Currently viewing the category: "Hump Winged Crickets"
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Subject: Uhler’s or Great Grig
Location: Premiere Ridge, British Columbia
May 9, 2016 7:59 pm
I’m a forester working the Kootenays, British Columbia. We exposed this guy under some loose bark. I did a bit of research and figured it’s a Uhler’s or maybe a Great Grig or a hump winged cricket. Are these all interchangeable names for the same insect?
Signature: J. Rynierse

Great Grig

Great Grig

Dear J. Rynierse,
We believe this is a Great Grig,
Cyphoderris monstrosa, whose name means “MONSTROSA: like a monster; very large and abnormally shaped or hideous (this species is the largest of the 3 in North America)” according to BugGuide,  though we would not rule out one of the other species in the genus identified on BugGuide.  We are not certain where you found the name Uhler’s Grig, but there is one image of a Great Grig on BugGuide that mentions the name Uhler’s Grig.  According to BugGuide, Hump Winged Crickets belong to the family Prophalangopsidae, and there is but one North American genus in the family, so globally, it is fair to say that all Great Grigs are Hump Winged Crickets, but there might be other Hump Winged Crickets elsewhere in the world that are not Grigs.  For your purposes in British Columbia, the two names are synonymous, though one is a family name and the other a species name.

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Subject: Found on our tent! (Cicada with out wings?)
Location: Gifford Pinchot National Forest 15 miles NE from Carson WA
July 9, 2012 11:50 am
We found this big guy (or gal) under the rain cover of our tent in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Any idea what it is?! It was about 4 inches long (not including the antennae)!
Signature: g. hoyt

Great Grig

Dear g. hoyt,
We always love posting photos of the Great Grig
, Cyphoderris monstrosa, because we love the name so much.  These Hump Winged Crickets are found in the Pacific Northwest.  We just learned on BugGuide that the Great Grig has another common name that might be even more interesting, the Monster Haglid.  We would love to trace the etymology on that nameFemales are wingless, so we can deduce that you have submitted a photo of a female.  BugGuide describes the habitat as:  “coniferous forests containing Lodgepole Pine, Englemann Spruce, and Mountain Hemlock; adults hide beneath leaf litter during the day, and become active at night, climbing tree trunks and continuing high into the branches to feed, sing (males), and mate.”

Thank you so much!! For two reasons – 1) Identifying the cool lady on top of our tent and 2) proving my husband wrong. (I said it was some kind of cricket and he said “nuh uh”)
WTB Rocks!!

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What is this?
Location: North Eastern Washington, US
June 5, 2011 11:08 am
I was relocating some wild strawberries, when I came across this big fat little guy. The area he was found in was damp and dark in a heavily weeded spot. I live in a mountainous area with lots of pine trees. It’s June, middle of spring. I don’t know if you can see well enough from the pictures, but I’ve noticed that most cricket’s hind legs are usually long, with the leg’s bend raised up higher than the body. This guy’s hind legs are shorter than the average cricket. He’s got the hair/frills or spikes on the front legs like a cricket would. His body is very fat! He was about 2 inches in length. He’s wasn’t aggressive or defensive in any way. I was able to pet him! Your help in identifying is grately appreciated!
Signature: Khaadim

Great Grig

Dear Khaadim,
We believe this is a Great Grig, which goes by the intimidating scientific name
Cyphoderris monstrosa.  If you look at the images on BugGuide, we believe you will agree with us.  BugGuide describes the habitat as “coniferous forests containing Lodgepole Pine, Englemann Spruce, and Mountain Hemlock; adults hide beneath leaf litter during the day, and become active at night, climbing tree trunks and continuing high into the branches to feed, sing (males), and mate” and that fits your description.

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Jerusalem Cricket/Potato Bug
Location:  Spokane, WA
October 2, 2010 2:48 am
Hello! Thanks to your website, I was able to identify a bug I’ve seen several times in my life, and seriously creeped out by.
I clean an elementary school in a rural area, and always find them in the tiled bathrooms far from any outside doors. I wonder what it is they are looking for…water? Somewhere cool?
These are very hearty creatures I have also discovered. One time, visiting in the Sierra Mountains, I got up in the morning to put on my shoes. A bit later I realized I had a rather uncomfortable rock in my shoe, but was unable to stop what I was doing to remove. Roughly half hour later, I pulled off my shoe and slapped the heel into the palm of my hand catching a really angry Jerusalem Cricket. I then promptly flipped out completely, flinging the insect in the air and released a piercing scream. I was completely taken by surprise something that size survived under my foot. Since that day, I have to say, it’s been on my mind what that insect was.
Thanks again for the great site with the awesome information!
Corey
Spokane,Washington
Signature:  Corey Douglas

Great Grig

Hi Corey,
Jerusalem Crickets and your insect, a Great Grig,
Cyphoderris monstrosa, are all in the same suborder Ensifera, the Longhorned Orthopterans, but they are in different families.  The Great Grig has a much more limited range, as it is only found in the Pacific Northwest.  According to BugGuide, Great Grigs are found in:  “coniferous forests containing Lodgepole Pine, Englemann Spruce, and Mountain Hemlock; adults hide beneath leaf litter during the day, and become active at night, climbing tree trunks and continuing high into the branches to feed, sing (males), and mate.”

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Bug Identification
October 14, 2009
Photographed this bug found on my tent tarp in the morning. I was camping in early July in Kootenay National Park in the Marble Canyon campground.
The bug was about 2 inches long and remained motionless even as we tried to move it from the tarp.
Thank you! Katherine
British Columbia, Rockies

Mormon Cricket

Mormon Cricket

Hi Katherine,
This is a Mormon Cricket, Anabrus simplex, a species of Shield Backed Katydid.

Correction from Eric Eaton
Daniel:
The “Mormon cricket” from British Columbia is actually a different insect altogether.  It is one of the “hump-winged grigs” in the genus Cyphoderris.  They represent an entire family by themselves (Prophalangopsidae).  Neat find.
Eric

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A question about … a bug!
Great site … say I, as I type on a keyboard graced by a dead ‘Longhorn’ of some description (found by my wife in the innards of a malfunctioning microwave and left here for my admiration, no doubt). I have a picture or two for you and, probably, an easy one for you to identify … “just a dumb old cricket” the opinion of one secretary I had hoped to gross out, totally unimpressed by my find. Not like any cricket I ever saw though (I grew up back east where they are all black and have flatter bodies and larger, more angulated hind legs). And we never hear the chirping of crickets around here either … “here” being west-central Alberta, in the heart of the Canadian Rockies.. Anyway – this specimen was found in, floating near the bottom in, a full water trough one morning. I went down to feed the ponies and this beast was only about one inch off the bottom and lifeless. I scooped it out but caried it around while doing the rest of the chores, hoping to identify it later or show it to someone who could. Eventually, about half an hour later, when showing it to someone, it had grabbed onto my fingers and wouldn’t let go. So – I did the befriend-a-bug thing, took it’s picture and let it go. (There must be some award on this site for such gallantry – though I could as easily fill your ‘carnage’ pages.) Any definitive I.D. on this one? (Sorry for the unintended use of the flash but I had let it go before I realized what it had done to the pictures.) … and how long can they survive under water, anyway … or would he have had brain damage?
Terry in Alberta

Hi Terry,
This is a Grig, a Hump Winged Cricket. It is a member of a family found in the Pacific Northwest. Sorry, we can’t answer your questions about drowning or brain damage.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination