Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
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Subject: Insect on birding walk
Location: Pipeline Road, Panama City
February 24, 2015 3:43 pm
This beautiful creature was on the trail, on the ground and very much alive, around 9 in the morning. I’m guessing it’s a leafhopper? Can you help identify?
Signature: Panama hiker

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Dear Panama hiker,
This is a gorgeous red eyed Grasshopper, and we found matching images on John Afdem’s Panama Photog Blog and FlickR, but alas, they are not identified by the species or genus.
  Another FlickR posting identifies is as Coscineuta coxalisWe verified the species name on Encyclopedia of Life.

Sue Dougherty, Jacob Helton, Alisha Bragg, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Kathy Haines, Norman Gems, Amy Gosch, Jessica Sory liked this post
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Subject: Orange grasshopper Florida
Location: 27.3724769,-80.3443463
February 23, 2015 1:23 pm
Hello!
We saw a few dozen of these on the base of a tree by a southeastern river hammock near the natural fall-line about 5 miles inland from the Indian River lagoon. It is not listed on insectidentification.org, and 10-15 mins of web searching yielded nothing that closely resembled what I saw. Sorry for the poor quality image, but I did not have my good cameras with me (we were fishing), so a cellphone cam is the best I could do. The appearance of these grasshoppers is unique enough to be identifiable, even with the poor image.
Thanks for any info you may be able to offer.
Cheers,
Signature: RetroJoe

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper Hatchlings

Eastern Lubber Grasshopper Hatchlings

Dear RetroJoe,
These are recently hatched Eastern Lubber Grasshoppers,
Romalea microptera, a common flightless species in the south with two color variations.

Thanks, Daniel!
I thought that was the most likely possibility, but I had not seen them in such an early phase before.
Thanks again,
Joe

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Subject: Insect in my raspberries
Location: Found in Glasgow, Scotland, raspberries originated in South Africa
February 6, 2015 8:11 am
On a shopping trip to tesco I bought raspberries which originated in South Africa. There was a green insect in the container, I’m just curious to know what it was! It was still alive too!
Signature: Curious raspberry lover

Immature Grasshopper

Immature Grasshopper

Dear Curious Raspberry Lover,
This is an immature Grasshopper.  Finding live insects in organically grown produces is not uncommon.

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Subject: UNKNOWN GRASSHOPPER
Location: Botriver Western Cape
January 30, 2015 6:24 am
Hi Bugman,
My hubby and I were in Botriver over the past two weeks ie. 14 to 25 Jan 2015.
We captured this stunning picture of what we believe is a grasshopper of sorts. Absolutely beautiful, never seen anything like it in my life.
Thought you might like to have a look at it and maybe identify it for me?
thanks so much.
kind regards
Signature: Judy

Green Milkweed Locust

Green Milkweed Locust

Hi Judy,
Your images are stunning and this Grasshopper is gorgeous.  It is a member of the family Pyrgomorphidae, commonly called the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers.  They feed on milkweed, and many species are ably to synthesize and store compounds from the plants that render the grasshoppers toxic.  They also have aposomatic or warning coloration to ward off predators.  Your individual is a Green Milkweed Locust,
Phymateus leprosus, and you can verify our identification on iSpot.

Green Milkweed Locust

Green Milkweed Locust

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Subject: Locust identification
Location: Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
January 21, 2015 3:31 am
Hi,
I took these photos of a locust/grasshopper in a suburb of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia about 2 weeks ago and would be interested in knowing what it is. It was around 5-6 inches (125-150mm) in length. I was thinking it was a female spur-throated locust but now I’m not so sure as they apparently do not grow this big. Any idea?
Signature: Chris

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Dear Chris,
The profile image of this Grasshopper is positively gorgeous, and the detail in the hind leg showing the red spines is so technically excellent that we are also including a close-up of that significant detail.  We wonder if this might be a Giant Grasshopper,
Valanga irregularis, which we located on the Brisbane Insect site.  According to the site:  “The Giant Grasshoppers are the largest grasshoppers in Australia. They also commonly known as Giant Valanga and Hedge Grasshoppers. They are native to Australia. The adult size vary from 60-90mm. They are common in Brisbane bushes and backyards. We found these grasshoppers easily on every board leaf plants in our backyard. They eat almost all kinds of leaves. In the early morning, we usually found them sun-bathing on leaf. At that time they are slow-moving. After they have been warmed up, they jump and fly away quickly. Notice the spines on their hind legs, if they are caught by birds or by spider web, they will attack their predators by their hind legs.  Their body colour and patterns are vary between individuals. Usually adults are greyish green and brown in colours with black dots pattern on forewings. The colours resemble the plant stem where they hide.” 

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Hind Leg of a Grasshopper

Hind Leg of a Grasshopper

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Subject: Grasshopper
Location: Coffee Bay, Wild Coast, South Africa
January 8, 2015 9:12 am
I would like to know what type of grasshopper this is.
Signature: Dalina Geldenhuys

Gaudy Grasshopper

Gaudy Grasshopper

Dear Dalina,
This colorful Grasshopper is in the family Pyrgomorphidae, and the members are commonly called Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers, Gaudy Grasshoppers or Koppie Foam Grasshoppers.  We believe your individual is a female
Maura rubroornata based on this image posted to iSpot.  Here is another image from iSpot.  There are images of mounted specimens on Orthoptera Species File, and there appear to be significant variations in the markings of this species.

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