Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug o mania
Location: South West Missouri
June 24, 2016 4:18 pm
I found this bug in my garage it’s about the size of my index finger but it’s weird looking and I can’t find it anywhere so I was wondering if you could tell me what kind of bug this is it looks like some kind of moth or something
Signature: JACK BONE

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Jack,
This species,
Glenurus gratus, it one of the loveliest of the Antlions in the family Myrmeleontidae.  Antlions are closely related to Lacewings and Owlflies in the order Neuroptera.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: AK tiny 6legged bug with pincers
Location: Anchorage, Alaska
June 7, 2016 4:34 am
hello! I sure would love your help in identifying this bug I found this crawling on my night stand. it appears to have 6 legs, a small set of pincers, ivory and grayish or perhaps yellowish 😕 in color w a body that could roll up a bit when poked. hopefully the pictures help and hopefully you can help me ! Oh yes and I live in Anchorage , Alaska. Thank you very much.
Signature: Sarah Quirk

Aphid Wolf

Aphid Wolf

Dear Sarah,
While we have received numerous reports from folks who have been bitten by Lacewing Larvae, including from our own editorial staff, these fierce predators that are sometimes called Aphid Wolves are nonetheless beneficial predators.  The bite may cause local irritation, but it is not considered dangerous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly mimic butterfly in Texas
Location: Katy (Fort Bend County) Texas
June 5, 2016 8:27 am
I came across this insect this morning. At first, I thought it was a dragonfly, but when I looked closer and saw the antennae, I knew immediately that it’s a butterfly. I have had no luck tracking it down online. Can you identify it for me?
Thanks!
Signature: DougM

Owlfly

Owlfly

Dear DougM,
The first time we saw an image of a European Owlfly, we were equally confused.  Owlflies are classified with Lacewings and Antlions, and all members of the family Neuroptera, both larvae and adults, are predators.  Neuropteran larvae including Aphid Wolves and Doodlebugs are about the most frightening looking creatures imaginable if scale with humans were equalized.

Owlfly

Owlfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Peculiar bug with eggs
Location: Phoenix, Arizona. urban setting
May 19, 2016 3:24 pm
I just noticed this bug on a leaf in my Arizona Ash tree, guarding its eggs. What the heck is it?! It’s pretty small about 2 centimeters in length.
Signature: Damaris

Lacewing Larva eats Eggs

Lacewing Larva eats Eggs

Dear Damaris,
This is NOT and insect guarding its eggs.  The insect is a Lacewing Larva and as it is not mature, it is not currently capable of laying eggs.  Lacewing Larvae are predators that feed on small insects, including Aphids, and we suspect it is eating these eggs, which appear to possibly be the eggs of a moth.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spring fishfly or termite?
Location: Philadelphia suburbs
May 13, 2016 8:56 am
I found this little fellow on my (often damp) fireplace wall and panicked about termites. This 1920 stucco house has had its share in the past. But the long antennae don’t look like termites, and the wings look like a spring fishfly, which I learned about on your site.
What’s your take on this winged insect?
Signature: Deborah

Brown Lacewing

Brown Lacewing

Dear Deborah,
The Spring Fishfly is a much larger insect than your beneficial, predatory, Brown Lacewing.  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Adults and larvae predaceous. Homopterans, such as aphids, are favorite prey.”

Daniel,
Thank you so much. I am normally not a fan of the predacious among us, but this one sounds very nice.
Deborah Fries

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green fly on a warm spring night
Location: Puget Sound, WA
May 2, 2016 10:40 pm
Left the balcony door open for the pets on a warm and slightly heavy spring evening, and this attractive creature fluttered by about an hour after the door was closed and the lights turned on. We live close to a pond and shrubs. Looks like something that would be tasty to frogs or trout.
Signature: Bug Friendly

Green Lacewing

Green Lacewing

Dear Bug Friendly,
This marvelous insect is not a fly, but a Green Lacewing, and despite its somewhat annoying habit of occasionally biting humans, it is considered a highly beneficial insect because of the large numbers of Aphids consumed by both adult larval Lacewings, which are sometimes called Aphid Wolves.  We recall reading that they have an unpleasant taste, which would discourage predators, and we will attempt, when we have some time, to research that information.  Green Lacewings are sometimes called Golden Eyes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination