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Subject:  Need to know What Bug is this?
Location: Pune, Maharashtra, India
Aug 1 2015
Hi,
We got this bug clicked at Pune city, Maharashtra, India. Not sure what species and name of this.
I guess this is some kind of Moth.
Could you please provide the details please.

Oleander Hawkmoth

Oleander Hawkmoth

This is a newly metamorphosed Oleander Hawkmoth and its wings have not yet expanded.

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Subject: A black-winged pink-headed bug
Location: Jiangsu province, China
July 31, 2015 7:11 am
Hi, Could you help me identify the species/ name of this bug? thanks
Signature: a bug lover

Histia flabellicornis:  Leaf Skeletonizing Moth

Histia flabellicornis: Leaf Skeletonizing Moth

Dear bug lover,
This request had us confused for a bit at first.  Though it looks decidedly mothlike, the antennae had us believing this might be a Fishfly in the Subfamily Chauliodinae, which delayed our ability to quickly find an identification.  Then we found a similar looking diurnal moth from China on FlickR that is identified as
Cyclosia midamia in the family Zygaenidae and we resumed our search, eventually finding a side view of Histia flabellicornis on the Digest of Taiwan Lepidopterology page.  A dorsal view on FlickR has us confident that your moth is indeed Histia flabellicornis, a Leaf Skeletonizing Moth in the family Zygaenidae.  Insect Creations describes it as:  “A wonderful and some what rare moth. The wing shape is very unique.”

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Subject: Luna Moth in Virginia
Location: Midlothian, VA
July 31, 2015 8:34 am
This was a luna moth I spotted yesterday in Midlothian, VA. I had never seen one before! It is amazing! I put my finger up to it to try to show how large it is. All I really accomplished was to show how much I need a manicure! :)
Also, just an FYI – your site has really tacky ads with very inappropriate content. I won’t recommend children to visit this site because of that. I closed it out and commented that it was inappropriate. Just wanted to let you know so you could contact your provider or something.
Signature: Nancy Morin

Luna Moth

Luna Moth

Dear Nancy,
Thanks for sending in your image of a gorgeous Luna Moth.  We did not receive as many submissions of Luna Moths this year as we have in the past.  Thanks for expressing your concern regarding “tacky ads with very inappropriate content” but the fact is that we cannot afford to run our site without Google ads.  Out of curiosity, we viewed our homepage just prior to crafting our response to you, and we found ads for Solar Energy, Dresses and a Flea and Tick Collar on our own computer.  A few minutes later those were replaced by a popular car company, a medical condition with unsavory symptoms and extreme urban stunts.  Because of the preponderance of exterminators that use Google Ads, and because we cannot control the advertisers, many years ago we added the disclaimer on our site above the first ad that “What’s That Bug? does not endorse extermination” to distance our actual content from the advertisements.  It is our understanding that Google ads are also very specific to the personal computer upon which they appear.  According to Wikipedia, the advertisements :  “are targeted to site content and audience,” meaning that the activity on your own computer has some effect on the ads that are generated.  So, if someone using your computer did research on buying a new car, when you later visit What’s That Bug? you might see car ads appear.  You were not very specific about the content you observed, but at least we have never seen a Google ad for pornography crop up on our site.  In a perfect world, we could operate without any advertisements, but that time has not yet come.  We are sorry that you cannot recommend the site to children because we believe our actual content is very PG rated, and when we do address adult themes, we resort to wit before vulgarity.

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Subject: Brazil Wasp Moth (Dinia?)
Location: Fenix, Parana State, Brazil
July 29, 2015 4:10 am
I found a moth similar to the one in my picture, though clearly a different species, here:
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2013/04/07/wasp-moth-from-brazil/
The photo I am submitting was taken on the 1st August 2008 in Parana State near the town of Fenix, close to the Ivai river. This one has a slimmer body and a yellow bar across the thorax, but is superficially otherwise similar.
Signature: Patrick

Wasp Mimic Moth

Wasp Mimic Moth

Dear Patrick,
We agree that your moth looks very similar to the
Dinea species you found in our archives, and we also found a similar looking Ctechunid on Project Noah, but it is only identified to the subtribe Ctenuchina.  Perhaps Cesar Crash who runs a sister site in Brazil, Insetologia, will recognize this lovely Wasp Mimic.

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Subject: imperial moth
Location: chesterton, Indiana
July 26, 2015 6:14 pm
This moth has black spots that remind me of mildew spots..is this a disease? Or something i should be concerned about. I have 3 acres of flower gardens and am afraid if its contageous in may lose all my butterfly and moths
Signature: kimmy t

Imperial Moth

Imperial Moth

Dear Kimmy,
This Imperial Moth looks perfectly normal to us and we do not believe you have to worry about it spreading a horrible plague to all your butterflies and moths.

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Subject: Bark colored moth
Location: Fair Harbor, Fire Island, New York
July 27, 2015 5:37 am
I’ve seen a few of these medium sized moths in Fire Island, NY. They stay on our cedar shingled house during the day unless disturbed.
Signature: Alison Sazinger

Underwing Moth

Underwing Moth

Dear Alison,
This is some species of Underwing Moth in the genus
Catocala.  Just last night, we posted a few images taken at our own porch light of a Walnut Underwing that visited our porch light.  We are not certain of your species.  According to BugGuide:  “Lafontaine & Schmidt (2010) listed 101 species of the genus Catocala in America north of Mexico.  Powell & Opler (2009) reported 110 species in all of North America, and about 230 worldwide. ”  The common name Underwing refers to the brightly colored underwings which are hidden when the moth is resting.  The upper wings of Underwing moths blend in perfectly with tree bark when the moth is resting, and a burst of color results when the disturbed moth takes flight.  A predator continues to search for the bright colors and easily overlooks the camouflaged moth.

Thank you for responding h so fast. I’ve never noticed them here before and now they seem common. When it flew I only saw dark brown.
Is the bright park on the dorsal side?
I’ll google the genus.
Thanks!
Alison Salzinger

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