Currently viewing the category: "Katydids"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ensifera
Location: Bulgaria
August 8, 2016 5:59 am
A friend of mine found this bug in his backyard. I could not ID it. It looks like weta to me which is strange – location is eastern Bulgaria. We have field crickets and grasshoppers here.
Signature: Del

Bush Cricket

Saddle-Backed Bush Cricket

Dear Del,
This Ensiferan is commonly called a Saddle-Backed Bush Cricket, and because of the long, sabre-like ovipositor, we are nearly certain it is a female Ephippiger ephippiger.  A male Saddle-Backed Bush Cricket is pictured on David Element’s Wildlife Webpage and the European Locusts and Their Ecology site states:  “threatened with extinction” and “In Germany Ephippiger ephippiger is critically endangered at the very few still existing sites (today almost exclusively in the middle Rhine valley area and its warmest tributary river valleys) by habitat changes. In Southern Europe (e.g. Southern France or Northern Greece) it is still more common.”  There is a nice image of a male Saddle-Backed Bush Cricket from Croatia on Project Noah.

Bush Cricket

Saddle-Backed Bush Cricket

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: green bug
Location: tacoma wa
July 30, 2016 7:25 am
my kids found this bug on our car. I never seen anything like it before. would like to know what it is a where it comes from.
it was found in Tacoma, WA.
Signature: uncle4x4

Immature Male Drumming Katydid

Immature Male Drumming Katydid

Dear uncle4x4,
The Drumming Katydid,
Meconema thalassinum, is a native insect in eastern North America, but it has been introduced into your part of the country.  The individual in your image is an immature male Drumming Katydid, which you can verify by comparing your image to this BugGuide image.  Adults, like the one in this BugGuide image, have wings and females have an ovipositor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange Bug
Location: East Windsor, NJ
July 15, 2016 12:28 pm
My daughter and I were looking around the garden and we found this strange bug. I was thinking it was a type of grasshopper, but I’m not sure.
Signature: Thanks, Robb & Paige

Immature Male Katydid

Immature Male Katydid

Dear Robb & Paige,
This is an immature male Katydid, and the best way to distinguish Katydids from Grasshoppers is that Katydids have much longer antennae.  Your nymph looks exactly like this image from our archives that we tentatively identified as a Round Headed Katydid in the genus
Amblycorypha.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Id bug- Croatia
Location: Croatia
July 16, 2016 1:17 am
And can you tell us what this is and any information about it?
Signature: Don

Common Long Legged Bush Cricket

Common Long Legged Bush Cricket

Dear Don,
We are confident that we have correctly identified your Katydid as a Common Long Legged Bush Cricket,
Acrometopa servillea macropoda, thanks to excellent images by Roy Kleukers on Grasshoppers of Europe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Cricket
Location: San Marcos, CA
July 7, 2016 11:00 am
Hi Bugman! This is the second time I’ve seen one of these green cricket-looking bugs with the leaf-like “tail” in my garden and I was wondering what it was. I found this guy hanging out on my fennel flowers last night (7/6/16) and he was still there this morning just…blending in. What’s that bug?
Signature: Megan

Female Fork-Tailed Bush Katydid Nymph

Female Fork-Tailed Bush Katydid Nymph

Dear Megan,
This is a female (as evidenced by her ovipositor), immature (as evidenced by the partially developed wings) Fork-Tailed Bush Katydid.  We believe she is a member of the species Scudderia mexicana based on this BugGuide image, though species can be difficult to distinguish from one another without carefully inspecting the genitalia.  According to BugGuide:  “To identify species within this genus, it is important to see the ‘terminalia’ (parts at the end of the abdomen). The shapes of the parts of both the males and females can be very useful for identification, and often are the only means to reliably tell species apart. In males it is useful (often necessary) to see these parts from both the side and from above, with the shapes of the supra-anal plate and the subgenital plate being important for diagnosis. The shape of the wings is also useful for some species. Also, the color pattern of living specimens can be of use, but is rarely diagnostic.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragon like bug
Location: Austria
July 6, 2016 10:46 am
Hi Bugman,
I found this beautiful wandering through my garden. Can you help me find out, what it is? (So I can give it an appropriate dragon like name).
Thanks a billion!
Signature: Berndman

Katydid

Katydid

Dear Berndman,
This is an immature male Katydid, but we are not certain of the species.

Katydid

Katydid

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination