Currently viewing the category: "Moths"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A silk moth of sorts?
Location: Jungle near. Lonawala, Maharashtra, Indian
September 22, 2016 1:43 pm
I took these photos at night in late monsoon season in the Western Ghats of. India near Lonawala. It was the second or third time I had seen this fantastic moth but not on consecutive seasons. The colour is not touched up and in the day was still a stunning brilliant yellow colour, like a classic deep daffodil yellow!
Signature: Suvajra

Golden Emperor Moth

Golden Emperor Moth

Dear Suvajra,
This spectacular moth is a Golden Emperor Moth,
Loepa katinka, a species we identified on Global Biodiversity Information Facility.  The Golden Emperor Moth is also pictured on Project Noah.  

Golden Emperor Moth

Golden Emperor Moth

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for identifying this moth.  Yes, spectacular, isn’t it!  Golden Emperor suits it to a ‘T’.  And found also in Taiwan, which makes me wonder if it is not an import to India.
Thanks again,
Suvajra

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looper Moth on Sedum at Mom’s?
Location: Faribault County, Minnesota
September 21, 2016 3:52 pm
Greetings, WTB Volunteers!
My Test Message went through! WooHoo! So I’m hoping this query I’ve been trying forever to send will make it as well.
Our Autumn flowers are beginning to bloom, which of course includes sedum. While most sedum are not native to MN, Dad had a fondness for them so several varieties are in Mom’s garden. Like prairie liatris, sedum are pollinator magnets. Late one afternoon at the end of August 2016, I was taking photos and noticed a moth I’ve not seen before. Gorgeous thing, which of course does not necessarily mean it’s an insect we want around. Years ago I a very large and absolutely stunning moth in my garden near the iris. (I took pictures I can send if you like). I put two and two together and discovered it was the adult of the Iris Borer. Beautiful markings, reminiscent of Native American cave paintings! Still, not a moth one wants if one hopes to grow iris!
Anyway, this most recent “new” moth has the outline of a star on its back with two prominent spots along the lower edges of the star. In profile, it has prominent ridges with arise from its shoulders and back. Quite stunning to see, and was feasting quite happily on the sedum blossoms. Even the bees did not deter this moth!
I’ve not seen a moth such as this, certainly not to photograph, so I’m excited to add this to my sightings list! The little bit of research I’ve been able to do gets me as far as a possible Looper Moth, but then I get stuck. So many Looper Moths! Can you help me narrow it down?
Blessings one and all!
Signature: Wanda J. Kothlow

Looper Moth

Looper Moth

Dear Wanda,
We are not going to be much help.  So many Looper Moths in the Subfamily Plusiinae, which is well represented on BugGuide, look very similar.  Some possibilities are that it is in the genus Autographa, which is pictured on BugGuide.

Looper Moth

Looper Moth

Well, Daniel, that helps explain why I was having difficulty with an ID. I’ll just refer to it as “Looper Moth A” until I have more information!
Thanks so much, Daniel.
Blessings,
Wanda

Looper Moth

Looper Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug thats wings expanded fast
Location: Florida
September 23, 2016 2:03 pm
I was outside and i found this little orange bug that looked kinda cute and it had red ears but after a little while it hung on to a leaf for a few minutes and all of a sudden the ears turned into wings! Do you know what bug this is?
Signature: Alyssa

Pink Striped Oakworm Moth

Pink Striped Oakworm Moth

Dear Alyssa,
This looks to us like a freshly eclosed Pink Striped Oakworm Moth,
Anisota virginiensis, or another member of the genus Anisota.  You can compare your image to this BugGuide image.  Here is an image of what you described you first saw when you originally noticed this individual.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this moth?
Location: Sumner Co, KS, USA
September 20, 2016 1:43 pm
We live in Kansas, and found this moth in our garage. It really really looks like the Blackburn’s Sphinx Moth, but how can that be since we live in Kansas?!
Signature: Sincerely

Carolina Sphinx

Carolina Sphinx

According to Sphingidae of the Americas, Blackburn’s Sphinx, Manduca blackburni, was:  “Previously known from all the main islands, [but] this rare endemic Hawaiian sphinx moth is now known only from Maui.”  Your moth, the Carolina Sphinx, Manduca sexta, looks similar to Blackburn’s Sphinx because it is in the same genus.  Because its caterpillar, the Tobacco Hornworm, feeds on tomato plants, the Carolina Sphinx is relatively common across North America.  You can read more about the Carolina Sphinx on Sphingidae of the Americas.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large brown moth with orange `eyes’ on upper wings
Location: Goa, India
September 20, 2016 1:20 am
Hello Bugman,
I am here to Bug you again.
This large brown moth with almost pea-size orange `eyes’ on the upper part of the wings flew in. Actually, I have seen them before but only a few days ago thought I need to know what it is. I hope you can be of help!
Thanks
Signature: Sucheta Potnis

Indian Owl Moth

Indian Owl Moth

Dear Sucheta,
We believe we have correctly identified this Indian Owl Moth,
Erebus macrops, thanks to images on India Nature Watch and Biodiversity India.

Hello,
Thanks very much for the quick ID!
Best regards,
Sucheta
Goa, India

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A Beautiful something…
Location: Hardeeville South Carolina
September 17, 2016 9:41 am
Hello Mr.Bugman! My brother told me about your page after I asked him if he had ever seen the bug in my picture. My name is Brittany, I work at a self storage facility out in the middle of nowhere. Every morning as I check the property and there are so many bugs outside. I think they must be attracted by the lights on the property at night. I always take pictures if i find new ones for my “collection”. I can normally identity them via google but this one has me stumped! This i am guessing was some type of moth, as after i took the picture he/she flew away. I know you are a busy bugman but I would love to find out what this beautiful somthing was. Thank you for your time!
Signature: -Brittany

Heiroglyphic Moth

Hieroglyphic Moth

Dear Brittany,
This lovely little Owlet Moth is commonly called a Hieroglyphic Moth,
Diphthera festiva, and we don’t think that common name needs any explanation.

Awesome! Thank you so much I cant wait to tell my brother!
p.s. What a perfect name!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination