Currently viewing the category: "Grubs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of grub is this?
Location: The Pas, Manitoba, Canada
March 23, 2014 7:34 pm
We found this grub burrowed in the middle of a frozen dead ash? tree we knocked down. We were cutting it up with an axe and noticed a few of them. The inside of the tree was totally eaten and was full of dark brown casings/guano. The fat big grub was right in the hard wood in a self made hollow.
We thought ands were damaging our trees but maybe this is the culprit! What is it? Any information about how to get rid of it, damage it causes, etc? Pretty gross but pretty cool at the same time. Thank you
Signature: Snug as a grub

Scarab Grubs

Scarab Grubs

We believe these are Scarab Beetle Grubs, most likely Rhinoceros Beetle Grubs from the subfamily Dynastinae.  We do not believe the Grubs are responsible for the demise of the tree.  They will infest dead and dying trees that are beginning to decompose, but they will not kill healthy trees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen this bug before
Location: Limpopo, hoedspruit (lowveld)
January 31, 2014 9:13 am
Hi, I saw this caterpillar in our garden and wonder if you could help to ID it.
Area: South Africa, Lowveld
near Hoedspruit, Limpopo
Season: summer 31 January 2014
Size: about 1.5 cm in length and 1 cm wide
I live in the Balule nature reserve thus it’s a wilderness area
Thank you
Signature: Laetitia

What's That Grub?

What’s That Grub?

Hi Laetitia,
This is not a Caterpillar, but we do believe it is a larval insect.  In our opinion, this is most likely a Beetle Grub, though we would not rule out that it might be a Sawfly Larva.  While your individual looks very different from the larvae in the links we provided, we wanted to show you some examples of possibly classifications.  Knowing the plant this larva was feeding upon might help with the identification.

What's That Grub???

What’s That Grub???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green June Beetle Grubs
Location: Rose Hills
January 27, 2014 12:21 pm
Happy New Year Daniel,
I hope all is well on the other side of the hill.
I wanted to share & get your thoughts on my morning find. I lifted a board in the back yard known to harbor a variety of chicken treats and much to my shock founds grubs the size of fingers! I diligently fought off 5 chickens & saved them for their photo shoot.
A little internet research tells me they are Green June Beetle Larvae. (I used this site: http://blog.growingwithscience.com/2008/10/bug-of-the-week-green-june-beetle/)
One telltale trademark is that they flip over onto their back to crawl away. They are pretty fast at doing that too. Gave me a hard time photographing them.
I am pretty sure this is what I have. My conundrum is, now what do I do with them? I imagine I should just put them back and make the girls wait for when they emerge to fly and they can chase them around the yard. We had a lot last year and a repeat would be nice… for the chickens. I’m just not sure how much of a pest they really are in greater Los Angeles nor do I feel right intervening in the circle of life.
Here are the photos I managed to get.
Kind regards
Signature: joAnn Ortiz

Crawlyback

Crawly Back

Hi joAnn,
Thank you so much for your kind greeting and wonderful contribution.  We love the common names Crawly Back for the larva and Figeater for the adult Green Fruit Beetles,
 Cotinis mutabilis.  Crawly Back is a reference to the manner in which the larvae move through substrate, which you noted in your letter.  Our initial inspection of the link you provided did not indicate the home base for the blogger, and there are other Green June Beetles in the genus, but our western species is Cotinis mutabilis.  In our opinion, Crawly Backs are beneficial as they help to break down materials in the compost pile, and though your letter did not mention a compost pile, we suspect that if you have chickens, you also have a compost pile.  We would release the Crawly Backs into the compost pile.

Crawly Backs

Crawly Backs

Close Up of a Crawly Back

Close Up of a Crawly Back

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this thing
Location: Riverside, CA, USA
October 24, 2013 8:38 am
We found two of these in two days. One in the entry and one in the laundry room. Curled up in about an inch diameter or less. These things look like some parasite out of a horror flick.
They are really freaking us out. What is it, and where is it living. Doesn’t look like its little legs in front would be any good for moving around on any surfaces, so we are suspecting that one of our animals has some kind of huge disgusting parasite.
Signature: WildermanFamily

Scarab Grub

Scarab Grub

Dear Wilderman Family,
This is the grub of a Scarab Beetle, not a parasite.  They are often found underground when digging in the garden.  We don’t know how they wound up in your laundry room.  Do you have a compost pile nearby.  Perhaps they are Crawlybacks, the larvae of the large Figeaters that are found in Southern California in late summer.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: creature 2 in my garden
Location: Hawthorne, CA
January 24, 2013 5:36 pm
Last time I contacted you wonderful folks I sent you pics of what you later identified as a scarab beetle grub, or June bug grub. I have also found another creature, very similar, yet different to that other grub. The ”head” of creature number 2 is a different color and it’s ”arms” seem different. Also, crazy creature number 2 is FAST. I have video of this thing wiggling across the floor on it’s back, legs up in the air! so odd… can you identify what this one is, too? Thanks!!!
Signature: Bef so Def

Crawlyback

Hi Bef,
This is also the grub of a Scarab Beetle, but the behavior you describe indicates it is most likely a Crawlyback, the larva of a green scarab known as a FigeaterCrawlybacks are often found in compost piles.

Crawlyback

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Creature in my garden
Location: Hawthorne, CA
January 24, 2013 12:33 am
Hello!
Found this creature in my garden. What is it?! Guessing it is some kind of moth larvae but I figured you were the best resource to find out for sure! Any info is greatly appreciated.
Signature: Bef so Def

Scarab Beetle Grub

Dear Bef do Def,
This is the grub of a Scarab Beetle, most likely that of a May Beetle, commonly called a June Bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination