Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: luna moth
Location: nc
May 3, 2016 5:54 am
hello, please help !
I have (what I believe is a male) luna moth by my front door for several days now. I was hoping it would have flown away at night but it hasn’t and now its at the bottom of the door step and does not look like its in a comfortable spot his wings tip bent as he is long. I have read a previous post that someone had moved one to a tree , I would do that but its pouring out and he is currently sheltered from my porch. please advise what I should do as I do not want to see it die
Signature: thanks

Male Luna Moth

Male Luna Moth

Like other Giant Silkmoths, Luna Moths do not feed as adults, meaning they must survive off of energy in the form of fat stored while the caterpillar was feeding.  Flying takes tremendous energy.  The female Luna Moth lives as an adult to mate and then lay her eggs.  The male Luna Moth flies to locate a female when he senses her pheromones.  He does not fly around needlessly.  If there is no female nearby, your male Luna may be waiting until he catches the scent of a female before he flies off.  In a previous Cecropia Moth posting, we recommended relocating the female so that she might lay eggs.  There would be no purpose to relocate this male unless it is to place him nearer to a mate.  Adult Giant Silkmoths, including the Luna Moth, only live a few days, perhaps a week at most.  Sadly, if this male does not sense a female soon and fly to mate with her, he may die at your front door.  Our advice is to wait and let nature take its course.

thank you so much for responding , I did relocate him to a tree in my front yard so no stray cats in the area will eat him as a previous posting on your website had mentioned. Im so happy I found your website and was educated about these beautiful moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth
Location: southern oregon
April 27, 2016 11:32 pm
Dear Burman,
I see this moth all the time and would love to know what it is. I thought it was a polphemus but the eyes are placed wrong…
Thank you
Signature: Jessica Hulsey

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Jessica,
This gorgeous moth is a Ceanothus Silkmoth, a west coast species related to the Polyphemus Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Newly emerged moth
Location: Randolph Co Indiana
April 26, 2016 3:01 pm
My daughter’s third graders found a cocoon on a building in October in NE Indiana. This morning, one of them yelled “That thing is moving!” And this interesting guy came out… Is it fully metamorphosed? Will the wings expand? What IS it?
Signature: Ms Lovern’s mom

Newly Eclosed Cecropia Moth

Newly Eclosed Cecropia Moth

Dear Ms Lovern’s mom,
Sometimes when an insect emerges from pupation in an enclosed container, the wings do not fully expand.  We hope this Cecropia Moth eventually expanded its wings and was capable of flight, at which point we would recommend releasing it.  Judging by the antennae, it looks like a female.  Even if her wings do not fully expand, she can release pheromones and mate.  In that case, she may attract a mate and lay viable eggs, which could be raised by your daughter’s class, though following that generation may take an entire year.

Thanks! I’ll pass this on to my daughter!

Hello,
My mother messaged you recently with photos of a moth that emerged from a cocoon in my classroom.  Her wings have not yet expanded but it appears she may be laying eggs in the terrarium??  Should we release her even with her closed wings so that she can try to find a mate or wait to see if her wings expand?
Thanks,
Mrs. Lovern

Dear Mrs. Lovern,
If her wings have not expanded after 24 hours, they most likely are either deformed or injured.  Giant Silkmoths only live a few days and they do not eat.  She will not be able to fly if her wings are deformed and her eggs will not hatch if they are not fertilized.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on leaves of various trees and shrubs including alder, apple, ash, beech, birch, box-elder, cherry, dogwood, elm, gooseberry, maple, plum, poplar, white oak, willow.  may also feed on lilac and tamarack.”  You can try releasing her on one of those trees and she may attract a mate.

Update April 29, 2016
Thank you for your reply we did release her and she now has clusters of eggs in the tree where we left her.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found this on my sisters doorstep
Location: Newport news va
April 24, 2016 8:13 am
I need help. My sister found this on her doorstep yesterday.
Signature: Help

Luna Moths

Luna Moths

Thanks for sending these great images of a pair of Luna Moths.  The male is the individual on the left with the more feathery antennae.  Like other Giant Silkmoths, Luna Moths do not feed as adults, and when a female emerges, she has only a few days to mate and lay eggs.  She releases pheromones, and the male is able to detect her presence, often from many miles away, because his antennae are sensory organs that can sense the pheromones. 

Luna Moths

Luna Moths

Thank you for your response.  I really do appreciate it.  Have a great day

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Colorful unknown insect
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
April 22, 2016 4:32 am
This bug was on the garage door frame yesterday. It was about 10cm long and 4-5 cm wide.
Signature: Gramma Patty

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear Gramma Patty,
This gorgeous creature is a male Luna Moth, one of our favorite insects.  We just posted our first Luna Moth image of the season a few days ago.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pretty Green Moth
Location: Virginia Beach
April 19, 2016 1:22 pm
Hey there,
Spotted this big guy hanging out in the window of the local grocery store, above some bags of mulch.
It’s wing looks damaged though :(
Never seen a moth that color before. Is it even a moth?
Signature: Lorraine

Male Luna Moth

Male Luna Moth

Dear Lorraine,
Even with damaged wings, this male Luna Moth, our first report of 2016, is a beautiful creature.  We suspect an encounter with a predatory bird resulted in the wing damage.  Normally we get our first Luna Moth reports of the year in late January or early February from Texas or Florida, and by May we get reports from Maine and Canada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination