Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow and black/gray bug
Location: Hemet CA
November 11, 2016 11:34 pm
I was at the park with my children in Hemet, CA. While waiting for them to play I was ‘bitten’ by this type of bug several times. No one I asked could identify it. Everyone says earwig, but the pinchers are on the head and not the tail.
Signature: BPaul

Lacewing Larva

Lacewing Larva

Dear BPaul,
This is the larva of a Lacewing, commonly called an Aphid Wolf.  We have received numerous reports from people who have been bitten by both larval Lacewings and adults, and our editorial staff is fully aware that the itchy welt produced by the bite will last as long as a week.

Thank you. I couldn’t find it anywhere else. I’m 7 months pregnant and wanted to be sure it wasn’t going to harm the baby.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Lacewing eggs
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana, USA
October 14, 2016 8:36 am
I think these are Green Lacewing larva hatching. I took this photo today.
Signature: Brady Reed

Hatching Green Lacewing Eggs

Hatching Green Lacewing Eggs

Hi Brady,
Your image of hatching Green Lacewing Eggs is a marvelous addition to our archives.  We have read that the larvae of Green Lacewings are such gregarious hunters, that the species has evolved so that the eggs are laid on stalks to help prevent cannibalism.

Hatching Green Lacewing Eggs

Hatching Green Lacewing Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Itty bitty pincers in KSA
Location: Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
October 11, 2016 11:49 pm
My wife found this little guy, about 8mm crawling on her laptop this morning. We are new to KSA from USA and have seen some interesting little creatures and were wondering if you could help us out identifying this one.
Signature: Isaac

Lacewing Larva

Lacewing Larva

Dear Isaac,
This is the larva of a Lacewing, commonly called an Aphid Wolf.  We get countless submissions of Lacewing larvae from around the world, including many from the USA.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A walking cocklebur only uglier
Location: Pinellas County, Florida
September 27, 2016 9:13 am
Hello,
Several days ago I released some ladybugs on my milkweed plants. They have all disappeared, which is befuddling as the plants are in an enclosed pool cage and there is a generous supply of aphids to munch on. Today (September 27, approximate temperature 87° ) I noticed these beauties. I can’t imagine this is any part of the ladybug lifecycle. I was wondering if you might know what they are? They appear to be about the size of a pencil eraser and seem to get around quite well. I can’t tell if they are eating the aphids or not, although that would be great.
Signature: Melanie W.

Lacewing Larva

Lacewing Larva

Dear Melanie,
While you might be distressed at the disappearance of your Ladybugs, you should be aware that Lady Beetles can fly and they can also be adept at squeezing through small openings in your enclosure.  On a positive note, this is a camouflaged Lacewing larva, sometimes called an Aphid Wolf, and many gardeners believe Lacewings, both adults and larvae, are more effective at eating Aphids than Lady Beetles are.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this
Location: LA California
September 17, 2016 7:23 pm
What kind of bug is this. Me and my friends keep disputing whether it is a dragonfly or not my mother passed away on Sunday Monday at 1 AM and there was this insect flying around at my window pain and I’m just curious what kind
Signature: The truth

Antlion

Antlion

Dear The truth,
This is an Antlion, and it is more closely related to Neuropterans like Lacewings and Owlflies than it is to Dragonflies, which belong to a distinctly different insect order.  Many Antlion Larvae, which are commonly called Doodlebugs, live with only their mandibles exposed at the bottom of a small pit they excavate, awaiting Ants and other insects to fall into their waiting jaws.  We just posted several images of Bee Flies from Los Angeles that parasitize the pupae of Antlions.  We don’t see many Antlions, but we do see Bee Flies, leading us to believe our Antlion population is being kept in check by the Bee Flies.  Your Antlion may be
Vella fallax based on this and other BugGuide images.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID this!
Location: Johns River, Australia
September 12, 2016 2:11 am
Found on the Mid North Coast, Australia. Just came into Spring on a sink with water.
Sorry for the low quality pics
I look forward to your reply!
Regards,
Signature: Tom Galati

Antlion Larva

Antlion Larva

Dear Tom,
This is the larva of a Neuropteran, probably an Antlion, which you can verify by comparing your individual to this image on The Brisbane Insect website.  In North America, Antlion larvae are known as Doodlebugs.

Oh thank you so much for the reply!
Couldn’t ID it myself yay
Regards,
Tom

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination