Currently viewing the category: "Geometrid Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White and black insect in MN
Location: SE Minnesota
October 24, 2014 8:43 am
This insect was seen on October 22, 2014, in southeast Minnesota (Minneapolis). It was about 5/8 to 3/4 of an inch in length. It was on an aluminum storm door’s frame (the green background), at about 5:30 p.m. (less than an hour before sunset). It stayed in the same place (did not climb the door frame, etc.) at least through the time we went in at sunset to fix supper. It was no longer there the next morning (no surprise). Temperatures were probably in upper 50s Fahrenheit. The porch is raised about four feet above ground level. There is a dogwood tree next to it, with branches touching the porch roof and supports. The ground below the dogwood is occupied by hostas. The body texture appeared a bit like moth wings, i.e., as though there were small scales, but in the photo the body looks smoother. The body is more flat than round, in case the photo does not show that sufficiently.
Signature: Curious in MN

Someone else has told me the insect is probably a wingless female linden looper moth, Erannis tiliaria.  Photos of the wingless female linden looper elsewhere (e.g., at the end of the page at http://www.wci.colostate.edu/shtml/LindenLooper.shtml and at http://www.invasive.org/browse/TaxThumb.cfm?fam=210&genus=Erannis) appear to be the same general size, color, and pattern, and there are indeed linden trees in the boulevard strip about thirty feet from the porch, up and down the street. Not that I’ve seen info yet to say that the linden looper feeds on or uses for egg-laying only linden or basswood trees, despite the “tiliaria” name; it might be tolerant of other species, too, even dogwoods.  Also, the mating season is said to be in the fall, and I probably should not have omitted from my original post that the porch is roofed, with a low-wattage light that attracts moths, including presumably any male Erannis tiliaria in the vicinity.  So you can probably mark this one as closed.

Female LInden Looper Moth

Female LInden Looper Moth

Dear Curious in MN,
While this file is closed for you and may not require any additional information on our part, we are still thrilled that you followed up with the identification of the wingless, female Linden Looper Moth and that you provided so many helpful links so that we can prepare a posting for our readership.  The introduction of invasive, exotic species continues to be a significant threat to agriculture and native species diversity.
  We did locate a related species in our archives, a female Mottled Umber Moth, Erannis defoliaria, which is in the same genus and which is native to Europe.  It is possible that that particular posting from our archives is of the Linden Looper Moth as well.  In doing our research, we discovered your image already posted to BugGuide.

Oops.  I may have jumped too early to a conclusion.  A search for Erannis on your site found a page for a tentative identification of a wingless female of a mottled umber moth on November 29, 2009 in California, that looks very similar, too.  And from the photos of Erannis defoliaria and Erannis tiliaria found elsewhere, I’m not sure I could tell them apart just from a photo of the back. Perhaps you will be sensitive to details in the photographs that might distinguish the two.

We don’t think that we are able to distinguish between the two species, but at least we can be certain that we are dealing with a member of the genus Erannis and that it is an invasive species in North America.  Since you have nearby Linden trees, we would favor your original identification of a Linden Looper Moth.

You’re right, I did ask two places, at your wonderful site and at BugGuide.  I hope that’s not a problem.  If you’re preparing a post, you might be amused to add a link to a picture of E. defoliaria from a British guide (John Curtis’s British Entomology Volume 6, says the Wikipedia attribution of the image) over a hundred years ago: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/19/Britishentomologyvolume6Plate703.jpg, that includes the wingless female, but not at sufficient detail in the image (I can’t speak to the print original) to be able to say what details are distinguishing for the female E. defoliaria and E. tilaria.  Thank you for operating a wonderfully useful site.

We love BugGuide and we have no problem sharing your image.  Thanks for the compliment and additional link.

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch, Kristi E. Lambert liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth ct
Location: connecticut
September 1, 2014 6:45 pm
just wondering what this is
Signature: diane

Geometrid Moth

Geometrid Moth

Hi Diane,
This pretty moth is in the family Geometridae and the larvae are known as Inchworms or Spanworms.  We wish the image was higher resolution.  We might not have the time to pursue a species identification at this time.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Reelfoot lake Samburg, TN
July 16, 2014 7:00 pm
Photographed this moth at Reelfoot Lake in the northwest corner of TN. What is it?
Thanks
Signature: Bugman

Geometrid Moth

Geometrid Moth

This is a Moth in the family Geometridae, possibly a diurnal species, and at first we thought it might be a Chickweed Geometrid which is pictured on BugGuide, but closer inspection reveals it to be a distinct species.  We will attempt a more thorough identification in the future.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Obtuse Euchlaena Moth
Location: Mancelona, MI
July 5, 2014 7:46 pm
Here’s another neat moth from Michigan! Judging by pictures on Bugguide there’s a fair amount of variation in color and fine details of shape in the wings of individual Obtuse Euchlaenas (Euchlaena obtusaria). The general idea–serrated hindwings, pointing forewings, brownish coloration–remains the same. Wingspan, about 27-48 mm, Bugguide says. Evidently they like forests. This one was drawn to a lamppost on July 3rd.
Signature: Helen

Obtuse Euchlaena

Obtuse Euchlaena

Hi Helen,
Thanks for submitting this subtly marked Geometrid Moth that you have identified as an Obtuse Euchlaena.  We are linking to the BugGuide information page on the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Northern Pine Looper Moth
Location: Mancelona, MI
June 27, 2014 7:21 pm
Dear lovely people,
Here’s another of the many moth species I’ve ID’d here in northern lower Michigan in the past couple of weeks. The nights are warm at last, and the moths love it. This is a Northern Pine Looper Moth (Caripeta piniata). Bugguide puts its wingspan at about 35 mm, which seems about right. I’ll send a few more species; if you don’t want more, please let me know–and if you do, I’ve got at least a dozen nifty moths to share with you.
Signature: Helen

Northern Pine Looper

Northern Pine Looper

Hi Helen,
We are aware of the four well researched submissions from you in our very full mailbox right now, but since you have provided names and gorgeous images, we are taking to time to format them all for posting to our site.  We would welcome additional images from you as well, but try to limit the number to just one or two per day so that we can invest some of our precious time responding to paranoid requests to confirm that the blurry images of carpet beetles are not bed bugs and requests to provide extermination advice for harmless wasps that are scaring people.  We much prefer mail like you have submitted.  Images on BugGuide of the Northern Pine Looper support your identification.  We are going to continue to post all that you have currently sent us even though the last six postings to our site are all moths, but that is justifiable as National Moth Week is fast approaching.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow Moth
Location: Bourne, Lincolnshire ( 52:46.3518N 0:23.4989W) England
June 24, 2014 12:44 pm
I photographed this moth in my kitchen before carefully putting it outside. I have trawled loads of web sites but failed to identify it.
My garden backs onto the local woodland, and we get hosts of moths that I can’t identify. But I have never seen anything like this before.
Any Idea?
Signature: Bob Harvey

Geometrid Moth

Blood-Vein

Hi Bob,
This lovely moth is in the family Geometridae, and we believe we have correctly identified it as a Blood-Vein,
Timandra comae, thanks to the UK Moths site where it states:  “This attractive moth is fairly common in the southern counties of England and Wales, but scarcer further north and in Ireland.  The adult rests with the wings held in such a position that the reddish cross-lines of the fore and hind wings form a continuous band. The fringes are also suffused with pink.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination