Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
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Subject: large moth
Location: north central Florida, usa
August 30, 2015 10:11 am
I took this picture of a moth on a wood post this morning.
Signature: Laurie

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Laurie,
This is not a moth.  Based on images posted to BugGuide, we believe your Antlion is
Vella americana.

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Subject: Please I’d this bug
Location: Creston, California
August 11, 2015 5:29 pm
This is a picture of a bug that seems to come out at night and for a few hours during the day. I live in very rural Creston, California.
Signature: Laurie

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Laurie,
This male Antlion has an impressive set of claspers on the tip of his abdomen.  We believe we have correctly identified him as
Brachynemurus sackeni thanks to this image on BugGuide.

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Subject: HELP! what’s that bug?
Location: Brisbane, Australia.
August 8, 2015 5:46 am
Hi, I was laying in bed when I noticed this small thing moving along my bed sheet. So I grabbed it with a bit of tissue and took it to the toilet where I was to dispose of it. But I was interested and wanted to know what it was so I took it out of the tissue and noticed its back was flaking off like a weak piece of bark.
It is currently winter (Augest)
I also was in the garden earlier that day.
I also moved and cleaned everything in my room.
in the third photo the bug is upside down.
Thank you for your time.
Signature: sebastian

Neuropteran Larva

Neuropteran Larva

Dear Sebastian,
This is a predatory Neuropteran larva, and we suspect it was a hitchhiker from your day in the garden.  What flaked off might have been a piece of bark or other plant detritus that the larva used for the purposes of camouflage.  You can read more about Australian Neuropterans on the Brisbane Insect site.

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Subject: Mysterious Blackberry-Shaped Bug
Location: Murphys, CA (central-eastern California)
July 28, 2015 3:43 pm
Hi,
A friend of mine recently found a strange bug inside a cabin she’s staying at for the weekend, and we’ve been trying to find what kind of insect it is but with no luck. It moves slowly, is slightly smaller than a dime, and is covered in shiny black bumps, so that it almost looks like a miniature blackberry. We can identify small pincers but she wasn’t able to see how many legs there were. Someone mentioned that it could be a transport unit for ticks, but I wasn’t aware that there was such a thing. Any insight would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Signature: Winslow

Camouflaged Lacewing Larva

Camouflaged Lacewing Larva

Dear Winslow,
This is a predatory Lacewing Larva, and larval Lacewings frequently camouflage themselves with the carcasses of prey.  It appears as though your individual has been eating Black Ants, which explains its resemblance to a blackberry.

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Subject: flying bug
Location: southwest louisiana
July 4, 2015 9:34 pm
Hello, just wondering what type of bug this is?
Signature: ?

Owlfly

Owlfly

This fascinating creature is an Owlfly in the family Ascalaphidae, and according to BugGuide, they are:  “Bizarre creatures that look like a cross between a dragonfly and a butterfly. The body resembles that of other neuropterans, more-or-less, but the prominent antennae are clubbed like those of butterflies. Key characters:  Medium to large size, Clubbed antennae, Eyes large and bulge out from head, may rest in cryptic posture with abdomen projecting from perch, resembling a twig.”

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Subject: What’s this flying beastie?
Location: tuscany
April 26, 2015 8:42 am
Took this photo in N. Italy last year. Cannot find what species it is. Can you identify I please?
Signature: Eric

Owlfly

Owlfly

Dear Eric,
The first time we received an image of this particular European Owlfly,
Ascalaphus libelluloides, we did not know how to classify it as it has characteristics associated with several different insect orders.  Owlflies are related to Lacewings and Antlions, and they are classified in the order Neuroptera. 

Great…your are a star…it’s been bugging me (sorry) for a while.
Thanks

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