Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Dead leaf mimic
January 31, 2010
Hi, I got a photo of this dead leaf mimic in Monteverde, Costa Rica during a night walk. Can you tell me what it is exactly please?
Thanks
Miles
Costa Rica

Katydid, possibly Mimetica species

Hi Miles,
Often the identification of tropical insects can be very difficult, and the best we are able to do is the family level, or even merely the level of order.  Interestingly, back in 2008, we received an image that was taken in Panama in the 1970s of a Katydid that was identified by Piotr Naskrecki, an expert in the family, as Mimetica crenulata.  Your Katydid looks very similar to that individual, and we believe it may be in the same genus.  While the image of Mimetica crenulata has an undulating wing edge, your specimen has what appears to be the petiole, or place where the leaf would be attached to the plant as part of its very effective mimicry.  We will attempt to contact Piotr Naskrecki to verify that identification.  More searching led us to a photo online on the Ecolibrary website, but no species name was provided.

Piotr Responds
Hi Daniel,
This is probably a female of Mimetica incisa.
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Grasshopper with white head and yellow legs
January 19, 2010
I found this grasshopper in a marsh on the boardwalk about 30 miles west of Chicago. He stayed there for about a minute and then jumped off into the weeds. Any ideas? He’s one of the most beautiful grasshoppers I’ve ever seen.
Sam
Wheaton, IL 60187

Meadow Katydid

Hi Sam,
We are late for an appointment right now, and haven’t the time to research this request, though we do have time to post it.  Hopefully, one of our readers will be able to assist.  We have also requested assistance from Eric Eaton.  Your letter did not indicate when the sighting was made, and since there is currently snow in Chicago, we doubt if it was spotted this week.

Sorry; I think it was in July or August if that helps.

Correction courtesy of Eric Eaton
Daniel:
The “grasshopper” is a male meadow katydid in the genus Orchelimum, possibly the black-legged meadow katydid, Orchelimum nigripes, but difficult to be certain.  One needs to see a close-up of the tail end to get a species ID.
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ecuadorian Giant Red Grasshopper
November 9, 2009
We noticed this insect crawling around our lodge one night. The natives told me that it was called a ‘lobster bug,’ and that it may be the adult version of a grasshopper which loses it’s wings at an old age. The wings do appear to be shriveled, and it’s movements were slow. It is several inches long, easily over 8 inches. Hope you can help me identify this beauty.
P.S. His name is Bladerunner
Anthony L.
Napo Valley, Ecuador

Longhorned Orthopteran

Panoploscelis specularis

Dear Anthony,
We randomly selected your letter from our older unanswered mail to post today.  This is some species of Longhorned Orthopteran and we are going to write to an expert in the order, Piotr Naskrecki, to see if he can give us a species or genus identification.  Based on the presence of an ovipositor, we hve to inform you that Bladerunner is a female.

Longhorned Orthopteran

Panoploscelis specularis

Identification thanks to Piotr Naskrecki
Hi Daniel,
This is a female of Panoploscelis, almost certainly P. specularis
(Pseudophyllinae: Eucocconotini). It is an interesting animal, one in which
the female has fully developed stridulatory organs on her wings, albeit ones
that are not homologous with those of the male. It really is a huge animal,
although probably not 8 inches long, more like 5, ovipositor included (at
least I have never seen an individual longer than that.)
Happy New Year!
Piotr

Ed. Note
Now that we have a name, we searched for some online information and found a detailed scientific paper.  We also found a reference to a common name Spiny Lobster Katydid.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Alien like Bug
December 31, 2009
I do not know what this is. It is not something I have seen before. It surely resembles to one of those alien creatures in sci–fi films than an earthling.
Appreciate some help to identify this fellow.
Refer below for more info.
http://kirigalpoththa.blogspot.com/2009/11/aliens-in-garden.html
http://picasaweb.google.com/Kirigalpoththa/AliensInTheGarden#
N/A
Colombo, Sri Lanka

Katydid

Katydid

Dear N/A,
Other than believing this to be a Longhorned Orthopteran or Katydid, we cannot provide a species or genus.  We are going to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki who has assisted us in the past in the hopes he can provide more information.

Katydid

Katydid

Response from Piotr Naskrecki
Hi Daniel,
The insect in the photo is a nymph of Cymatomerini (Pseudophyllinae). The
only genus of this tribe known from Sri Lanka is Sathrophyllia, which of
course does not mean that it cannot be something else (the orthopteran fauna
of Sri Lanka is virtually unknown.)
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Borneo to be Weird
December 29, 2009
Spotted at night while trekking in Borneo. This insect was quite large (around 12 cm), and was found at our camp in Maliau Basin. I have no idea what it is, but I’m guessing that it’s some type of stick insect. This individual is the only one of its kind that we saw during our three weeks in Malaysia. I would love to know what it is.
Croix
Maliau Basin, Sabah, Malaysia

Mystery from Borneo

Katydid from Borneo

Dear Croix,
Tropical species can often be very difficult to recognize, and diversity in the jungles often results in a physiognomy that is nearly unrecognizable from closely related species found in well documented areas like North America.  We believe this is some species of Longhorned Orthopteran, but we will probably need some time to research that possibility.  Meanwhile we are going to post your photos of this fascinating creature with the hopes that we can identify it online, or that our readership may be able to contribute to the identification.

Mystery from Borneo

Katydid from Borneo

We are also going to contact Eric Eaton to see if he is able to confirm that this is a Longhorned Orthopteran.

Mystery from Borneo

Katydid from Borneo

A Differing Opinion
I think that the insect on the picture should be some kind of Phasmatodea. If I look the third leg pair in the third picture then I can’t imagine how could he jump. The head is also like Phasmatodea’s have.
Mardikavana

Daniel,
Thank you for posting my submission and replying as quickly as you did. I really enjoy your site, and I’m excited to see if someone will be able to identify this insect. Have a wonderful new year.
All the best,
Croix

Eric Eaton writes back
Hi, Daniel:
I’m “cc’ing” Piotr Naskrecki because the images are of a katydid, and Piotr is the most knowledgeable and helpful authority I know for this group of insects.  He will likely know the genus at least.  Wonderful creature!
Best wishes to you and Lisa for a very prosperous and stress-free 2010.
Eric

Katydid Expert Piotr Naskrecki provides an answer
Hi Eric,
This pretty animal is either the genus Olcinia or Sathrophyllia, both common
katydids in Borneo and peninsular Malaysia (hard to tell them apart without
seeing the wing venation.) They are members of the Pseudophyllinae:
Cymatomerini.
Cheers,
Piotr

Wow!  That was ridiculously fast, Piotr:-)  Thank you so much.  I am getting a wonderful education from you.  I have always liked katydids anyway, but you have only increased my fascination and wonder through your helpful comments and identifications.  Thank you again, and happy new year to you!
Sincerely,
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Large, green, slow-moving, wide wingspan
November 30, 2009
I found this guy on my lampshade in November. We live amongst Oaks and Cedars predominantly, have acid soil, nights down to 40′s currently. I thought Katydid, but maybe a tree cricket of some kind? Thank you!
Rhoni Lawrence
2400 ft. Sierra Nevada foothills in N. California

Common Conehead

Common Conehead

Dear Rhoni,
This sure appears to be a Common Conehead Katydid in the genus Neoconocephalus, but we cannot be certain of the species.  None of the species that are identified on bugGuide are found in California, but some unidentified specimens are.

Common Conehead

Common Conehead

Perhaps one of our readers who is more skilled at Katydid identification will be able to provide a species name.

Common Conehead

Common Conehead

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination