Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Floridian moths
Location: Southwest Florida
November 6, 2016 1:38 pm
Would you help me identify these two beauties?
The big yellow one, dying on its back, had similar coloring on the top side of its wings.
The reddish copper one, taking a nap on the wall, was much smaller.
Thank you!
Signature: Lost Yankee

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Dear Lost Yankee,
Both of your moths are Giant Silkmoths in the family Saturniidae.  The dead yellow moth is an Imperial Moth,
Eacles imperialis, and in our opinion, they are much more beautiful alive than dead.  Though you did not indicate from where you were transplanted, you might be interested in knowing that the Imperial Moth is found throughout eastern North America, as far west as Texas and north into Canada.  Your other moth is an Oakworm Moth in the genus Anisota, and members of this genus share a similar range, but extending west to Arizona.

Oakworm Moth

Oakworm Moth

Neat! I wondered if the yellow one was
an Imperial. Certainly has a regally wide wingspan.  Maine is where I
come from, and even though the Imperial ranges that far north, I’ve never seen it.
Too bad the Oakworm moth caterpillars feed on our beautiful live oak trees, but they grow up to be good-looking little fuzzies.
Thank you very much for your quick and informative reply, Bugman! As I explore Florida, you may hear from me again.
Lost Yankee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large moth S.A
Location: Polowane, South Africa
October 26, 2016 12:39 am
Hi there bugman. Please help ID, northern South Africa, Limpopo Prov. 13cm wingspan
Signature: Ryno J

Emperor Moth

Cabbage Emperor Moth

Dear Ryno,
This is a lovely image of a female Cabbage Emperor Moth,
Bunaea alcinoe, which is pictured on African Moths.  We frequently receive images of the caterpillars of Cabbage Emperor Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Bug on Car
Location: Winter Park, FL
October 15, 2016 8:26 am
This large looking moth was hanging on the side of a car. Hurricane Matthew recently came through, wondered if it could have been disturbed by the storm.
Signature: Maxwell D Osborne

Male Polyphemus Moth

Male Polyphemus Moth

Dear Maxwell,
This male Polyphemus Moth is a local species for you, and we don’t believe Hurricane Matthew had anything to do with its appearance.  The startling eyespot markings are hidden in your image.  Polyphmus Moths are found in all 48 lower United States.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Luna Moths
Location: Pittsburgh
October 5, 2016 1:50 pm
I’d like to plan an outing this year where we would have a higher likelihood of seeing a Luna Moth. What is the season for the Luna Moth in Pittsburgh, PA?
Signature: David

Ed. Note:  Once we learned the lovely, originally submitted image was not taken by David, it was removed and replaced with an image from our archives.

Mating Luna Moths

Mating Luna Moths (image from our archives)

Dear David,
Your Luna Moth image is positively lovely.  When did you take it?
We will request our readers who live in Western Pennsylvania and Eastern Ohio within 50 miles of Pittsburgh to write in with any personal Luna Moth sightings.  According to BugGuide, Pennsylvania sightings are between April and September, but we are not certain those sightings distinguish between caterpillars and imagos.  According to Ohio BugGuide data, May through August, skipping to October are months with sightings.  In our own archives, we would stick to images of mating pairs as that seems like peak season, in our minds.  This Swarthmore, Pennsylvania sighting is from August 5, 2016.  This Pulaski Township sighting is from June 1, 2014.  This reintroduction program from Chagrin Falls, Ohio occurs at the end of July to the beginning of August.

Thanks,
I did not take the photo, it was required for a submission. But I do volunteer with Venture Outdoors and we are planning some Citizen Science outings with respect to insects.
We did a wonderful Monarch banding trip last Sunday but did not see a single Monarch. We did see 2 pairs of mating Praying Mantises.
https://flickr.com/photos/54763394@N06/sets/72157674709386026
Thanks for your help in planning our Spring moth event!
David Bennett

Thanks for letting us know that you did NOT take the image David.  Do you have permission to post the image or was it pilfered from the internet?  We are very conscious of internet plagiarism and copyright infringement, and we will have to remove your submitted image and replace it with one from our own archives if you do not have permission.  Our standard submission form clearly states:  “By submitting an identification request and/or photo(s), you give WhatsThatBug.com permission to use your words and image(s) on their website and other WhatsThatBug.com publications. Also, you swear that you either took the photo(s) yourself or have explicit permission from the photographer or copyright holder to use the image.”  We hope folks from the Pittsburgh area write in with any information they might have about sightings from previous years.  You might want to check back nearer to your trip planning time to see if there are any comments submitted to this posting.

It’s not my image, and I did not intend to post, just wanted to ask a question
David Bennett

Thanks David.  We will remove it and replace it with an image from our own archives.

I’m so happy to discover your website and I will be happy to post REAL pictures in the future. For example I lead a butterfly event every July that participates in the NABA count.
David Bennett

We look forward to future submissions from you David.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’ve lived here for 40 years. Never noticed anything like her before now. What us she?!?
Location: Wildomar, CA USA.. Southwest Riverside County
October 3, 2016 6:58 am
Good morning. We have had a visitor on our garage. She was laying eggs for more than 2 days. She arrived in the late hours on last day of September. She was gone on the morning of October 3. I’ve never seen anything like her before. Please help us identify her. Also, any infornation on how to ensure her little ones the best possible start would be great! We have become oddly attached to all their welfare in the last couple days. She is about 2.5 to 3 inches long and about 1.5 inches tall.
Signature: Molly W.

Hubbard's Small Silkmoth laying Eggs

Hubbard’s Small Silkmoth laying Eggs

Dear Molly,
This is a Hubbard’s Small Silkmoth,
Sphingicampa hubbardi, and it is not a common species in California.  BugGuide lists the range as “Extreme eastern California, southern Nevada and southern Arizona to western Texas” but BugGuide has no records from California.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on Wright’s acacia, honey mesquite and catclaw acacia.”  Hopefully you have some native acacia plants in the vicinity and you can transfer the caterpillars to the plants when they hatch.  Though there are several similar looking species in the genus found in the Southwest, to the best of our knowledge, this is the only species found in California.  The caterpillars are also quite impressive.  We will send your images to Bill Oehlke for verification, and we hope you allow him to post your images to his own very comprehensive site as he has no images of eggs posted. 

Eggs of Hubbard's Small Silkmoth

Eggs of Hubbard’s Small Silkmoth

Post her eggs to your heart’s content. I will purchase the necessary Acacia for her babies in the morning, as we have none in the area. Thank you so much for your help!

If you are successful at rearing the caterpillars, we would love to continue postings of the life cycle of Hubbard’s Small Silkmoths.

I’ll do my best. How long until the eggs are expected to hatch? What shall I purchase to increase the odds? These eggs are on the side of the garage. I can’t imagine it the right environment. Also, more moths are in the area. We have now seen about 4 of them. So I expect more eggs in the near future. 🙂  I have more moths. Two more laying eggs. Our friend has one, too. The other moth is in La Cresta. They are very far from their normal home, yes?

We suspect the eggs should hatch within two weeks.  If you have so many adult moths, there must be a nearby food plant.  As we stated earlier, California is considered part of the normal range, but there are always pockets within the ranges of insects where populations are higher as well as areas where a species is absent.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A silk moth of sorts?
Location: Jungle near. Lonawala, Maharashtra, Indian
September 22, 2016 1:43 pm
I took these photos at night in late monsoon season in the Western Ghats of. India near Lonawala. It was the second or third time I had seen this fantastic moth but not on consecutive seasons. The colour is not touched up and in the day was still a stunning brilliant yellow colour, like a classic deep daffodil yellow!
Signature: Suvajra

Golden Emperor Moth

Golden Emperor Moth

Dear Suvajra,
This spectacular moth is a Golden Emperor Moth,
Loepa katinka, a species we identified on Global Biodiversity Information Facility.  The Golden Emperor Moth is also pictured on Project Noah.  

Golden Emperor Moth

Golden Emperor Moth

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for identifying this moth.  Yes, spectacular, isn’t it!  Golden Emperor suits it to a ‘T’.  And found also in Taiwan, which makes me wonder if it is not an import to India.
Thanks again,
Suvajra

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination