Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Possible Moth
Location: Northern California Sierra Nevadas 6200ft
August 23, 2016 2:41 pm
This creature was spotted in the Sierra Nevada mountains in Northern California. What is it?
Signature: Tim Green

Newly Eclosed Pandora Moth

Newly Eclosed Pandora Moth

Dear Tim,
This is a newly eclosed Pandora Moth,
Coloradia pandora, as you can verify by comparing it to this BugGuide image.  The caterpillars pupate underground, and your image is of a freshly metamorphosed adult. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Bronx, NY, 10467
August 10, 2016 7:30 pm
So it was around 9pm, I’m using the bathroom and I hear a PLAT and I look and i see this giant moth, I’ve never seen this before in New York. I didn’t even know we had moths like this. Do you have any idea of what this is?
Signature: Corinthia Ferreiras

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Corinthia,
This is probably the ghostliest image we have ever received of a Polyphemus Moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow and red moth from Costa Rica
Location: Northeastern Costa Rica
August 8, 2016 2:36 am
Here is another fairly striking moth that I haven’t been able to put a name to.
It was taken in lowland forest, at the La Suerte Biolgical Station, in northeastern Costa Rica, on July 18, 2009.
Thanks in advance
Signature: Thibaud Aronson

Giant Silkmoth: Xanthodirphia amarilla

Giant Silkmoth: Xanthodirphia amarilla

Hi again Thibaud,
We started with the World’s Largest Saturniidae Site and we found several mounted specimens representing
Xanthodirphia amarilla, but no images of living individuals.  The World’s Largest Sturniidae Site states:  “Males come in to lights readily, but females are seldom taken at lights.”  The markings on your individual look like it is most likely a male.  We did locate a few images of a live individual on the Gallery Kunzweb site.  When especially nice images like your own are submitted to us, we frequently contact Bill Oehlke who maintains an excellent database of both Saturniids and Sphingids for verification, and we also request permission for Bill Oehlke to post the images.  We hope you will allow Bill to use this lovely image of an equally lovely moth. 

Bill Oehlke Comments
Thanks, Daniel,
It could be either Xanthodirphia abbreviata or Xanthodirphia amarilla. Describers of abbreviata indicate forewing is always less than 4cm long  while that of amarilla is always greater than 4cm.
The type specimen of abbreviata shows yellow specimen with grey brown markings and relatively small median field. In same publication, amarilla is also yellow but with more reddish brown markings and a larger median field (am and pm lines not  so close together), so I favour amarilla.
Bill Oehlke

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Pa
August 5, 2016 9:06 pm
Large yellow moth-about 6″ across; in PA.
Signature: Tina

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Dear Tina,
Judging by the size of the abdomen, this Imperial Moth is a female full of eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: plant-like creature
Location: Swarthmore, PA
August 5, 2016 4:51 am
This, which I took at first to be a plant, was clinging to a lamp post this morning. What is it please?
Signature: talluncle31

Mating Luna Moths

Mating Luna Moths

Dear talluncle31,
Though we have already received several images of Luna Moths this year, we are especially thrilled to post and feature your mating pair of Luna Moths, arguably the most distinctive looking North American moth species.  The male in the pair has the more feathery antennae, which he uses to sense the pheromones of the female, who is full of eggs and has the fatter abdomen.  Luna Moths do not eat as adults, and they live only long enough to mate and procreate.

Mating Luna Moths

Mating Luna Moths

Thank you very much for the identification of the Luna Moths. They were still there as it got dark last evening, but no longer in contact. This morning they were gone.
Talluncle31

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of moth is this
Location: Cypress,TX
August 3, 2016 7:23 pm
We found a large moth (5″ across) on the edge of our pool on Aug 2 in Cypress TX. Reddish brown with eyespots, some black on the lower wings. Think it layed eggs on the edge of the pool. Was gone by dark. It was really gorgeous. Can you tell me what kind of moth it was? I can send a picture.
Signature: Cheryl Claybough

Polyphemus Moth

Polyphemus Moth

Dear Cheryl,
This lovely moth is a Polyphemus Moth.

Thanks so much for the quick response.  We just moved to the Houston area and this was the first one I have seen. It stayed for quite awhile without moving right about the waterline of our pool.  Up close you could tell it had many of the same colors as our pool tiles.
Also I really appreciate your website.

The Polyphemus Moth has been reported from all 48 continental United States as well as across Canada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination