Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
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Subject: Green fly on a warm spring night
Location: Puget Sound, WA
May 2, 2016 10:40 pm
Left the balcony door open for the pets on a warm and slightly heavy spring evening, and this attractive creature fluttered by about an hour after the door was closed and the lights turned on. We live close to a pond and shrubs. Looks like something that would be tasty to frogs or trout.
Signature: Bug Friendly

Green Lacewing

Green Lacewing

Dear Bug Friendly,
This marvelous insect is not a fly, but a Green Lacewing, and despite its somewhat annoying habit of occasionally biting humans, it is considered a highly beneficial insect because of the large numbers of Aphids consumed by both adult larval Lacewings, which are sometimes called Aphid Wolves.  We recall reading that they have an unpleasant taste, which would discourage predators, and we will attempt, when we have some time, to research that information.  Green Lacewings are sometimes called Golden Eyes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please identify this insect for me
Location: Attica, Greece
May 2, 2016 12:07 pm
Hello, I saw this very interesting creature flying above me, than managed to catch it on cam. Do you know what it is? I’d really appreciate it.
Signature: George

Spoonwing Lacewing

Spoonwing Lacewing

Dear George,
This delicately beautiful insect is a Spoonwing Lacewing or Threadwing Lacewing in the genus
Nemoptera.

Thank you so much for your quick response, you are awesome!
George

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: WTB?
Location: Hollywood, FL
April 5, 2016 4:19 am
Just saw this very odd bug on the front of my house. It looked like a fly with a stick on it at first. I’m 54 years old and have never seen anything like this one. Do you know what it is? My neighbor’s 6 year old grandson wants to know as well! Many thanks!
Signature: Bambi Davidson

Mantisfly

Mantisfly

Dear Bambi,
Though it is commonly called a Mantisfly, this unusual insect is neither a Mantis nor a Fly.  Though they are not related, the Mantis Fly and the Preying Mantis have both evolved raptorial front legs for capturing prey, and grasping the prey while feeding.  Mantisflies or Mantidflies are classified in the family Mantispidae, and they are most closely related to Lacewings and Antlions which are all in the order Neuroptera.

Dear Mr. Marlos-
Thank you so much for identifying that insect. I told the 6 year old that it looked like a cross between a fly and a preying mantis.
You’re the best!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?!
Location: NSW Australia
March 7, 2016 8:05 pm
Hi, I just found this on my ceiling. Can anyone identify it?
I honestly don’t even know if its a bug, it looks like it though haha
Please help!
Signature: Bianca

Possibly Blue Eyes Lacewing Hatchlings

Possibly Blue Eyes Lacewing Hatchlings

Dear Bianca,
These are hatchling Neuropterans, possibly Blue Eyes Lacewing hatchlings.  The hatchlings are such gregarious hunters that the members of the order Neuroptera have adapted to laying eggs on filaments so that the hatchlings do not eat one another.

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Subject: Moth identification
Location: Between Port Kenny and Streaky Bay SA
February 28, 2016 4:10 am
Can you tell me what this moth is seen in SA?
Thanks
Signature: Jack Ritchie

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Jack,
This is NOT a moth.  It is an Antlion, and we believe it might be
Heoclisis fundata based on images posted to the Atlas of Living Australia.

Thanks Daniel
We saw it at Murphy’s haystacks on one of the rocks. I note in the atlas that there aren’t recorded sightings of them in that area.
Thanks so much for what you do. Brilliant
Talk soon
Jack

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful fairy-like bug
Location: NSW , Port Macquarie
February 16, 2016 9:12 pm
This little creature was sitting on the pigs-face in January 2016. The eye is a beautiful purple colour and the wings are gossamer fine with long antennae. The body was quite a startling yellow. I live in Port Macquarie in NSW and would appreciate an ID.
Kind regards
Signature: Lindie

Green Lacewing

Green Lacewing

Dear Lindie,
This is a Lacewing, and Green Lacewings in North America are frequently called Golden Eyes.  We tried searching for additional images of purple eyed individuals from Australia, and we found an image on Life Unseen that is called a Golden-eyed Lacewing,
Mallada traviatus.  We then searched for additional information using that scientific name and we found a nice image on Atlas of Living Australia.  We wonder if the eyes on your individual are reflecting the color of the blossom upon which it is resting.  Both adult and larval Lacewings are predators that feed on Aphids and other troublesome insects in the garden.  Your image is quite beautiful. 

Dear Daniel,
Thank you very much for the information ! I am totally chuffed at the name…Lacewing…it’s EXACTLY what it should be
called, don’t you think ?
I think your musings about the colour of the eye might be right then, that the colour of the blossom was reflected straight into it. Just amazing.
Thank you for the compliment on the picture, much appreciated.
Once again , thank you for the information.
Kind regards
Lindie Kolver

We are quite amused at the name of the plant because that blossom sure doesn’t look like a “pigs-face.”

Hi Daniel,
They do have strange names for most everything in Australia. Takes some getting used to, tell you.
Lovely having dealings with you.
Kind regards
Lindie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination