Currently viewing the category: "Mites"
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Subject: Infested Beetle
Location: grand rapids michigan
May 15, 2015 11:21 pm
I found this beetle on a log after dark. Its about the size of an index fingernail and just about as flat as one. The thing that I found really interesting is that its belly is covered with what appear to be aphids. At first I thought they were eggs or offspring but they really look like aphids, and they don’t resemble their host whatsoever. It doesn’t move much and seems content to just sit there… Hopefully you find this as interesting as I do.
Signature: dave

Clown Beetle

Clown Beetle

Dear Dave,
This very distinctive Beetle is a Clown Beetle, probably in the genus
Hololepta, and it is carrying Phoretic Mites, Neolobogynium americana, that use the mobility of the beetle to be transported from location to location to gain access to food.

Clown Beetle (ventral view) with Phoretic Mites

Clown Beetle (ventral view) with Phoretic Mites

Mark Reister, Rachel Carpenter, Timothy Steele, Kitty Heidih, Sue Dougherty, Ann Levitsky, Claire Kooyman, Maryann Struman liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Plagued by bugs!!
Location: Newcastle nsw
January 24, 2015 7:57 am
Hi there,
I live in Newcastle nsw Australia and have been plagued by bugs for the past 6 months. They are irritating my skin and my partners. We get itchy and have open sores all over our bodies, mainly just behind our ears and on the neck, legs, arms, face, back, hands and feet, well everywhere! We had pest control come and exterminate what he believed to be bird mites several types he said, funnily enough he wouldn’t come back again because he was tired and won’t take our calls now . Initially the problem died down but now 2 months later is back full force, it’s not scabies, it’s possibly a million other things but we can’t seem to find any help with this. Tonight I was in the bathroom and this long spindly legged thing appeared from nowhere, I know I have seen it several times around the house but have no idea what it is and if it could be a factor in the skin dilemma.
Signature: Rachel

Unknown Hymenopteran

Possibly Red Spider Ant Alate

Dear Rachel,
We are relatively certain that the pictured insect is not responsible for your skin irritation, and we believe that Mites are most likely the problem.  The pictured insect is a member of the order Hymenoptera which includes wasps and ants.  We are leaning toward it being the alate of an Ant, a winged reproductive individual, though the legs are quite long for a typical ant.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide us with a more definitive identification.  Again, we do not believe this Hymenopteran is related to your skin condition.  This individual does resemble the Red Spider Ants pictured on the Brisbane Insect website.

Unknown Hymenopteran

Possibly Red Spider Ant Alate

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Subject: Possible mite?
Location: West Virginia
December 30, 2014 7:32 am
Found this little bug on my bedside table. Have been having skin irritations for months. Is it a mite?
Signature: Dar

Mite

Mite

Dear Dar,
You are correct that this is a Mite, but we cannot say for certain that it is a species that can cause skin irritations.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange red lumps
Location: Styx Valley, Tasmania, Australia
October 23, 2014 4:21 am
Hi there,
I would like an ID on both the insect (a crane fly?) and the strange red lumps on its thorax. Are they mites? I found this specimen on the car after a drive through a forestry logging track. Its body (excluding the legs) was probably around 2cm long.
Thanks for the help.
Signature: Curious

Crane Fly with Mites

Crane Fly with Mites

Dear Curious,
You are correct that this is a Crane Fly, and we don’t know if we are going to be able to provide you with a more specific identification beyond the Infraorder Tipulomorpha.  The red lumps do appear to be Mites, and we do have several images in our archives of Crane Flies with Mites.  We found an example from UK on The Ranger’s Blog.  We suspect the Mites are phoretic, but we are not certain.

Crane Fly with Mites

Crane Fly with Mites

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bewildering Fungus eater
Location: Singapore
September 9, 2014 6:39 am
Hi Daniel
Hope you’re well.
Was wondering if you could help me narrow down an ID for the attached insect. It was on a dead log together with a lot of fungus weevils and fungus beetles so I suspected it liked the fungus too. I’ve never seen anything like it before. As usual when I see something bewildering I think of you :-)
Thanks,
Signature: David

What's That Beetle???

What’s That Beetle???

Dear David,
Your images are spectacular, and this is truly an odd looking beetle, and we haven’t even a guess at its identity at the time of posting.  Alas, we cannot research this at this time because we must rush off to work.  Perhaps one of our readers has a clue or the time to investigate.  It does appear to be carrying some Mites on the elytra.  The placement of the eyes is quite unusual, almost like those of a frog that lies submerged with only its eyes visible above water.

Beetle from Singapore

Bark-Gnawing Beetle from Singapore

Hi Daniel and David:
My first impression was that it looked like an odd Jewel Beetle (Buprestidae) but I could find nothing similar online. I believe this is actually a Bark-gnawing Beetle (Trogossitidae), a relatively small and obscure family of beetles. The dorsal markings resemble some Leperina (=Lepidopteryx) species, but I think there are too many dissimilarities for that to be the correct genus. I believe it is probably a species of Xenoglena, for which the lack of elytral scales and dorsally placed eyes are diagnostic. Information is generally lacking for Asian Trogossitidae, but Kolibáč (2009) provided a very complete (and technical) description of the family. Google Books provides access to this document – see page 46 for discussion and page 37 for representative pictures of Xenoglena sp.  I have a feeling it could be X. deyrollei, but I have found no image for that species so I really can’t be certain.  If you have difficulty accessing that site the same information for Xenoglena sp. is also provided atspecies-id.net.  Despite the common name for the family, these beetles are actually predatory. According to Kolibáč (2009) “Adults dwell on fallen trees and dry branches, hunting for xylophagous insects. They fly and run at great speed and appear very like some jewel beetles in body shape.”  Regards. Karl

 

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Subject: Tomentose Burying Beetle With Mites
Location: Toledo, OH
August 23, 2014 2:03 pm
Hello there! I’ve never been lucky enough to see one of these guys until today, and wanted to share! I’m pressure sure it’s a Tomentose Burying Beetle with Poecilochirus mites.
Thanks!
Signature: Katy

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Dear Katy,
Thank you for your excellent images.  The “hairy” thorax indicates that this Burying Beetle is a Tomentose Burying Beetle,
Nicrophorus tomentosus, and according to BugGuide:  “dense yellow hair on pronotum distinctive.”  We generally identify the mites as Phoretic Mites, meaning that they use the beetle for transportation purposes, so thank you for supplying a genus name.  According to BugGuide:  “Species in this genus inhabit vertebrate carrion and ride on silphid beetles. They don’t show host specificity, but mix up in larger carcasses where adult beetles come to feed. Those on Nicrophorus ride back on the adult and enter the brood cell and reproduce there. “

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

Tomentose Burying Beetle with Phoretic Mites

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination