Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large moth
Location: Northern Ohio – Seneca County
May 23, 2016 9:14 pm
My son came across this moth on our evening walk/run tonight (5/23/16). We live in Northern Ohio about 35 miles South of the lake in Seneca County.
Very pretty and large. It was neat to see. Just wondering what type of moth it might be.
Signature: Michelle Hoepf

Cecropia Moth

Cecropia Moth

Dear Michelle,
This is a female Cecropia Moth, and she is laden with eggs.  Like other members in her family Saturniidae, the Cecropia Moth only lives long enough to mate and lay eggs.  Adults do not feed.

Thank you for the information.  I appreciate it. I am glad I came across your website.  We learned about other moths from other posts and questions posted.   Thanks again for you help!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth
Location: Sweden, Stockholm
May 23, 2016 10:14 pm
I would really like to know what kind of moth this is. It was aproximately 2.5 inches.
Signature: Lena

Poplar Hawkmoth

Poplar Hawkmoth

Dear Lena,
The Poplar Hawkmoth,
Laothoe populi, is one of the largest members of the family Sphingidae found in Europe.  According to UK Moths:  “Probably the commonest of our hawk-moths, it has a strange attitude when at rest, with the hindwings held forward of the forewings, and the abdomen curved upwards at the rear. If disturbed it can flash the hindwings, which have a contrasting rufous patch, normally hidden.  Distributed commonly throughout most of Britain, the adults are on the wing from May to July, when it is a frequent visitor to light.”  According to The Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic:  “Frequents almost any damp, low-lying area, such as country lanes, open woodland rides, railway cuttings or town parks, particularly where Populus spp. but also Salix spp. are present; commoner where the former occurs. Up to 1600m in the Alps. Most emerge late at night or early in the morning, clambering up the tree trunk at the base of which the larva had pupated. Not until the following evening does the moth take flight, females quickly selecting a resting position amongst foliage from which the males are attracted at around midnight. Once paired, they remain coupled until the following evening when, after separation, the females start laying eggs almost immediately.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth to be identified
Location: Botswana
May 23, 2016 4:34 am
Photographed this Moth at Kubu Island in Southern Botswana. Kabul Island is situated in the Makgadikgadi Salt Pans. The Moths wingspan/width when not in flight was between 2.5 – 3 Inches wide. Any help will be appreciated.
Signature: Tony Camacho

Cream Striped Owl Moth

Cream Striped Owl Moth

Dear Tony,
We believe we have correctly identified you stunning moth as a Cream Striped Owl Moth,
Cyligramma latona, thanks to images posted to iSpot.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beefly? What kind?
Location: Voldstream bc
May 18, 2016 11:28 pm
Location: coldstream, bc
Date: May 18, 2016
Detail: seen everywhere on our 5 acre hobby farm. I keep rescuing them from out of our hot greenhouses. Havent seen these fellers in our area before.
We have normally lots of polination plants and wild bees.
Thanks.
ER
Signature: in kind

Bee Hawkmoth

Bee Hawk Moth

Dear ER,
Bee Flies, like other flies, have a single pair of wings.  Your insect has two sets of wings.  It is a Bee Hawk Moth,
Hemaris thetis, which we identified on the Sphingidae of the Americas site where it states:  “Adults mimic bumblebees and are quite variable, both geographically and seasonally. The wings are basically clear, with dark brown to brownish-orange veins, bases and edges. The thorax is golden-brown to dark greenish-brown. The abdomen tends to be dark (black) with 1-2 yellow segments just before the terminal end. These yellow segments are in much sharper contrast to the rest of the abdomen than in somewhat similar species. Also note the relatively narrow dark outer margin of the hindwing. Most fresh specimens also have some blue “fur” tufts highlighting the first black band on the abdomen.” 

Hello Daniel,
Thank you so much for this detailed id. I am excited I have a bee hawkmoth on my property ~
Evan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mothra behind my house?
Location: Calgary, Alberta
May 18, 2016 10:03 pm
I spotted this grey moth sitting against my house. It’s huge. I couldn’t measure it, but I can safely guess it’s 2 inches in length (from the top of it’d head to tip of the wings). Possibly more, but not less. It is may 18th, and it has been a hot dry spring, and a very mild winter (comparatively). I’ve never seen anything like it here. I’ve never seen a moth this big outside of a moth and butterfly exhibit!
I’m so curious as to what it is (and why it’s in my yard??? What do it’s larvae eat?).
Signature: Regards, Sheila

Northern Ash Sphinx

Northern Ash Sphinx

Dear Sheila,
Your moth is one of the Sphinx Moths or Hawkmoths in the family Sphingidae, and we identified it as a Northern Ash Sphinx,
Sphinx chersis, thanks to the Sphingidae of the Americas site where it states “Larval hosts are ash, lilac, privet, cherry, and quaking aspen.”  If there was a light nearby, it may have been attracted to the light at night.

wow, thank you so much for the quick response! I’m pleased to know it won’t try to make off with my 2 year old. 😛
best,
Sheila

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Walnut Underwing
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
May 17, 2016 6:48 PM
Each year we look forward to the first appearance of a Walnut Underwing at our office.  We were pleasantly surprised by this especially gorgeous individual earlier in the week.  Perhaps we will try to get a good image with the colorful underwings revealed the next time it comes to the porch light.

Walnut Underwing

Walnut Underwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination