Currently viewing the category: "Mites"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Coming out of my skin!
Location: Peoria heights IL
January 8, 2014 4:45 am
Hi! I was diagnosed with scabies, but they are coming out of my skin, and all the research I’ve read says scabies doesn’t do that. This happens when I put clove oil or coconut oil on my skin. Please help. I want them all gone!
I live in central Illinois, but moved here this year. Since June of this year I have gone from Hawaii to Georgia to South Carolina to Connecticut to southern Illinois up to central Illinois. Symptoms started after we moved to a new house in central Illinois. The bugs range in size from a black speck to what looks like a small brown flea. They appear to be dead when they come out of my skin.
I was diagnosed as having scabies because I went to the doctor with SEVERE itching and they asked if my fingers itched and I said yes. They did not examine me or see the bugs.
Signature: Desperately seeking help

Evidence of Something

Evidence of Something

Dear Desperately seeking help,
Unlike the doctor who “diagnosed” you, we have no credentials for the treatment of conditions.  We would urge you to seek a second professional opinion.  One of the images you provided looks like a blood splotched paper towel and we don’t see any “bugs”.  The second image looks vaguely insect-like, but there is not enough detail for us to make an identification.

Thing

Thing

Thank you for the response.
I understand you are not doctors, but had hoped you’d have some idea of what it is.
I am sorry I cannot get a very detailed photo of the bugs. They are ridiculously small right now. The big ones are all gone thank goodness.
Do you maybe have an idea of what would live inside the skin and surface when dying?
Thank you again for having responded to me in the first place. I really do appreciate it!

The list of places you visited in the past year includes Hawaii, and that is considered the tropics.  It is entirely possible that you contracted something in Hawaii that was brought in by another tourist.  We really have no idea what you would have living under your skin, but we have fielded requests like yours in the past including this Unknown Parasite posting from 2010.  We would suggest that you leave a comment on your query on our site in the event any of our readers write in with a suggestion.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tiny green beetle-like bug
Location: Albuquerque, NM
December 23, 2013 5:04 pm
Hi guys!
This tiny guy was crawling across our bathroom floor before we put him outside. He’s actually so small that I thought at first that he was a tick. Closer inspection showed that he looks more like a tiny watermelon with legs. :-) We’ve done searches but can’t seem to find any picture that matches closely enough for a 100% positive ID. If you can help satisfy our curiosity, that would be great! Thanks!
Signature: Kathy Kubica

Mite

Mite

Hi Kathy,
This has to be one of the smallest digital files that has ever been sent to us for identification purposes.  This appears to us to be a Mite.

Thanks, Daniel!
Based on your narrowing down, I went on to search and narrowed it down further to a clover mite (which, while irksome to have discovered in our home, is admittedly far less worrisome than the sort that nosh on animal life). Thanks for the speedy reply!
–Kathy Kubica
PS: The ID file was so small because it was a zero-in crop from an iphone shot. None of our real cameras could focus within the range and flash-glare of the small bathroom paper cup the bug was in. :-)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Velvet Mites
Location: Nigeria
December 16, 2013 6:03 am
Hi Mr Bugman,
I sent you a robberfly like a decade ago, and found some Velvet Mites I was able to determine using your site.
Maybe you’re still interested int he pics.
Signature: Robert

Velvet Mites

Velvet Mites

Hi Robert,
Thank you for sending your images of Velvet Mites in the family Thrombidiidae.  According to What’s Bugging You?, “Although often difficult to find, they are sometimes extremely abundant locally, if only for a few hours at time. For example, after a brief yet intense thunderstorm, a massive emergence of giant red velvet mites was sighted from the air at an altitude of 1500 feet just north of  Tucson. An estimated 3-5 million mites had emerged in an area roughly two acres in size!  The annual emergence of the giant mites is apparently timed to coincide with that of their primary prey, termites. However, their opportunity to gorge themselves on abundant termite reproductives is quite limited. After mating, the termites quickly shed their wings and bury themselves so that they are out of reach of the mite’s predatory embrace. Adult giant red velvet mites spend most of their lives in subterranean burrows in a diapause-like state waiting for a specific set of ecological conditions triggered by summer monsoons.”  According to Charles Hogue in Insect of the Los Angeles Basin, “The larvae are parasites of grasshoppers, and the adults are predators on subterranean termites.”   The Africa Image Library has a nice photograph of a Velvet Mite and East African Notes and Records blog has an image of a Tanzanian stamp with a Velvet Mite as well as the information:  “Marguerite Jellicoe’s evocative description of the start of the annual rains in Singida includes a rare reference to the cultural significance of red velvet mites in Tanzania. I first came across these brightly coloured arachnids (family Trombidiidae) in 1981, at the start of my second wet season in the village of Utengule in Usangu (in what is now Mbarali District). I was away when the rains began on 2nd December, but when I returned to the village two days later these small crimson creatures were everywhere on the newly dampened earth. Sangu-speakers called them inkhadupa, their generic name for ticks and mites, and told me that they were thought to fall down from the sky along with the rain. In this respect they were similar to ground pangolins (Manis temminckii), another creature believed to fall from the heavens, from whence they were sent by the ancestors, amanguluvi.”  

Velvet Mites

Velvet Mites

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pthiraptera? weeeird Hemiptera?
Location: Orlando, Florida
October 6, 2013 7:31 am
Hi Bugman! I’m writing in yet again with an identification request. I found this bug as an ecto-parasite (or maybe just phoretic) on a midge that wandered into a black light trap. What you can’t see in the picture are two little filamentous antennae that stick out from about mid way down the rostrum and the little needle like mouthparts extending from the tip. My original thought was a tick, but there are only 6 legs (none are broken off) and antennae. Then I thought Pthiraptera, but the key I have wasn’t really working out. Maybe it’s some weird Hemiptera? It should be said that the total length of this insect is under 0.5 mm ( it was on a midge after all). Any help you can give me would be great! Thanks!
Signature: Brian S

Unknown "Bug"

Unknown “Bug” is Mite Nymph

Hi Brian,
We are going to request some assistance on this mystery, and we are posting your photo in the event one of our readers is able to assist in the identification.  Are you able to provide a higher resolution image?

Eric Eaton Responds
Hi, Daniel:
This is a real mystery to me, so I am including Dr. Brian Brown in my reply, hoping he might be able to confirm my suspicions that this is actually some kind of wingless fly.  It may not be possible to determine anything from this one image, though, so please don’t hold your breath.
Eric

Hi Daniel, thanks for the quick response! I just figured out a way to get my DSLR to work with my microscope. It’s a little ghetto, but these pics are way better. I even got a picture of the mouth parts! Thanks for posting this bug on the site.
Thanks, Brian S.

Unknown "Bug"

Mite Nymph

Thanks for the better images Brian.  We hope to have some type of answer for you soon.

Mouth of the Creature

Mite Nymph:  Mouth of the Creature

Dr. Brian Brown responds
Some kind of mite nymph (they only have 6 legs).
Brian

Eric Eaton requests clarification
Mites have compound eyes and hair-like antennae?  Otherwise I’d agree with you automatically….
Eric

Dr. Brian Brown requests assistance from Barry OConner
Barry- this is a mite larva, right?
Thanks,
Brian

Barry OConner responds
Hi Brian – Yes, this is a larval water-mite. Species in this group commonly have ocelli (not compound eyes). The majority of these larvae parasitize adults of aquatic Diptera. After engorgement, they drop back into the water and continue life as predators, alternating inactive and active nymphal stages. Don’t know what the reference to “antennae” was; perhaps the palps? Chelicerae in these mites are stylet-like.
All the best! – Barry

Thanks, Barry!

Eric Eaton Closes the Book on the Mystery Creature
Daniel:
I learned something, too, out of all this….
Eric

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: How are you at identifying idiots?
Location: My Entire Body (PDX, OR)
September 24, 2013 11:29 am
I think I must be one, idiot that is. Recovering myself from yet another bout of complete hysteria, I gathered myself together and decided to check my email. I noticed and opened the auto confirmation the system sent in reference to my first letter.
As I re-read it, I realized that my poorly worded letter seems to be asking you to look at hundreds of photos, and generously offers to let you view hundreds more if you can’t identify anything from the first few hundred. This cannot be further from what I was actually trying to ask. I only meant to ask if you wouldn’t mind looking at the three photos I submitted with my original inquiry and give me your opinion and if those three weren’t any good I meant I could choose another three from the hundreds that I have that might be better suited for identification. I apologize for any confusion. In my defense I claim my advanced age of 46 and what can only be massive blood loss from bed bugs.
The system required me to upload more photos. You might have to look closely at Image 3. In the bottom center of the picture is what I think is a scabie. Would love to be wrong though.
Thanks
Signature: KillMeKnow

Possibly Scabies

Possibly Scabies

Dear KillMeKnow,
The best and surest method for a conclusive Scabies identification is to check with a physician.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it, and how do I kill it?
Location: NE Ohio
July 26, 2013 11:52 am
Hello! My name is Logan (female). I have discovered some kind of teeny tiny bug (mites, I think) in my bed and the area surrounding it. I’ve burned my sheets and vaccummed like crazy, but they’re still there. I havnt noticed any bites, but maybe I’m just lucky. They’re much too small to be bedbugs. I’ve lived in the same house for 19 years and never experienced this problem before. About a month ago I took a trip to Honduras, so I’m wondering if I brought back some hitchhikers. I was thinking they might be tropical rat mites, but I’m not sure because we have no rats or birds they could live on. It’s been hot and humid in NE Ohio. I tried to play detective and looked at one under my microscope. I managed to get some good pictures. If anyone could take a stab at what this creepy bug is, I’d be forever greatful! Thanks!
Signature: Logan

Which Mite is this???

Which Mite is this???

Hi Logan,
This is certainly a Mite, but we haven’t the necessary expertise to determine which species.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to supply an identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination