Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Polyphemus?
Location: Contra Costa County, CA
April 16, 2014 3:27 pm
He was on the window seal at the office. I tried to get good pictures of the front and wings.
Signature: Fel

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Fel,
Thanks for sending your images of a male Polyphemus Moth.  We don’t get many Polyphemus images from California.  Most are from the states east of Texas and Canada.  You followup email offered to submit lower resolution files.  We can handle large files and we like the best quality available since we need to reformat every image prior to posting anyways. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s that bug in Mobile, AL?
Location: Mobile, AL
April 4, 2014 9:54 am
Daughter saw this today at a park. Can you identify?
Signature: Interested Nana

Male Polyphemus Moth

Male Polyphemus Moth

Dear Interested Nana,
This beauty is a male Polyphemus Moth, one of the Giant Silkmoths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green caterpillar with spikes
Location: Limpopo, South Africa
March 30, 2014 11:15 pm
My mother is trying to idenify this caterpillar. It is green with spikes onthe back. She lives om a farm near Musina in Limpopo Province, South Africa
Signature: Curious

What's that Silkworm???

What’s that Silkworm???

Dear Curious,
We are a bit excited that your Silkworm looks very much like the first South African species we researched, the African Moon Moth,
Argema mimosae.  The caterpillar of Argema mimosae resembles your caterpillar, since both have double rows of horns, what we suspect to be an uncommon feature.  This image on FlickR shows the distinctive intersegmental zones.  The imago is one of the loveliest and most elegant Giant Silkmoths in South Africa.

After your email I did a quick search. It looks like it is the African Moon Moth Caterpillar (Argema mimosae)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fuzzy/furry moth seen in Austin, Texas
Location: Austin, Texas, USA
March 27, 2014 6:59 pm
Hi there -
A friend saw this moth today in Austin, Texas outside a coffee shop, and I was hoping you could help me identify what sort of moth it was.
Thank you!
Signature: Mark Miller

Cecropia Moth

Cecropia Moth

Hi Mark,
This impressive Cecropia Moth is a male as evidenced by his very feathery antennae.  We thought a Texas sighting was a bit unusual as we think of the Cecropia as being an eastern species, but BugGuide indicates that Texas is the western end of the range.

Awesome!!  Thank you for the feedback Daniel  :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth ID
Location: South Africa
March 21, 2014 8:13 pm
Saw this gorgeous moth near the western entrance to Kruger national Park in South Africa, February, 2014. It’s wingspread was about 4 or 5 inches. Do you know what it is?
Signature: Jeanne

Southern Cat-Eyed Emperor

Southern Cat’s-Eyed Emperor

Hi Jeanne,
This beautiful moth is a Southern Cat’s-Eyed Emperor,
Aurivillius fuscus, and it you disturbed it, you would see that its common name refers to the eyespots on the underwings which will startle a predator into thinking it might be about to be eaten by a much larger predator.  The Southern Cat’s-Eyed Emperor is well represented on ISpot.

Thank you so much for identifying this moth.  I can see how those eye spots would be intimidating.    Ironically, the evening before I’d seen a rhinoceros beetle near the same spot.  It’s pretty cool, too.
Jeanne

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of moth is this?
Location: Austin, TX 78731
March 21, 2014 9:38 am
Hi there,
On the night of March 19th 2014 I saw this little guy/girl on my window. The body was about the size of a large thumb and was very furry/fuzzy. It had leaf-like antennae and large full wings. When I turned the flash on my camera phone the moth closed its wings but was not frightened away. I apologize for the poor quality of one of the three photos. I was just curious to figure out what it was.
Thank you!
Signature: Kimberly Spears

Male Polyphemus Moth

Male Polyphemus Moth

Hi Kimberly,
You should have tried to see this male Polyphemus Moth from outside the house because his coloration is much more dramatic on the dorsal view.  The ventral view that you have provided most likely acts as a type of camouflage coloration that will blend in with wood and leaves, but the dorsal view includes dramatic eyespots, that when they are revealed, would likely startle a predator into sensing it was about to be eaten by a much larger predator with huge eyes.  The male uses his well developed antennae to sense the pheromones of the female, allowing him to locate her so they can mate and reproduce.

Thank you so much for your reply!
I just moved to a very wooded area and expect to find many little creatures out here.
Have a wonderful weekend!
Kimberly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination