Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
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Subject: Mysterious Blackberry-Shaped Bug
Location: Murphys, CA (central-eastern California)
July 28, 2015 3:43 pm
Hi,
A friend of mine recently found a strange bug inside a cabin she’s staying at for the weekend, and we’ve been trying to find what kind of insect it is but with no luck. It moves slowly, is slightly smaller than a dime, and is covered in shiny black bumps, so that it almost looks like a miniature blackberry. We can identify small pincers but she wasn’t able to see how many legs there were. Someone mentioned that it could be a transport unit for ticks, but I wasn’t aware that there was such a thing. Any insight would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Signature: Winslow

Camouflaged Lacewing Larva

Camouflaged Lacewing Larva

Dear Winslow,
This is a predatory Lacewing Larva, and larval Lacewings frequently camouflage themselves with the carcasses of prey.  It appears as though your individual has been eating Black Ants, which explains its resemblance to a blackberry.

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Subject: flying bug
Location: southwest louisiana
July 4, 2015 9:34 pm
Hello, just wondering what type of bug this is?
Signature: ?

Owlfly

Owlfly

This fascinating creature is an Owlfly in the family Ascalaphidae, and according to BugGuide, they are:  “Bizarre creatures that look like a cross between a dragonfly and a butterfly. The body resembles that of other neuropterans, more-or-less, but the prominent antennae are clubbed like those of butterflies. Key characters:  Medium to large size, Clubbed antennae, Eyes large and bulge out from head, may rest in cryptic posture with abdomen projecting from perch, resembling a twig.”

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Subject: What’s this flying beastie?
Location: tuscany
April 26, 2015 8:42 am
Took this photo in N. Italy last year. Cannot find what species it is. Can you identify I please?
Signature: Eric

Owlfly

Owlfly

Dear Eric,
The first time we received an image of this particular European Owlfly,
Ascalaphus libelluloides, we did not know how to classify it as it has characteristics associated with several different insect orders.  Owlflies are related to Lacewings and Antlions, and they are classified in the order Neuroptera. 

Great…your are a star…it’s been bugging me (sorry) for a while.
Thanks

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Subject: Small hanging pods
Location: Interior – Northern Wisconsin
April 15, 2015 12:40 pm
Found these small pods (the size of a deer ick) hanging from an interior door. Do you know what they are?
Signature: P. Menz

Lacewing Eggs

Lacewing Eggs

Dear P. Menz,
These are Lacewing EggsLacewings are beneficial predators and it is believed that the eggs have evolved to being laid on stalks to prevent the ravenous Aphid Lions or larval Lacewings from devouring one another when they hatch.

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Subject: Beautiful white winged antlion
Location: Central Kalahari, Botswana
April 9, 2015 7:37 am
Hey guys :)
I found this antlion in the beginning of march, and I have never seen such a beautiful antlion!!
It came to our dining area in our camp during the evening, when we had the lights on. I haven’t seen it since that one night and some of the guys that have been here for several years, had never seen it before. We see a lot of Bark Antlions and Dotted Veld Antlions along with several others and have antlion larvea spread throughout the camp. The surrounding landscape is bushveld of Acacia and T. sericae.
I hope you can help me with an ID of the species, since I haven’t had much luck by myself… Otherwise, can we at least agree that it IS an amazing antlion 😀
Signature: Mathias

Antlion

Painted Antlion

Dear Mathias,
This truly is a gorgeous Antlion, and we thought we had an identity for you when we quickly discovered a matching image on the Walk in Africa blog, but alas, it is only identified as an Antlion with no species name.
  We located additional images on iSpot where it is identified as a Painted Antlion, Tomatares citrinus.  We also discovered it pictured on a stamp from Zimbabwe on the Insects on Stamps site.

Antlion

Painted Antlion

Painted Antlion on a stamp from Zimbabwe

Painted Antlion on a stamp from Zimbabwe

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Subject: What’s that bug, Dallas, TX
Location: Carrollton, TX
February 12, 2015 5:26 pm
Hello bug enthusiast, me and my daughter caught this one on the mirror at home, it appears to have 6 legs, lacy wings, not overlapping when crawling, and antennas that are pretty long. The color is beige I guess. It’s middle february here is Dallas, Texas, and starting to get warm, pre-spring. It’s small, only the length of a finger width. Thank you, Anette
Signature: Anette and Sofia

Lacewing

Lacewing

Dear Anette and Sofia,
This is a predatory Lacewing (you got that description correct) and they are beneficial as both winged adults and larvae consume large quantities of Aphids and other small insects.  Some folks who are sensitive complain about receiving bites from both adults and larvae, and though there may be an itchy reaction, the bite is not considered dangerous.  Lacewings are often attracted to lights.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination