Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
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Insect from Belize…
Location:  Mountain Pine Ridge in Cayo, Belize
July 28, 2010 10:21 am
We think it’s a sort of locust, what do you think? We were fascinated with this bug! I took this picture on Thursday, July 22, 2010. Thanks for your help!
Sandie Young

Crayola Katydid from Belize

Hi Sandie,
This appears to be a Katydid, though we sometimes mistake other Long Horned Orthopterans in the suborder Ensifera for Katydids.  We are going to check with international Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he recognizes your species.

That is wonderful, thank you so much.  Will you please let me know what you find out?  I’ve never seen such a beautiful colorful bug !  :)

Hi Daniel,
This is a female of the Crayola katydid, Moncheca pretiosa (Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae), one of the few katydids that probably uses chemical defenses. Although this species has not yet been tested, its closest relative,  a similarly colored genus Vestria, produces volatile pyrazines that are known to act as repellants to monkeys and birds.
Cheers,
Piotr

Wow Piotr,
That is wonderful.  The Crayola Katydid sure has a fitting name for such a colorful Katydid, and those of us who grew up with the 64 pack of crayons appreciate the significance.

How cool is that!!  I love his name.  We were calling him the disco bug :)  Thanks for the info !  What a great website you have !  :)
Sandie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

huge outer space bug
Location:  Austin Texas at Lake Travis
July 23, 2010 12:11 pm
I need help… while camping in Texas we came across this huge grass hopper type bug with packs on it’s back, weird mouth, legs and everything else…. I just got to find out…
Bug Quest

Greater Arid Land Katydid

Dear Bug Quest,
This Greater Arid Land Katydid,
Neobarrettia spinosa, is in the same order as a Grasshopper, Orthoptera, but then their taxonomies diverge.  Katydids are Long Horned Orthopterans in the suborder Ensifera and the family Tettigoniidae.  The Spiny Predatory Katydids in the genus Neobarrettia are “voraciously omnivorous” according to BugGuide, which also indicates:  “When approached, said to sometimes threaten and attack, may bite and draw blood.”  We are rather fond of the less commonly used but colorfully descriptive name Red Eyed Devil.

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Green bug
June 12, 2010
Green bug
Found this on my patio in Abilene Texas.
Michael
Abilene, Texas

Greater Arid Land Katydid

Hi Michael,
This is a predatory Katydid in the genus Neobarrettia.  We believe it is the Greater Arid Land Katydid, Neobarrettia spinosa, sometimes called the Red Eyed Devil according to BugGuide.  This is a gregarious omnivorous species that is found in Texas and a few neighboring states.  We would not discount that it might be the smaller White Eyed Devil, Neobarrettia victoriae, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  The individual in your photo is a female based on her long ovipositor that might be mistaken for a stinger.  These aggressive Katydids are capable of biting and drawing blood.

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Huge Creepy Crawlers
June 7, 2010
These very loud chirping “crickets” like to jump on me! I have seen them green with black legs and red with black legs.
Nervous in Mico
Medina Lake, Texas

Central Texas Leaf Katydid

Dear Nervous,
It must be a bumper crop year for the Central Texas Leaf Katydid which is represented in your photograph.  If they are plentiful, they may defoliate oak trees.  Your specimen is a female as evidenced by the saber-like ovipositor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What is it? Katydid? Bush cricket?
June 2, 2010
Righty then, I have an employee that brought this mystery bug to work for identification. After scouring the web and looking through books, obviously I’ve turned to the experts. According to the employee, there are lots of these and they are eating her oak trees. She lives in a county about 20 miles outside Bexar County, TX. Photography by Kathy Moffett-Jones.
Steve
San Antonio, Texas, Surrounding area

Central Texas Leaf Katydid

Hi Steve,
This is the third photo of a Truncated True Katydid or Central Texas Leaf Katydid, Paracyrtophyllus robustus, we have received from Texas in the past few days.  Your specimen is immature and when it is mature, the wings will be full sized.  We understand when they are quite plentiful, they can defoliate oak trees, but this does not seriously compromise healthy trees which will just grow more leaves.

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Texas Hill Country bug
June 1, 2010
Saw a fair number of these bugs in Government Canyon State Natural Area, which is just northwest of San Antonio, Texas. Saw it walking on oak trees and in grasses nearby. It’s about 2 inches long. Maybe a roach, but not like any I’ve seen before. Photo is of one on a Juniper tree. If not moving, it can be confused with a brown leaf. Did not see one fly, but it looks like maybe it could. Thanks.
Don B
(29.56, -98.76)

Central Texas Leaf Katydid

Dear Don,
Once we recognized this as a True Katydid in the family Pseudophyllinae (doesn’t the prefix ‘pseudo’ mean false?), we quickly identified it as a Truncated True Katydid or Central Texas Leaf Katydid, Paracyrtophyllus robustus on BugGuide which indicated:  “Large concentrations in the canopies of live oak and junipers, producing an amazing chorus at mid-day.
”  BugGuide also reports that there are periodical outbreaks of great numbers of Central Texas Leaf Katydids and by comparison “Katydids normally sing only at night, but during outbreaks they [Central Texas Leaf Katydids] sing day and night (and how!!!)”  A few days ago, we posted a photo of an immature Central Texas Leaf Katydid.  We suspect, when they are very plentiful, they provide a valuable food source for many creatures, and that they are probably quite palatable to humans as well.  Perhaps David Gracer will comment.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination