Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help!
Location: California
February 25, 2015 10:37 am
Bugman, what in the heavens is this world coming to? I was starving and wishing that someone would make me a hot meal when I went outside and noticed this monstrosity out on the cement! Now I don’t know about you, but I think it’s safe to say that this creature is a sure fire fact that evolution exists as it is most certainly something entirely new!
PS. I hope you appreciate my photography skills as I almost lost my head taking them!
Signature: Tight Red Jeans

Whitelined Sphinx

Whitelined Sphinx

Dear Tight Red Jeans,
This Whitelined Sphinx or Striped Morning Sphinx,
Hyles lineata, is one of the most common, larger moths found in California.  When conditions are right, great quantities of the edible caterpillars are found on desert plants, and they will metamorphose into moths that are generally seen at dawn or dusk, are attracted to lights, and that are easily mistaken for hummingbirds.  You could have eaten the moth to prevent starvation.  We are curious to find out how you almost lost your head.

Fiona Cunningham Pausch, Sue Dougherty, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Andrea Leonard Drummond liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth laying eggs
Location: Spring Hill, Florida
February 22, 2015 10:53 am
My friend sent me this interesting photo of a beautiful moth laying eggs on her car cover. I have tried Google and the only thing I can find close to it is the Leopard moth.. but I am confused because this moth has red.. and I can not find any moth that looks like this at all?
Signature: Tina

Eyed Tiger Moth laying Eggs

Eyed Tiger Moth laying Eggs

Dear Tina,
Your identification of a Giant Leopard Moth,
Hypercompe scribonia, is correct, and the species is also known as an Eyed Tiger Moth.  The reddish mark on the thorax is an area where the scales have worn away, revealing the exoskeleton.  Here is an image from BugGuide of an individual with a similar bare spot on the thorax.

Alisha Bragg, Alfonso Moreno, Sue Dougherty, Julieta Stangaferro, Kristi E. Lambert, Amy Gosch, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Darlene Ricotta liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Medowie, Australia NSW
February 17, 2015 1:28 pm
I was hoping to have this bug identified. It is in a tree in our yard in Medowie NSW. No-one seems to know what it is. There is a circular spider web right next to the bug & cocoon of eggs.
Signature: Toni Alley

Tussock Moth with Eggs

Tussock Moth with Eggs

Dear Toni,
This is a flightless female Tussock Moth with her eggs, probably
Orgyia australis.

Thank you for letting me know :-)
Toni Alley

Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth from South Africa
Location: Cape Town, South Africa
February 18, 2015 12:45 pm
Hi there!
I hope you guys can help to identify this magnificent moth.
Spotted in a garden in Cape Town, South Africa in mid Feb.
Lots of granadilla and lavender plants around.
Never seen one even remotely similar – the photo is pretty good though, I hope we can identify it and find out more.
Please let me know what turns up!
Looking forward to your reply and thanks for the help!
Signature: Yours truly, NJV

Echo Owlet Moth

Echo Owlet Moth

Dear NJV,
Your lovely moth with its curled wings reminded us of an Australian Fruit Piercing Moth, so we searched the subfamily Catocalinae on iSpot and we quickly found the Echo Owlet Moth,
Achaea echo, a perfect match for your moth.  The species is also pictured on African Moths.

Superb!!
Thank you so much for the help, I really appreciate it!
Have a fantastic day,
Kind Regards
Norman Visser

Melissa Leigh Cooley, Rachel Carpenter, Jennifer MacAulay, Ana Šorc, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Julieta Stangaferro, Amy Gosch, Kristi E. Lambert, Carmen Thompson, Alfonso Moreno, Chris Cooper, Kathy Haines, Kitty Heidih, Mathew Becker, Cora Lukehart liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug shape like a T
Location: Idaho
February 17, 2015 11:36 am
What is it?
Signature: Carrie

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

Hi Carrie,
This is a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae.

Sue Dougherty, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this insect?
Location: Bangalore, India
February 16, 2015 7:54 am
This picture was sent to me by one of my friends. I have never seen an insect like this. To me it appears to be a moth but i’m totally naive in this. But i was interested in finding out this little guy’s name. So i searched the internet and found your website good. Can you please tell about it.???
Signature: Shubhojeet

Oleander Hawkmoth from India

Oleander Hawkmoth from India

Dear Shubhojeet,
You are correct that this is a moth, more specificially an Oleander Hawkmoth.

Ana Šorc, Julieta Stangaferro, Sue Dougherty, Alfonso Moreno, Kathy Haines, Mary Lemmink Lawrence liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination