Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large moth
Location: Northern Ohio – Seneca County
May 23, 2016 9:14 pm
My son came across this moth on our evening walk/run tonight (5/23/16). We live in Northern Ohio about 35 miles South of the lake in Seneca County.
Very pretty and large. It was neat to see. Just wondering what type of moth it might be.
Signature: Michelle Hoepf

Cecropia Moth

Cecropia Moth

Dear Michelle,
This is a female Cecropia Moth, and she is laden with eggs.  Like other members in her family Saturniidae, the Cecropia Moth only lives long enough to mate and lay eggs.  Adults do not feed.

Thank you for the information.  I appreciate it. I am glad I came across your website.  We learned about other moths from other posts and questions posted.   Thanks again for you help!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: This guy is near my Luna moth.
Location: Reston virginia.
May 14, 2016 6:51 pm
I have a beautiful Luna moth at my front door and another large brown moth I can’t identify on my outdoor light.
Questions.
1 are Luna moths endangered by weather in th 30’s?
2 his wings are quivering. What does that mean?
3 what is the brown moth on my lamp?
4 there’s a toad hanging out near the Luna. Will he eat him/her?
Thank you. So happy I found your website.
Signature: Love nature.

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Love nature,
All of the preserved native open space in Reston is obviously having a positive impact on wildlife.  Adult Giant Silkmoths, including Luna Moths, emerge from the cocoon when conditions, including temperature, are conducive to reproduction.  If temperatures dip to the low 30s, the moths will likely not fly and await a warming trend, but if they are sheltered, they will most likely survive.  Quivering wings are sometimes evident just prior to a moth beginning to fly, and the phenomenon is explained on BugGuide:  “The shaking behavior is a method of regulating body temperature, similar to shivering in humans. Though these are ‘cold-blooded’ animals, their nocturnal nature forces them to be active in lower temperatures, so the shivering heats up the flight muscles enough to expend the massive amounts of energy required to take off.”  Your brown moth is a male Polyphemus Moth, a species with pronounced eyespots on the ventral surface.  Regarding your final question, we believe you are mistaken.  That appears to be a cat and not a toad that is checking out your Luna Moth.  A cat can do considerable damage to a Luna Moth, including mortally wounding it. 

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Thank you for your quick response.  That was my cat wishing she were on the other side of the door (which will NEVER happen). The toad was out of sight of my camera.  My husband moved him down the porch for the evening.  The Luna was gone this morning so I hope he/she is ok.  These beautiful moths come to my home annually.
Love your website.  Thank you so much.
Debi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2007/08/14/indian-moon-moths/Subject: Looks like moth
Location: Rock island, il
May 10, 2016 3:37 am
Found this bug. Not sure what it is
Signature: Barb

Luna MOth

Luna Moth

Dear Barb,
Though it has similar looking relatives in other parts of the world like the Indian Moon Moth, no other North American species looks remotely like your Luna Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large moth
Location: Panama, Azuero Peninsula
May 8, 2016 4:25 pm
Hello Bugman,
We live in Panama (pacific coast) and a few days ago, after the first rains, this large moth (wing span about 22 cm (8 inch) honored us with a visit. Do you have any idea what family or species this is?
Best regards and many thanks in advance
Signature: Kees and Loes

Giant Silkmoth: Rhescyntis hippodamia norax

Giant Silkmoth: Rhescyntis hippodamia norax

Dear Kees and Loes,
This spectacular Giant Silkmoth from the family Saturniidae is a female
Rhescyntis hippodamia norax, which we identified on the World’s Largest Saturniidae site and then verified on Nature Watch where we learned the species ranges “from Mexico to Brazil.”  The species is also pictured on Costa Rican Moths and on FlickR.  Adult moths from this family do not feed.  They have atrophied mouthparts and they survive off of fat stored by the caterpillar.  Adults usually live less than a week, long enough to mate and lay eggs.

Hi Daniel,
We highly appreciate your very fast identification service and quick reply.
Feel free to use our photograph for your database and other educational uses.
Thank you again.
Loes and Kees

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: luna moth
Location: nc
May 3, 2016 5:54 am
hello, please help !
I have (what I believe is a male) luna moth by my front door for several days now. I was hoping it would have flown away at night but it hasn’t and now its at the bottom of the door step and does not look like its in a comfortable spot his wings tip bent as he is long. I have read a previous post that someone had moved one to a tree , I would do that but its pouring out and he is currently sheltered from my porch. please advise what I should do as I do not want to see it die
Signature: thanks

Male Luna Moth

Male Luna Moth

Like other Giant Silkmoths, Luna Moths do not feed as adults, meaning they must survive off of energy in the form of fat stored while the caterpillar was feeding.  Flying takes tremendous energy.  The female Luna Moth lives as an adult to mate and then lay her eggs.  The male Luna Moth flies to locate a female when he senses her pheromones.  He does not fly around needlessly.  If there is no female nearby, your male Luna may be waiting until he catches the scent of a female before he flies off.  In a previous Cecropia Moth posting, we recommended relocating the female so that she might lay eggs.  There would be no purpose to relocate this male unless it is to place him nearer to a mate.  Adult Giant Silkmoths, including the Luna Moth, only live a few days, perhaps a week at most.  Sadly, if this male does not sense a female soon and fly to mate with her, he may die at your front door.  Our advice is to wait and let nature take its course.

thank you so much for responding , I did relocate him to a tree in my front yard so no stray cats in the area will eat him as a previous posting on your website had mentioned. Im so happy I found your website and was educated about these beautiful moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth
Location: southern oregon
April 27, 2016 11:32 pm
Dear Burman,
I see this moth all the time and would love to know what it is. I thought it was a polphemus but the eyes are placed wrong…
Thank you
Signature: Jessica Hulsey

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Ceanothus Silkmoth

Dear Jessica,
This gorgeous moth is a Ceanothus Silkmoth, a west coast species related to the Polyphemus Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination