Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: Elanora, QLD, Australia
August 23, 2016 10:24 pm
Found this little guy sitting on a mate’s garage door, I have seen anything like him.
Signature: Liam Jackson

Mantispid

Mantispid

Dear Liam,
This is a Mantispid or Mantis Lacewing in the family Mantispidae.  All of those names make reference to the resemblance of members of the family to the predatory Preying Mantids, but despite the resemblance, they are not closely related.  Predatory Mantispids are classified along with Antlions, Lacewings and Owlflies in the order Neuroptera.  Of all the Mantispids depicted on the Brisbane Insect site, your individual looks most like
Austromantispa imbecilla, or perhaps Ditaxis biseriata which is also pictured on the Brisbane Insect site.

Mantispid

Mantispid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug?
Location: Central Indiana, USA
August 19, 2016 7:45 am
This guy or gal was hanging out on my porch last night. The picture doesn’t give much indication of scale for size, but I would say it was about the length of a half dollar. I’m in central Indiana where we are into late summer. Thank you for any help in identifying!!!
Signature: R. Morris

Spotted Winged Antlion

Spotted Winged Antlion

Dear R. Morris,
This is a Spotted Winged Antlion,
Dendroleon obsoletus, and according to BugGuide:  “Large, with black circular spots on wings–distinctive in much of range. Antennae slightly clubbed, with pointed tips, often (or always?) pinkish in the middle.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Bug
Location: Sydney, Australia
August 19, 2016 7:19 pm
Hey there,
We found this bug in our garage, any idea what it is?
Signature: Dale

Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs

Dear Dale,
These are most likely Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs.  The hatchlings are such fierce and beneficial predators that the species has evolved, indeed many members of the order Neuroptera have evolved, so as to lay eggs in a manner that will help protect the hatchlings from being eaten by one another.  The duration needed for each individual to hatch and climb down the stalk helps to separate it from its siblings in both time and space.  You may verify our identification on the Australian Museum site where it states:  “The larvae are ambush predators with traplike jaws feeding on small invertebrates found in the leaf litter.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big fly
Location: Arizona
August 17, 2016 10:24 am
Someone suggested it could be a salmon fly. It’s similar but not the same as the photos I’ve found. It is on my front porch. No water nearby, though we’ve had a little rain this past week. Neighbors down the street have a pool, but would like fly eggs survive the chlorine? Even with rain, it’s very dry in zip code 86326.
Signature: Bug aficionado

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Bug aficionado,
This is most definitely NOT a Salmonfly.  It is an Antlion in the family Myrmeleontidae and we believe we have correctly identified it as
Vella fallax thanks to images posted to BugGuide where it states:  “very large, wingspan to circa 120 mm, with tropical specimens even larger.”  Antlion larvae are sometimes called Doodlebugs.  The larvae of many species lie buried in the sand at the bottom of a pit where they wait with only their mandibles exposed for hapless creatures to fall into their jaws.  We suspect the creators of the “graboids” from the movie Tremors used Doodlebugs as inspiration.

Thank you! I used to recite the “doodlebug” poem when I was a child visiting cousins in NC. I had no idea they were ant predators.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Elko Co. Nevada
August 12, 2016 8:26 pm
On my house located in high desert northeastern Nevada. 2.5-3″ in length, lacy, delicate wings, grey in color, identical maybe slightly smaller partner s few feet away. August 2016.
Signature: Shannon

Antlion

Antlion

Hi Shannon,
This is an Antlion in the family Myrmeleontidae.  We will attempt to identify the species.

VERY COOL.  Let me know what you find out and I’ll try to search some data too!  There were two of these yesterday late afternoon/early evening on south wall.
Thanks,
Shannon
Elko County, NV

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scorpion fly female?
Location: South central Virginia
August 2, 2016 6:35 pm
Hi, I took a photo of this pretty insect and was trying to identify it. I think it might be a scorpion fly female. I’m in south central Virginia. Thank you!
Signature: Nina Eagle

Spotted-Winged Antlion

Spotted-Winged Antlion

Dear Nina,
This is not a Scorpionfly, but we do acknowledge some visual similarities between Scorpionflies and this Spotted-Winged Antlion,
Dendroleon obsoletus, which we identified on BugGuide where they are described as”Large, with black circular spots on wings–distinctive in much of range. Antennae slightly clubbed, with pointed tips, often (or always?) pinkish in the middle (based on photos in the guide).”  The pink in the antennae is especially prominent in your lovely image.  Antlions are classified along with Lacewings, Mantispids and Owlflies in the order Neuroptera, the Net Winged Insects.  Discover Life indicates the common name for the order as “‘nerve-wings’ or ‘nerve-winged insects'”, the name we have always preferred.  P.S.  If you click on the thumbnails in our links, you will get a new window with an enlarged image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination