Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large brown grasshopper/locust in the Pilbara
Location: Pilbara, Australia
February 8, 2014 7:02 pm
Hi there, I spotted this chap in the car park recently. About 6/8cms in length hand 1-1.5 in width.
Signature: Griffo

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Hi Griffo,
We quickly located a visual match on The Northern Myth blog where is it tentatively identified as being in the genus
 Urnisiella.  The individuals identified online as being in the genus Urnisiella do not look like your individual in our mind.  See FlickR and Superstock.  At this time, we are unable to provide a conclusive identification.  

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your reply. I’ll have a read of the info. I did try to get a side profile photo, but I got spotted and he flew away.
All the best
Ian

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Australian Cricket
Location: australia
February 1, 2014 5:30 pm
Hello,
I came across this cricket in WA, Australia in the bush a few years back.
Would like to know what is its name?
Signature: damien

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Hi Damien,
This is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae, but we are uncertain of the species.  At first we thought it might be a Blistered Grasshopper,
Monistria pustulifera, which we have identified before, but the markings are different, especially the yellow band through the face on the Blistered Grasshopper.  We speculated it was a different species in the same genus, which led us to a photo of a Mountain Spotted Grasshopper, Monistria concinna, on FlickR, and it looked very close, but when we checked the range on Csiro, it was wrong.  We also found photos on Dave’s Garden, and they look different than your individual.  So, we believe your Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper is in the genus Monistria, but we are not certain of the species.  Csiro indicates several species found in Western Australia, but alas Csiro does not have photos of them.  You might try writing to Csiro to see if they can identify the species, and if they do, please get back to us so that we can name this beautiful Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper more specifically.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper
Location: North West [South Africa]
February 1, 2014 12:45 am
Hi there,
This bug was photographed at Dube Private Game Farm in the North West, if you can tell us what this species is called it would settle a nice little argument.
Signature: Johan

Immature Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Immature Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Dear Johan,
This is a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper or Bush Locust in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  It is an immature specimen, so it might be difficult to identify to the species level.  It greatly resembles the immature Green Milkweed Locust,
Phymateus viridipes, image on the Field Guide to Insects of South Africa.  The nymphs are described as being “spotted black and yellow.”  It also resembles an immature Phymateus saxosus from Madagascar that is in our archive.  We believe the genus Phymateus is most likely correct, but the species is not something about which we are certain.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Toxic grasshopper ID
Location: Madagascar, Andringitra National Park
January 26, 2014 4:53 am
Hi,
I’m trying to ID the attached grasshopper – seen in Andringitra National Park, Madagascar, and known locally simply as a “toxic cricket”.
It looks like a Phymateus milkweed grasshopper, as far as I can work out from Google, but I’ve not seen photos with quite the same black/orange colouring (no yellow or red), and short, stubby wingcases.
Length is probably about 6-7 cm, so quite a big insect.
Signature: Simon

Immature Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Immature Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper

Hi Simon,
This is definitely a Toxic Milkweed Grasshopper in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  We located a matching photo taken on Madagascar on Dorit Bar Zakay’s blog that is identified as a young
Phymateus saxosus.  The color and markings change will change as it develops into an adult, and the wings will also increase in size and become functional.  We have a photo of an adult Phymateus saxosus from Madagascar on our site and there is no shortage of photos of adults online.  Previous research indicates that it is also called a Rainbow Bush Locust.  We also learned that locals refer to this as a Ghost Grasshopper.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Hi guys,
Just wishing you a happy new year, hope it is a good one. I see global warming has taken another holiday there. Hope you are all keeping warm.
I was looking at the Robberfly eats Bee post from Jen and noticed that some of the thumbnails below were my shots. I clicked a couple to reminisce and found it amazing that it has been over 7 years since I started sending shots to you. Where did the time go?
Anyway, all the best.
Kindest regards,
Trevor

Hi Trevor,
Well, most of North America may be experiencing record low temperatures, but it is sunny and hot in Los Angeles and we are experiencing the driest year on record.  We just received a correction on one of your submissions.  The Bark Mimic Grasshopper you submitted was later identified as a similar looking Stem Grasshopper.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper from Costa Rica
Location: Costa Rica
January 7, 2014 4:37 pm
Hello Bugman,
could you help me to identify the exact species of this unusual Grasshopper that I photographed in Costa Rica?
Thank you very much!
Signature: Frank

Orthopteran

Grasshopper

Dear Frank,
Do you have an image that shows the antennae in their entirety?  The antennae are a very important diagnostic feature of insects and they should be included in images that you want to have identified.  We would not want to classify beyond the order Orthoptera without seeing the antennae.

Hello Daniel,
thank you so much for answering! I am attaching another pic that shows more of the antennae. Maybe you can work with that? I am afraid I was unable to take better pictures of that one…
Thank you so much!
Best regards from Lima
Frank

Orthopteran

Grasshopper Nicarchus erinaceus

Thanks Frank,
We would really love to know how long those antennae are.  We are uncertain if this is a Grasshopper or a Katydid, but we are leaning toward a Grasshopper.  We are going to try to contact Katydid expert Piotr Naskrecki to see if he can provide any information.

Hi Daniel,
I am pretty sure the antennae weren’t quite that long and that this was a grasshopper. Thanks again!

Piotr Naskrecki provides an identification:
Hi Daniel,
The name of this grasshopper is Nicarchus erinaceus (Acrididae: Ommatolampidinae). Some species in this group have spines and bumps on their bodies, and characteristically flattened antennae.
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination