Currently viewing the category: "Mites"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bewildering Fungus eater
Location: Singapore
September 9, 2014 6:39 am
Hi Daniel
Hope you’re well.
Was wondering if you could help me narrow down an ID for the attached insect. It was on a dead log together with a lot of fungus weevils and fungus beetles so I suspected it liked the fungus too. I’ve never seen anything like it before. As usual when I see something bewildering I think of you :-)
Thanks,
Signature: David

What's That Beetle???

What’s That Beetle???

Dear David,
Your images are spectacular, and this is truly an odd looking beetle, and we haven’t even a guess at its identity at the time of posting.  Alas, we cannot research this at this time because we must rush off to work.  Perhaps one of our readers has a clue or the time to investigate.  It does appear to be carrying some Mites on the elytra.  The placement of the eyes is quite unusual, almost like those of a frog that lies submerged with only its eyes visible above water.

Beetle from Singapore

Bark-Gnawing Beetle from Singapore

Hi Daniel and David:
My first impression was that it looked like an odd Jewel Beetle (Buprestidae) but I could find nothing similar online. I believe this is actually a Bark-gnawing Beetle (Trogossitidae), a relatively small and obscure family of beetles. The dorsal markings resemble some Leperina (=Lepidopteryx) species, but I think there are too many dissimilarities for that to be the correct genus. I believe it is probably a species of Xenoglena, for which the lack of elytral scales and dorsally placed eyes are diagnostic. Information is generally lacking for Asian Trogossitidae, but Kolibáč (2009) provided a very complete (and technical) description of the family. Google Books provides access to this document – see page 46 for discussion and page 37 for representative pictures of Xenoglena sp.  I have a feeling it could be X. deyrollei, but I have found no image for that species so I really can’t be certain.  If you have difficulty accessing that site the same information for Xenoglena sp. is also provided atspecies-id.net.  Despite the common name for the family, these beetles are actually predatory. According to Kolibáč (2009) “Adults dwell on fallen trees and dry branches, hunting for xylophagous insects. They fly and run at great speed and appear very like some jewel beetles in body shape.”  Regards. Karl

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tomentose Burying Beetle With Mites
Location: Toledo, OH
August 23, 2014 2:03 pm
Hello there! I’ve never been lucky enough to see one of these guys until today, and wanted to share! I’m pressure sure it’s a Tomentose Burying Beetle with Poecilochirus mites.
Thanks!
Signature: Katy

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Dear Katy,
Thank you for your excellent images.  The “hairy” thorax indicates that this Burying Beetle is a Tomentose Burying Beetle,
Nicrophorus tomentosus, and according to BugGuide:  “dense yellow hair on pronotum distinctive.”  We generally identify the mites as Phoretic Mites, meaning that they use the beetle for transportation purposes, so thank you for supplying a genus name.  According to BugGuide:  “Species in this genus inhabit vertebrate carrion and ride on silphid beetles. They don’t show host specificity, but mix up in larger carcasses where adult beetles come to feed. Those on Nicrophorus ride back on the adult and enter the brood cell and reproduce there. “

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: She’s carrying her babies on her back!
Location: Mt. Hood, OR
August 22, 2014 9:35 pm
Dear Bugman,
This bug flew into my house tonight. I thought it was a bumble bee at first because it’s about the same size as one and it also has black and yellow markings, When I caught it to let it outside I noticed it was covered in little bugs. I took pictures thinking you might want some. They may not have turned out very well though…
Is it some kind of beetle?
Signature: D

I figured out it’s a burying beetle and those are mites. Thank you for you’re time.

Burying Beetle with PHoretic Mites

Burying Beetle with PHoretic Mites

Dear D,
Sorry about the delay, but we have been playing tour guide to out of town visitors for the past two days.  You are correct that this is a Burying Beetle covered in Phoretic Mites.  Your initial guess was understandable as some arthropods carry around young on their backs, including Scorpions and Wolf Spiders, but very few insects utilize that means of protecting young.  One rarity is the habit of some Giant Water Bugs to have the female cement the eggs to the back of the male Giant Water Bug to protect, but only until the eggs hatch.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Velvet Mite
Location: Sibley Nature Center, Midland TX
May 26, 2014 11:20 am
I took this photo of a Velvet Mite after the recent rains here. I thought you might like to have it for your database. It’s nicely focused and clearer than the photos you currently have.
Signature: John P. Van Dusen

Velvet Mite

Velvet Mite

Hi John,
Thanks for sending in your very detailed image of a Velvet Mite in the family Trombidiidae.  Your individual might be in the genus
Dinothrombium based on this image from BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug that can’t be identified by exterminators or by looking on the web
Location: Albuquerque, NM
May 22, 2014 12:23 pm
Please help, I have a bit of a problem! I have had these bugs dropping in my house from a skylight. I have had 3 different exterminators come and can’t identify them. They are a yellowish color and .1 cm in size. I need to know what they are to get rid of them. There are several hundreds maybe more that are finding their way in my house. It seems to be some sort of freshly hatched bug but have no idea what class they fit in. PLEASE HELP! The photos attached are of a few of the bugs stuck on a mini lint roller, the tape is 3 inches long and the roller it’s self is small enough to travel in a small purse. Please contact me as soon as possible. Thank you so much for your time and help!
Signature: Sincerely, Rebecca Rockett

Mites perhaps

Mites perhaps

Dear Rebecca Rocket,
We cannot identify what we cannot see, and your images lack any critical detail.  Our best guess, based on the size you have indicated, is that you are being troubled by Mites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Longhorn Beetle from Barbados
Location: Barbados, Caribbean
April 21, 2014 9:50 pm
Hi, This green longhorn beetle (looks like Chlorida festiva) flew into my room to get its picture taken last night. First time I’m seeing one of these and it was about 4cm (body) long. I also noticed what looks to be mites on its ‘neck’ area, can you confirm this? Thought it would be a nice addition to your collection.
Signature: Niaz

Longicorn, Chlorida Festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn, Chlorida festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Hi Niaz,
We agree that you have correctly identified your Longicorn as
Chlorida festiva, but in searching for an image online for a link, we stumbled upon this Superstock image of Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites identified as Histiogaster arborsignis.  Phoretic Mites do not prey upon the Longicorns, but rather use them to move from location to location.  Back to the Longicorn, according to American Insects:  “Linnaeus described this large and striking species in 1758. It can be found in the West Indies, and from Mexico south to Argentina.”  Your images are gorgeous.

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination