Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Flying Insect!

Location: Ocala, FL
November 25, 2014 7:39 am
Just saw this insect flying around outside and I have no idea what it is. Do you know? The wing markings are identical and the body looks like a house fly. Thanks
Signature: Wendy

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Dear Wendy,
The Polka Dot Wasp Moth is a common species in Florida that develops from Oleander Caterpillars that feed on the leaves of Oleander.

Julieta Stangaferro, Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this, insect
Location: Sierra Leone
November 24, 2014 9:57 am
Hello,
I’m currently based in Sierra Leone as part of a military op and have had the chance to take pics of a few bugs. I appreciate that you said you won’t be able to identify all pics, so I’ve narrowed it down to just one bug.
Signature: Na

Possibly Euchroma lethe

Possibly Euchroma lethe

Dear Na,
This is one of the diurnal Wasp Mimic Moths in the genus Euchroma, and we believe based on your location and this African Moths posting that it might be Euchroma lethe.  The species is pictured on a Palau stamp where it is given the common name The Basker and the stamp is reproduced on the Colnect site.

Thanks so much,
I’ve had a lot of people impressed by your speedy and knowledgable reply, not to mention, being able to impress two little boys, Francis and Ryan…
Candis

We are happy the youngsters were impressed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feathery tailed moth
Location: New Orleans
November 22, 2014 10:58 pm
Hi!
Found this bug at the local farmers market in New Orleans. It appears to be a black and white moth with a feathery tail. Any clues to what it is?
Thanks!
Signature: Milk n moths

Melonworm Moth

Melonworm Moth

Hi Milk n moths,
This Melonworm Moth gets its common name because the caterpillars “feed on cucumber family plants: cucumber, melon, squash” according to BugGuide.

Kristi E. Lambert, Amy Gosch, Julieta Stangaferro liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird moth type bug
Location: Johannesburg, south Africa
November 23, 2014 11:46 am
Hi
I live in South Africa and found an insect I have never seen before. Can you assist?
Signature: Rudi

Diurnal Hawkmoth

Diurnal Hawkmoth

Dear Rudi,
This is a diurnal Hawkmoth in the family Sphingidae.  We believe it is a Pellucid Hawkmoth,
Cephonodes hylas, which according to African Moths, is found in South Africa.  It is also pictured on Africa Wild.

Ito Fernando, Rick Smith, Amy Gosch, Jacob Helton, Julieta Stangaferro, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: identification
Location: Hartbeespoort, South Africa
November 18, 2014 3:27 am
Good day, I saw this one in my garden on 7th november this year. Later it was on the ground, and an hour later gone. I live in North West Province in South Africa.
Signature: Carla

Probably Flannel Moth

Probably Flannel Moth

Dear Carla,
Your moth bears a striking resemblance to North and Central American Flannel Moths in the family Megalopygidae, and we believe your moth is also a member of that family, however, we are currently unable to verify that identification on iSpot as the site is currently unavailable.  Perhaps when iSpot solves its technical problems, we can provide you with a species name.

Flannel Moth, we believe

Flannel Moth, we believe

Amy Gosch, Jessica Sory, Kitty Heidih, Julieta Stangaferro liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this flying bug?
Location: Rodeo Beach, Marin Co, CA
November 15, 2014 8:47 pm
Hi – attached are photos, one with and one without flash, of a flying thing that from a distance I first thought was a type of hummingbird because it was so big. Can you tell me what it is? Thank you
Signature: Judy

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Judy,
This is a Whitelined Sphinx Moth,
Hyles lineata, a crepuscular species that is most commonly sighted near dawn and dusk.  Because of its large size and its manner of flight, it is easily confused with a hummingbird.  We are thrilled that you have offered us two images, one that freezes the movement of the flight of this Whitelined Sphinx, and another with a slower shutter speed that effectively illustrates the rapidly beating wings.

Whitelined Sphinx showing rapidly beating wings

Whitelined Sphinx showing rapidly beating wings

thank you for ID’ing this for me!  And. I’m glad you like the photos.
Judy

Julieta Stangaferro, Kristi E. Lambert, Jaye Ridet, Amy Gosch, Sue Dougherty, Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination