Currently viewing the category: "Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Locust from Mozambique
Location: Mozambique Africa
December 4, 2016 11:02 am
Hi , good morning , i have some bugs photos from my son who is in Mozambique
Will like to know what species or genres .
Thx
Signature: DANIEL BENARROCH

Green Milkweed Locust

Green Milkweed Locust

Dear Daniel,
This is one of the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers or Gaudy Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  We are pretty confident that it is the Green Milkweed Locust,
Phymateus viridipes, which we found on Jungle Dragon, and verified on pBase where it states:  “These grasshoppers are toxic enough to cause death if eaten. Not a good idea anyway, based on looks alone.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Species of this Grasshopper
Location: Nepal Ghats
October 8, 2016 11:46 pm
Dear Bugman,
My friend is traveling in Nepal and photographed a variety that I have yet to be able to identify. It is very similar to the Nepal Coffee Locust and is likely a milkweed grasshopper varietal of some kind. Could you help us come up with a species name it is truly beautiful. Thank you
Signature: Ranger Bert

Coffee Locust

Coffee Locust

Dear Ranger Bert,
We see from a comment you have provided to a posting in our archives that you have used the more than 20,000 postings on our site to identify this Coffee Locust,
Ausarches miliaris, a member of the family Pyrgomorphidae, the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers that flaunt this toxicity or bad taste through aposomatic or warning coloration.  The images we have found online, including on the Insects in Indian Agroecosystems and  Macroclub, have yellow or white banded faces.  Your individual may represent a different species in the genus, a subspecies, or most likely just a color variation.  According to ZipcodeZoo:  “It swarms in October, the mating and egg-laying season, collecting on bushes and grasses. It is heavy and sluggish, able to make only short leaps, very visible on vegetation. Outbreaks leading to this species damaging cultivated crops are uncommon. When A. miliaris (of either sex) is disturbed or grabbed, it emits a sharp rasping noise from its thoracic segments. If its thorax is pinched, it also squirts a clear viscous mucus with unpleasant smell and a bitter taste, faintly alkaline, with many embedded bubbles. This foam comes out as a strong jet from apertures in the thorax, and more gently from other openings in the body (ten in total); it heaps up around the insect and partly covers it.”

Thank you so much.
My friends use me to help ID stuff all the time and this guy stumped me with its colors. Really appreciate your time and expertise.
Brett Thomsen (aka Ranger Bert)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper
Location: Cape Town South Africa
April 14, 2016 6:35 am
Hello,
I took some pictures of a huge grasshopper.
Think its a juvenile, cause it had no proper wings developed.
Size was r.a. 12cm which is really big for a grasshopper
Picture was taken on mid november in Cape Town
Signature: ThunderPie

Koppie Foam Grasshoppers

Koppie Foam Grasshoppers

Dear ThunderPie,
Based on this and other images posted to iSpot, we have identified this as a Koppie Foam Grasshopper,
Dictyophorus spumans, one of the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  Many species feed on milkweed, and they are able to process and absorb the toxic compounds in the plant, which gives the Grasshoppers protection against predators.  Many members of the family advertise with aposomatic or warning colors.

Koppie Foam Grasshopper

Koppie Foam Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID of Locust?
Location: South Africa, Entabeni reserve, Limpopo
February 9, 2016 12:31 pm
Hi took these photos in South Africa February 2015 on the Entabeni reserve, Limpopo region but cannot find a name for them, can you help please.
Signature: Roger

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Dear Roger,
We had to look through numerous images of Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers or Foam Grasshoppers from the family Pyrgomorphidae on iSpot before we found an image that appears to be the same species you encountered, however it is only identified as being a member of the family.  Bright aposomatic warning colors and patterns are characteristic of this family.  We found a similarly colored individual pictured on Midlands Conservancies Forum.  It is possible that this is a highly variable species and not all individuals have striped antennae and abdomens, or even the same color combination.

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

Mating Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: East Usambara Mountains near Amani Research Station NE Tanzania
January 14, 2016 11:28 am
This “bug” I photographed in East Usambara Mountains near Amani Research Station NE Tanzania Nov 22 2015.
I guess this is a nymph.
The image no 1 and no2 is the same. My image no 2 was a “not allowed image”. I found no better way of deleting it than to add the same image again. Sorry.
Signature:  Slit

Milkweed Grasshopper

Milkweed Grasshopper

Dear Slit,
This wingless Grasshopper may be immature or it may be a wingless species.  Your image is overexposed, which is likely resulting in inaccurate color reproduction, but we believe it is one of the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  Many members of this family are very brightly colored with aposomatic or warning colors to warn predators that they are toxic.  We don’t believe we will be able to provide you with the species, but we are relatively confident the family is correct.

Thank you for your reply!
It is not bad at all to come as far as milkweed grasshopper, I think.  Whether the photo is over-exposed or it is an effekt of I having lightened it a bit in Photoshop I don´t know. Since I don´t know a lot about what is important to look at in these groups and I also have heard that hairs sometimes play an important role for identification, I worked that photo. It was exposed at night using a flash from the camera and an extra torch – useful when trying to locate the creature for photographing. I enclose a photo with very little work on.
Best regards
Stefan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Kenyan grasshopper?
Location: Nairobi, Kenya
November 13, 2015 6:48 am
Several of these were in the grounds of the hotel in the Langata district of Nairobi, 31st October 2015. Moving slowly and didn’t fly off on close approach
Signature: Chris

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Koppie Foam Grasshopper

Dear Chris,
This is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, and we want to compliment you on the wonderful lateral view of your image.  Based on this image from Beetles of Africa, we believe it is
Dictyophorus spumans, the Koppie Foam Grasshopper, though many images online of the species are more colorful.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination