Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chalcid wasps from katydid eggs
Location: Kirksville, Missouri
April 10, 2014 1:02 pm
I discovered your site last fall in my search to identify some katydid eggs attached to a sweet gum ball. I kept the eggs on my desk in the hopes of seeing katydids hatching, but ended up having parasitized eggs–I had about a dozen chalcid wasps emerge from the eggs. Sadly, they didn’t survive.
I used this site and bugguide to figure out that they were chalcid wasps, but I’d like to narrow down the identification if possible.
Thanks!
Signature: AC Moore

Katydid Eggs Parasitized by Chalcid Wasp

Katydid Eggs Parasitized by Chalcid Wasp

Dear AC Moore,
We actually found your answer much faster than we anticipated.  We found this posting to BugGuide of Parasitized Katydid Eggs and a comment reads:  “The holes you are seeing are actually the emergence holes of wasps that parasitize the eggs of katydids. The wasps produce these circular holes to escape the confines of the egg in which they develop. When a katydid hatches it splits the side of the egg open. I know wasps in the genus
Anastatus (Eupelmidae) and Baryconus (Scelionidae) attack katydid eggs having reared some myself.”  We then searched for images of wasps in the two mentioned genera, and this image of a Baryconus species on zsi.gov looks nothing like your wasp, however the Anastatus that is pictured on BugGuide looks very much like your wasp.  You are correct.  It is a Chalcid.

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crazy scale like bug!
Location: Indianapolis Indiana
April 3, 2014 6:09 am
Greetings!
I have a mature clematis vine in my garden. While pruning it. I came across this symmetrical, armor-looking growth on the vine. I picked one off and it seemed sticky on the underside. It reminds me of some sort of scale or maybe some insect larvae. I’ve searched the internet and googled EVERY POSSIBLE combination of words and I cannot find ANYTHING. Please help me identify this creature! Blessings
Signature: Lacey O.

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Hi Lacey,
These are actually the eggs of a Katydid.

Wow. Thank you! What a quick response! I will let them be then. :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Katydid
Location: Tortola, BVI
March 25, 2014 6:59 pm
Hey,
I asked about this a while ago but included 3 different species by accident and rightfully on got one species identified. Anyways, this is a katydid I discovered on a door on Tortola in the Bristish Virgin Islands. I am doing a project on identifying everything I photograph and would love to know the species this is! Thanks!
Signature: Charlie M

Katydid

Katydid

Hi Charlie,
We are posting your beautiful photos and we will attempt to research your request.  Piotr Naskrecki is in the field and he has still not answered our last request for assistance.

Katydid

Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Singapore Katydid
Location: Singapore
March 22, 2014 10:20 pm
Hi Daniel.
I’ve seen this Katydid on Flickr from a few different photographers but no one has a name for it. I was able to photograph it for the first time this week and I’d love to be able to put a full name on it. Maybe Piotr would have some idea? It seems pretty distinctive so it might be ‘easy’ for him to ID.
Hope you’re well,
Signature: David

Immature Katydid

Immature Katydid

Dear David,
This Katydid is an immature nymph, and many times nymphs greatly differ from adults in coloration and markings.  We found a matching individual on DeviantArt, but as you indicated, it is not identified.  It is also unidentified on Singapore Nature.  As you requested, we will contact Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can identify this colorful little guy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crested Katydid
Location: Western Australia
March 18, 2014 9:43 pm
Hi Bugman,
I took this photo of what I think is a Crested/Superb Katydid in the Eastern Goldfields of Western Australia. I thought that it looked very interesting and might make a good photo for your website.
Kind regards,
Signature: Zoe

Crested Katydid

Crested Katydid

Dear Zoe,
Thank you so much for sending in your wonderful image of a Superb Katydid,
Alectoria superba, a magnificent Australian species.  We haven’t gotten a new image of a Superb Katydid in several years.  According to the Australian Museum blog:  “Also known as the Superb Katydid, this species is the only member of its genus which means it has no close relatives – which is not surprising as no other type of grasshopper anywhere in the world looks like it. this species is widespread in central Australia but seems to be relatively uncommon. This probably is the effect of the unpredictable seasonal nature of the rains out west. When there have been good rains in the warmer months these spectacular katydids have been found on a variety of plants and in places ranging from remote areas to suburban gardens. Some individuals show more yellow coloration and some appear greener. Little is known of their biology and life cycle but it appears as though this katydid feeds on flowers rather than the foliage of a number of plant species. It will also eat nectar and pollen from the same flowers. The females have a very short ovipositor, or egg laying tube, and as a result they probably stick their eggs to the side of plant stems rather than burying them in bark, or the ground, as do other katydids – but in truth we do not know. Nor do we know what happens to these katydids during excessive or long dry seasons. We don’t even know what the purpose of the strange crest on the back is for, but both sexes have this to an equal degree and it is hollow inside. “

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mongolian insect
Location: Mongolia
February 22, 2014 11:06 am
I was in Mongolia and saw this giant cricket/grasshopper like creature. The biggest one I saw measured about 4 inches in length. They had no visible wings and only crawled along the ground much like a potato bug.
Signature: Erin

Shieldback Katydid

Katydid

Dear Erin,
This Orthopteran is a Shieldback Katydid.  We will try to contact Piotr Naskrecki to see if he is able to provide a genus or species name.

Piotr Naskrecki provides an identification
Hi Daniel,
A very interesting creature – this katydid is Deracantha, probably D. mongolica (Tettigoniidae: Bradyporinae: Zichyini). This group of insects has an interesting mix of very advanced and basal (“primitive”) morphological characters that may help explain the origin of sound production in katydids. Some species in this tribe have highly modified tarsi (feet) that are equipped with crampons-like spikes that help them walk on smooth rocks.
Cheers,
Piotr
Piotr Naskrecki, Ph. D.
Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University

Thanks so much Piotr,
So, it is a Katydid, but not a Shieldback, and it is in a subfamily that is not represented in North America, correct?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination