Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
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Subject: Can you identify this insect?
Location: Hardin County Kentucky
March 17, 2014 5:18 pm
I found this insect on my kitchen window on March 17 in Hardin Co., Kentucky. Can you identify what this is and please tell me it isn’t a termite?
Signature: Thank You

Brown Lacewing

Brown Lacewing

Though it does not do much good in the home, this Lacewing is a highly beneficial insect in the garden where it will consume large quantities of undesirable insects like Aphids.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Question on bug
Location: clallam county, Washington
February 18, 2014 4:13 pm
Hello I live in Northwest Washington State and I was curious about a bug I found my indoor or tomato garden on top of the soil. It was dead but im very curious onwhat it is.
Signature: Hi

Lacewing

Lacewing

This is a beneficial, predatory Lacewing.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth? with transparent wings
Location: Tocumwal NSW 2714 Australia
February 16, 2014 1:10 pm
Hi,
This little lovely is 6cm long from tip to tip.
Body is ‘furry’
Wings are transparent and iridescent with small black and grey markings.
Location is Tocumwal, NSW on the Murray River.
Hope you can help identify.
Signature: Sue Trewhella

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Sue,
Your mystery insect is an Antlion, and we believe it is
 Heoclisis fundata  based on the photo on Atlas of Living Australia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Damselfly
Location: Durban_South Africa
February 10, 2014 10:18 pm
Hi
This damselfly? was spotted early in the morning on 10th April 2014 in Durban, South Africa. Mid summer.
I have never seen one like this before. At fist I thought it was a moth or butterfly because of the shape of the wings. Total length about 60mm.
Input appreciated.
Regards
Roland
Signature: Roland

Antlion

Tree Hole Antlion

Dear Roland,
This is not a Damselfly, but rather an Antlion in the family Myrmeleontidae and in the Nerve Winged Insect order Neuroptera, which also includes Lacewings and Owlflies.  We thought this would be an easy Antlion to identify, because of the large, unusual wings.  We thought we were off to a good lead when we located this image on Beetles in the Bush of an individual in the genus
Palpares, but all the examples from that genus have rounded tips on the wings, while your Antlion has pointed tips.  Though it is strictly North American species, we turned to BugGuide for some help, and we noticed that the general in the tribe Nemoleontini on BugGuide, including Glenurus gratus, have pointed wings.  Alas, The Antlions of South Africa lists many species and genera, but does not have photos of the individuals.  It is merely a checklist.  Continued efforts on our part led to the Field Guide to Insects of South Africa and a photo of a Tree Hole Antlion in the genus Cymothales that has similar pointed wings, and it is described as being:  “small (wingspan 56mm), delicately built, with very long thin legs, and highly iridescent wings intricately patterned in shades of brown and ending in an elegant hooked tip.  Biology:  Larvae live in detritus in tree holes or in fine sand on rock ledges below overhangs.  Habitat:  Restricted to the region, especially arid areas.”  A photo on Project Noah shows striking similarities.

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Subject: Scary bug!
Location: NSW, Australia
January 8, 2014 12:59 am
Hi!
I found this bug in my bathroom just the other day thinking it was a piece of fluff or dust i just left it be. Although the next day when i noticed it walking i was a little worried. It seems to have rather large fang looking things?
And chance you know what he may be?
Signature: Emma

Camouflaged Neuropteran Larva:  Owlfly, Antlion or other???

Camouflaged Neuropteran Larva: Owlfly, Antlion or other???

Dear Emma,
What we know for certain is that this is the camouflaged larva of a Neuropteran, a member of the order that included Lacewings, Antlions and Owlflies.  In North America, there are many Lacewing Larvae that utilize this style of camouflage, but the mandibles on your individual look much larger.  We found this previously posted, but still unidentified camouflaged Neuropteran Larva in our archives.  The Owlfly Larvae pictured on the Brisbane Insect website have similar mandibles, but no camouflage.  The Antlion Larva pictured on the Brisbane Insect website also has similar mandibles, but again, no camouflage.
  The best we can provide at this time is that this is the camouflaged Larva of an insect in the order Neuroptera.  Hopefully, we will eventually determine a family, genus or even species identity.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: dragonfly???
Location: mumbai, maharashtra, India
December 22, 2013 8:57 am
This fellow looks cool
Signature: Sid

Owlfly

Owlfly

Hi again Sid,
This is an Owlfly in the family Ascalaphidae, one of the Neuropterans related to Lacewings and Antlions.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination