Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth ?
Location: Clisson, France
April 23, 2015 9:18 am
I spotted this beauty last summer, during Hellfest Open Air Festival (06 / 20-21-22 / 2014) in Clisson, France.
It landed on our tente on the first day, and almost not move for 3 days, despite the sun and the rain.
When we folded the tente, it flew away and landed on the top of a tree.
It was about 5-6 cm long, without antennae, it had hairy and soft paws.
I live in Nantes, near Clisson, and I’ve never seen that kind of bug before.
Does anyone ever seen the same beauty ? What is its species ?
Thank you so much for your help.
Signature: Fleur

Tiger Moth we believe

Lesser Puss Moth

Dear Fleur,
WE believe that this is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, but we cannot be certain.  We have attempted to search the UK Moths site because we don’t know of a French resource, and we have not had any luck with the identification.

Update:  April 25, 2015
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash of Insetologia, we now know that this is Cerura ermine, a Prominent Moth in the family Notodontidae, and that it is called a Lesser Puss Moth according to the Lepidoptera Breeders Association.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Lovely moth
Location: Navasota, Texas
April 24, 2015 12:06 pm
My daughter found this beautiful specimen in our garage several nights ago. I relocated him (her?) to a bush in our side yard. From looking online I thought it might be a Polyphemus, but when I compare the pictures, the colors aren’t quite right. It looks more like the Automeris sp. from Ecuador, but we live in Texas, so I’d be very curious to know what kind of moth this is. Thank you!
Signature: Curious Mom

Female Io Moth

Female Io Moth

Dear Curious Mom,
This lovely moth is a female Io Moth, and she can be differentiated from male Io Moths which have yellow instead of brown forewings.  This extreme visual difference between the sexes is known as sexual dimorphism.  Hindwings of both species have bold eyespots or oculi that are used to frighten predators like birds.  Io Moths often rest with their hindwings covered, but when disturbed, they reveal the eyespots which effectively startle the predator into thinking it is about to be eaten by a larger creature.  Io Moths like other members of the Giant Silkmoth family Saturniidae, only live a few days and do not feed as adults.  Their purpose is to mate a reproduce.  Handle the Caterpillar of the Io Moth with caution as they have stinging spines.

Thanks so much for your speedy reply! We have not seen any caterpillars but I appreciate the warning to steer clear. Your website is a fabulous resource, especially for someone like me with inquisitive kids. Thanks again.

Carol Love, Kathy Haines, Lori Filipovich Kelly, Donna Paslay, Leslie Gist, Amy Gosch, Jaye Ridet, Clint Lockyer, Lia Schae, Sue Dougherty, Melissa Leigh Cooley, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Jess Huggins, Bill Demetree Jr, Megan Sweetness, Kitty Heidih liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful black and white moth
Location: Central Kalahari, Botswana
April 23, 2015 2:49 am
Hey guys :)
I have been doing a lot of searching for this fella/misses lately.
It came by on April 4th and I haven’t seen one before or since i my almost 3 months stay. It came to our dining area late evening, where we have lights on.
as you can see on the picture, the hind wings are white outlined with black and fore wings are white and black, but much diffuse markings. The abdomen is yellow with a broad black line from thorax to the tip of abdomen.
I hope you can help me with an ID :)
Signature: Mathias

Unknown Moth

Unknown Moth

Dear Mathias,
As you have probably realized, attempting online insect identifications can be quite difficult, and many times after hours of searching, no results are produced.  With that said, we are posting your image and tagging it as unidentified.  It is not unusual for us to get comments many years later that provide proper identifications.

Jep I know…
I identify insects as my job in Denmark, but in Denmark we have
Bayasian keys for almost every kind of insect in the country. So being
in Southern Africa and the only way to identify is by internet search,
isn’t that much different, except you don’t have anything to start
from :)
But it can never hurt to try right ;) sometimes one can get surprised ;)

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Subject: Caterpillar
Location: Northern Mozambique
April 20, 2015 11:00 am
Hi, I found this guy on the ground in Nampula, Mozambique. We can’t find anything that it will eat and we are wondering what to feed it and what it will turn into. We have it in a bug box to hopefully watch the metamorphosis. We also found an amazing moth we’d love to identify. Thank you!
Signature: mj

Lobobunaea angasana

Lobobunaea angasana

Dear mj,
The Giant Silkmoth is a much easier identification than the Caterpillar, so we are starting there.  Your moth, which we identified on Bizland, is
Lobobunaea angasana.

Lobobunaea angasana

Lobobunaea angasana

 

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Subject: Trinidad Moth
Location: ASA Wright Nature Centre, Trinidad
April 18, 2015 10:56 am
Thought this would be an easy one but am coming up short.
Signature: Steve nanz

Moth

Moth

Dear Steve,
The illusion of a curled dead leaf that this Moth creates is magnificent.  Even the antennae look like the petiole of the leaf.  We will continue to research its identity, and we hope our readership may assist in the matter. 

Moth

Moth

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Subject: Ghost Moths
Location: Edenhope Caravan Park, Edenhope, Victoria
April 13, 2015 5:27 pm
Hi To You,
Just found about 28 Ghost Moths, which must have hatched over night.
Thought you might like some photos.
Signature: Ronda

Ghost Moth and pupal exuvia

Ghost Moth and pupal exuvia

Dear Ronda,
Your images are wonderful.  One of them appears to show the shed pupal skin or exuvia.  We will attempt a species identification for you when we have more time to browse through the images in the family Hepialidae on the Butterfly House site.  We have problems differentiating between Ghost Moths and Wood Moths in the family Cossidae which are also pictured on the Butterfly House site.

Ghost Moth

Ghost Moth

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination