Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
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Subject: Madagascan cricket
Location: Ifaty, Madagascar
September 20, 2014 2:07 am
Are you able to id this Madagascan cricket? Seen on a night visit to a small nature reserve at Ifaty on the coast of south west Madagascar.
Signature: Niall Corbet

Unknown Ensiferan

Conehead Katydid

Hi again Niall,
We are contacting Piotr Naskrecki about this Ensiferan as well.

Thanks Daniel, I look forward to his thoughts.
Cheers, Niall

Karl Provides and Identification:  September 23, 2014
Hi Daniel and Niall:
I believe this may be the same species as in the previous post, Colossopus grandidieri, but a sub-adult this time. Hopefully Piotr Naskrecki can confirm, correct or clarify. Regards Karl.

We are always appreciative of your excellent research Karl.

Many thanks Daniel. I would never have guessed that they were the same species! Is the pale coloured one a female and the dark one a male?
Regards, Niall

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Subject: Cricket, Madagascar
Location: Ifaty, Madagascar
September 20, 2014 2:53 am
Another cricket from Ifaty in south west Madagascar – any ideas for id?
Signature: Niall Corbet

Ensiferan

Conehead Katydid:  Colossopus grandidieri

Hi Niall,
We believe this Ensiferan or Longhorned Orthopteran is a type of Katydid.  We are contacting Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki regarding both of your submissions.  The red eyes and blue legs are quite distinctive.

Katydid possibly

Conehead Katydid

Karl Provides Identification:  September 23, 2014
Hi Daniel and Niall:
It looks like the Conehead Katydid (Tettigoniidae: Conocephalinae), Colossopus grandidieri. The species is wingless but the dark coloration suggests that it is likely and adult. There really isn’t very much information available online for this species; what there is has been posted mostly by German breeders. The common name may be Giant Cricket or Tiger Cricket, both erroneous since it is not a cricket, and it is endemic to Madagascar, perhaps only the southern part of the island. The literature for C. grandidieri is very sparse and there seems to be some confusion or ambiguity between this and a related species, Oncodopus zonatus. Based on what I could find on both species I would go with C. grandidieri. Regards. Karl

Thanks so much Karl.  We are surprised that such a gorgeous Conehead Katydid is not better documented.

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Subject: ID please
Location: near water fall
September 16, 2014 6:58 pm
Please ID this bug. First it looks moth to me. But i am confused.
Signature: hello

Katydid

Katydid

UHHH, and where was this water fall?????

Karl Identifies mystery Katydid:  September 25, 2014
Hi Daniel and hello:
It looks like Parasanaa donovani (Tettigoniidae: Pseudophyllinae). It is apparently the only species in the genus Parasanaa. There’s not much information to be found but according to Wikipedia it feeds on some kind of cactus and “When the thorax is pinched, the insect squirts a slimy yellow fluid from two slits on the dorsal surface of the mesothorax, with a range of three to four inches. One aperture may discharge at first, and the other after the insect is pinched again. Some fluid also oozes out from other apertures over the body and legs, and also from the stumps of broken-off legs.” The species was first described from India and most of the surprisingly few online references also suggest it is an Indian katydid, but the Orthoptera Species File gives a distribution that stretches from India to the Solomon Islands. The waterfall remains a mystery. Regards. Karl

Thanks so much Karl.  You have more patience than we do.  We weren’t going to take any time to research the identity of this Katydid without a true location.

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Subject: Grasshopper?

Location: Powell , Ohio
September 12, 2014 6:21 am
Dear bug man, not positive, is this a grasshopper? Thought his/her camoflouge looked really neat. These pics are the best I can do, since he’s sitting on poison ivy and I’m itching just looking at him.
Signature: Amber

Subject: Grasshopper, again
Location: Powell, Ohio
September 12, 2014 7:13 am
The grasshopper moved, took another pic, you can see his face in this one. Took it through the glass though, not going near that plant.
Signature: Amber

Angle-Wing Katydid

Angle-Wing Katydid

Dear Amber,
This sure looks to us like a Greater Angle-Wing KAtydid,
Microcentrum rhombifolium, though it is possible it might be another member of the genus.  See BugGuide for additional information on the Greater Angle-Wing Katydid.  The major distinguishing feature that between Katydids and Grasshoppers is the appearance of the antennae, which are long and threadlike in the Katydids, and shorter and thicker in the Grasshoppers. Your second image shows the antennae.

Greater Angle-Wing Katydid

Greater Angle-Wing Katydid

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Subject: sci-fi grasshopper
Location: Toledo District, Belize
September 7, 2014 3:46 pm
Hello, folks,
I saw this grasshopper while I was pruning cacao recently. I’ve pruned a lot of cacao, but this was a first. Any idea what this is?
Sure hope my server cooperates and sends along a couple photos. I’ve got more if you’re interested.
Thanks a lot,
Tanya
Signature: Tanya

Immature Male Katydid from Belize

Immature Katydid from Belize

Dear Tanya,
This is an immature male Katydid, not a Grasshopper.  The antennae
of a Grasshopper are considerably shorter and thicker than the antennae on Ensiferans, including Katydids, Long Horned Orthopterans with which they share the order.  We will attempt to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki who frequently provides Katydid identifications down to the genus and species level.  We can tell you your individual is immature as evidenced by the short wing pads, and that your individual is a male as evidenced by his lack of an ovipositor.

Immature Male Katydid from Belize

Immature Katydid from Belize

Wow, Daniel,  what a fast and useful response.  Many,many thanks.  I’m going to check my other photos of this katydid because I think there may have been an ovipositor or something that looked like one to my untrained eyes.
You and your dedicated staff are the best.  I’ve been busy reading the Nests section.
Tanya

Subject: Is that an ovipositor on the katydid
Location: Toledo District, Belize
September 7, 2014 6:25 pm
Is that stubby bit too short to be an ovipositor? If so, what is it?
Many thanks.
Signature: Tanya

Immature Katydid from Belize

Immature Katydid from Belize

Hi again Tanya,
From this angle, that does appear to be an ovipositor, so we are retracting our previous statement.  This is an immature female Katydid.

You’re great, Daniel and crew.  Thanks so much for making bugs so compelling to so many of us.
Tanya

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Subject: Cricket? Katydid? Stinger?!?
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
August 21, 2014 6:08 am
My girls found this and thought it to be a grasshopper but it has what appears to be a stinger.
Signature: Michelle

Lesser Pine Katydid

Greater Meadow Katydid

Hi Michelle,
This is a Meadow Katydid in the tribe Conocephalini, and it is in the Greater Meadow Katydid genus
Orchelium. The closest match we located on BugGuide is the Lesser Pine Katydid, Orchelimum minor, or possibly a Common Meadow Katydid, Orchelimum vulgare, also pictured on BugGuide.  What you have mistaken for a stinger is actually the ovipositor, an organ used to lay eggs, which makes this individual a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination