Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
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What is this insect?
July 28, 2009
I took this photo at Poring Hot Springs in Sabah, Borneo. It was about 15 cm long, at least half of that being the antennae.
Susan
Borneo

Unknown Katydid from Borneo

Katydid from Borneo:  Pseudophyllus species

Hi Susan,
When it comes to tropical insects, identification for us is often a c%#p-shoot.  With that said, we are relatively certain that this is an Orthopteran, and more specifically, one of the Long Horned Orthopterans in the suborder Ensifera, and probably one of the Katydids in the family Tettigoniidae.  We would like a second opinion on that and perhaps one of our readers will be able to come up with a genus and species.  Karl, are you busy?

Hi Daniel:
Not unexpectedly, Borneo is blessed with an impressive diversity of katydids (Tettigoniidae), most of them poorly documented on the internet. My hunch is that Susan’s bug is in the genus Pseudophyllus which has many of the right characteristics (large size, green color and, at least sometimes, dorsovdentral compression). Most species also have the shoulder spots evident in Susan’s photo, although I couldn’t find any images that looked quite right. It is a relatively small genus with at least three representatives on Borneo (P. dyaka, P. colosseus and P. hercules). Nothing else I found came close, but if I find the time I may try to look again. Regards.
Karl

Update
July 29, 2009
Wow, thanks! Well, i’m thrilled about that because that’s what I thought it was but a naturalist friend of mine said it couldn’t possibly be a katydid. It’s always so gratifying to be vindicated. LOL! BTW, did this go up on the blog? Don’t you think he’s beautiful? Anyway, I’ll look forward to the other opinions, too.
Thanks again, Daniel.
Susan

Update:  January 24, 2013
We just received a comment that suggested the genus
Phyllozelus, and this image on FlickR looks quite close.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

What kind of bug is this?
July 27, 2009
We walked outside of the apartment to find this big huge green bug. We could not figure out what kind of bug it was. At first we thought it might be some sort of cricket or locus, but we could not find a picture online similar to it. Our town is between a city and country.
Athena
Portland, TX

Greater Arid-Land Katydid

Greater Arid-Land Katydid

Hi Athena,
We just love that according to BugGuide, the Greater Arid-Land Katydid, Neobarrettia spinosa, is also known as a Red Eyed Devil.  Unfortunately, your photo that shows the red eyes is quite blurry, but we are posting it anyway.  The ovipositor indicates that this is a female.  This is a predatory species.  Also according to BugGuide, it may bite and draw blood.

Red Eyed Devil

Red Eyed Devil

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Huge green Ortopthera (?)
July 5, 2009
Helo! Todays walk near Danube cliff revealed me this huge cricket, which im trying to identify whole day. But closest that i get is Phaneroptera nana… Still it doesnt seep to be one. Phaneroptera nana is relatively frekvent here… Anyway, this one on the picture have more coned head, somewhat thinner body and white stripes :) Can u help?
Aleksandar
Serbia

Predatory Bush Cricket

Predatory Bush Cricket

Greetings Aleksandar,
This is most definitely not a Mediterranean Katydid, Phaneroptera nana.  Your specimen is a female judging by her long swordlike ovipositor.  She is also in the suborder Ensifera, the Longhorned Orthopterans.  We also would concur that this is a species of Katydid in the family Tettigoniidae.
We believe we have identified it as a Predatory Bush Cricket in the genus Saga, perhaps Saga pedo based on a photo on BioLib.  There are many additional images on BioLib and when we did a websearch of the name, we found a page that indicates 6 specimens were found in Michigan and indicates it is called the Matriarchal Katydid because:  “No males; females large and wingless. Known only from Jackson County, Michigan. Length 60–65 mm.” and “A reasonable hypothesis as to how the matriarchal katydid was brought to Michigan is that one or more of its eggs were in soil adhering to farm equipment returning from plowing contests in Italy. The first Michigan specimen was collected in 1970 and only six have been taken since. Unlike our native katydids and other species of Saga in Europe, the matriarchal katydid is obligatorily parthenogenetic. No males are known from here or from Europe. Even though there is no male calling song, females have prominent tympanal organs on the fore tibiae.”  We located a pdf ( cantrall72) of a Great Lakes Entomologist article written by Irving J Cantrall that contains accounts of the discovery in the early 1970s of this species in Michigan.

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Red and Green Insect
Tue, Jun 9, 2009 at 3:08 PM
This picture was taken at Gamble Rodgers Memorial State Recreation Area, Florida on June 1. The site was on the intercoastal Waterway, brackish water and near a nature trail that winds through a shady coastal forest of scrub oaks and saw palmetto.
Jon
Flagler Beach, Florida

Immature Katydid

Immature Bush Katydid

Hi Jon,
This is an immature Katydid. It is most probably a Bush Katydid in the genus Scudderia. There are similar photos posted to BugGuide. The most likely candidate is the Southeastern Bush Katydid, Scudderia cuneata, whose nymphs are often red and green and they are also pictured on BugGuide.  Many adult Katydid are marvelously camouflaged green insects that are frequently mistaken for grasshoppers.

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Mystery Bug with Tiny Wings!
Tue, May 5, 2009 at 1:27 PM
I’ve been meaning to write this letter for a long time! I have to apologize, because I’m sure this bug is “out of season” (?) right now. We found this little guy climbing on one of our baby willow trees on August 19, 2008. He looks to me like a kind of grasshopper, but I bet you’ll tell me I’m wrong! I was slightly perplexed by his tiny wings in proportion to his large body, which was a little smaller than my thumb (around 1.5-2 inches maybe?). I apologize for not grabbing a ruler or something… I’m kind of embarassed to say I was concentrating on being artistic, haha. If you could give me any insight into who this little guy is, I’d greatly appreciate it. Thank you so much!
Sincerely, Jess K.
Northeast Ohio

Greater Angle-Wing Katydid

Greater Angle-Wing Katydid

Dear Jess,
This is a Katydid and it is immature as indicated by its still developing wings. We are relatively certain it is a Greater Angle-Wing Katydid, Microcentrum rhombifolium , as evidenced by an image posted to BugGuide. We will be traveling to Youngstown in about a month to visit family.

Wow, I never would have guessed a katydid… but I guess I’ve never really seen one until then, either, haha. Thanks for your help, and best wishes for your safe travels to Ohio!

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long horn Grasshopper
Wed, Mar 11, 2009 at 6:10 AM
Hi all,
i found this Grasshopper in Guinea (west-africa). Ist about 5cm long an have a strange spkie an his Head.
Maybe its Acrida spec.?
Guinea found
Guinea, West africa

Conehead Katydid

Conehead Katydid

Dear Guinea found,
Grasshoppers in the genus Acrida are known as the Slant Faced Grasshoppers, and they are members of the Orthoptera suborder Caelifera, the true Grasshoppers with short antennae. Acrididae is the predominant family of Short Horned Grasshoppers. Horned in this case refers to the antennae. Your insects is a Long Horned Orthopteran in the suborder Ensifera, and the family Tettigoniidae, the Katydids. Though the spined head is more extreme than North American species, we would say that your Katydid is a Conehead Katydid in the subfamily Conocephalinae. You can find images of North American species on BugGuide. We will contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he recognizes your specimen.

Conehead Katydid

Conehead Katydid

Update:
Hi Daniel,
Somebody has already sent me a picture of this katydid, but not one with the
view of its face. Now that I can see the exact shape of the fastigium and
the marking on the face there is no doubt that this is a female of
Pseudorhynchus pungens Schaum, a fairly common, nearly pan-African species.Cheers,
Piotr
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

Update: Sat, Mar 14, 2009 at 2:43 PM
Hi,
thanks for your detailed and fast answer!
I had founded the exact name of the species, its Pseudorhynchus cf lanceolata or pungens.
But again, thanks a lot for your strive!
Greetings from Germany
Chris

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination