Currently viewing the category: "Mites"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Velvet Mite
Location: Sibley Nature Center, Midland TX
May 26, 2014 11:20 am
I took this photo of a Velvet Mite after the recent rains here. I thought you might like to have it for your database. It’s nicely focused and clearer than the photos you currently have.
Signature: John P. Van Dusen

Velvet Mite

Velvet Mite

Hi John,
Thanks for sending in your very detailed image of a Velvet Mite in the family Trombidiidae.  Your individual might be in the genus
Dinothrombium based on this image from BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug that can’t be identified by exterminators or by looking on the web
Location: Albuquerque, NM
May 22, 2014 12:23 pm
Please help, I have a bit of a problem! I have had these bugs dropping in my house from a skylight. I have had 3 different exterminators come and can’t identify them. They are a yellowish color and .1 cm in size. I need to know what they are to get rid of them. There are several hundreds maybe more that are finding their way in my house. It seems to be some sort of freshly hatched bug but have no idea what class they fit in. PLEASE HELP! The photos attached are of a few of the bugs stuck on a mini lint roller, the tape is 3 inches long and the roller it’s self is small enough to travel in a small purse. Please contact me as soon as possible. Thank you so much for your time and help!
Signature: Sincerely, Rebecca Rockett

Mites perhaps

Mites perhaps

Dear Rebecca Rocket,
We cannot identify what we cannot see, and your images lack any critical detail.  Our best guess, based on the size you have indicated, is that you are being troubled by Mites.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Longhorn Beetle from Barbados
Location: Barbados, Caribbean
April 21, 2014 9:50 pm
Hi, This green longhorn beetle (looks like Chlorida festiva) flew into my room to get its picture taken last night. First time I’m seeing one of these and it was about 4cm (body) long. I also noticed what looks to be mites on its ‘neck’ area, can you confirm this? Thought it would be a nice addition to your collection.
Signature: Niaz

Longicorn, Chlorida Festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn, Chlorida festiva, with Phoretic Mites

Hi Niaz,
We agree that you have correctly identified your Longicorn as
Chlorida festiva, but in searching for an image online for a link, we stumbled upon this Superstock image of Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites identified as Histiogaster arborsignis.  Phoretic Mites do not prey upon the Longicorns, but rather use them to move from location to location.  Back to the Longicorn, according to American Insects:  “Linnaeus described this large and striking species in 1758. It can be found in the West Indies, and from Mexico south to Argentina.”  Your images are gorgeous.

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

Longicorn Chlorida festiva with Phoretic Mites

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Coming out of my skin!
Location: Peoria heights IL
January 8, 2014 4:45 am
Hi! I was diagnosed with scabies, but they are coming out of my skin, and all the research I’ve read says scabies doesn’t do that. This happens when I put clove oil or coconut oil on my skin. Please help. I want them all gone!
I live in central Illinois, but moved here this year. Since June of this year I have gone from Hawaii to Georgia to South Carolina to Connecticut to southern Illinois up to central Illinois. Symptoms started after we moved to a new house in central Illinois. The bugs range in size from a black speck to what looks like a small brown flea. They appear to be dead when they come out of my skin.
I was diagnosed as having scabies because I went to the doctor with SEVERE itching and they asked if my fingers itched and I said yes. They did not examine me or see the bugs.
Signature: Desperately seeking help

Evidence of Something

Evidence of Something

Dear Desperately seeking help,
Unlike the doctor who “diagnosed” you, we have no credentials for the treatment of conditions.  We would urge you to seek a second professional opinion.  One of the images you provided looks like a blood splotched paper towel and we don’t see any “bugs”.  The second image looks vaguely insect-like, but there is not enough detail for us to make an identification.

Thing

Thing

Thank you for the response.
I understand you are not doctors, but had hoped you’d have some idea of what it is.
I am sorry I cannot get a very detailed photo of the bugs. They are ridiculously small right now. The big ones are all gone thank goodness.
Do you maybe have an idea of what would live inside the skin and surface when dying?
Thank you again for having responded to me in the first place. I really do appreciate it!

The list of places you visited in the past year includes Hawaii, and that is considered the tropics.  It is entirely possible that you contracted something in Hawaii that was brought in by another tourist.  We really have no idea what you would have living under your skin, but we have fielded requests like yours in the past including this Unknown Parasite posting from 2010.  We would suggest that you leave a comment on your query on our site in the event any of our readers write in with a suggestion.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: tiny green beetle-like bug
Location: Albuquerque, NM
December 23, 2013 5:04 pm
Hi guys!
This tiny guy was crawling across our bathroom floor before we put him outside. He’s actually so small that I thought at first that he was a tick. Closer inspection showed that he looks more like a tiny watermelon with legs. :-) We’ve done searches but can’t seem to find any picture that matches closely enough for a 100% positive ID. If you can help satisfy our curiosity, that would be great! Thanks!
Signature: Kathy Kubica

Mite

Mite

Hi Kathy,
This has to be one of the smallest digital files that has ever been sent to us for identification purposes.  This appears to us to be a Mite.

Thanks, Daniel!
Based on your narrowing down, I went on to search and narrowed it down further to a clover mite (which, while irksome to have discovered in our home, is admittedly far less worrisome than the sort that nosh on animal life). Thanks for the speedy reply!
–Kathy Kubica
PS: The ID file was so small because it was a zero-in crop from an iphone shot. None of our real cameras could focus within the range and flash-glare of the small bathroom paper cup the bug was in. :-)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Velvet Mites
Location: Nigeria
December 16, 2013 6:03 am
Hi Mr Bugman,
I sent you a robberfly like a decade ago, and found some Velvet Mites I was able to determine using your site.
Maybe you’re still interested int he pics.
Signature: Robert

Velvet Mites

Velvet Mites

Hi Robert,
Thank you for sending your images of Velvet Mites in the family Thrombidiidae.  According to What’s Bugging You?, “Although often difficult to find, they are sometimes extremely abundant locally, if only for a few hours at time. For example, after a brief yet intense thunderstorm, a massive emergence of giant red velvet mites was sighted from the air at an altitude of 1500 feet just north of  Tucson. An estimated 3-5 million mites had emerged in an area roughly two acres in size!  The annual emergence of the giant mites is apparently timed to coincide with that of their primary prey, termites. However, their opportunity to gorge themselves on abundant termite reproductives is quite limited. After mating, the termites quickly shed their wings and bury themselves so that they are out of reach of the mite’s predatory embrace. Adult giant red velvet mites spend most of their lives in subterranean burrows in a diapause-like state waiting for a specific set of ecological conditions triggered by summer monsoons.”  According to Charles Hogue in Insect of the Los Angeles Basin, “The larvae are parasites of grasshoppers, and the adults are predators on subterranean termites.”   The Africa Image Library has a nice photograph of a Velvet Mite and East African Notes and Records blog has an image of a Tanzanian stamp with a Velvet Mite as well as the information:  “Marguerite Jellicoe’s evocative description of the start of the annual rains in Singida includes a rare reference to the cultural significance of red velvet mites in Tanzania. I first came across these brightly coloured arachnids (family Trombidiidae) in 1981, at the start of my second wet season in the village of Utengule in Usangu (in what is now Mbarali District). I was away when the rains began on 2nd December, but when I returned to the village two days later these small crimson creatures were everywhere on the newly dampened earth. Sangu-speakers called them inkhadupa, their generic name for ticks and mites, and told me that they were thought to fall down from the sky along with the rain. In this respect they were similar to ground pangolins (Manis temminckii), another creature believed to fall from the heavens, from whence they were sent by the ancestors, amanguluvi.”  

Velvet Mites

Velvet Mites

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination