Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orthoptera
Location: San Diego, north county
July 18, 2014 11:26 am
We found this cricket-type in Poway, CA I couldn’t find it in my guides. What is it?
Thanks.
Maureen
Signature: Up to you.

Lesser Meadow Katydid, probably

Uniform Shieldback

Hi Maureen,
We have not been able to locate a good match on BugGuide, but we believe that this is a Lesser Meadow Katydid in the genus
Conocephalus.  You cas nee the similarities to this Straight-Lanced Meadow Katydid pictured on BugGuide, though your individual lacks the marking along the head and back.  We will try to get another opinion on this identification.

Lesser Meadow Katydid

Uniform Shieldback

July 19, 2014:  Eric Eaton provides a correction
Hi, Daniel:
I disagree, actually.  This should be a much larger creature than a meadow katydid.  It is one of the shield-backed katydids of which California has a great number of endemic (found only in California) species.  This *might* be Idiostatus aequalis, but I would not put money on it.  Lots of other similar genera even.
Eric

Thanks Eric.  According to BugGuide, the common name for Idiostatus aequalis is the Uniform Shieldback.  This BugGuide image looks even closer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large green seed pod looking bug
Location: Columbus, Ohio
July 19, 2014 9:10 am
Yesterday I saw this guy on my car. I live in Columbus, Ohio. This critter can hold on as it stuck on my car through two freeway drives. It is July here. So far the going theory is that it is a katidid nymph. It was pretty sluggish but that could be because it was only in the 70′s yesterday.
Signature: Lena

Female Common True Katydid nymph

Female Common True Katydid nymph

Dear Lena,
You are correct in your supposition that this is a Katydid nymph.  More specifically, it is a female Common True Katydid nymph, which you can verify by comparing your individual to this image on BugGuide.
  The impressive swordlike ovipositor identifies her as a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper?
Location: Southern Indiana
July 16, 2014 7:47 am
This bug was found in southern Indiana in July, 2014, in a lightly wooded area among dry grass and leaves. My grandson captured in and put it in his bug box, then after admiring it for a while we released it. This photo was taken on our back steps just before the bug jumped off and disappeared. We have search several web sites but have been unable to find a match.
I took this picture with my iPad.
Signature: Curious Grandmother

Female Eastern Shieldback

Female Eastern Shieldback

Dear Curious Grandmother,
This is a Shield-Back Katydid, and research on BugGuide indicates it is a female Eastern Shieldback in the genus
Atlanticus.  According to BugGuide:  “Identification of species is challenging” and they are found in “Dry deciduous and mixed woodlands: on ground and in low vegetation.”  What appears to be a stinger is actually the ovipositor, the organ used by the female to lay eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect from the south of France
Location: South of France, up a mountain, near Grimaud.
July 15, 2014 6:41 am
I came across this funny looking fellow, in the South of France, more specifically up a mountain near Cogolin, Grimaud and St. Tropez. This was two weeks ago, in the start of July.
It must have been around 8 cm long.
It had a slow and secure style of crawling. The thing that threw me off, is this very long and dangerous looking broth it has at the back.
Can you help me identify it?
Signature: Maria Olsson, Denmark

Saddlebacked Bush Cricket

Saddle-back Bush Cricket

Dear Maria,
This is a Saddle-Back Bush Cricket in the genus
Ephippiger, and according to Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki:  “Normally this species is green, but at higher elevations you often find dark-colored forms of this (and other Ephippiger) species.”  Though we are uncertain what you mean by “broth”, we understand you are referring to what appears to be a stinger.  This is actually an ovipositor, the organ used by the female to lay eggs and it will not harm humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orchid-eating Long-horned Beetle?
Location: Sandy Springs, Georgia, USA
July 9, 2014 11:30 am
I was startled last week to find a little green guy chomping on my orchid blossoms, and leaving his mess as he went. The orchid had 23 individual blossoms that had been beautiful for more than 10 weeks, then suddenly blossoms started dropping and holes started appearing.
When I found the culprit (and I only found one), I took lots of pictures, and ultimately cut the stem of blossoms and discarded the bug and the blossoms because I have several other orchids in the house.
He/she was pretty and rather sporty bright green body, lovely legs, black and white striped antennae, and a white muzzle with 4 short feelers. Despite the good look I got, I can’t seem to find this guy in any of my books.
Let me know if you want more pictures.
Thanks.
PS Love the website!
Signature: Helen

Bush Katydid Nymph

Bush Katydid Nymph

Hi Helen,
This is an immature Bush Katydid in the genus
Scudderia, and you can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.  Bush Katydids normally feed on the leaves of plants, but they do not shy away from tender plant blossoms.  

Bush Katydid Nymph

Bush Katydid Nymph

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting Green bug
Location: Central Arkansas
June 8, 2014 8:35 pm
Hello, this bug was on my car this weekend and I’ve never seen one like him. It was a hot day and I was parked at a soccer field next to a wooded area. Can you please help to identify him, more for my curiosity than anything.
Thanks!
Signature: Tammy

Female Conehead Katydid

Female Conehead Katydid

Dear Tammy,
This is a Katydid, and she is a female based on her ovipositor, but we are having some difficulty narrowing to a genus and species.  The closest match we can find is a Conehead Katydid in the genus
Belocephalus, however, BugGuide only lists sightings from Florida.  In the past, Piotr Naskrecki has indicated there are thirteen species, but we don’t know if they range as far west as Arkansas, so we have contacted him for his input.

Conehead Katydid

Conehead Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination