Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s this bug?
Location: Central Florida
July 31, 2014 7:33 am
These are all over our yard, and eating all our plants and flowers.
What are these?
How do we get rid of these things?
We live in central florida.
Signature: Bug Crazy!

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper:  Dark Form

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper: Dark Form

Dear Bug Crazy,
This is an Eastern Lubber Grasshopper,
Romalea microptera, and your individual is the dark form.  There is also a light form of Eastern Lubber Grasshopper.  According to BugGuide, they eat:  “Many herbs and shrubs. Favorite foods are said to include: Pokeweed, Phytolaca americana; Tread-softly, Cnidoscolus stimmulosus; Pickerel Weed, Pontederia cordata; Lizard’s Tail, Saururus sp.; Sedges, Cyperus; and Arrowhead, Sagittaria sp.”

Subject: Eastern Lubber
August 1, 2014 9:06 pm
Thanks for letting me know what this bug is,
but how do I kill it??
My lawn and plants are covered with them.
Need to get rid of them, please.
Signature: Bug Crazy

Dear Bug Crazy,
We do not provide extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Inornate Checkered Beetle Eating Grasshopper Eggs?
Location: Albuquerque, NM
May 20, 2014 6:37 pm
Lately I’ve run across several strange beetles in the house of a type that I don’t remember having seen before. I looked around on Bugguide.net for a while and think I’ve managed to identify them as Inornate Checkered Beetles. There doesn’t seem to be much information on this particular species, but a quick internet search indicates that some checkered beetle species feed on grasshoppers and grasshopper eggs, and we’ve been having a local explosion of grasshoppers lately. (Third picture is an example of one of these grasshoppers.) What do you think?
Signature: Cat

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Hi Cat,
We have researched the Inornate Checkered Beetle,
Cymatodera inornata, which we have located on BugGuide., and we believe you have correctly identified the genus, but the species may be incorrect because the distribution map for the Inornate Checkered Beetle does not contain any sightings west of the Mississippi River.  The description of the species on BugGuide indicates its range as being:  “Eastern N. Amer. to UT & AZ,” supporting your identification of the species.  Another member of the genus, Cymatodera dietrichi,  looks very similar and is found in New Mexico and Texas, according to BugGuide.  Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “adults are predaceous, feeding (in part) on the larvae of gall wasps, fruit tree lepidoptera, and wood-boring beetles” and there is no mention of Grasshoppers.

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Your identification of the Pallid Winged Grasshopper, Trimerotropis pallidipennis, appears to be correct based on images on BugGuide.  We don’t believe there is any relationship between the appearance of the Checkered Beetles and the large number of Grasshoppers, but we might be wrong.

Pallid Winged Grasshopper

Pallid Winged Grasshopper

Thanks! We still get plenty of wood-boring beetles and fruit tree lepidoptera around here too, so the checkered beetles will still be able to find plenty to eat even without the grasshoppers!

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Valanga irregularis
Location: Perth, Western Australia
May 13, 2014 7:12 am
Just commented on a post on your website about a giant grasshopper found last November in Perth, Western Australia. We also found one in a bougainvillea outside our window (under the eaves, which would have sheltered it from the recent rains), but the websites I’ve seen put these as living in our tropical top end, not here in the temperate south. We are in Autumn, just heading into winter. Are they lost???
Signature: Helen

Grasshopper

Giant Grasshopper

Dear Helen,
Your identification appears to be correct.  According to the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, the Giant Grasshopper or Hedge Grasshopper is “Very large – Australia’s biggest grasshopper.”  According to Csiro, the Giant Grasshopper is found in Western Australia, but it does not indicate if it ranges as far south as Perth.  Perhaps this is another symptom of global warming.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pyrgomorphidae (Foam or Lubber Grasshoppers)??
Location: South Africa
May 10, 2014 12:37 am
Hello Bugman!
I’m back with a grasshopper question. I found this little beauty at Addo National Park in South Africa. Upon doing some research, it looks like he *may* be a Foam Grasshopper. After taking the photo, I could see he was foaming, which bums me out because I learned online that they foam when stressed or disturbed. This means, I was probably the cause of his stress. :(
Would love to hear your thoughts.
Cheers!
Signature: Kenda Swartz Pepper

Garden Locust

Garden Locust

Hi Kenda,
This is definitely not a Koppie Foam Grasshopper.  We believe it is a Garden Locust,
Acanthacris ruficornis subsp. ruficornis, which we quickly located on iSpot.  According to Beetles of Africa, it is “a very large grasshopper which can fly very well.  A very common species.”  There are also images on Natures World of Wonder South Africa.

Garden Locust

Garden Locust

Awesome and thank you, Daniel!
Only moments ago, I posted the information you sent and a shout-out to my readers to check out your site. http://www.travelsandtripulations.com/2014/05/11/endangered-bontebok/
Looks like I’ll be revisiting your site with a new image. While hiking today, we found a very cool striped beetle. I’ll send the image to see if you know what it is. I already looked on the links you sent with the grasshopper info and was unable to find it. Granted, our internet here is super slow, so iSpot wasn’t loading properly.
Many thanks and cheers,
Kenda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Grasshopper in Kenya
Location: Kijabe, Kenya
May 6, 2014 5:36 am
Can you identify this grasshopper? It was found in May in the mountains of Kenya (7,000 feet).
Signature: Matt

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Dear Matt,
This is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, but we are having difficulty finding a species identification.  We have located a matching image on FlickR that is called a Clown Grasshopper, but we don’t believe that name has any importance.  That individual was found on Mount Kenya, so we suspect this might be a high altitude species.
Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck today with a species identification.

Could it be the nymph of the phymateus viripedes as seen at
http://thesmallermajority.com/2012/09/18/dangerous-candy/
It looks very similar.
Thanks for what you’re doing. It makes this fun!
Matt

Hi Matt,
While we would not entirely rule out that possibility, we believe the markings on the abdomen of the individuals in the two images are quite different.  Your Grasshopper has a dusting of small yellow spots over the entire body, while the example on The Smaller Majority has very different markings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stunning and Curious Grasshopper
Location: Marloth Park, South Africa
April 18, 2014 3:49 am
Hello bugpeople!
I’m a travel blogger (at www.travelsandtripulations.com) currently in South Africa. I’ve given a shout-out to my readers about your site, because it’s so fabulous. And now I need your help. What in the world kind of grasshopper is this? He is gorgeous. He was studying me as intently as I was studying him.
And would it, by any chance, leave a hard yellow, white and black striped “shell” when it dies? I recently found one on the ground that looks similar to his body. But we’ve also seen a lot of furry yellow black and white striped caterpillars that I’ve been unable to identify (last pic)
I appreciate your help! Thank you!
Cheers,
Signature: Kenda

Elegant Grasshopper

Elegant Grasshopper

Hi Kenda,
Your beautiful grasshopper is appropriately named an Elegant Grasshopper or Rainbow Locust,
Zonocerus elegans , and it is one of the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  We do not believe that the exuvia or shed skin of a Grasshopper would be very hard or durable.  Providing a photo would make it easier for us to respond to that question.

Elegant Grasshopper

Elegant Grasshopper

Wow. I’m so pleasantly surprised about how quickly you responded!  Thank you, kindly. My next blog post (going out on or about Monday) will include a nice big shout-out for your work. Thank you!  Tomorrow I’ll go outside and see if I can find that “skin” and take a photo. It looks like it has little feet attached to it.Almost like what a millipede would have but it’s striped – yellow, black, white. It’s quite beautiful and fascinating. There’s a lot of awesome bug activity here. I’ve been having a blast seeing all these critters – even the Orb Spiders that kind of creep me out and fascinate me all at the same time.
Anyway, thank you, Mr. Marlos!
Cheers,
Kenda

Hello Mr. Bugman!
I just published a blog post touting your site and applauding your fabulous bug skills. Here ya go:  http://www.travelsandtripulations.com/2014/04/21/the-wildlife-of-marloth-park-south-africa/
Cheers,
Kenda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination