Currently viewing the category: "Grubs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Insect Larva
Location: Denver, Colorado
May 28, 2016 5:08 pm
Dear WTB,
While on a walk through my neighborhood in Denver, I found this black insect larva crawling around the sidewalk.
It was fairly large, I’m guessing around 1-1/2″ long, and moved at several inches per second, making taking a good photo a little tricky. This happened today, May 28th. The area is a low-density urban neighborhood with lots of yards, lawns, gardens, and trees. There are water sources in the general area, but not near where the insect was found.
I’m guessing this is some type of beetle larva, but I’ve definitely never seen this species, or one that come close to this size, before.
Signature: Duncan

Caterpillar Hunter

Caterpillar Hunter

Dear Duncan,
This is the larva of a Caterpillar Hunter, a Ground Beetle in the genus
Calosoma.  Both larvae and adults from this genus consume large numbers of caterpillars.  See this BugGuide image for comparison.  We are postdating your submission to go live to our site during our absence from the office in mid-June.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Is This Totally Nasty Thing??!!
Location: 10933 Gilbert Drive, Beaumont, Texas 77705
January 23, 2016 1:55 pm
My husband found this thing, the nastiest looking thing ever on this planet, this morning (Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016) on our back porch here in Fannett, Texas. Our exact address for GPS purposes is 10933 Gilbert Drive, Beaumont, Texas 77705. NASTY!!
Signature: Kathi and Richard Orgeron

Grub

Grub

Dear Kathi and Richard,
This is the grub of a Scarab Beetle, but we have never seen one so blue.  We are not certain of the species, but we suspect it belongs to a Rhinoceros Beetle in the subfamily Dynastinae.  Members of this family include some of the largest beetles in the world, including the heaviest North American beetle, the Eastern Hercules Beetle that is found in Texas.  Here is a BugGuide image of the grub of an Eastern Hercules Beetle.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae live in rotting heartwood of logs and stumps, particularly hardwoods, but sometimes pine.”  We are uncertain why you found this grub on your porch, but if someone was splitting firewood, or if firewood is stored on the back porch, the appearance may be connect to the wood.

Grub

Grub

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Beautiful Creey Crawly
Location: Forest Lake, MN
November 1, 2015 8:33 pm
Hey, Dan! I hope this finds you and your family doing well!
I was at a friends house today and they were splitting old Red Oak for the winter. We came across this beauty, burrowed what looked like about 4 inches into the tree trunk. It’s about 2 inches long. I’m sorry I didn’t get a photo of it when it came out of the hole eventually. I thought I got enough photos but I guess not. Do you have any idea what it could be? I usually check your site before I ask, but I don’t know if it’s larvae, pupae, or what. We are all dying to find out! I feel bad that it’s probably now going to die, but perhaps an opossum with find a tasty meal.
Signature: carpwoman

Beetle Grub

Beetle Grub

Dear Carpwoman,
This is some species of Beetle Grub, and we followed up on our initial suspicion that this might be the larva of an Eyed Elater, and we believe we are correct.  Images on both BugGuide and Bug Eric confirm our suspicions.  According to Bug Eric:  “Larvae of all Alaus species live in decaying wood where they prey on the larvae and pupae of other kinds of beetles.  These ginat ‘wireworms’ have strong jaws and should be handled carefully, if at all.”  According to BugGuide:  ” larvae in decaying hardwood or pine wood, esp. in decaying roots.  Food Larvae feed on larvae and pupae of various insects, esp. beetles.”  The much more commonly encountered adult form of the Eyed Elater or Eyed Click Beetle is a large beetle with false eyespots.

Thank you for such a speedy response!  It’s nice to see this beautiful grub would have (hopefully still will) turned into such a cool beetle.
Joanne

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification Needed!
Location: Hetauda, Central Region, Nepal
July 30, 2015 5:58 pm
Hello Bugman,
I have this little creature that looks amazing, i have always found it living and feeding on Bitter Melon or Bitter Gourd leaves.
Now please give me name. Thank you very much.
Signature: Suman Acharya

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Dear Suman,
Our initial web search did not produce any matching images while searching with the key word Nepal, but we believe, based on the similarity in appearance to other species from other locales that we have identified, that this is the larva of a Tortoise Beetle in the tribe Cassidini.  Here is an image of a North American individual from BugGuide.  The larvae of Tortoise Beetles are often quite spiny, they feed on leaves and they are often very host specific.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide some more specific information.

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

Probably Tortoise Beetle Larva

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I found this orange bug
Location: In a rabbit hole
May 9, 2015 9:52 am
I found these in my rabbit habitat im.Like usually I got ciourious.Do you know what it is?
Signature: From anonymous

Wireworms

Wireworms

Dear anonymous,
We believe these are Wireworms, the larvae of Click Beetles in the family Elateridae.  More information on Wireworms can be found on the Maine Government page.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Scarabs in Chicago?!
Location: Chicago, Illinois USA
April 26, 2015 7:28 pm
These grubs were inside of a dying silver maple. Found in the middle amongst wood pulp and poop. We live just north of the Windy City. I figured it was some kind of rhino or tricerotops beetle.
Signature: Jim Griesenauer

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Dear Jim,
We agree with your assessment that these Scarab Beetle Grubs are in the subfamily Dynastinae, the Rhinoceros Beetles.  In our opinion, they probably began feeding on the rotting portion of the dying tree because we do not believe that the grubs were responsible for the tree’s demise.  Thanks for including the images of the children because they provide a nice sense of scale for these large grubs.  We suspect that large Scarab grubs are considered edible by entomophages, so we will attempt to contact David Gracer (see Huffington Post Food Blog) for his opinion.

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs

Scarab Beetle Grubs with Children for scale

Scarab Beetle Grubs with Children for scale

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination