Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mysterious green dragon-fly looking bug
Location: Portland, oregon
July 29, 2014 12:48 pm
Dear Bugman,
We found this bug while sweeping our porch today. Both the six-year-old bug expert I was babysitting and myself could not identify this insect. Your help would be greatly appreciated! Thank you very much for your time!
Signature: Electronically

Green Lacewing

Green Lacewing

Dear Electronically,
Green Lacewings like the one in your image are important predators that feed upon many agricultural pests, including Aphids.  Both adults and larval Lacewings feed on Aphids.  Green Lacewings are sometimes called Goldeneyes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: beetle or weevil??
Location: england
July 27, 2014 9:02 am
Found this in north east england yesterday, in woodland near a river, never seen one before.
Do you know what it is??
Signature: mark

Aphid Wolf

Aphid Wolf

Dear Mark,
Weevils are a family of Beetles, and this is neither a Beetle nor a Weevil.  It is a larval Lacewing, sometimes called an Aphid Wolf.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this thing?
Location: Little Rock, AR
July 25, 2014
Daniel,
I hope you don’t mind my emailing you with another bug question.  I found this one on the same plant as the scentless plant bug, and, once again, we’re all stumped.  Given that this one made us feel a strong urge to stuff cotton into our ears before we sleep, I’m even more curious than last time.
Thank you for any info you can offer. :)
Sincerely,
L.J. Rhodes

Lacewing Larva

Lacewing Larva

Dear L.J. Rhodes,
This efficient predator is the larva of a Lacewing, and they are one of the most effective, beneficial predators for both home gardeners and the agricultural industry.  Both larvae and adult Lacewings consume large quantities of insects including Aphids.  Lacewing Larvae are sometimes called Aphid Wolves.  In the future, please continue to use our standard submission form for new requests.  We had to cobble location information together from your previous submission, and using the standard form ensures that all the location is contained in one email.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beetles in Portugal
Location: Serra da Mamede, Portugal
June 29, 2014 12:39 am
Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much for the identification. At the risk of being greedy, could I also ask you to identify this lovely two tailed fly. Found near a stream in the same area, its wingspan and tails are about two and a half inches long.  What does it use these amazing tails for?
Peter Burrows

Thread-Winged Lacewing

Thread-Winged Lacewing

Hi again Peter,
This is a Thread-winged Lacewing or Ribbon Winged Lacewing,
Nemoptera bipennis.  We are not certain why the wings have evolved to have such delicate tails.

Dear Daniel,
Many thanks for this. It is wonderful to have your expertise available on the internet.
With bets wishes, Peter

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Why does this dragonfly have clubbed antennae?
Location: Northern Kentucky
June 28, 2014 7:22 pm
Dear Bugman,
After looking for about two hours all over the web, I can’t find an ID for this so I’m typing this request… which probably means I will find the answer five minutes from now…. Anyway, my sons found this dragonfly-like insect on our siding in Kentucky. And I have to brag on them for just a second: they are 5 and 9 and knew that dragonflies don’t normally have “antlers.” It looks like a dragonfly, a moth, and a butterfly had an impossible love child. Dragonfly body/head, hairy, with clubbed antennae. Whuh? P.S. I think I accidentally uploaded the same pic twice.
Signature: Hannah P

Owlfly

Owlfly

Dear Hannah,
You are having identification problems because this is not a Dragonfly.  It is an Owlfly, and it is in the order Neuroptera with Antlions and Lacewings.  Many years ago, the first time we received an image of a colorful Owlfly from Italy, we were quite confused as it seemed to have the characteristics of several different insect orders and families.  It really reminded us of a Skipper because of the antennae and coloration, but we knew that was not correct.

Thanks Bugman,
After asking you about my owlfly, of course I found it this morning. Still, your reply is appreciated. I knew it couldn’t be a dragonfly, but I thought it quite funny that it looked like a dragonfly had eaten a whole butterfly and left the antennae hanging out of his mouth.
I’m glad I didn’t find that Italian Owlfly you linked to me, because much as I like bugs, that thing would’ve freaked me out big time. You ever hear the description of scorpions that goes: “scorpions are what happens when God combines spiders, snakes, and nightmares”? I’m thinking that Italian Owlfly would merit a similar hyperbole.
H

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird bug
Location: Querétaro Querétaro, Mexico
June 6, 2014 4:52 pm
Greetings! I was studying outdoors inside my university campus when I noticed this strange little animal walking on the table I was writing on. This table is located alongside green areas where there is grass, trees and bushes. It is very small, around 2-5 millimeters in length, with its size and color patterns varying depending on the individual. I´ve stumbled across this animal around 6 times between February and May walking on the benches and tables of the green areas.
I also know they bite. The first time I encountered one of these little animals it bewildered me so much that I let it walk on my hand so I could see it more closely. When it reached my index finger it bit me without showing any other signs of aggression. After that incident another one bit me in my arm without me noticing its presence before it bit. The feeling when it bites is comparable to when a mosquito is biting you and it only leaves some itching for some minutes (no skin reddening or weals).
I took every photo indexed here inside my university campus. The one with the green background seems like it is from the same species, but it has some unique characteristics by itself, like haired sides, less pronounced fangs and awesome color patterns.
I have way more photos and even videos of this little creature in case it is needed.
Signature: David Chavarín Flores

Aphid Wolf

Aphid Wolf

Dear David,
These are larval Lacewings, important predatory insects, along with Lady Beetles, in controlling Aphids and other pests that plague gardeners and farmers.  Lacewing Larvae are often called Aphid Wolves.  While we do not have the necessary skills to distinguish one species of Lacewing Larva from another, it seems that your images represent two different species.

Lacewing Larva

Lacewing Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination