Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: scary hybrid looking bug
Location: Western Oklahoma USA
August 18, 2014 5:57 pm
My assistant found this bug in her dog’s water dish.
Signature: Beth Tones

Grasshopper Lure???

Grasshopper Lure???

Hi Beth,
This “thing” looks Orthopteran, like a Grasshopper, however it is missing its jumping legs.  Though it is somewhat realistic, it does not look like any species of Grasshopper we are familiar with, and we are entertaining the possibility that it is a lifelike fishing lure not unlike the many examples pictured on the Realistic Fishing Lures and Fly Tying page of Graham Owen’s Gallery.

Grasshopper or Fishing Lure???

Grasshopper or Fishing Lure???

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug to be identified ASAP
Location: pathanamthitta, kerala, india
August 15, 2014 4:43 am
I’m from Kerala, India. What insect is this? Please find it out. It is some sort of grass hopper or cricket?
Signature: daniel

Grasshopper Nymph

Grasshopper Nymph

Dear Daniel,
This is an immature Grasshopper in the suborder Caelifera, and we will attempt to provide you with a species identification, however, often nymphs look very different from adults, and often it is the adults that are documented in images.  We found a very similar looking pair of Grasshoppers identified as Painted Grasshoppers, but with no scientific name, on the Samyak Photography Macro page.
  Another similar looking individual is posted to TrekNature, and again, it is identified as a Painted Grasshopper with no scientific name indicating the genus or species.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with an identity than we have had.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Grasshopper
Location: Texas Panhandle
August 10, 2014 2:31 pm
I would like any info on this grasshopper you may have.
Signature: Jody

Painted Grasshopper

Painted Grasshopper

Dear Jody,
This Painted Grasshopper,
Dactylotum bicolor, is positively gorgeous.  According to BugGuide, it is also called a Barber Pole Grasshopper.  BugGuide also notes:  “Female deposits eggs in soft soil in masses of about 100 eggs. She may lay up to twelve batches. Eggs overwinter and hatch late, usually later spring or early summer, so adults are present in late summer and into early fall. One generation per year.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: south-african grasshopper
Location: South-Africa
August 2, 2014 3:23 am
Hello bugman,
This grasshopper I photographed in the second half of January 2005 in South-Africa. I already saw many pictures of Milkweed Grasshoppers and Toxic Foam Grasshoppers, but what really is different I think, is that the one I photographed was at least 15 cm long and what I mostly see in pictures are far smaller ones. Anyway, let me know what you think.
Kind regards, Hanny Keulers
Signature: Hanny Keulers

Koppie Foam Grasshopper

Bushlocust:  Phymateaus morbillosus

Dear Hanny,
This is one of the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, and we believe it is a Koppie Foam Grasshopper,
Dictyophorus spumans.  As you can see from the images on ISpot, this is a highly variable species and indications are that there are numerous subspecies.  The Grasshoppers feed on Milkweed, and they are able to store the toxins, which makes them at the very least unpalatable, and at worst, toxic if ingested.  Even though the coloring is highly variable, the coloration is generally aposomatic or warning coloration, which helps predators to remember an unfavorable taste or reaction if another individual is encountered at a later time.  

Correction
Dear Daniel,
Having continued my own search, I have meanwhile been able to identify my locust with 100% certainty as a Phymateaus Morbillosus, very colourful and beautiful. What I still am wondering about is the size. Can an adult locust reach a total length of 15 cm.? Thanks for your help anyway, I also add a picture for your website.
Kind regards, Hanny Keulers

Hi again Hanny,
Thanks for getting back to us on this identification.  We are going to try to find credible links to
Phymateaus morbillosus.  The first one we located is on the Catalogue of South African Insects, but there is no further description there other than identifying it as a species of Bushlocust, another name for Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae, which was our initial point of departure.  ISpot verifies that and provides the common name Common Milkweed Locust.  We even located this individual from our own archives.  Additionally, we located a mating pair of Common Milkweed Locusts on our site that were only identified to the family level.  Thank you for your valuable contribution to our site.  The size you indicate, nearly six inches long, is not something we are able to verify at this time.  There are Grasshoppers that attain that size, most notably Tropidacris dux from Central and South America which is picture on God Of Insects.

Hello Daniel,
You get the most hits under its Latin name Phymateus Morbillosus.
In general one should always go for the (scientific) Latin names of plants and animals,
because with the names in other languages < anything goes > and most
descriptions are foklore..
Regards, Hanny Keulers

Thank you Daniel for your remark about the correct scientific way of writing.
What surprises me most is that they call this magnificent insect the
COMMON Milkweed Locust, there is nothing ‘common’ about it.
Thanks again for all your information. The strange thing was that I bought a book
in South Africa about all the animal wildlife, but the locusts were not mentioned in it.
Regards, Hanny Keulers

Hanny,
In the interest of scientific correctness, the second name in the binomial, the species name, is not capitalized, hence
Phymateaus morbillosus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s this bug?
Location: Central Florida
July 31, 2014 7:33 am
These are all over our yard, and eating all our plants and flowers.
What are these?
How do we get rid of these things?
We live in central florida.
Signature: Bug Crazy!

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper:  Dark Form

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper: Dark Form

Dear Bug Crazy,
This is an Eastern Lubber Grasshopper,
Romalea microptera, and your individual is the dark form.  There is also a light form of Eastern Lubber Grasshopper.  According to BugGuide, they eat:  “Many herbs and shrubs. Favorite foods are said to include: Pokeweed, Phytolaca americana; Tread-softly, Cnidoscolus stimmulosus; Pickerel Weed, Pontederia cordata; Lizard’s Tail, Saururus sp.; Sedges, Cyperus; and Arrowhead, Sagittaria sp.”

Subject: Eastern Lubber
August 1, 2014 9:06 pm
Thanks for letting me know what this bug is,
but how do I kill it??
My lawn and plants are covered with them.
Need to get rid of them, please.
Signature: Bug Crazy

Dear Bug Crazy,
We do not provide extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Inornate Checkered Beetle Eating Grasshopper Eggs?
Location: Albuquerque, NM
May 20, 2014 6:37 pm
Lately I’ve run across several strange beetles in the house of a type that I don’t remember having seen before. I looked around on Bugguide.net for a while and think I’ve managed to identify them as Inornate Checkered Beetles. There doesn’t seem to be much information on this particular species, but a quick internet search indicates that some checkered beetle species feed on grasshoppers and grasshopper eggs, and we’ve been having a local explosion of grasshoppers lately. (Third picture is an example of one of these grasshoppers.) What do you think?
Signature: Cat

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Hi Cat,
We have researched the Inornate Checkered Beetle,
Cymatodera inornata, which we have located on BugGuide., and we believe you have correctly identified the genus, but the species may be incorrect because the distribution map for the Inornate Checkered Beetle does not contain any sightings west of the Mississippi River.  The description of the species on BugGuide indicates its range as being:  “Eastern N. Amer. to UT & AZ,” supporting your identification of the species.  Another member of the genus, Cymatodera dietrichi,  looks very similar and is found in New Mexico and Texas, according to BugGuide.  Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “adults are predaceous, feeding (in part) on the larvae of gall wasps, fruit tree lepidoptera, and wood-boring beetles” and there is no mention of Grasshoppers.

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Your identification of the Pallid Winged Grasshopper, Trimerotropis pallidipennis, appears to be correct based on images on BugGuide.  We don’t believe there is any relationship between the appearance of the Checkered Beetles and the large number of Grasshoppers, but we might be wrong.

Pallid Winged Grasshopper

Pallid Winged Grasshopper

Thanks! We still get plenty of wood-boring beetles and fruit tree lepidoptera around here too, so the checkered beetles will still be able to find plenty to eat even without the grasshoppers!

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination