Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: yellow european moth
Location: Centre/East of Sardinia, Italy
September 21, 2014 4:04 pm
Hi there bugman, my name’s Rossana, location Sardinia, East side, not in the coast but rather to thr centre of it.
Here is the moth I couldn’t identify through google. It is not, in my opinion, a leopard moth, since it is yellow rather than white. So who can it be?
Please let me know!
Btw, it was nice to find your site again after more than ten years! Congratulations, as it’s beautiful
Kind regards
Rossana
Signature: Rossana

Tiger Moth

Tiger Moth

Hi Rossana,
Common names can create some confusion as often the same name is given to more than one species, and sometimes one species can have more than one common name.  The scientific binomial system is much more accurate, and it eliminates confusion when one species has a range that extends across countries that speak different languages.  We suspect the Leopard Moth you mentioned is
Zeuzera pyrinaYour moth is a Tiger Moth in the subfamily Arctiinae, and we believe it might be Chelis maculosa which is pictured on Hants Moths.  Additional images can be found on Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa.  Another possibility is Cymbalophora pudica which can also be viewed on the Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa.

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Subject: Nepali moth
Location: Nepal
September 20, 2014 11:58 pm
Dear bugman,
here is a small day-flying moth taken in June, in the Kathmandu valley of Nepal. It’s about an inch long. Can you tell me what it is? It looks like a lady singing an aria.
Signature: Curious

Footman Moth

Footman Moth

Dear Curious,
The markings on the thorax of this Tiger Moth do indeed resemble the face of a woman with a mouth opened wide in song.  Having guessed correctly that the subfamily is Arctiinae, we quickly found a matching image on FlickR that is identified as a Footman Moth,
Barsine orientalis.  We then located an image on SinoBug that supports the initial identification, but we realized is was another view from the same location taken by the same photographer, so we decided to search for a unique verification.  We found verification on the Moths of Thailand site. 

Dear Daniel,
thank you so much for the quick reply and the accurate identification!
Mia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please Identify
Location: San Antonio, TX 78229
September 15, 2014 2:05 pm
I suspect this is a moth? I found it on my car when I left work on Sunday September 14th around 11:30pm. I live in San Antonio, Texas and I saw it in the 78229 zip code. Let me know if you need more information.
Thank you
Signature: Ray Silva

Black Witch

Black Witch

Hi Ray,
This spectacular moth is a Black Witch,
Ascalapha odorata, a species that has naturalized in the southernmost parts of the U.S., but most individuals migrate north from Mexico during the fall months.  See BugGuide for additional information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth of some sort?
Location: Venice Florida
September 12, 2014 4:00 am
This was taken in early September in Venice Florida on The outside open the screen to an apartment porch.. The temperature was close to 90°F, and the humidity was quite high – like 95%
Signature: Tony Lincoln

Banded Sphinx

Banded Sphinx

Hi Tony,
This striking moth is a Banded Sphinx,
Eumorpha fasciatus, and according to the Sphingidae of the Americas site:  “The upperside of the moth is dark pinkish brown. Each forewing has a lighter brown band along the costa, and sharp pinkish white bands and streaks. The hindwing has a pink patch on the inner margin and pink along the outer margin, distinguishing it from vitis.”  Your individual has enough of the underwings showing in the attached image, revealing the pink outer margin, the identifying feature.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small blue insect
Location: Memphis, TN
September 10, 2014 12:15 pm
I saw this fellow flying in my yard this morning. I don’t recall ever seeing one before. I reckon it was about an inch long. Any idea what this is?
Signature: William Cooper

Clematis Borer

Clematis Borer

Hi William,
Even though your insect has black wings, it is a member of the moth family Sesiidae, commonly called the Clearwings.  The members of the family Sesiidae are wasp mimics, and even though they cannot sting, they derive protection from their protective coloration and markings.  We first found a similar looking individual on the Moth Photographers Group that is identified as
Alcathoe caudata, the Clematis Clearwing Moth, and upon checking Bugguide we found a good match with Alcathoe carolinensis which is called the Clematis Borer.  The moths in the family Sesiidae have larvae that bore in woody plants, sometimes causing considerable damage, though the Clematis Borer might be unjustly tagged with an unfitting common name based on this BugGuide statement:  “Although other Alcathoe use species of Clematis (Ranunculaceae) as larval hosts, earlier reports of carolinensis on this host have been called into question and no Clematis species were found within 160 meters of the Tennessee collection site.” No larval host and no common name are included in the Butterflies and Moths of North America site.

That makes sense — the photo that I sent actually shows the insect on a clematis leaf!
Thanks!!  I enjoy the site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Hoghton, Lancs. UK. PR5 0JY.
September 6, 2014 8:26 am
I photographed this creature on the wall of my house, It appears to have a fixed wing cover for its flight wings. Unfortunately it disappeared in a flash as I wasn’t looking. I have checked several books but can’t see anything like it. I have from the photo calculated it’s dimensions as 30mm wingspan and
15mm. body length.
Signature: J.B. Lewis (Mr.)

Plume Moth

Plume Moth

Dear Mr. J.B. Lewis,
This is a Plume Moth in the family Pterophoridae, but we are not certain of the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination