Currently viewing the category: "Reptiles"
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Subject: Snake, Worm?
Location: San Antonio, TX
March 29, 2016 11:53 pm
I live in San Antonio, TX, and have seen these little guys around my house about 4-5 times now. It’s been around this fall-spring time where the weather is a bit warm or a bit chilly. I thought it was a worm, but zooming in on the picture, wonder if it might be a snake. I have 3 cats, and the little guy doesn’t move too fast but is very squirmy/wiggly. His squirmy/wiggly movements are pretty quick, though it’s more like a zig zag motion that doesn’t get him very far. I’m mostly concerned what might happen if a kitty catches and eats him. If you’re able to help, I’d greatly appreciate it!
Also, sorry I couldn’t get more pictures. He’s wiggly so it’s hard to get clear ones. I added in the clothespin to help with size.
Signature: Dealer’s choice :)

Legless Lizard

Snake, we believe

We believe this is a Legless Lizard, though your image does not make an exact identification easy.  If we are correct, the Legless Lizard is harmless.  We haven’t the time right now to research if the Legless Lizard is found in Texas.

Thank you so much! I appreciate the quick response.

Comments are beginning to pour in.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: NSW, Australia
February 13, 2016 9:53 pm
Found this odd looking thing near the house today and we have never seen anything like it. Any ideas?
Signature: Freaked out

Spiny Thing

Spiny Thing is Leaf Tailed Gecko tail

Dear Freaked Out,
This does not look like an insect or arthropod.  It look Reptilian to us and we do not believe this is a complete creature.  How large was it?
  The best guess we have right now is that a Lizard that was eaten by a predator that left behind the hard, spiny skin after biting off the head and legs.  The first Spiny Lizard we found in Australia is the Thorny Mountain Devil, or Moloch, but according to the University of Texas site, the Thorny Mountain Devil is not known from New South Wales, but only the western parts of Australia.  The Inland Bearded Dragon pictured on the Reptiles of Australia site and on FlickR looks like a possible match.  It is described on Long Island Herpetological Society site.

Spiny Thing

Spiny Thing is Leaf Tailed Gecko tail

Thanks so much for your reply. I can’t believe hadn’t even considered that it might not be a complete creature.
You’ve put me on the right track to what I now believe to be the tail section from a broad leaf tailed gecko.

Thanks for writing back with the actual species.  The Southern Leaf Tailed Gecko, Phyllurus platurus, pictured on Featured Creature looks spot on.  The site states:  “This cryptic creature is the Broad-tailed Gecko or Southern Leaf-tailed Gecko (Phyllurus platurus). It truly is a master of disguise – and deception. First of all, it will lay perfectly flat on the bark of a tree to camouflage itself when not hunting. With it’s big, leafy-looking tail, the gecko blends in perfectly. Its tail is used for extra fat storage and also as a useful defense mechanism. You see, when and if the lizard feels threatened, it has the ability to detach its tail to confuse predators. It will regenerate later on, though the color and details will be entirely different from the original body.”

Facebook Comment from Tracy
Yes. Definitely a leaftail gecko tail. We get heaps of them in our house and they are lovely. They drop their tail when threatened or attacked and will regrow another one although it will be smaller. Hope this one only lost his tail…

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Roadkill:  Gopher Snake

Roadkill: Gopher Snake

Subject:  Gopher Snake found unresponsive in street
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Saturday, March 21, 2015 11AM
Late Saturday morning, Bettie called to say hikers were poking  a snake with a stick in the street.  We immediately picked up the unresponsive snake which “yawned” and then started to quiver over parts of its body.  It hasn’t moved in two days but we thought it might be coming out of hibernation.  This poor lethargic Gopher Snake, probably a female, and fully four feet long, has been kept in a cabbage crock by our editorial staff until this evening.  Greg Pauly from the Natural History Museum in Los Angeles, who we spoke with at length this evening, asked us to put it in the freezer to preserve it for the museum because based on our description, Greg determined it was dead.

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Subject:  Alligator Lizards
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
July 5, 2014 & July 12, 2014
While these are not the largest Alligator Lizards we have seen, the two individuals were between 10 and 12 inches long.  The first individual was repelling down the logs and the second larger individual was sunning in the late afternoon rays.

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

 

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Alligator Lizard hiding in the hydrangeas
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
Sunday, April 20, 2014
Abel and Temple wanted to take some photos today, and they were inspecting the garden.  Abel spotted this impressive Alligator Lizard and I had trouble getting a photo while it was hiding in the hydrangeas.

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

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Subject:  Very Handsome Paso Robles Alligator Lizard
Location:  Paso Robles, California
April 18, 2014
we estimated 9-10”. and much lighter in colour than the southern california cousins.
c.

Alligator Lizard

Alligator Lizard

The editorial staff at What’s That Bug? encountered a nice Alligator Lizard last week while moving wood around in the wood pile.  Alas there was no camera handy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination