Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large grey moth
Location: Gawler, SA
December 13, 2014 1:06 pm
Hi,
I found this large grey moth sitting on the platform of a train station near Adelaide. I thought it was the giant wood moth but according to what I read this does not occur in South Australia?
Thanks,
Signature: Anne-Marie

Giant Wood Moth we presume

Giant Wood Moth we presume

Dear Anne-Marie,
We agree that this appears to be a Giant Wood Moth,
Endoxyla cinereus, based on images posted to Butterfly House where it states:  “The adult moths have a variable vague pattern of light and dark grey or brown on the wings, including a darker spot near the middle of each forewing. The forewings each have a sinusoidal inner margin, and the hindwings a convex inner margin. The moths are very large. The females are larger than the males, and have a wingspan up to 23 cms.  The species occurs over Queensland and New South Wales.”  The map on Csiro supports that range information, and states “Not verified” regarding South Australia sightings.  Perhaps global warming and other climate changes are resulting in a natural range expansion.  It is also possible that this might be another member of the genus that has a greater range.  We are curious if our readership has an opinion on this matter.

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for your reply. I am also curious whether your readers will be able to shed some light on the issue. In any case I felt privileged to have been able to see it, as it was the largest moth I have ever seen!
Thanks, Anne-Marie

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Subject: Never seen anything like it.

Location: Victoria, Australia
December 9, 2014 3:19 pm
I have no idea what this bug is. I’m pretty sure they’re falling out of my roof through the fan in my bathroom.
It doesn’t necessarily look like a bug but they do move.
It’s about as long as a thumb nail and looks like a dirty bit of roof insulation.
Signature: TC

Case Bearing Moth Larva, we presume

Case Bearing Moth Larva, we presume

Dear TC,
We can’t imagine that this is anything other than a Case Bearing Moth Larva, though it looks different from individuals we are used to seeing, perhaps because it is using distinctly Australian building materials.

Sue Dougherty, Kristi E. Lambert, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: cool moth
Location: Manila, Philippines
November 30, 2014 11:29 am
Hi bugman! Saw this inside my room. I wonder if it is harmful or not.
Signature: Daryll

Green Pergasa Hawkmoth

Green Pergasa Hawkmoth

Dear Daryll,
We quickly identified your harmless Hawkmoth as a Green Pergasa Hawkmoth,
Pergasa acteus, thanks to the Sphingidae of the Eastern Palaearctic website.

Rachel Mouldey, Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified Flying Insect!

Location: Ocala, FL
November 25, 2014 7:39 am
Just saw this insect flying around outside and I have no idea what it is. Do you know? The wing markings are identical and the body looks like a house fly. Thanks
Signature: Wendy

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Polka Dot Wasp Moth

Dear Wendy,
The Polka Dot Wasp Moth is a common species in Florida that develops from Oleander Caterpillars that feed on the leaves of Oleander.

Julieta Stangaferro, Amy Gosch liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this, insect
Location: Sierra Leone
November 24, 2014 9:57 am
Hello,
I’m currently based in Sierra Leone as part of a military op and have had the chance to take pics of a few bugs. I appreciate that you said you won’t be able to identify all pics, so I’ve narrowed it down to just one bug.
Signature: Na

Possibly Euchroma lethe

Possibly Euchroma lethe

Dear Na,
This is one of the diurnal Wasp Mimic Moths in the genus Euchroma, and we believe based on your location and this African Moths posting that it might be Euchroma lethe.  The species is pictured on a Palau stamp where it is given the common name The Basker and the stamp is reproduced on the Colnect site.

Thanks so much,
I’ve had a lot of people impressed by your speedy and knowledgable reply, not to mention, being able to impress two little boys, Francis and Ryan…
Candis

We are happy the youngsters were impressed.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Feathery tailed moth
Location: New Orleans
November 22, 2014 10:58 pm
Hi!
Found this bug at the local farmers market in New Orleans. It appears to be a black and white moth with a feathery tail. Any clues to what it is?
Thanks!
Signature: Milk n moths

Melonworm Moth

Melonworm Moth

Hi Milk n moths,
This Melonworm Moth gets its common name because the caterpillars “feed on cucumber family plants: cucumber, melon, squash” according to BugGuide.

Kristi E. Lambert, Amy Gosch, Julieta Stangaferro liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination