 pm
Any idea on this moth species? The wings are rolled up on the moth as you see in the pic . thxs
Signature: BRIAN

Unknown Moth

Hi Brian,
Research takes time, and we are running late for work.  We are posting this as an unidentified moth and perhaps our readership will come to our assistance while we work a 13 plus hour day.

Update:  September 9, 2011
We haven’t had much time to research this request, and we are thankful to the two readers who submitted comments.  We believe this might be one of the Geometrid Moths in the genus
Pero as has been suggested by one of our readers and this example from BugGuide has the same rolled wing structure as the submitted photo.

Update:  September 9, 2011
With the newest comment to arrive, we believe this might be a Juniper Twig Geometer.  The photos posted to BugGuide are a very strong visual match.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Long shot… cute squiggly brown moth
Location: Norther Colorado mountains
July 19, 2011 9:40 am
Yea, I know noctuid moths (which I assume this guy is) can be tough. A long time moth enthusiast (all bugs actually) I leave the light on for them and love seeing who came to visit over night. I no longer kill and collect them, but I do regularly refer back to my 4-H collection.
This guy visited a couple days ago (July 11th, give or take. I can’t seem to pin him down (no pun intended). For some reason, I decided to focus my attention to identifying it this morning, 3 hours online, no avail. Any thoughts?
Norther Colorado foothills/mountains, 15 miles by crow west of Fort Collins, 40 miles by crow south of Wyoming. 8100 feet.
Signature: Matt B

I’d also like to add… if there is a need, I’d be happy to volunteer some time to help with ID requests. Especially those that are semi local to me, as I am pretty familiar with northern CO species, having collected hundreds of different species during my 10 year 4-H entomology tenure…
Feel free to fwd anything that comes in. I love the challenge  :)
Love your website!
Matt

Unknown Moth

Hi Matt,
Your are sure right about some moth identifications being extremely difficult.  We are posting your photo and indicating that it is unidentified.  We hope our readership is able to provide an identification.  We greatly appreciate your identification offer.  You might want to start to peruse our unidentified tag to see if you can provide comments to any of those postings.

Identification provided thanks to littlechkn’s comment
Seems this may be The Scribe or Lettered Habrosyne, and the images on BugGuide looks correct.  It is in the family Drepanidae, the Hooktip Moths and False Owlet Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Whats This Bug
Hi,
I live in southeastern Ohio. Could you tell me what this beautiful moth / butterfly is? I found it in the shade next to the door of my house. At first I thought it was a leaf, then I noticed it was actually an insect. I am very curious. Thank you,
Jennifer

Hi Jennifer,
This little beauty is a Rose Hooktip Moth, Oreta rosea. It is the only member of its genus in North America. BugGuide has some excellent examples of the color variations of this species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

rosewing hooktip moth
Good evening Mr. Bugman,
I just discovered your site today, and as an inveterate 1. namer, 2. shutterbug (didn’t find that one on your site) and especially 3. macro fiend I was more than delighted! I’ve already ID’d several ‘bugs’ that had been bugging me. Thank you so much. I’ve attached 5 photos – 4 I know, and one I’d like to confirm. I live in Orange County, VIRGINIA – the north central piedmont of the state. All photos have been taken within a 4 mile radius of Orange, VA (county seat). If you don’t object, I’ll send others of insects you don’t appear to have – and maybe a few that I need help with. I just don’t want to overdo it in my enthusiasm for your site. What a great service, and I’ll add that no insects are harmed in the photographic process. They are either in the wild or occasionally found deceased, although no deceased ones in this group. 2. Rosewing hooktip, (Oreta rosea) – beautiful moth, found on the ceiling of my front porch in Orange (May 2005). Taken with a flash, so the colors are a tad exaggerated. Thanks again for the wonderful site!
Best regards,
Lynne
Orange, VA

Hi Lynne,
We are overwhelmed by all the images you sent in and have chosen to post the Rose Hooktip first as this is a new species for our site. In the future, please send only one image or one species per letter. It makes our lives so much easier. Thanks so much for expressing your enthusiasm.

Good morning Daniel, I apologize for loading my first email with photos, and will in future keep to one species/photo per. I’m glad you found some of my snaps useful and that I could contribute a new species for the site. Oh, and since it might be of interest, all of my pictures have been taken using a digital Nikon 880 Coolpix (pre-October 2005) or a digital Nikon 4800 Coolpix. Cheers,
Lynne

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination