Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Luna moth
Location: Wytheville VA mountains
August 31, 2015 2:59 pm
This beauty was on our car bumper when we overnighted in Wytheville VA in early August. I thought it was so beautiful. I’d never seen one before. Unfortunately it was injured, missing 1 antenna. It was barely moving when I placed it on the ground. FB friends identified it for me.
Signature: Jane Price

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear Jane,
The remaining plumose antenna indicates that this is a male Luna Moth.  Luna Moths do not eat as adults, and they live solely to reproduce.  The male spends his adult life searching for a mate, and once mated, he has fulfilled his purpose.  The mated female Luna Moth’s sole purpose is to search for the appropriate food for her brood and to lay her eggs on, according to BugGuide, leaves from trees:  “including white birch (
Betula papyrifera), persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua), hickories (Carya), walnuts (Juglans), pecans, and sumacs (Rhus).”  We would like to think that your male Luna Moth fulfilled his purpose.

Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big yellow butterfly
Location: Croatia
August 26, 2015 4:05 pm
Do you know what is the name of this beautiful butterfly?
Signature: Yellow butterfly

Japanese Silkmoth

Japanese Silkmoth

This is not a butterfly, but rather, a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae.  Our first matching image in researching its identity was found on Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa where it is identified as a Japanese Oak Silkmoth, Antheraea yamamai, and on SummitPost it states:  “Europe’s largest moth: Japanese Oak Silkmoth (Antheraea yamamai). Its wing span is 11-15 cm.  Originally it lived only in Japan, but it was imported into Europe I think in the middle of the 20th century. A few of them escaped from the farm where they were hosted, and since then it widespread in a few CEE countries, living on oak leaves.”  According to Stock Photo, it was:  “introduced in Europe for silk production.”

Sue Dougherty, Juliett Moth, Jen Nay, Jeff Lanterman, Aundrea Murillo-Faynik, Eve Bennett, Melissa Covey, Jessica M. Schemm, Ann Levitsky liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Butterfly or Mothra?
Location: Washington, DC
August 11, 2015 5:19 am
Dear Bugman,
Yesterday morning I opened my front door and promptly was ready to become an agoraphobe, because of what was awaiting me on my porch. While my initial thought was it was the size of a football, I will now acquiesce that perhaps a child’s football is more accurate – not an NFL sized one. The wingspan was about 5″ – 6″.
Still…
Anyhoo, my fearless father poked it, and it fluttered to the ground, appearing quite dead, allowing him to snap the attached picture. However, as he prepared to move it, it suddenly came back to life (perhaps it is a Zombie Mothra) and flew away.
Which lead to a debate about whether it was a Butterfly, Moth, or alien sent to kill me. (Suffice to say I’m not the world’s biggest insect fan).
Can you help?
Signature: Not-a-bug-girl

Male Polyphemus Moth

Male Polyphemus Moth

Dear Not-a-bug-girl,
This male Polyphemus Moth is a member of the Giant Silkmoth family Saturniidae, and adults do not have functioning mouthparts, so they are incapable of either eating or biting.  Helping with the identification was an easy matter, but it seems convincing you that insects are wondrous creatures might be a bit more difficult.

I sincerely thank you for your help!  I’m going to endeavor to be less scream-and-run-crying-like-a-baby about insects, but I make no promises.  I *did* however this morning refrain from squishing a small white spider in my house and instead lured it onto a piece of paper and relocated it outside.  Baby steps…  :-)

Aundrea Murillo-Faynik, Sharon Warren, Nancy Hildebrand, Sue Dougherty, Veikko Juhani Loponen, Jana McAtee Corley, Kimberly Stephenson, Casey Marlow, Tip Crawford, Heather Duggan-Christensen, Mary Sheridan Page Fatzinger, Jaye Ridet, Norman Gems, J Amber Z Vartorella, Jenny Roberts, Lauri Taylor, Ann Levitsky, Melissa Covey, Joani Tompkins, Anna Fletcher liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful big moths
Location: Ripley mississippi
August 7, 2015 9:39 am
Hello I live in Ripley mississippi and woke to these beautiful moths on my porch what kind are they?
Signature: S.mckeown

Royal Walnut Moth

Royal Walnut Moth

Dear S. mckeown,
Both of your moths are Giant Silkmoths in the family Saturniidae.  The redder individual is a Royal Walnut Moth and the yellow and purplish moth is a male Imperial Moth.

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Luna Moth in Virginia
Location: Midlothian, VA
July 31, 2015 8:34 am
This was a luna moth I spotted yesterday in Midlothian, VA. I had never seen one before! It is amazing! I put my finger up to it to try to show how large it is. All I really accomplished was to show how much I need a manicure! :)
Also, just an FYI – your site has really tacky ads with very inappropriate content. I won’t recommend children to visit this site because of that. I closed it out and commented that it was inappropriate. Just wanted to let you know so you could contact your provider or something.
Signature: Nancy Morin

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear Nancy,
Thanks for sending in your image of a gorgeous Luna Moth.  We did not receive as many submissions of Luna Moths this year as we have in the past.  Thanks for expressing your concern regarding “tacky ads with very inappropriate content” but the fact is that we cannot afford to run our site without Google ads.  Out of curiosity, we viewed our homepage just prior to crafting our response to you, and we found ads for Solar Energy, Dresses and a Flea and Tick Collar on our own computer.  A few minutes later those were replaced by a popular car company, a medical condition with unsavory symptoms and extreme urban stunts.  Because of the preponderance of exterminators that use Google Ads, and because we cannot control the advertisers, many years ago we added the disclaimer on our site above the first ad that “What’s That Bug? does not endorse extermination” to distance our actual content from the advertisements.  It is our understanding that Google ads are also very specific to the personal computer upon which they appear.  According to Wikipedia, the advertisements :  “are targeted to site content and audience,” meaning that the activity on your own computer has some effect on the ads that are generated.  So, if someone using your computer did research on buying a new car, when you later visit What’s That Bug? you might see car ads appear.  You were not very specific about the content you observed, but at least we have never seen a Google ad for pornography crop up on our site.  In a perfect world, we could operate without any advertisements, but that time has not yet come.  We are sorry that you cannot recommend the site to children because we believe our actual content is very PG rated, and when we do address adult themes, we resort to wit before vulgarity.

More on our Google Ads
Your Page Ads
August 5, 2015 4:25 pm
OK…I love butterflies but your ads like the one below “lengthen Your Healthspan” with the naked woman with black thin leather straps around her “flesh” is unexceptible for your PG site.  The other person commenting recently was correct.
Signature: Lee

Thanks for your concern Lee, but as we stated previously, we cannot control the content of the google ads and we cannot run our site without advertisers.  We will copy our technical staff to further investigate.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: imperial moth
Location: chesterton, Indiana
July 26, 2015 6:14 pm
This moth has black spots that remind me of mildew spots..is this a disease? Or something i should be concerned about. I have 3 acres of flower gardens and am afraid if its contageous in may lose all my butterfly and moths
Signature: kimmy t

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Dear Kimmy,
This Imperial Moth looks perfectly normal to us and we do not believe you have to worry about it spreading a horrible plague to all your butterflies and moths.

Sue Dougherty, J Amber Z Vartorella, Melanie Conover, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Laura Maura, Ann Levitsky liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination