Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID please
Location: near water fall
September 16, 2014 6:58 pm
Please ID this bug. First it looks moth to me. But i am confused.
Signature: hello

Katydid

Katydid

UHHH, and where was this water fall?????

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: sci-fi grasshopper
Location: Toledo District, Belize
September 7, 2014 3:46 pm
Hello, folks,
I saw this grasshopper while I was pruning cacao recently. I’ve pruned a lot of cacao, but this was a first. Any idea what this is?
Sure hope my server cooperates and sends along a couple photos. I’ve got more if you’re interested.
Thanks a lot,
Tanya
Signature: Tanya

Immature Male Katydid from Belize

Immature Katydid from Belize

Dear Tanya,
This is an immature male Katydid, not a Grasshopper.  The antennae
of a Grasshopper are considerably shorter and thicker than the antennae on Ensiferans, including Katydids, Long Horned Orthopterans with which they share the order.  We will attempt to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki who frequently provides Katydid identifications down to the genus and species level.  We can tell you your individual is immature as evidenced by the short wing pads, and that your individual is a male as evidenced by his lack of an ovipositor.

Immature Male Katydid from Belize

Immature Katydid from Belize

Wow, Daniel,  what a fast and useful response.  Many,many thanks.  I’m going to check my other photos of this katydid because I think there may have been an ovipositor or something that looked like one to my untrained eyes.
You and your dedicated staff are the best.  I’ve been busy reading the Nests section.
Tanya

Subject: Is that an ovipositor on the katydid
Location: Toledo District, Belize
September 7, 2014 6:25 pm
Is that stubby bit too short to be an ovipositor? If so, what is it?
Many thanks.
Signature: Tanya

Immature Katydid from Belize

Immature Katydid from Belize

Hi again Tanya,
From this angle, that does appear to be an ovipositor, so we are retracting our previous statement.  This is an immature female Katydid.

You’re great, Daniel and crew.  Thanks so much for making bugs so compelling to so many of us.
Tanya

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cricket? Katydid? Stinger?!?
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
August 21, 2014 6:08 am
My girls found this and thought it to be a grasshopper but it has what appears to be a stinger.
Signature: Michelle

Lesser Pine Katydid

Greater Meadow Katydid

Hi Michelle,
This is a Meadow Katydid in the tribe Conocephalini, and it is in the Greater Meadow Katydid genus
Orchelium. The closest match we located on BugGuide is the Lesser Pine Katydid, Orchelimum minor, or possibly a Common Meadow Katydid, Orchelimum vulgare, also pictured on BugGuide.  What you have mistaken for a stinger is actually the ovipositor, an organ used to lay eggs, which makes this individual a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange grasshopper?
Location: Greece
August 18, 2014 12:04 pm
I am on holydays in Greece and I found this large insect dead in my kitchen. Initially I thought it was a grasshopper but I noticed that several features do not much. Would you be so kind to tell me what is it?
Signature: Stell Hai

Predatory Katydid:  Saga hellenica

Predatory Katydid: Saga hellenica

Dear Stell,
This Katydid in the family Tettigonidae is in the same order Orthoptera as the Grasshoppers, but they are in different suborders, which explains their superficial resemblance to one another.  We quickly located a pictorial match on FlickR that is identified as
Saga hellenica, and the image was taken in Delphi, Greece in 1986.  We had hoped to find more than just a name, and that proved to be the case when we found the Orthoptera and their Ecology site where it states:  “The species leads a predatory life and eats mostly other insects.”  We also learned:  “Saga hellenica will be endangered in the long term due to the decline in habitats because of cultivation (afforestation, agricultural intensification, solar parks) and overbuilding (industry, tourism).”  The range is listed as:  “Southeastern Europe (Albania, Macedonia, Greece).”  The pointy ovipositor at the end of the abdomen indicates that this individual is a female.  

Predatory Katydid:  Saga hellenica

Predatory Katydid: Saga hellenica

Predatory Katydid:  Saga hellenica

Predatory Katydid: Saga hellenica

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Leaf-Like Grasshopper?
Location: Yucca Valley, CA 92284
August 18, 2014 11:06 am
Hi B-Man, I just moved to Southern California In April and am originally from Alaska. There are SO many Interesting, Neat-Looking, and just plain BIG Freaking Bugs down here, that I have NEVER seen let alone had the chance to experience living up North. I found this Bug on My Father-In-Law’s GMC Truck. I immidiatley was intrigued. He (or she) looks sort of like a Grasshopper, other than the fact it looks like a perfect leaf. He acts like a grasshopper cuz he hops…But he can fly too. What’s weird is that his head/face looks kind of like a Praying Mantis Head? I know he’s not a P.M. But, his head and eyes sort of remind me of one. Hope you know what this gorgeous guy is, so I can finally end the Questions regarding what it is with my Stubborn Fiance…LoL ;)
Please and Thank You in Advance!!!
Signature: Haley Nadine~

California Angle-Winged Katydid

California Angle-Winged Katydid

Hi Haley,
This Katydid is in the same insect order as a Grasshopper, Orthoptera, which explains its resemblance to a Grasshopper.  We believe this is a California Angle-Winged Katydid,
Microcentrum californicum, based on the similarities to this image from BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: leaf looking bug
Location: Nashville, TN USA
August 10, 2014 7:27 am
Could you tell me what this is?
Signature: timmyd

Common True Katydid

Common True Katydid

Hi timmyd,
You are quite correct when you indicate the Common True Katydid,
Pterophylla camellifolia, is an excellent camouflage artist that looks exactly like a leaf.  The sickle-shaped ovipositor protruding from the edge of her wing tips is an indication this is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination