Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
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Huge Creepy Crawlers
June 7, 2010
These very loud chirping “crickets” like to jump on me! I have seen them green with black legs and red with black legs.
Nervous in Mico
Medina Lake, Texas

Central Texas Leaf Katydid

Dear Nervous,
It must be a bumper crop year for the Central Texas Leaf Katydid which is represented in your photograph.  If they are plentiful, they may defoliate oak trees.  Your specimen is a female as evidenced by the saber-like ovipositor.

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What is it? Katydid? Bush cricket?
June 2, 2010
Righty then, I have an employee that brought this mystery bug to work for identification. After scouring the web and looking through books, obviously I’ve turned to the experts. According to the employee, there are lots of these and they are eating her oak trees. She lives in a county about 20 miles outside Bexar County, TX. Photography by Kathy Moffett-Jones.
Steve
San Antonio, Texas, Surrounding area

Central Texas Leaf Katydid

Hi Steve,
This is the third photo of a Truncated True Katydid or Central Texas Leaf Katydid, Paracyrtophyllus robustus, we have received from Texas in the past few days.  Your specimen is immature and when it is mature, the wings will be full sized.  We understand when they are quite plentiful, they can defoliate oak trees, but this does not seriously compromise healthy trees which will just grow more leaves.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Texas Hill Country bug
June 1, 2010
Saw a fair number of these bugs in Government Canyon State Natural Area, which is just northwest of San Antonio, Texas. Saw it walking on oak trees and in grasses nearby. It’s about 2 inches long. Maybe a roach, but not like any I’ve seen before. Photo is of one on a Juniper tree. If not moving, it can be confused with a brown leaf. Did not see one fly, but it looks like maybe it could. Thanks.
Don B
(29.56, -98.76)

Central Texas Leaf Katydid

Dear Don,
Once we recognized this as a True Katydid in the family Pseudophyllinae (doesn’t the prefix ‘pseudo’ mean false?), we quickly identified it as a Truncated True Katydid or Central Texas Leaf Katydid, Paracyrtophyllus robustus on BugGuide which indicated:  “Large concentrations in the canopies of live oak and junipers, producing an amazing chorus at mid-day.
”  BugGuide also reports that there are periodical outbreaks of great numbers of Central Texas Leaf Katydids and by comparison “Katydids normally sing only at night, but during outbreaks they [Central Texas Leaf Katydids] sing day and night (and how!!!)”  A few days ago, we posted a photo of an immature Central Texas Leaf Katydid.  We suspect, when they are very plentiful, they provide a valuable food source for many creatures, and that they are probably quite palatable to humans as well.  Perhaps David Gracer will comment.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Yellow insect from South Africa?
June 1, 2010
Ok, so my friend sent me a picture of the mysterious bug that wouldn’t die! I’m sorry this is such a terrible picture… all of the pictures in this album were taken with a cell phone as that was their only camera at the time! My friends are told that they are harmless.
Stacy F.
South Africa (Bugeni)

Koringkrieks

Hi Stacy,
We believe this must be an Orthopteran, but we do not recognize it.  We wonder if perhaps it is a type of Weta.  We are going to contact Piotr Naskrecki to see if he recognizes it.

Piotr Naskrecki Identifies Koringkrieks
Hi Marcos,
This is Enyaliopsis transvaalensis (Tettigoniidae: Hetrodinae), member of a group of katydids known in South Africa as koringkrieks. Although unrelated to European Bradyporinae, they also exhibit reflexive bleeding as a defense mechanism. This species is common in NE South Africa (the old Transvaal.)
Piotr

?Hi Daniel,
Actually, I think I identfied this bug and it is a  Shieldback Katydid, also known as Koringkriek. Ask PiotrNaskrecki if he thinks I am correct.
The main thing is, are they harmless? We have a missionary family tha are pretty freaked out by these because they have a small child.
Sincerely,
Stacy Fisher

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Bug identification
May 31, 2010
I noticed these guys on my rose today. They hop and have very long antennae. It was late afternoon and they may have been searching for aphids. I only notice them on the dark colored roses. I live in Lodi, CA (Central Valley)
Mary
Central California

Scudder's Bush Katydid Nymph

Hi Mary,
This is an immature Scudder’s Bush Katydid.  Winged adults look like green grasshoppers with long antennae.  Katydids eat leaves, and we find that in our own Southern California garden, they like nibbling on rose petals.  They never get plentiful enough to be a problem, and we tolerate the Scudder’s Bush Katydids because they are such interesting creatures.

Thanks Daniel.  Yes, I read that they eat citrus but I have none on my orange or lemon here in the CA Central Valley.  They’re just on the roses.  I find them fascinating as well.  I love the antennae.  Do they eat aphids or are they herbivores?

Hi again Mary,
From all we have read, they are strictly phytophagous, feeding solely on plants, despite that numerous Katydids are predatory or at least omnivorous.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black-Red-Yellow Cricket?
May 28, 2010
Black-Red-Yellow Cricket with long legs
Mark
San Antonio, Texas

Central Texas Leaf Katydid Nymph

Hi Mark,
This is an immature Katydid, and we are going to seek professional assistance from Piotr Naskrecki in the identification.

Central Texas Leaf Katydid Nymph

Hi Daniel,
This looks like a nymph of the Central Texas Leaf Katydid (Paracyrtophyllus
robustus.)
Piotr

Thanks Piotr.  There are matching images on BugGuide which indicates:  “True katydids have leaf-like wings that form cups enclosing the abdomen. (The cupped wings probably serve to amplify their sounds.) Antennae longer and stiffer than in other katydids.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination