Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
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Subject: What’s this flying beastie?
Location: tuscany
April 26, 2015 8:42 am
Took this photo in N. Italy last year. Cannot find what species it is. Can you identify I please?
Signature: Eric

Owlfly

Owlfly

Dear Eric,
The first time we received an image of this particular European Owlfly,
Ascalaphus libelluloides, we did not know how to classify it as it has characteristics associated with several different insect orders.  Owlflies are related to Lacewings and Antlions, and they are classified in the order Neuroptera. 

Great…your are a star…it’s been bugging me (sorry) for a while.
Thanks

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Subject: Small hanging pods
Location: Interior – Northern Wisconsin
April 15, 2015 12:40 pm
Found these small pods (the size of a deer ick) hanging from an interior door. Do you know what they are?
Signature: P. Menz

Lacewing Eggs

Lacewing Eggs

Dear P. Menz,
These are Lacewing EggsLacewings are beneficial predators and it is believed that the eggs have evolved to being laid on stalks to prevent the ravenous Aphid Lions or larval Lacewings from devouring one another when they hatch.

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Subject: Beautiful white winged antlion
Location: Central Kalahari, Botswana
April 9, 2015 7:37 am
Hey guys :)
I found this antlion in the beginning of march, and I have never seen such a beautiful antlion!!
It came to our dining area in our camp during the evening, when we had the lights on. I haven’t seen it since that one night and some of the guys that have been here for several years, had never seen it before. We see a lot of Bark Antlions and Dotted Veld Antlions along with several others and have antlion larvea spread throughout the camp. The surrounding landscape is bushveld of Acacia and T. sericae.
I hope you can help me with an ID of the species, since I haven’t had much luck by myself… Otherwise, can we at least agree that it IS an amazing antlion 😀
Signature: Mathias

Antlion

Painted Antlion

Dear Mathias,
This truly is a gorgeous Antlion, and we thought we had an identity for you when we quickly discovered a matching image on the Walk in Africa blog, but alas, it is only identified as an Antlion with no species name.
  We located additional images on iSpot where it is identified as a Painted Antlion, Tomatares citrinus.  We also discovered it pictured on a stamp from Zimbabwe on the Insects on Stamps site.

Antlion

Painted Antlion

Painted Antlion on a stamp from Zimbabwe

Painted Antlion on a stamp from Zimbabwe

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Subject: What’s that bug, Dallas, TX
Location: Carrollton, TX
February 12, 2015 5:26 pm
Hello bug enthusiast, me and my daughter caught this one on the mirror at home, it appears to have 6 legs, lacy wings, not overlapping when crawling, and antennas that are pretty long. The color is beige I guess. It’s middle february here is Dallas, Texas, and starting to get warm, pre-spring. It’s small, only the length of a finger width. Thank you, Anette
Signature: Anette and Sofia

Lacewing

Lacewing

Dear Anette and Sofia,
This is a predatory Lacewing (you got that description correct) and they are beneficial as both winged adults and larvae consume large quantities of Aphids and other small insects.  Some folks who are sensitive complain about receiving bites from both adults and larvae, and though there may be an itchy reaction, the bite is not considered dangerous.  Lacewings are often attracted to lights.

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Subject: Insect in Namibia
Location: Namibia
February 1, 2015 4:14 am
This insect was in the namib desert in Namibia :
https://goo.gl/maps/2OQMc
Thanks for your research !
Signature: A traveler

Antlion Larva we believe

Antlion Larva we believe

Dear A traveler,
According to our mailbox, we received at least 8 identification requests from you in rapid succession, and while we appreciate your enthusiasm at getting your critters identified, there is a dearth of information regarding the sightings except to indicate the country of Namibia and GPS coordinates.  We would love to have details about this desert sighting.  For example, did it wander into your tent, was it found lurking around your food, or was it dug up from the bottom of a pit it dug in the sand?  We believe this might be the larva of an Antlion, called a Doodlebug in North America, but there is not enough detail in your image to be certain.
  In the future, please try to provide us with valuable information on the sightings.

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Subject: Mystery Eggs – Australia
Location: Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia
January 17, 2015 11:50 pm
Hi Guys,
Found this under the awning on my back patio. Found another pic of this on this site from 2006 which hasn’t yet been identified (now 2015). Location – Coffs Harbour NSW.
Looks very similar to lacewing but in this odd configuration.
A fine hair/filament radiates outwards from each “node” and support the structure roughly 10mm from the surface. Another set of hairs support each “node” vertically, from surface to egg. Each filament looks as if it has “droplets” attached along the length, in the same way a spider leaves sticky drops along their sticky strands.
Please note, the eggs are solid white, with the filaments being transparent. All dark areas in the pictures should be considered shadows cast by the cameras flash.
Signature: Grey

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Dear Grey,
Interestingly, the person who submitted those Neuropteran Eggs in 2006 was named Grev.  Your submission has led us to an identification of Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs,
Nymphes myrmeleonides, thanks to Project Noah. There are also images on the University of Sydney Entomology page and the Brisbane Insect website.  The larvae of Lacewings are predators with ravenous appetites, and this type of egg configuration helps to ensure that the hatchlings do not devour one another as they must first climb away from the other eggs. 

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

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