Currently viewing the category: "Geometrid Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth ct
Location: connecticut
September 1, 2014 6:45 pm
just wondering what this is
Signature: diane

Geometrid Moth

Geometrid Moth

Hi Diane,
This pretty moth is in the family Geometridae and the larvae are known as Inchworms or Spanworms.  We wish the image was higher resolution.  We might not have the time to pursue a species identification at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Reelfoot lake Samburg, TN
July 16, 2014 7:00 pm
Photographed this moth at Reelfoot Lake in the northwest corner of TN. What is it?
Thanks
Signature: Bugman

Geometrid Moth

Geometrid Moth

This is a Moth in the family Geometridae, possibly a diurnal species, and at first we thought it might be a Chickweed Geometrid which is pictured on BugGuide, but closer inspection reveals it to be a distinct species.  We will attempt a more thorough identification in the future.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Obtuse Euchlaena Moth
Location: Mancelona, MI
July 5, 2014 7:46 pm
Here’s another neat moth from Michigan! Judging by pictures on Bugguide there’s a fair amount of variation in color and fine details of shape in the wings of individual Obtuse Euchlaenas (Euchlaena obtusaria). The general idea–serrated hindwings, pointing forewings, brownish coloration–remains the same. Wingspan, about 27-48 mm, Bugguide says. Evidently they like forests. This one was drawn to a lamppost on July 3rd.
Signature: Helen

Obtuse Euchlaena

Obtuse Euchlaena

Hi Helen,
Thanks for submitting this subtly marked Geometrid Moth that you have identified as an Obtuse Euchlaena.  We are linking to the BugGuide information page on the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Northern Pine Looper Moth
Location: Mancelona, MI
June 27, 2014 7:21 pm
Dear lovely people,
Here’s another of the many moth species I’ve ID’d here in northern lower Michigan in the past couple of weeks. The nights are warm at last, and the moths love it. This is a Northern Pine Looper Moth (Caripeta piniata). Bugguide puts its wingspan at about 35 mm, which seems about right. I’ll send a few more species; if you don’t want more, please let me know–and if you do, I’ve got at least a dozen nifty moths to share with you.
Signature: Helen

Northern Pine Looper

Northern Pine Looper

Hi Helen,
We are aware of the four well researched submissions from you in our very full mailbox right now, but since you have provided names and gorgeous images, we are taking to time to format them all for posting to our site.  We would welcome additional images from you as well, but try to limit the number to just one or two per day so that we can invest some of our precious time responding to paranoid requests to confirm that the blurry images of carpet beetles are not bed bugs and requests to provide extermination advice for harmless wasps that are scaring people.  We much prefer mail like you have submitted.  Images on BugGuide of the Northern Pine Looper support your identification.  We are going to continue to post all that you have currently sent us even though the last six postings to our site are all moths, but that is justifiable as National Moth Week is fast approaching.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Moth
Location: Bourne, Lincolnshire ( 52:46.3518N 0:23.4989W) England
June 24, 2014 12:44 pm
I photographed this moth in my kitchen before carefully putting it outside. I have trawled loads of web sites but failed to identify it.
My garden backs onto the local woodland, and we get hosts of moths that I can’t identify. But I have never seen anything like this before.
Any Idea?
Signature: Bob Harvey

Geometrid Moth

Blood-Vein

Hi Bob,
This lovely moth is in the family Geometridae, and we believe we have correctly identified it as a Blood-Vein,
Timandra comae, thanks to the UK Moths site where it states:  “This attractive moth is fairly common in the southern counties of England and Wales, but scarcer further north and in Ireland.  The adult rests with the wings held in such a position that the reddish cross-lines of the fore and hind wings form a continuous band. The fringes are also suffused with pink.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blackberry Looper Moth?
Location: Austin, TX
April 10, 2014 9:29 am
I found this little gal on my front porch in Austin, TX – the linked HSU page says’ she’s a Blackberry Looper. Can you confirm? Sure is pretty.
~ Laura
http://www.hsu.edu/pictures2.aspx?id=16785 website
Signature: Laura

Emerald

Emerald

Hi Laura,
Thank you so much for resubmitting your request using our standard form as it is much easier to create postings if we have a standard format.  We cannot say for certain that your moth is a Blackberry Looper,
Chlorochlamys chloroluecaria, but that is a good possibility.  Your moth is definitely an Emerald in the subfamily Geometrinae which contains many similar looking green moths.  See BugGuide for the myriad possibilities.  Perhaps someone with more experience identifying Geometrid Moths will be able to confirm the identity of your moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination