Currently viewing the category: "Neuropterans: Lacewings, Antlions, and Owlflies"
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Subject: Mystery Eggs – Australia
Location: Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia
January 17, 2015 11:50 pm
Hi Guys,
Found this under the awning on my back patio. Found another pic of this on this site from 2006 which hasn’t yet been identified (now 2015). Location – Coffs Harbour NSW.
Looks very similar to lacewing but in this odd configuration.
A fine hair/filament radiates outwards from each “node” and support the structure roughly 10mm from the surface. Another set of hairs support each “node” vertically, from surface to egg. Each filament looks as if it has “droplets” attached along the length, in the same way a spider leaves sticky drops along their sticky strands.
Please note, the eggs are solid white, with the filaments being transparent. All dark areas in the pictures should be considered shadows cast by the cameras flash.
Signature: Grey

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Dear Grey,
Interestingly, the person who submitted those Neuropteran Eggs in 2006 was named Grev.  Your submission has led us to an identification of Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs,
Nymphes myrmeleonides, thanks to Project Noah. There are also images on the University of Sydney Entomology page and the Brisbane Insect website.  The larvae of Lacewings are predators with ravenous appetites, and this type of egg configuration helps to ensure that the hatchlings do not devour one another as they must first climb away from the other eggs. 

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyed Lacewing Eggs

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Subject: Yellow Dragonfly moth
Location: Woy Woy, New South Wales, Australia
January 7, 2015 4:12 am
This dragonfly looking insect flew in at about 9:30pm while very dark outside and was attracted to the light like a moth, however it looks much like a dragonfly. I’m living in the Central Coast about 1.5 hours north of Sydney.
Signature: Dean

Giant Orange Lacewing

Giant Orange Lacewing

Hi Dean,
We quickly identified your Neuropteran as a Giant Orange Lacewing or Blue Eyes Lacewing,
Nymphes myrmeleonides, on the Brisbane Insect website where it states:  “They have a pair of transparent wings of about equal size. When fly, they may be mistaken as dragonflies. But their wings are fold in tent shape whish dragonflies do not do. They can also distinguished by their long antenna.  Adult body is orange-brown in colour, with iridescent grey eyes. The moniliform antennae are black with pale apex. Legs are pale yellow. Their transparence wings are narrow with a white marking on the wing tips.”  According to OzAnimals:  “It is one of the largest lacewings with a body growing to about 4 cm long and wingspan of up to 11cm. Despite the large wings, they are not strong fliers.”

Giant Orange Lacewing

Giant Orange Lacewing

Hey there,  I just about 10 to 15 minutes ago submitted a photo post about a “dragonfly moth looking insect” however I’ve just been browsing online and have stumbled across the identification myself it being a “blue eyes lacewing”. So just letting to know thats one submission you dont have to worry about anymore. :)
Signature: Dean

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Subject: Identifying a “stick” insect
Location: Eastern Cape, South Africa
December 30, 2014 6:33 am
Hi
I recently found this insect in my garden and would love to identify it.
Latitude : -33.092624 | Longitude : 27.78924
2014/12/27 1:52 PM
Thank you!
Signature: Waldo

Owlfly

Owlfly

Hi Waldo,
This is not a Stick Insect, but rather, an Owlfly in the family Ascalaphidae.  We browsed iSpot and found this very similar looking individual that is only identified to the family level.

Hi Daniel
Thank you so much for taking the time to respond to my request.
Regards
Waldo

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID help
Location: Arlington, TX
December 21, 2014 3:32 pm
Small insect about 3mm in length. Bit my arm and was painful but did not leave a welt. Found a second I my pant leg. Possibly picked up walking thru a leafy yard.
Signature: Lindsay

Lacewing Larva

Lacewing Larva

Dear Lindsay,
This is the larva of a Lacewing, commonly called an Aphid Wolf.  Both adult and larval Lacewings eat large quantities of small insects, including agricultural pests like Aphids, and they are considered beneficial.  Though Lacewing larvae occasionally bite humans, the bite produces no lasting effects, though itching and swelling may persist for several days.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ant Lion
Location: Buderim, Australia
October 6, 2014 8:35 pm
Hi,
I just found this bug on our garage wall (under the house). I live at Buderim, Queensland, Australia. It looks like an ant lion or lacewing in the larval stage. It has debris attached to it’s body and when moved rolls up into a ball as much as possible. It is just over 1 cm long.
Signature: Stuthie

Antlion covered in debris

Antlion covered in debris

Dear Stuthie,
Your images are positively gorgeous.  We hope you don’t mind that we color corrected them.  This larval Antlion is quite distinctive in that it is covered in debris.  Antlions are related to Lacewings, and some Lacewing Larvae, aka Aphid Wolves, also cloak themselves in debris that is composed of the carcasses of their prey.  Those mandibles, those the jaws of death, do not seem what one would expect on Doodlebugs, a common North American name for Antlion larvae that await, buried at the bottoms of cone shaped holes, for all hapless ants or other creatures to fall into their clutches.

Gaping Jaws of a Doodlebug

Gaping Jaws of a Doodlebug

 

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Subject: Dragonfly?
Location: South Carolina
August 31, 2014 6:44 pm
I have never seen this bug before. Is it some kind of dragonfly?
Signature: Nikon

Antlion

Antlion

Dear Nikon,
You are not the first person who has written to us mistaking an Antlion for a Dragonfly.  In our minds, the greatest similarity they possess is the way the wings move, but not the way the wings are held.  The wings of both orders, Neuroptera and Odonata, are able to move independently of one another.
  Of Neuroptera, BugGuide states:  “Four membranous wings: FW and HW about same size or HW a little wider at base;  wings usually held rooflike over body at rest; wings generally with many veins.”  Of Dragonflies in the suborder Anisoptera of the order Odonata, BugGuide states:  “Wings usually held outstretched horizontally at rest. Hindwing is broader at base than the forewing. Male has three terminal appendages on abdomen; female has only two.  Males and females often colored differently. Details important to identification include face color, eye color, color and markings on the thorax and wings, color of the pterostigma (small colored area near the front edge of the wing), color and markings of the abdomen and shape of the abdomen. Recently emerged (teneral) individuals are often pale, unmarked, and impossible to identify until they develop the adult color pattern. Some change color several times on the way to sexual maturity (within a few days); some change color with temperature, and some also change color after death.”  Additional differences include the complexity of metamorphosis.  Dragonflies have incomplete metamorphosis with aquatic nymphs known as Naiads.  Antlions have complete metamorphosis which includes a dormant pupa, and the terrestrial larvae are known as Doodlebugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination