Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: id a “hummingbird moth”
Location: Central Nebraska
August 26, 2014 5:04 pm
Could you please identify this “moth”?
Signature: Amateur photo “bug”

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Amateur photo “bug”,
This is a nice action image of a Whitelined Sphinx.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hummingbird Clearwing Moth
Location: Evanston, IL
August 25, 2014 10:47 am
Here is a photo I captured in our school garden one summer about five years ago. Just a few weeks ago I saw two more of these moths in our garden but did not have my camera on me. Don’t think, however, I could get better than this.
Signature: Lynn Hyndman

Snowberry Clearwing

Snowberry Clearwing

Hi Lynn,
We believe you have misidentified this diurnal sphinx moth, and that it is
Hemaris diffinis, the Snowberry Clearwing or Bumblebee Moth, not a Hummingbird Clearwing.  The two species look quite similar as they are in the same genus, but the Snowberry Clearwing is slightly smaller and has black legs, not light legs like the Hummingbird Clearwing.  The Sphingidae of the Americas site has an excellent image with both species for comparison.  Your image is quite nice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sphinx Moth ?
Location: Middle Tennessee
August 23, 2014 10:46 am
My husband spotted this at work. I was sure it was a type of Sphinx Moth until I looked on your site and saw the others did not have long antennas. Can you enlighten me on what type of moth this may be?
Signature: Sarah P.

Elm Sphinx

Elm Sphinx

Hi Sarahm
This appears to us to be an Elm Sphinx or Four Horned Sphinx,
Ceratomia amyntor.  You can read more about the Elm Sphinx on the Sphingidae of the Americas website where it states:  “Ceratomia amyntor adults fly as a single brood in a wide variety of forested and open habitats in the northern portions of their range from June-July. There are two broods further south, and Vernon A. Brou confirms five broods in Louisiana from March-October.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: San Fernando, CA
August 22, 2014 5:31 pm
Friend found this in his home in San Fernando, CA. It’s huge
Signature: J Lytle

Black Witch

Black Witch

Dear J Lytle,
This impressive moth is a Black Witch, and they are found in the American neotropics.  They are a common species in Mexico and each year at the end of summer, individuals fly north, some reaching as far north as Alaska.  Though they are unable to naturalize in the northern climes, larvae have been found in Southern California, though most sightings in the continental US are of migrants.  This individual is a male Black Witch.

Thanks so much for the information. I have a copy of Hogue’s Insects of the LA Basin, and the Black Witch photo didn’t look like this, but all your sources do!
Best,
Jeanie Lytle

The illustration in Hogue is a female Black Witch.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Imperial Moth
Location: Pinehurst, NC
August 21, 2014 11:31 am
This moth has been on my bathroom mirror for 2 days. Why is it not moving?!?!
Signature: Kristan

Male Imperial Moth

Male Imperial Moth

Hi Kristan,
According to BugGuide, Imperial Moths have:  “wings yellow, variably spotted and shaded with pinkish, orangish, or purplish-brown; male more heavily marked than female, especially in the south.”  The male Imperial Moth in this image from BugGuide is colored and marked almost exactly like your individual.

Mating Imperial Moths, male below

Mating Imperial Moths, male below

We are going to speculate on your questions.
1.  The light attracted your male Imperial Moth.
2.  Like all Giant Silkmoths in the family Saturniidae, Imperial moths live long enough to mate, and in the case of the female, to lay eggs.
3. Flying when you are a Giant Silkmoth takes significant energy, and adults do not feed, needing to store fat and energy during the caterpillar stage.
4.  We believe this male Imperial Moth was attracted to your light, and he is resting because he cannot sense a ready female nearby.
5.  Male Giant Silkmoths have well developed antennae that can sense a female’s pheromones from a mile away.
6.  If you allow him to rest, and he senses a female before he is ready to die, this male Imperial Moth will fly off into the night.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Orange Bee like bug
Location: Maine
August 19, 2014 7:30 am
This bug was seen flitting about a group of flowers. It was the size of a large bumble bee, and moved as such. It was Orange colored on the back half, and greyish on the front half. The wings in the photos looked more butterfly like. It had fairly long antenna and tongue. It looked like a cross between a bee and a hummingbird.
Found flitting about medium sized white clustered flowers within a few yards of the shore of a Maine fresh water lake.
The photos were taken by my sister, and she will be sending me larger copies soon, but I attached what I have so far.
Signature: J from Maine

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Hummingbird Clearwing Moth

Dear J from Maine,
This is a Hummingbird Clearwing Moth,
Hemaris thysbe, a diurnal Sphinx Moth.  We don’t need larger copies, but since one image looks like it was taken from a television screen and the other is just plain blurry, it you have sharper images with more clarity, we would love to post those instead.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination