Currently viewing the category: "Mayflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug looks like cross between mantis and dragonfly
Location: South Texas
August 10, 2014 9:17 pm
My neice and I were out swimming at a small lake in south Texas when this incredibly odd looking bug landed on my hand. I called my neice over and we looked at it for a while, neither of us being able to identify it. I brushed it off my hand, only to find it about an hour later hanging off the side of her drink, where I snapped this picture.
I’m incredibly interested in finding out what this crazy looking bug is! Thanks in advance!
Signature: Leah

Mayfly

Mayfly

Dear Leah,
This Mayfly is in the order Ephemeroptera, and it is not closely related to either Mantids or Dragonflies.  Mayflies are generally found close to water sources as the nymphs are aquatic.  Mayflies do not feed as adults, and larger Mayflies are prized bait for fly fishers who also tie flies to mimic Mayflies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow and Black with a whip tail
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
July 11, 2014 7:51 pm
Dear Bugman:
A friend found this bug on her windshield wiper. It was at night on July 11, 2014.
Thanks in Advance!
Signature: Curious Mark

Mayfly

Mayfly

Hi Curious Mark,
This is a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera, and we are speculating that you are near some body of water as the Mayfly nymphs or naiads are aquatic, and adults are feeble fliers that do not travel great distances.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: march brown or sulphur?
Location: western maryland, usa
May 16, 2014 4:47 am
March Brown or Sulphur? In a debate with a buddy. North Branch Potomac river, May 13, 2014
Signature: SRA

Mayfly

Mayfly

Dear SRA,
This debate will most likely take someone with far greater Mayfly identification skills than our own.  From our research, the March Brown is a European species,
Rhithrogena germanica, and it is not found in North America, so we would eliminate that as an identity of the individual in your images.  The images of the March Browns on the First Nature website have patterned wings like the ones in your submitted images, but the pattern appears to be distinctly different.  According to Trout Nut, the Sulphur Dun is Ephemerella invaria, and that species, as pictured on BugGuide, does not have patterned wings, so we don’t believe that is the correct identity for this Mayfly either.  We tried browsing through the images on BugGuide, and this might be Hexagenia bilineata based on this BugGuide image as well as this Bugguide image.  We are looking at the darker border on the hind wings and the shape of the eyes as distinguishing features.  There is no common name for Hexagenia bilineata on BugGuide, however the genus is know collectively as the Giant Mayfly, Golden Mayfly or Burrowing Mayfly, according to BugGuide.  Since BugGuide readers have different interests than anglers, and we are guessing you and your buddy are anglers, we tried to learn if there is a common name for Hexagenia bilineata among trout fishermen.  There is no common name on Trout Nut, but the site does state:  “These are huge mayflies. Hexagenia limbata, by far the most important species, is the second largest mayfly in the United States.”  Again we cannot confirm that our identification is correct, but we believe you are both incorrect.   

Mayfly

Mayfly

Thanks for the info  The insect was approximately a #12 (fly fisherman sizing)  I think the bilineata is a much larger (#06-08) mayfly than the one I sent.  Any other ideas?   PJ

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange looking bug in ohio
Location: Mason, oh
May 1, 2014 5:28 pm
A friend was walking around in the woods in ohio and stumbled across this weird looking bug(?) it almost looks like a scorpion and frog bred. What is it?!
Signature: Jackie

Naiad, possibly Mayfly

Naiad, possibly Mayfly

Hi Jackie,
This is the aquatic nymph of a flying insect, known as a Naiad.  It might be a Mayfly Naiad, and it looks very similar to this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identify bug
Location: Coimbra, Portugal
April 12, 2014 9:01 am
Hi,
I’m from Portugal, and I live in a village where you can find a lot of this kind of bug. Usually they’re in windows or walls, and they barely move. Sometimes I see one and in the next day it is in the same exact place. They look like they have wings but I never saw it fly, even when you lightly touch them. But they move! They look like they have two really big needles (but thin) on the bottom but they look inoffensive.
Signature: David

Mayfly

Mayfly

Hi David,
This is a Mayfly in the order Ephemeroptera, and winged adults do not eat and only live a few days, long enough to mate and reproduce.  Larval nymphs are aquatic and they are known as naiads.  Since adults are weak fliers, they are generally found near the water source that spawned them, so we expect there is a sluggish stream or pond nearby.  The threadlike tails or cerci are not harmful.  See Encyclopedia Britannica for more information on Mayflies.

Yes, there is a water source nearby. Thank you for your answer! Keep up the good work!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is it
Location: western wa state
March 25, 2014 11:07 am
Found in western wa state
Signature: sonny

Possibly Water Nymph?

Possibly Water Nymph?

Dear sonny,
Are you able to provide any additional details?  Was the sighting near water?  This is obviously a nymph, and the front half of its body looks aquatic, while the rear end looks arboreal.  We will attempt to discover this immature insect’s identity.  It is going to have really big eyes.

Immediate Update:  Small Western Green Drake
Hi again sonny.  We quickly identified this Small Green Drake,
Drunella coloradensis, on the Troutnut website.  Here is a photo from BugGuide, which reports sightings in the Pacific Northwest, including Washington.

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination