Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Peculiar bug with eggs
Location: Phoenix, Arizona. urban setting
May 19, 2016 3:24 pm
I just noticed this bug on a leaf in my Arizona Ash tree, guarding its eggs. What the heck is it?! It’s pretty small about 2 centimeters in length.
Signature: Damaris

Lacewing Larva eats Eggs

Lacewing Larva eats Eggs

Dear Damaris,
This is NOT and insect guarding its eggs.  The insect is a Lacewing Larva and as it is not mature, it is not currently capable of laying eggs.  Lacewing Larvae are predators that feed on small insects, including Aphids, and we suspect it is eating these eggs, which appear to possibly be the eggs of a moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spring fishfly or termite?
Location: Philadelphia suburbs
May 13, 2016 8:56 am
I found this little fellow on my (often damp) fireplace wall and panicked about termites. This 1920 stucco house has had its share in the past. But the long antennae don’t look like termites, and the wings look like a spring fishfly, which I learned about on your site.
What’s your take on this winged insect?
Signature: Deborah

Brown Lacewing

Brown Lacewing

Dear Deborah,
The Spring Fishfly is a much larger insect than your beneficial, predatory, Brown Lacewing.  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults and larvae predaceous. Homopterans, such as aphids, are favorite prey.”

Daniel,
Thank you so much. I am normally not a fan of the predacious among us, but this one sounds very nice.
Deborah Fries

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green fly on a warm spring night
Location: Puget Sound, WA
May 2, 2016 10:40 pm
Left the balcony door open for the pets on a warm and slightly heavy spring evening, and this attractive creature fluttered by about an hour after the door was closed and the lights turned on. We live close to a pond and shrubs. Looks like something that would be tasty to frogs or trout.
Signature: Bug Friendly

Green Lacewing

Green Lacewing

Dear Bug Friendly,
This marvelous insect is not a fly, but a Green Lacewing, and despite its somewhat annoying habit of occasionally biting humans, it is considered a highly beneficial insect because of the large numbers of Aphids consumed by both adult larval Lacewings, which are sometimes called Aphid Wolves.  We recall reading that they have an unpleasant taste, which would discourage predators, and we will attempt, when we have some time, to research that information.  Green Lacewings are sometimes called Golden Eyes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this insect for me
Location: Attica, Greece
May 2, 2016 12:07 pm
Hello, I saw this very interesting creature flying above me, than managed to catch it on cam. Do you know what it is? I’d really appreciate it.
Signature: George

Spoonwing Lacewing

Spoonwing Lacewing

Dear George,
This delicately beautiful insect is a Spoonwing Lacewing or Threadwing Lacewing in the genus
Nemoptera.

Thank you so much for your quick response, you are awesome!
George

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTB?
Location: Hollywood, FL
April 5, 2016 4:19 am
Just saw this very odd bug on the front of my house. It looked like a fly with a stick on it at first. I’m 54 years old and have never seen anything like this one. Do you know what it is? My neighbor’s 6 year old grandson wants to know as well! Many thanks!
Signature: Bambi Davidson

Mantisfly

Mantisfly

Dear Bambi,
Though it is commonly called a Mantisfly, this unusual insect is neither a Mantis nor a Fly.  Though they are not related, the Mantis Fly and the Preying Mantis have both evolved raptorial front legs for capturing prey, and grasping the prey while feeding.  Mantisflies or Mantidflies are classified in the family Mantispidae, and they are most closely related to Lacewings and Antlions which are all in the order Neuroptera.

Dear Mr. Marlos-
Thank you so much for identifying that insect. I told the 6 year old that it looked like a cross between a fly and a preying mantis.
You’re the best!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?!
Location: NSW Australia
March 7, 2016 8:05 pm
Hi, I just found this on my ceiling. Can anyone identify it?
I honestly don’t even know if its a bug, it looks like it though haha
Please help!
Signature: Bianca

Possibly Blue Eyes Lacewing Hatchlings

Possibly Blue Eyes Lacewing Hatchlings

Dear Bianca,
These are hatchling Neuropterans, possibly Blue Eyes Lacewing hatchlings.  The hatchlings are such gregarious hunters that the members of the order Neuroptera have adapted to laying eggs on filaments so that the hatchlings do not eat one another.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination