Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
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Subject: grass hopers of 3 different patterns in the same plant
Location: Peña de Bernal, Queretaro, Mexico
October 2, 2016 6:05 pm
Dear bugman,
This summer I found 3 grasshopers morphologically similar but with different color patterns.
The grasshopers where feeding in the same plant in central méxico, The ecosystem where i found them is shrubland with wet summers.
¿Do you know what kind of grasshopper this is?
Signature: Juan Sebastian Ramirez

Painted Grasshopper

Painted Grasshopper

Dear Juan,
The most colorful Grasshopper image you submitted, the black and red individual, is a Painted Grasshopper,
Dactylotum bicolor, a species that, according to BugGuide, is found in:  “Western Great Plains of United States (and southern Canada), southward to Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and into northern Mexico.”  It is the only species in the genus listed on BugGuide, and of the tribe Dactylotini, BugGuide indicates:  “Most genera included in tribe Dactylotini occur only in Mexico.”  It is entirely possible that all your Grasshoppers are in the same tribe.  We have not been able to locate a Mexican site devoted to insects quite as comprehensive as BugGuide, so we cannot say for certain if your green Grasshopper and your brown Grasshopper, which we suspect might be color variations on the same species, are closely related to the Painted Grasshopper.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with identifying your other two images.

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

Unknown Grasshopper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper
Location: Serengeti, Tanzania
September 28, 2016 12:27 pm
Hi. I am glad I found your page while searching for African grasshoppers. I took the picture of the two grasshoppers last December in Tanzania/Serengeti ad I’d love to know the name of this species. Can you help me?
Signature: Sabine

Mating Grasshoppers

Mating Grasshoppers: Pyrgomorphella albini

Dear Sabine,
We spent a little time attempting unsuccessfully to identify your mating Grasshoppers, and because we want to make a few more postings this morning, we are going to post your image as Unidentified and try to get back to it later.  Maybe one of our readers will have more success than we have had.  We suspect these interesting Grasshoppers may be in the family Pyrgomorphidae.

Dear Daniel,
based on your information I kept on searching and found somebody who finally could identify the mating grasshoppers from Serengeti.
So I wanted to give you some feedback and send you the link to the page with detailed information:
http://orthoptera.speciesfile.org/Common/basic/Taxa.aspx?TaxonNameID=1121129
By the way, I have ordered your book The curious world of bugs and like it very much.
Kind regards from Marburg, Germany
Sabine Peiseler

Dear Sabine,
Thanks so much for getting back to us with an identification of 
Pyrgomorphella albini from Orthoptera Species File.  We are happy to hear you are enjoying the book.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you identify this Grasshopper please.
Location: Minnesota
September 20, 2016 7:56 am
Hello, we were outside at the zoo in Minnesota on 9-19-2016. It was very warm outside and we came across this Grasshopper which had what looked like larve on its back. It was very docile and allowed me to photograph it a few times. Help us solve our curiosity about this odd little critter.
Thanks for an awesome sight,
Signature: Adam Godes

Grasshopper with Fly Larvae

Injured Grasshopper with Eggs

Dear Adam,
This is not a healthy Grasshopper.  We believe it is a Spur-Throated Grasshopper from the subfamily Melanoplinae which is well represented on BugGuide.  The Grasshopper is definitely injured, as it is missing its hind legs, which are the legs used for jumping.  We believe that injury has led to this female Grasshopper’s Eggs being expelled through the wounds.  We have an image in our archives of an Obscure Bird Grasshopper that looks very similar.  We received a comment to that image from Brandon who wrote:  “so I found the same thing when I was feeding my turtle. Pulled off the legs of a grasshopper to feed him and out came these yellow ovals.  I believe them to be eggs too.”

Injured Grasshopper

Injured Grasshopper with Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshoppers?
Location: Eastern Iowa
August 31, 2016 12:37 pm
I was wondering if you could help me identify which type of grasshoppers these are. Eastern Iowa, Johnson County parking lot in Iowa City on 8/29/2016.
Thank you!
Signature: des

Band-Winged Grasshoppers

Band-Winged Grasshoppers

Dear Des,
These are Band-Winged Grasshoppers in the subfamily Oedipodinae, and as you can see by browsing BugGuide, there are many species in the subfamily.  Band-Winged Grasshoppers get their common name which is descriptive of the underwings, that are hidden in your image.  The underwings are often brightly colored (red, orange, yellow and blue depending upon the species) with black bands.  When the grasshoppers fly, they attract attention because of the bright colors, but when they land, as in your image, they are camouflaged by the drab colors that hide the underwings.  Unfortunately, we cannot provide you with a species name at this time.

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Subject: Grasshopper Needs a Name
Location: West Palm Beach, Florida
August 24, 2016 11:59 am
While roaming around Winding Waters Natural Area in West Palm Beach, Florida, I found this grasshopper hanging out in the tall grass. He (or she) posed for several pictures and even waved to the camera! This natural area is full of American bird grasshoppers but I don’t think this grasshopper is from that family. Any ideas? Thanks for providing an awesome bug identification service – I always learn something new when I visit your site.
Signature: Ann Mathews

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Dear Ann,
We did not think that such a distinctive green Grasshopper with red antennae and blue tibiae would be that difficult to properly identify, but we were wrong.  After trying for some time on BugGuide, we decided to post it as unidentified and to elicit assistance from our readership.

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

I’m with you on the “oh, this should be an easy critter to identify” mindset. When I got back to the office and saw I actually had some decent pictures of the grasshopper I thought it would be a piece of cake to do the identification. Hopefully someone seeing this post will be able to give this distinctive insect its proper name. Until then, I will call it Gerry the Grasshopper.
Ann Mathews
Palm Beach County
Department of Environmental Resources Management

Update:  Chortophaga viridifasciata australior
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we agree that this looks like it might be Chortophaga viridifasciata australior which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “The hind tibiae are brown or bluish green.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s kind of grasshopper
Location: Northern Nevada
August 4, 2016 5:40 pm
Found this grasshopper on my windshield then he hopped to ground. What kind is it, is it related to locust family? Thanx for ur reply.
Signature: C. Hartery

Red Shanked Grasshopper

Band-Winged Grasshopper

Dear C. Hartery,
This is one of the Band-Winged Grasshoppers in the Subfamily Oedipodinae.  At first we thought it might be a Red-Shanked Grasshopper,
Xanthippus corallipes, which we located on Bug Eric, where it states:  “The enormous female Red-Shanked Grasshopper, … is more typical of the leopard-spotted grasshoppers.  She keeps her most vibrant colors mostly concealed.  The back of her head is blue, and the inner surface of her hind femora (“thighs”), and the entirety of her hind tibiae, are bright vermillion.  Her hind wings, visible only when she is flying, are bright yellow with a black band.”  We then realized that other species also had red legs and that a careful examination of leg markings, including both tibia and femora, as well as a good view of the hind wings are all needed for more exact identification.  We are now leaning toward the genus Trimerotropis which is well represented on BugGuide.

Cool
I’ll try and track her down again.  I do recall seeing yellow under wings I think.
Thanks very much for the reply.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination