Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
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Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Northern Mozambique
April 20, 2015 11:00 am
Hi, I found this guy on the ground in Nampula, Mozambique. We can’t find anything that it will eat and we are wondering what to feed it and what it will turn into. We have it in a bug box to hopefully watch the metamorphosis. We also found an amazing moth we’d love to identify. Thank you!
Signature: mj

Lobobunaea angasana

Lobobunaea angasana

Dear mj,
The Giant Silkmoth is a much easier identification than the Caterpillar, so we are starting there.  Your moth, which we identified on Bizland, is
Lobobunaea angasana.

Lobobunaea angasana

Lobobunaea angasana

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Moth
Location: Austin, Texas
April 8, 2015 3:44 pm
We have a moth that we found on the outside of our house near our light. It leaves every night and returns the next day, and has been for a couple days now. It is quite large relative to the moths we usually see. It is about the size of my fist when the moth is closed like in the picture, maybe even a little bigger. Do you know what kind it is and why it keeps returning to our house?
Signature: Jamie Dawson

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Jamie,
This Polyphemus Moth is most likely being attracted to your light.  Polyphemus Moths do not feed as adults and only live a few days, long enough to mate, so your nightly visits by this individual will end soon.

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Subject: Huge Moth
Location: South Central Texas
March 27, 2015 6:08 pm
Could you identify this moth for me? I live at the easternmost edge of the Texas Hill Country where cedar and oak trees are prolific. The moth’s wings are about 3 inches in length. It clung to this brick in this position for 3 days. The antennae are very interesting. I believe it is a male. Many thanks!
Signature: Rita K, Schertz, TX

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Rita,
This beauty is a Polyphemus Moth,
Antheraea polyphemus, and you can tell by the feathery antennae that it is a male.  We hope you were able to see him with his wings opened, because the incredible eyespots on his wings are quite showy.

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Subject: Ecuador cloud forest bugs
Location: mindo, ecuador
March 15, 2015 8:39 am
Both of these were found on the same morning in my house.. Any clues as to ID?
Signature: PB

Possibly Automeris abdomiorientalis

Possibly Automeris argentifera

Dear PB,
We are splitting your two requests apart so they can be better archived on our site.  We believe your moth may be
Automeris abdomiorientalis, and we are going to check with Bill Oehlke to get his opinion.  There are not many images of this species online, but you can compare your individual to the images posted on BOLD Systems Taxonomy.

Bill Oehlke Responds
Hi Daniel,
It is Automeris banus argentifera which has now been given full species status as Automeris argentifera.
Very nice image. Can you get permission for me to use image??
Thanks,
Bill

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Subject: Luna Moth
Location: spring TX
March 13, 2015 8:16 pm
This moth flow into my kitchen this evening and i was looking it up and your web sight showed up. 3/13/15 at 10:00pm
Signature: David liles

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear David,
Thanks for sending in the first Luna Moth sighting of 2015.  Normally we begin to receive reports in February, and we are curious why our first report arrived late this year.

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Ceanothus Silkmoth Comment
Location:  Anderson, CA
March 5, 2015
I just found one tonight (3-5-15) at our home in Anderson, CA didn’t know what it was for sure so I looked and this image came up, the one I found looks the exact same! Beautiful moth.
Ali

We wish you had sent in a photo as we have not posted a Ceanothus Silkmoth image recently.

This is the moth we found it was battered pretty bad but still flying.

Battered Ceanothus Silkmoth

Battered Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Ali,
Thanks for sending us your image of a battered Ceanothus Silkmoth.  Adults only live a few days, long enough to mate and lay eggs.  They do not even feed as adults as they do not have working mouthparts.  Adult life is dangerous for a Silkmoth.  They store fat while a caterpillar to get them through the adult stage, and they are an excellent food source for birds and other predators.  Hopefully your individual mated and was able to pass on its genes to a new generation.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination