Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Inornate Checkered Beetle Eating Grasshopper Eggs?
Location: Albuquerque, NM
May 20, 2014 6:37 pm
Lately I’ve run across several strange beetles in the house of a type that I don’t remember having seen before. I looked around on Bugguide.net for a while and think I’ve managed to identify them as Inornate Checkered Beetles. There doesn’t seem to be much information on this particular species, but a quick internet search indicates that some checkered beetle species feed on grasshoppers and grasshopper eggs, and we’ve been having a local explosion of grasshoppers lately. (Third picture is an example of one of these grasshoppers.) What do you think?
Signature: Cat

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Hi Cat,
We have researched the Inornate Checkered Beetle,
Cymatodera inornata, which we have located on BugGuide., and we believe you have correctly identified the genus, but the species may be incorrect because the distribution map for the Inornate Checkered Beetle does not contain any sightings west of the Mississippi River.  The description of the species on BugGuide indicates its range as being:  “Eastern N. Amer. to UT & AZ,” supporting your identification of the species.  Another member of the genus, Cymatodera dietrichi,  looks very similar and is found in New Mexico and Texas, according to BugGuide.  Of the genus, BugGuide notes:  “adults are predaceous, feeding (in part) on the larvae of gall wasps, fruit tree lepidoptera, and wood-boring beetles” and there is no mention of Grasshoppers.

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Inornate Checkered Beetle

Your identification of the Pallid Winged Grasshopper, Trimerotropis pallidipennis, appears to be correct based on images on BugGuide.  We don’t believe there is any relationship between the appearance of the Checkered Beetles and the large number of Grasshoppers, but we might be wrong.

Pallid Winged Grasshopper

Pallid Winged Grasshopper

Thanks! We still get plenty of wood-boring beetles and fruit tree lepidoptera around here too, so the checkered beetles will still be able to find plenty to eat even without the grasshoppers!

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Valanga irregularis
Location: Perth, Western Australia
May 13, 2014 7:12 am
Just commented on a post on your website about a giant grasshopper found last November in Perth, Western Australia. We also found one in a bougainvillea outside our window (under the eaves, which would have sheltered it from the recent rains), but the websites I’ve seen put these as living in our tropical top end, not here in the temperate south. We are in Autumn, just heading into winter. Are they lost???
Signature: Helen

Grasshopper

Giant Grasshopper

Dear Helen,
Your identification appears to be correct.  According to the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, the Giant Grasshopper or Hedge Grasshopper is “Very large – Australia’s biggest grasshopper.”  According to Csiro, the Giant Grasshopper is found in Western Australia, but it does not indicate if it ranges as far south as Perth.  Perhaps this is another symptom of global warming.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pyrgomorphidae (Foam or Lubber Grasshoppers)??
Location: South Africa
May 10, 2014 12:37 am
Hello Bugman!
I’m back with a grasshopper question. I found this little beauty at Addo National Park in South Africa. Upon doing some research, it looks like he *may* be a Foam Grasshopper. After taking the photo, I could see he was foaming, which bums me out because I learned online that they foam when stressed or disturbed. This means, I was probably the cause of his stress. :(
Would love to hear your thoughts.
Cheers!
Signature: Kenda Swartz Pepper

Garden Locust

Garden Locust

Hi Kenda,
This is definitely not a Koppie Foam Grasshopper.  We believe it is a Garden Locust,
Acanthacris ruficornis subsp. ruficornis, which we quickly located on iSpot.  According to Beetles of Africa, it is “a very large grasshopper which can fly very well.  A very common species.”  There are also images on Natures World of Wonder South Africa.

Garden Locust

Garden Locust

Awesome and thank you, Daniel!
Only moments ago, I posted the information you sent and a shout-out to my readers to check out your site. http://www.travelsandtripulations.com/2014/05/11/endangered-bontebok/
Looks like I’ll be revisiting your site with a new image. While hiking today, we found a very cool striped beetle. I’ll send the image to see if you know what it is. I already looked on the links you sent with the grasshopper info and was unable to find it. Granted, our internet here is super slow, so iSpot wasn’t loading properly.
Many thanks and cheers,
Kenda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large grasshopper
Location: Scone, NSW., Australia
March 16, 2014 3:01 am
Please can you tell me what this grasshopper is? I live in Australia. This is the female and is 6.4cm from head to tip of wing. It is a pale brown colour when alive with darker markings, but has gone darker and redder since freezing. They fly very fast and are difficult to catch! I have many in my suburban garden and plan to do a drawing of the specimen. It would be great if you could also give me the scientific description e.g. phylum, class, order, family and genus. Thank you.

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

The best we are able to provide for you at this time is the taxonomy to the family level.
Phylum Arthropoda – Arthropods
Class Insecta – Insects
Order Orthoptera – Grasshoppers, Crickets, Katydids
Suborder Caelifera – Grasshoppers
Family Acrididae – Short-horned Grasshoppers.

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Grasshoppers

Grasshoppers

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug.
Location: North East Florida
March 15, 2014 3:43 pm
Saw this strange bug on the hood of my Step Dad’s car. It is about 3 inches long and appears to have only 4 legs. I’ve never seen anything like this before. What on Earth is it?
Signature: Brandon

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper

Dear Brandon,
This sure looks like a Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper,
Leptysma marginicollis, to us.  According to BugGuide, it:  “Inhabits wet areas, and is usually found on emergent vegetation such as cattails and sedges.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper (?) from Panama
Location: Panama
March 4, 2014 6:13 pm
Hello Bugman,
I photographed this -what I believe to be some kind of- grasshopper in Central Panama last month. It was sitting next to a similar looking mate with orange legs. They could both jump very far, that’s why I don’t think they were katydids. What makes me doubt my conclusion are the long and unusual antennae. Could you help with a positive ID? Would be glad to send you the picture of the other specimen if that helps. Thanks again!
Signature: Frank

Unknown Orthopteran

Wingless Grasshopper

Dear Frank,
We are relatively certain that this is an Orthopteran, a member of the insect order that includes Grasshoppers, but we don’t believe this is a Grasshopper.  We are going to contact Piotr Naskrecki, who is an expert in Katydids, another family within the straight winged order Orthoptera.

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
This is wingless grasshopper of the subfamily Rhytidchrotinae (Acrididae), most likely Piezops or Opaon.
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination