Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Peruvian cricket
Location: Rio Pindayo, near Curimana, Ucayali, Peru
February 9, 2011 3:28 am
Can you help me find the identity of this cricket found in central Peru?
Signature: Peter Bruce-Jones

Katydid

Hi again Peter,
This is not a cricket, but rather, it is a Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae.  Crickets and Katydids are classified together in the suborder Ensifera, the Long Horned Orthopterans.  We often request assistance with exotic Katydid identifications from entomologist Piotr Naskrecki, however, we suspect he is in the field as he did not respond to our recent emails.  We will write to him to see if he recognizes your Katydid.  We can tell you that she is a female as evidenced by her swordlike ovipositor.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you.
On this side of the Atlantic the Tettigoniidae are known as Bush-crickets and the term “katydid” is alien to us, hence my (imprecise) use of “cricket”. I look forward to hearing what your expert makes of it, and will hold back my other similar queries until he is in contact again.
Best regards,
Peter

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
This is a female of Choeroparnops, most likely C. tuberculatus (Tettigoniidae: Pseudophyllinae: Platyphyllini).
Cheers,
Piotr

Thank you Daniel. That was quicker than I expected. I have a few more orthopterans to enquire about; I’ll start with the long-horned ones.
All the best,
Peter

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green Insect Found On Oahu
Location: Honolulu, HI
January 31, 2011 1:48 am
Hi, I found this insect on a hike in Manoa this weekend. Do you know what it is? It was on a tree near a river.
Signature: EMC

Unknown Green Thing

Dear EMC,
Do you have a photo with more depth of field that shows some of the physical characteristics of this creature, like its head?  It appears from your photo that the creature keeps its back two pairs of legs together, but we cannot make out what is going on with the front legs.  Perhaps one of our readers will recognize this creature, which we believe might be some Orthopteran, the order that included crickets and katydids.  Since we cannot make out any wings, we believe this may be an immature specimen.

Daniel-
Thank for your reply.  I was thinking a form of leaf insect too, but then I was thinking that it had characteristics of a net casing spider also.  This was the only photo that I was able to get of it.
Thank you for your help.
EMC

Update courtesy of Karl
Hi Daniel and EMC:
I believe you are correct Daniel in suggesting that this is a katydid (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae). I was able to find only one similar image on a site by Collin Miller (scroll down four images). Unfortunately creature is not identified beyond family but, although the photo is a little fuzzy, it does show what is going on with the front legs. It probably is a juvenile so a more precise identification will likely require some expertise or a lot of research. Regards. Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Beautiful leaf-like bug
Location: Belize
January 5, 2011 12:30 pm
Hi – I found this outside on a wall. I *think* his eyes are near the narrow end? Had he been in a tree, I never would have seen him. What an amazing shape – he really does look just like a leaf! Any idea what he is? Thanks!
Signature: Cindy

Katydid

Hi Cindy,
This is a Katydid, but we haven’t the time to research the species at this moment.  We will try to get assistance from Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki, but we suspect he is on holiday at the moment.

Hi Daniel,
Wow.  A katydid?  Amazing…   The ones I remember seeing, while leaf-like, still had legs and antennae that looked like, well, legs and antennae.  This guy didn’t have antennae at all and even his legs were “leaf-like”.  (Can you tell *I’m* not an entomologist? “legs”?  “antennae?”   *laughing*)  Hey, I’m still only partly convinced that I can tell where his eyes are.
Anyway, thanks again – at least I know what type he is!  (He really is gorgeous.)
Thanks again for your excellent work – love you guys!
-cindy

Piotr Naskrecki provides an identification
February 9, 2011
Hi Daniel,
The green, leaf-like katydid from Belize is a male of Aegimia sp. (Phaneropterinae). The antennae in this genus are unusually thin for katydids, and in this individual folded backwards to enhance the mimicry of leaves.
…  Cheers,
Piotr
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

32 Spotted Katydid
Location: Quensland Australia
January 2, 2011 6:27 pm
Happy New Year guys.
It’s been wet, wet, wet, here in Queensland but finally a bit of sunshine today. This katydid (Ephippitytha trigintiduoguttata) is not usually seen in the adult phase as it prefers to feed on leaves at the top of gum trees but I was lucky to find this one on some regrowth close to the ground. Quite a looker, hope you like the shots.
Signature: aussietrev

32 Spotted Katydid

Happy New Year Trevor,
Thanks so much for sending us these wonderful photos of the magnificent 32 Spotted Katydid.  We will try to find a link to additional information tomorrow.

Update: January 3, 2011
The Insects of Brisbane website has a nice set of images of the 32 Spotted Katydid.

32 Spotted Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Kekoa the Katydid – RIP
Location: Vancouver, Washington
January 2, 2011 4:41 am
Well, she lived much longer than I had originally thought she would after laying her eggs, and I’m not happy to see her go, but I’ve got her babies to watch for in the spring and maybe raise one of them in her stead. Left four days ago for a new years trip, came back early rather than on Monday because of family issues, to discover my brother telling me he’d seen her face down in the bottom of her cage for a while, and she hadn’t been moving. I checked on her, and sure enough she was dead, and her body starting to brown. Even in death I think she is beautiful. Sad to see her go, but her role in life was done, and I’m proud to have helped her live it through :)
Found her on Veteran’s Day, Nov. 11th
She laid eggs on Nov. 23rd through 27th (more here:  She laid eggs on Nov. 23rd through 27th)
Passed away either Dec. 30 / 31st
When her babies start to emerge, I’ll take pictures and help increase the Katydid picture resources! :)
Signature: Sincerely, Kaetlin the bug fanatic

Kekoa the Katydid has died

Dear Kaitlin,
Thanks for keeping us informed of the death of your pet Katydid.  As you indicated, her life in captivity probably increased her longevity.  We hope she has produced viable eggs for you and we look forward to additional updates when the eggs hatch.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Pink Bug
Location: Brazil, Rio de Janeiro
December 23, 2010 9:13 am
Hi!!! I took these pics months ago, but i have no idea of what bug this could be!!! I’m thinking it might be a pink katydid but i’m not sure at all!! I’m sorry for the quality of the images!!!
Signature: Mac

Unknown Katydid

Dear Mac,
This is a Longhorned Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera, and there is a really good chance that it is a Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae.  We will try to get a definitive identification from Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki.  Many typically green Katydids have pink or brown morphs and this particular specimen blending in so nicely with the pink blossom might explain how this unusual coloration may contribute to the survival of certain individuals.

Unknown Katydid

Piotr Naskrecki responds
February 9, 2011
Hi Daniel,
… The pink Brazilian katydid is a young nymph of a phaneropterine katydid, but it is too young to be identified based on the photos.
Cheers,
Piotr
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination