Currently viewing the category: "Giant Silk Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth in southern New Jersey
Location: southern New Jersey
July 18, 2014 10:17 am
I saw this yellow and lavender moth on an ATM July 18 2014. Only in inch or two long . Too small to be an imperial moth I think? Thanks
Signature: Jim B

Rosy Maple Moth

Rosy Maple Moth

Hi Jim,
This pretty moth is a Rosy Maple Moth and it is in the family Saturniidae which includes the Imperial Moth you mentioned.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mad moth disease
Location: Clarksville, tn
July 18, 2014 3:30 pm
Let me tell you about this moth, it was pretty big. A little smaller than a luna moth, I found it while coming home from work. It was smashing itself into the ground over and over and over, and was so loud I thought it was a dog with long claws trotting up the street to me. I made an attempt to catch it, but the damn thing would not stop it’s furious flapping frenzy. Woke up this morning to find it dead on my porch with it’s abdomin busted out like it was possessed by something unholy! I’m mostly just curious, what kind of moth and what do you think did it in? Personally I’m thinking parasite possession!
Signature: Skye

Bedraggled Imperial Moth

Bedraggled Imperial Moth

Dear Skye,
Based on its condition, this Bedraggled Imperial Moth was at the end of its short life, and it appears it encountered considerable trauma, perhaps getting caught in a storm or falling victim to some predator like a domestic cat or dog or possibly a bird.  One cannot appreciate the beauty of this lovely moth in its present condition, and we have numerous images of more pristine Imperial Moths on our site.  Like other members of the family Saturniidae, Imperial Moths do not feed as adults and generally live for less than a week, long enough to mate and lay eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A type of polyphemus moth?
Location: Canton, GA
July 12, 2014 4:25 pm
Hi, can you help identify this moth. A small swarm came to my deck this afternoon, only one is still here. North Georgia, wooded area. There is also a large white spot on the lower wing (white spot, on the purple wing if opened).
Signature: Christine

Oakworm Moth

Oakworm Moth

Hi Christine,
This is an Oakworm Moth in the genus
Anisota, and it our opinion, it looks like the Pink Striped Oakworm Moth, Anisota virginiensis, that is pictured on BugGuide.  Oakworm Moths and the Polyphemus Moth are in the same family, Saturniidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Central PA
July 12, 2014 9:00 am
I live in central PA and found this moth that looks like an owl…I would love to know the name of it!
Signature: Ricki Light

Io Moth

Io Moth

Hi Ricki,
Owls are top of the foodchain predators, and if you think about it, the ability to mimic an owl would be a very effective defense mechanism, especially creatures who are preyed upon by creatures that might be prey to owls.  There are several moths that very effectively mimic the face of an owl through the evolution of false eyespots known as ocelli.  The male Io Moth in your image is one such North American moth.  Female Io Moths are very effective owl mimics as well, but female Io Moths are brown instead of yellow and they are even larger than the males, a textbook example of sexual dimorphism.  Another good North American Owl Mimic is the Polyphemus Moth.  Both Io Moths and Polyphemus Moths hide their ocelli while at rest, but if they are disturbed, they quickly “open” their eyes, potentially frightening off any threatening creature.   

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth?
Location: Central FL
July 9, 2014 8:02 am
this is camped out on my patio in Central Florida. Not really sure what it is
Signature: Brent

Deformed Luna Moth Lays Eggs

Deformed Luna Moth Lays Eggs

Dear Brent,
This is a female Luna Moth and she has atrophied wings that for some reason did not develop normally.  Many people consider the Luna Moth to be the most beautiful North American moth.  Despite the failure of her wings to develop properly, she has laid eggs.  If she mated, the eggs will hatch, but if the caterpillars are unable to locate an appropriate food supply, they will surely perish.  The caterpillars of Luna Moths feed upon the leaves of “a variety of trees including white birch (Betula papyrifera), persimmon (Diospyros virginiana), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua), hickories (Carya), walnuts (Juglans), pecans, and sumacs (Rhus)” according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: sphinx moth
Location: NW Wyoming
July 6, 2014 9:33 pm
Dear bugman, I took this photo back in 2007 and have always called this moth a sphinx moth. Recently I’ve come to realize that spinx moth encompasses a very large number of varieties. Is this a sphinx moth and if so, what variety?
Signature: Jeff

Glover's Silkmoth

Glover’s Silkmoth

Dear Jeff,
This is not a Sphinx Moth, but rather a Giant Silkmoth in the family Sphingidae, more specifically a Glover’s Silkmoth,
Hyalophora columbia gloveri, which is a subspecies of the Columbia Silkmoth.  You can verify our identification on BugGuide.  The feathery antennae indicate that this is a male who uses his sensitive antennae to search for a mate by following the pheromones she releases.

Glover's Silkmoth

Glover’s Silkmoth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination