Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is the common name for this Katydid?
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
February 6, 2016 12:36 am
Hello! I took a picture of this katydid at our lodge in Monteverde Costa Rica. I can’t seem to figure out what the common name of it would be. Could you help please?
Thank you!
Signature: Lise

Katydid

Katydid: Scopiorinus sp.

Katydid

Katydid: Scopiorinus sp.

Subject: Another katydid from Costa Rica
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
February 6, 2016 12:43 am
Hello again, I have another katydid that I can’t identify. I took a picture of this one at Cala Lodge in Costa Rica. I think it may be a bush katydid but, not sure. Can you help please?
Thank you!
Signature: Lise

Katydid

Katydid: Lamprophyllum sp. (most likely L. bugabae)

Hi again Lise,
We have combined your other requests into a single Katydid posting and we will contact Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can identify all your Katydids.

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
Yes, the big, mossy katydid is Haemodiasma tessellata. The smaller one with a sickle-shaped ovipositor is Scopiorinus sp. (impossible to ID to species based on the photos), whereas the bigger green one is a female of Lamprophyllum sp. (most likely L. bugabae).
Cheers,
Piotr

Wow!  Thank you and thank Piotr for the very quick response!  It is so nice to be able to get an identification of the insects I’ve found.  What an excellent thing it is to have you and your associates as a resource.
Again, many thanks!
Lise

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big grasshopper!!
Location: Monteverde, Costa Rica
February 5, 2016 11:24 pm
Hello Mr. Bugman!
I am so happy to have found your website. I am often curious as to what kind of bug I’ve found and now there is a resource! I have here a picture I took at Cala Lodge in Monteverde, Costa Rica last month. This huge grasshopper looked like he would camouflage very well in a tree. Helooked like he had a piece of leaf sticking out of his neck. Can you tell me what kind of grasshopper this is?
Thanking you in advance for your time,
Signature: Lise

Moss Mimic Katydid

Moss Mimic Katydid

Dear Lise,
This is NOT a Grasshopper.  It is a Katydid.  We believe it is a Moss Mimic Katydid,
Haemodiasma tessellata, a highland species that is already pictured on our site, or a closely related species in the same genus.  We noticed you have three additional identification requests, all titled as Katydids.  We did not look at the images yet.  If they are in fact all Katydids, we will attempt to get Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to verify our identifications when they are all posted.

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
Yes, the big, mossy katydid is Haemodiasma tessellata.
Cheers,
Piotr

That’s excellent!  Thank you for taking the time to look into this photo.  A moss mimic katydid.  How cool is that!?  :)  I can’t wait to go back to Costa Rica.  I plan to pay way more attention to the insects there next time.  So different from what we have here in northern Canada.
Thanks again,
Lise

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper
Location: South Africa
January 12, 2016 11:40 pm
Hi I just want to ID this bug can’t seem to find its name was hoping you guys can help, thanks
Signature: N/A

Predatory Katydid

Predatory Katydid

This is a Katydid, and we got our first clue thanks to the Getty Images site where we determined the genus to be Clonia.  Here is another similar image from iSpot.  Most of the iSpot images are of winged individuals so we are presuming your image is an immature nymph.  The presence of the long ovipositor is an indication this is a female.  We will try to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide additional information. 

Piotr Naskrecki responds
Hi Daniel,
From this dorsal view it is difficult to say what it is, do you have a lateral view? It is definitely a Clonia but not sure which subgenus, Xanthoclonia or Hemiclonia. Do you know the exact locality where this photo was taken?
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is he or she?
Location: El Cajon California
November 21, 2015 4:37 pm
Hello. This little critter had been hanging out on our rose plant for a couple of weeks. 24-7 he’s there. Never have seen one before. My family and I had been trying to find out what it is. Just a cool little guy and interesting. Been trying to find an app and can’t. Maybe you can help . We live in El Cajon Calif. Just outside San Diego.
Thx!
Shannon
Signature: ?

Scudder's Bush Katydid Nymph

Scudder’s Bush Katydid Nymph

Dear Shannon,
This is a Scudder’s Bush Katydid nymph, and they seem to be particularly fond of roses.  Though they eat the leaves and petals, we do not believe they do much damage and we permit them to live in our own garden.  According to BugGuide:  “Most species probably favor foliage of broad-leaved woody deciduous plants, but probably will feed on a variety of other plants. Often (especially nymphs) seen feeding on flowers of assorted, often herbaceous plants.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Trying to identify this creature
Location: Oklahoma City, OK, USA
November 20, 2015 9:10 am
This was found dead on a window sill in Oklahoma City, OK this past week. I’ve tried googling the image to no avail. Could you help me?
Signature: Anne Reynolds

Meadow Katydid

Meadow Katydid

Dear Anne,
This is a Katydid, and the sickle-like ovipositor indicates she is a female.  We believe she is a Meadow Katydid in the genus
Orchelimum, possibly the Long Spurred Meadow Katydid, Orchelimum silvaticum, which is pictured on BugGuide. or possibly the Common Meadow Katydid, Orchelimum vulgare, which is also pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found odd insect on my tire
Location: Pennsylvania
November 16, 2015 12:08 am
Just purely out of curioisity i was wondering what bug this is,I tried to look it up but could not find anything that exactly looked likes this bug it almost looks like a cricket but has what looks to be a big stinger on the back of it.
Signature: -Trevor

Female Lesser Meadow Katydid

Female Lesser Meadow Katydid

Dear Trevor,
This is a Lesser Meadow Katydid in the genus
Conocephalus and the straight ovipositor on her posterior end identifies her as a female.  We are not certain of the species, but BugGuide provides some great images of various species in the genus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination