Currently viewing the category: "Geometrid Moths"
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Subject: Blackberry Looper Moth?
Location: Austin, TX
April 10, 2014 9:29 am
I found this little gal on my front porch in Austin, TX – the linked HSU page says’ she’s a Blackberry Looper. Can you confirm? Sure is pretty.
~ Laura
http://www.hsu.edu/pictures2.aspx?id=16785 website
Signature: Laura

Emerald

Emerald

Hi Laura,
Thank you so much for resubmitting your request using our standard form as it is much easier to create postings if we have a standard format.  We cannot say for certain that your moth is a Blackberry Looper,
Chlorochlamys chloroluecaria, but that is a good possibility.  Your moth is definitely an Emerald in the subfamily Geometrinae which contains many similar looking green moths.  See BugGuide for the myriad possibilities.  Perhaps someone with more experience identifying Geometrid Moths will be able to confirm the identity of your moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth?
Location: Mobile Alabama
July 28, 2013 8:30 am
Spotted this early one morning, have not seen one like this before, is it a moth? The other picture of the very large hard shell bug was on the road in Murfreesboro Tennessee, I just about stepped on it as I was jogging. What is it bug man?
Signature: Rae Nichols

Is this a Tulip Tree Beauty???

Is this a Tulip Tree Beauty???

Hi Rae,
This is one of the Geometrid Moths, and we believe, though we are not certain, that it is a Tulip Tree Beauty,
Epimecis hortaria, based on photos posted to BugGuide which states:  “Adult: Large geometer. Scalloped outer margin on hindwing. Variable pattern. Typical pattern is whitish background with black zigzag lines. “  The Beetle is a male Eastern Hercules Beetle, Dynastes tityus.

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Subject: is that bee or butterfly?
Location: Borneo
June 4, 2013 4:35 am
Hi, my friend found that on Borneo and we cannot find what is is, does anybody know if it´s dangerous or harmless?
Thanks
Signature: Catherine

Dysphania sagana

Dysphania species

Hi Catherine,
This is neither a bee nor a butterfly.  It is a moth, more specifically, Dysphania sagana, a member of the family Geometridae, which we first found on this blog and verified on the Moths of Borneo website.
  We suspected it to be a diurnal moth, and this was confirmed on this Indonesian blog that also pictures the caterpillar.  The Siam Insect Zoo website also has some photos, but they have fewer spots than the image you submitted.  A drawing of a related species, Dysphania militaris, is also included, and that might be the moth you have submitted.  That seems to be confirmed with the Butterfly from Rejang Lang site.  We cannot be certain of the species, but we believe we have the genus correct.  There are nice photos of Dysphania militaris on the Critters Page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Purple Plagodis taken at blacklight
Location: Frederick, MD
May 16, 2013 5:41 am
Hi Bugman,
Here’s a Purple Plagodis that showed up at my blacklight trap on May 9th. Love the site!
Signature: Ben M.

Purple Plagodis

Purple Plagodis

Hi Ben,
We had not heard of a Purple Plagodis,
Plagodis kuetzingi, prior to your submission and we are happy to post this new Geometer Moth to our site.  According to BugGuide it is found from:  “Nova Scotia to Virginia and Tennessee west to Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin” and adults fly from May to July.  BugGuide also notes:  “larval host is Fraxinus (ash trees).”  The species is also represented on the Moth PHotographers Group and North American Moths has an interesting dialog about range maps.

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Subject: Hibernating Moths
Location: Seattle WA
February 21, 2013 10:33 pm
I was cleaning the Garage, and when I opened the barbecue grill (to fix the handle) I found that it had become a ”den of choice” for hibernation. I think these are Ectropis crepuscularia – Small Engrailed. There are a lot of them, dozens, all through the garage, and they move only very slowly, but I thought this grouping amusing.
Signature: George

Winter Geometrid Moths

Hibernating Winter Geometrid Moths

Dear George from Washington,
These are Geometrid Moths in the family Geometridae.  They are also commonly called Measuring Worm Moths or Inchworm Moths.  We located on JSTOR an online article called Bat predation and flight timing of winter moths,
Epirrita and Operophtera species (Lepidoptera, Geometridae) by Mats G. E Svensson, Jens Rydell and Richard Brown,  when we searched for “hibernating Geometrids.”  We then searched those names and found additional information, but the photos are all of rather drab and unremarkable looking moths shaped similarly to your beauties, but without the intricate markings on your moths.  These must be hibernating male Winter Geometrid Moths, and we don’t really know how to tell them apart for certain based on the markings found in photos of individuals online.  BugGuide has some pictures of several species from the genus Operophtera found in North America and all three species are found along the West Coast.  The markings on the Espirrita species pictured on BugGuide are more defined, but different from the markings on your moths.   We love your photo.  We rotated it and cropped it to a square prior to sizing for the internet.  Moth PHotographers Group has nice photos of the Autumnal Moth, but they do not look like your moths.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unkown beaty
Location: Sri Lanka, Sinharadja forest
December 25, 2012 12:40 pm
Hi bugman,
during our visit to Sri Lanka we found the one attached. Can you tell me what it is?
Thanks in advance.
Signature: Ton Elzerman

Unknown Moth

Hi Ton,
We tried without any success to identify your moth.  We suspect is it in the family Erebidae and we hope we will eventually be able to provide you with a species name.

Karl provides an Identification
December 28, 2012
Hi Daniel and Ton:
It’s a Geometrid moth (Geometridae: Ennominae) in the genus Chiasmia. There are at least six similar species of Chiasmia in Sri Lanka and I wasn’t able to come up with a definitive species name. Regards.  Karl.

Hi Daniel and Karl,
I would like to thank you for the identification so far. It is a great
help for us after our visit to that beautiful Sri Lanka.
Have happy days and a good 2013!
Best regards,
Ton Elzerman

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination