Currently viewing the category: "Geometrid Moths"
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Subject: Horned spanworm moth and large maple spanworm moth
Location: Troy, VA
June 26, 2016 11:02 am
Given my horrible guess on the last moth, I hesitate to say I know what these are, but I spent a lot of time at the Discover Life website comparing photos, so I can say with reasonable certainty that I have a photo of a horned spanworm moth. I’m not quite as certain about the large maple spanworm moth, but I found images that were very similar so I’m going to give it an 85% certainty. Fingers crossed. I do love their amazing leaf mimicry.
thanks
Signature: Grace Pedalino

Possibly Horned Spanworm Moth

Possibly Horned Spanworm Moth

Dear Grace,
Leaf-mimicking, brownish Spanworm Moths in the family Geometridae can be extremely difficult to identify to the species level, and we often avoid such specifics, preferring a general family identification.  We agree that one of your moths is possibly the Horned Spanworm Moth,
Nematocampa resistaria, based on images posted to BugGuide.  We are not convinced that your second moth is a Large Maple Spanworm.  We believe it looks more like the Curve-Toothed Geometer, Eutrapela clemataria, a species also pictured on BugGuide.  In both cases, we wish someone with more experience determining the species of Spanworm moths would weigh in on an identification.

Possibly Curve-Toothed Geometer

Possibly Curve-Toothed Geometer

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ID
Location: Michigan
June 13, 2016 11:32 am
I am having issues id’ing this moth. We found them in upper Michigan in the pine barrens where the Kirtland’s warbler nests. I have narrowed it down to a possible black-banded orange (Epelis truncartaria)
Signature: Glenn

Black Banded Orange

Black Banded Orange

Dear Glenn,
In our opinion your identification is absolutely correct, after we compared your image to this image of a Black Banded Orange,
Epelis truncataria, on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults fly during the day and are not known to be active at night.  Generally uncommon and local in the southern parts of its range; common and widespread across the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth & eggs identification!
Location: bellingham, washington, usa
May 30, 2016 3:11 pm
hi! i found this moth laying eggs in my dorm building today. i live in bellingham, washington. i want to know what kind she is so that i can put her eggs somewhere safe where they’ll find something to eat- i know some moths only eat certain plants. please write back soon, i love moths and i want these babies to grow up safely. thank you!
Signature: tessa f.

Omnivorous Looper

Omnivorous Looper

Dear Tessa,
Eggs can be very difficult to identify, so having images of the female insect laying the eggs is one way to ensure the identity of the eggs.  This moth is an Omnivorous Looper,
Sabulodes aegrotata, a species found in the western states.  Here is a BugGuide image for verification.  According to BugGuide:  “The larvae feed on a large variety of herbacious and woody broad-leaved angiosperms. Plants in 27 familes have been reported as hosts, and the species’ feeding occasionally causes damage to to orchard trees such as avocado, citrus, and walnuts.”  Many moths that are general feeders do not concern themselves with laying eggs on an actual host plant as the young can forage once they hatch.  Because we will be away from the office for a spell in June, we are postdating your submissions as well as other postings to go live during our absence. 

Omnivorous Looper Lays Eggs

Omnivorous Looper Lays Eggs

Eggs of an Omnivorous Looper

Eggs of an Omnivorous Looper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this moth
Location: Ballarat, Australia
April 26, 2016 12:50 am
Hi bugman,
This moth appeared in my house on 1st April 2016. It stayed for the day and then disappeared. Could you please tell me what is its name?
Thanks,
Signature: Eddie R

Satin Moth

Satin Moth

Dear Eddie,
Why did you wait nearly an entire month to submit your images?  It took us a bit of time to identify your Orange Trimmed Satin Moth,
Thalaina selenaea, though we did notice several similar members of the genus on Butterfly House.  Not until we found this FlickR posting were we convinced our ID was correct, and we verified its identity on ipernity.

Satin Moth

Satin Moth

Thank you so much Daniel! I tried searching the internet myself but couldn’t find this Orange Trimmed Satin Moth. It didn’t occur to me that there would be a website dedicated to identifying bugs until a few days ago.
I had never seen a moth like this before and it also just happened to appear on my 10th Wedding Anniversary so it made it extra special because the colours reminded me of my wife’s wedding dress.
Thanks again and I appreciate the rapid response!
Cheers,
Ed.

Hi again Ed.  Thanks for letting us know about the memories this Orange Trimmed Satin Moth triggered for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow moth with clear spots on wings
Location: Arlington, Virginia
February 23, 2016 11:30 am
I found this moth last summer in Virginia. Very small, about a 1.5-2 inch wingspan. Spots on wings are transparent. Love your site. Thanks.
Signature: Dan

Yellow Moth

The Beggar

Dear Dan,
We did a quick search and did not turn up an identity, but we feel confident that one of our readers may have better luck before we can return to this research.

Thanks for checking. I have been looking at pictures of moths for the past year and I still can’t figure it out. Oh well!

Update:  The Beggar
Thanks to a comment from Ben, we didn’t have to research the identity of this lovely moth any longer.  It is The Beggar,
Eubaphe mendica, and according to BugGuide:  “This is not a typical geometer in appearance, at least.”   That might explain the difficulty we had on our first attempt at identification and why this has troubled Dan for a year.

Thank you so much Ben and WTB :) I can now sleep at night.

We surmise that will be some relief after a year of deprivation.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknow Bug
Location: Prescott, AZ 86301
February 20, 2016 12:01 pm
I found this insect on the side of my house and I have no idea where to start for an identification. Thoughts?
Thanks in advanced
Signature: Ed Wright

Pug

Pug

Dear Ed,
Based on this and other images posted to BugGuide, we believe your moth is a Pug, a Geometrid Moth in the genus Eupithecia.  According to BugGuide, they are   “Commonly referred to as pugs because of the short underwings.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination