Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
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Subject: Found in SW Ohio
Location: Ohio, USA
May 21, 2015 5:21 pm
this bug was found on a friends’s farm in SW Ohio on May 21, near Dayton. We have No idea what it is.
Thank you.
Signature: Puzzled

Carolina Sphinx Metamorphosis

Carolina Sphinx Metamorphosis

Dear Puzzled,
This is a newly metamorphosed Carolina Sphinx,
Manduca sexta, and soon its wing will expand and it will be able to fly.  Though the adult Carolina Sphinx might not be familiar to your friends, if they grow tomatoes, they are probably familiar with the large caterpillars of the Carolina Sphinx, the Tobacco Hornworm, that feeds on the leaves of tomatoes and related plants.

Thank you!
I appreciate the answer. It was found in a greenhouse where they grow tomatoes.
I will let them know, as we were all fascinated by it.
Jennifer

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillar or moth?
Location: North Charleston, SC
May 21, 2015 8:14 pm
This strange fellow about fell on my head tonight. I’ve never seen a bug quite like it. It looked like a caterpillar but had wings and was quite large (about 5 inches long). Any idea who this guy was?
Signature: Christy

Newly Metamorphosed Imperial Moth

Newly Metamorphosed Imperial Moth

Dear Christy,
This is a newly eclosed Imperial Moth, and because its wings have not yet fully expanded, it still resembles a caterpillar in form though its metamorphosis is complete.  Once its wings have expanded, it can fly and it will seek out a mate, living only long enough to reproduce.  Adult Imperial Moths do not take food.

Alisha Bragg, Alfonso Moreno, Jaye Ridet, Amy Gosch, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Lori Ledeboer, Kristi E. Lambert, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify
Location: Nelspruit, South Africa
May 19, 2015 3:11 am
I found this butterfly this morning but have not been able to identify it yet
Signature: Nicolette

Milkweed Butterfly

Snouted Tiger Moth

Dear Nicolette,
We believe this is a Milkweed Butterfly in the subfamily Danaiae, but we wish your image had more detail because it does not appear that your individual has clubbed antennae.  Your individual appears to be dead, so it is possible the ends of the antennae have been damaged.  We browsed unsuccessfully through iSpot, and though we did not locate any exact matches, we did observe a similarity to butterflies in the genus
Amauris, and the closest match we could find is Amauris ochlea, the Novice, which is pictured on BioDiversity Explorer.  We are not fully confident that is a correct identification, and we are still troubled by the lack of a clubbed end on the antennae on your image.  Perhaps one of our readers will steer us in another direction.

Correction:  Snouted Tiger Moth
South African entomology student Michelle sent us a comment identifying this as a moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, in the genus Nyctemera.  Following that lead, we found this image of a Snouted Tiger Moth, Nyctemera leuconoe, on iSpot.  We suspect there is some mimicry involved here as Milkweed Butterflies are distasteful, and the Snouted Tiger Moth probably derives some protections from resembling one.  The same species is called a White Bear on iNaturalist.

Dear Daniel,
Found an id at last- its a white bear moth – Family: arctiidae
Thank you for taking the time to help me in my search to id!
Regards
Nicolette

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Subject: New to us critter
Location: Reston, Virginia
May 17, 2015 7:42 pm
While visiting family in Reston, Virginia, on Mothers Day 2015, we spotted this on the patio door. None of us had seen anything like it before, but knew we could count on WTB to enlighten us. Many thanks in advance.
Signature: Curious

Eight Spotted Forrester

Eight Spotted Forrester

Dear Curious,
This through the glass view provides a very interesting perspective on the Eight Spotted Forrester,
Alypia octomaculata, a diurnal Owlet Moth.  MOBugs has a very nice narrative on the Eight Spotted Forrester.

Stacey Haza, Maryann Struman, Jaye Ridet, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Alisha Bragg, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Kitty Heidih liked this post
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Subject: Mississippi moth?
Location: Vicksburg, Mississippi
May 17, 2015 2:10 pm
I saw this bug while visiting Vicksburg, MS a couple of days ago. It was the biggest moth I’ve ever seen (I typically avoid all bugs). I’m just curious what it is since it flew away before yesterday morning for me to see it again!
Signature: Christina

Female Cecropia Moth

Cecropia Moth

Dear Christina,
Your recently metamorphosed male Cecropia Moth is stunning.  He will sense pheromones released by a female Cecropia Moth, sometimes from as far away as a mile, with his big, feathery antennae, and then they will mate.  He does not need to eat.  Neither he nor his mate will feed, as they have atrophied mouthparts and they can subsist for approximately a week off fat stored in the body while a large, green Cecropia Caterpillar.

Cecropia Moth

Cecropia Moth

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Subject: Interesting Photos/Identification Potentially
Location: Longmont, CO
May 17, 2015 8:32 am
Hi,
I took these photos a while back (July 29, 2013) and think it was potentially the coolest bug I have encountered, since it was just so huge! This particular critter was found in Longmont, Colorado (very close to Boulder).
Can you tell me more about it? I believe when I looked around at the time, it said it was a tomato moth? Also just wanted to share with your other readers! I know the second one is blurry, but it allows for size comparison since I had my finger in the shot.
Thanks for what you do!
Signature: Claire

Big Poplar Sphinx

Big Poplar Sphinx

Dear Claire,
Your moth is not a Tomato Moth, which we presume is your memory of the Tomato Hornworm, the larva of the Five Spotted Hawkmoth,
Manduca quinquemaculatus, though your moth is in the same family, hence it bears a physical resemblance to other members of the family.  Your Big Poplar Sphinx, Pachysphinx occidentalis, is stunning, and you may read more about it on the Sphingidae of the Americas site.

Big Poplar Sphinx

Big Poplar Sphinx

Thanks so much! I really enjoy every post on your site, and feel happy to be a small part of it!
Claire

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination