Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

I’ve seen these brown leaves on Sideroxylon salicifolium and wonder what could be causing it.
October 1, 2009
Hello dear bug people. I keep seeing webbing and dead leaf clusters on Willow Bustic and wonder if the attached bugs/larvae that I saw today are the cause.

Brown Leaves:  Insect Damage???

Fall Webworm Leaf Damage

Would you know what they are by these not so great pictures?
Thank you so much, Susan
North Key Largo, Florida

Unknown Web Spinning Insect

Giant Katydid Hatchlings

Dear Susan,
WE are really puzzled by these hatching insects, but the webbing they are constructing does appear to be on the brown clusters of leaves.  We are calling in the big guns and are requesting assistance from Eric Eaton.

Unknown Web Spinning Insect

Giant Katydids hatching in Webworm Nest

Update from Eric Eaton
October 3, 2009
Daniel:
I’m at a friend’s computer right now, but my quick answer is that those are most likely katydid nymphs hatching from eggs.  Probably giant katydids (Stilpnochlora couloniana).  They would not be the cause of the leaf damage, and certainly not the cause of the webbing, which may be a product of the Fall Webworm or a related caterpillar.
Hope this helps.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Strange Cricket ID
September 23, 2009
Found this cricket (?) in our barn here in Olympia, WA, this evening. It doesn’t look like anything I’ve seen before. I was by itself in the corner of our barn. I’ve had it i a jar for an hour and no sounds have come from it but it jumps like a son of a gun. It has very long antennae and a tail of sorts.
Sincerely, Cynthe Slaybaugh
Olympia, WA

Sierra Shieldback Katydid

Sierra Shieldback Katydid

Hi Cynthe,
We believe you have found a Sierra Shieldback Katydid in the genus Neduba.  We are linking to a BugGuide page with a nice image from Oregon that originated as a submission to our own website several years ago.

Sierra Shieldback Katydid

Sierra Shieldback Katydid

Awesome!  Thank you!  Here are a couple more pics.  We let her go this morning.

Sierra Shieldback Katydid

Sierra Shieldback Katydid

Thanks for sending in additional photos of a higher quality.

Sierra Shieldback Katydid

Sierra Shieldback Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Pink – rose katydid
September 22, 2009
hey today i found a grasshopper that looks like a katydid and is pink and kind of rose colored and is quite beautiful, it is about 2 – 2.5 inches long. I have seen several bright green ones around but found this one today!
Chris
nassau county florida

Round Headed Katydid:  Pink Form

Round Headed Katydid: Pink Form

Hi Chris,
The pink form of the Round Headed Katydids in the genus Amblycorypha is not very common.  According to an Eric Eaton comment on BugGuide:  “the genus Amblycorypha (roundheaded katydids), the only genus in North America that I am aware of that gets pink or red individuals.

Round Headed Katydid:  Pink Form

Round Headed Katydid: Pink Form

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Is this a grasshopper?
September 14, 2009
This bug has been hanging out with me for a while now. First it was on my front porch hanging out on the hibiscus and just the other day it was in my room. I put it outside many times and it always comes back. Now I just let it hang out in my room and it just stays sitting in the same spots.
Malia
Virginia Beach, VA

Greater Meadow Katydid

Greater Meadow Katydid

Hi Malia,
Grasshoppers have much shorter antennae than this Greater Meadow Katydid does.  We believe the species is Orchelimum minor, based on images posted to BugGuide.  The red eyes and green face are quite distinctive.  Your individual is a female as evidenced by her sword-like ovipositor, and she is missing one leg, which may have happened because of a run-in with a predator.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Bug on Trail in Jackson Hole
September 3, 2009
Hi! I saw this bug sitting on the trail in Jackson Hole, WY on the Cascade Canyon Trail. Bug was not alarmed at my approach. It did not fly away, but crawled (I wanted to be sure it did not get stepped on!)
Doug
Jackson Hole, WY

Mormon Cricket

Mormon Cricket

Hi Doug,
This is a Shield Backed Katydid, most likely a Mormon Cricket, Anabrus simplex, which can be compared to individuals on BugGuide.  Your specimen is a female as evidenced by the swordlike ovipositor.

Update from Eric Eaton
September 6, 2009
Daniel:
The mormon cricket is pretty easy, plus this was “their year” apparently with lots of posts popping up in Bugguide from the Rocky Mountain states and Pacific Northwest.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Green Bug!! aka: Possible, preveiously unseen phasmid/timema found in the southern St Croix River Valley just outside the Twin Cities
August 11, 2009
Now I could be totally wrong on all this because I really don’t practice entomology, but it’s been one of those random moments that makes me realize I probably should. Oh, and I also feel I should mention that I’ve seen more fireflies and random small hunting-spiders this year than any year in the past few that I can recall. It could mean nothing, it could mean everything…. {Disregard}
So I caught this random bug last night. It looked like a green grasshopper at first glance, so the first thing I thought was “What’s a grasshopper doing out flying at night?” I looked closer and noticed the long antennae and hind legs.
I looked it up as best I could through Google and ended up here after turning up nothing on Wikipedia and found the closest visual match to be the green timema pictures on this site, however my specimen has transparent/green wings that folded up across its back much like a native green grasshopper.
I let that one go outside last night, then saw another identical bug this morning, only this time, I got pictures and a better view of it.
Took these pictures with my phone so the resolution isn’t the best, but all of the legs have sparse red bristles on them, and the feet of it appear to be a small hook-like structure. They cling easily to most surfaces, even glass so I’m guessing it’s like a house-fly’s feet.
That’s about all the info I have to offer aside from pictures. Hope this is some good material for you guys. If I see another one of these, I’ll catch it and keep it until I hear back from you just in case it’s something important.
Kudos!
Erik C Larsen, mad scientist
William O’Brien State Park, Marine on St Croix, Minnesota, North America

Fork-Tailed Bush Katydid

Fork-Tailed Bush Katydid

Dear Erik,
Your letter is so entertaining.  This is not a Timema.  It is a Scudder’s Bush Katydid in the genus Scudderia, probably Scudderia furcata,
the Fork-Tailed Bush KatydidIt is a male specimen as evidenced by its unique forked subgenital plate.  You may read more on the genus page on BugGuide.

Correction from Eric Eaton
August 18, 2009
Daniel:
Ok, here are all the identifications:
Also, the “fork-tailed bush katydid” from Minnesota, dated August 11, is actually a male “northern bush katydid,” Scudderia septetrionalis, the only species without a supra-anal plate over the curving subgenital plate (I know, I know that makes perfect sense if you are an entomologist….:-).
Keep up the great work!
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination