Currently viewing the category: "Grasshoppers"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stunning and Curious Grasshopper
Location: Marloth Park, South Africa
April 18, 2014 3:49 am
Hello bugpeople!
I’m a travel blogger (at www.travelsandtripulations.com) currently in South Africa. I’ve given a shout-out to my readers about your site, because it’s so fabulous. And now I need your help. What in the world kind of grasshopper is this? He is gorgeous. He was studying me as intently as I was studying him.
And would it, by any chance, leave a hard yellow, white and black striped “shell” when it dies? I recently found one on the ground that looks similar to his body. But we’ve also seen a lot of furry yellow black and white striped caterpillars that I’ve been unable to identify (last pic)
I appreciate your help! Thank you!
Cheers,
Signature: Kenda

Elegant Grasshopper

Elegant Grasshopper

Hi Kenda,
Your beautiful grasshopper is appropriately named an Elegant Grasshopper or Rainbow Locust,
Zonocerus elegans , and it is one of the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers in the family Pyrgomorphidae.  We do not believe that the exuvia or shed skin of a Grasshopper would be very hard or durable.  Providing a photo would make it easier for us to respond to that question.

Elegant Grasshopper

Elegant Grasshopper

Wow. I’m so pleasantly surprised about how quickly you responded!  Thank you, kindly. My next blog post (going out on or about Monday) will include a nice big shout-out for your work. Thank you!  Tomorrow I’ll go outside and see if I can find that “skin” and take a photo. It looks like it has little feet attached to it.Almost like what a millipede would have but it’s striped – yellow, black, white. It’s quite beautiful and fascinating. There’s a lot of awesome bug activity here. I’ve been having a blast seeing all these critters – even the Orb Spiders that kind of creep me out and fascinate me all at the same time.
Anyway, thank you, Mr. Marlos!
Cheers,
Kenda

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dictyophorus spumans
Location: Krugersdorp, South Africa
March 20, 2014 1:59 am
The Locust I found Yesterday.
On research I discovered it may be the above.
Is the foam toxic to humans?
Signature: Sharon Parkinson

Koppie Foam Grasshopper

Koppie Foam Grasshopper

Hi Sharon,
Your identification is correct and the common name for your individual is the Koppie Foam Grasshopper, one of the Toxic Milkweed Grasshoppers.  According to NeatNature:  “The Koppie Foam Grasshopper is indeed toxic, consuming poisonous plants and storing the toxins inside their bodies.  The are also known for bathing themselves in a noxious foam when threatened. Through glands along their thorax, it is able to squeeze out a putrid foam which then covers them. The smell and the taste is enough to ward off any predator curious enough to get too close.”  According to Project Noah:  “Many members of this family (Pyrogomorphidae) can produce a defensive foamy secretion from there thoracic region which contain strong and poisonous chemicals, nasty deterrent and hence the vivid warning coloration.  The Pyrgomorphs are also referred to as ‘Gaudy Grasshoppers’. The warning coloration reflects their poisonous nature. The nymphs consume poisonous plants such as Milkweeds and retain the chemicals which include cardiac glycosids (heart poisons). There are records of dogs dying after eating these grasshoppers. One would have imagined that such a distinctive looking locust/grasshopper would be easily identified but unfortunately this has not proved to be the case. I initially located 2 other photos of this species on the web but neither author had committed to a species ID beyond genus. Progress: we (the PN community) now believe that this is a subadult of the species Dictyophorus spumans, with adult coloration and that the earlier nymph stages are much more black with red trimmings.”  It is our understanding that the toxins will also affect humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large grasshopper
Location: Scone, NSW., Australia
March 16, 2014 3:01 am
Please can you tell me what this grasshopper is? I live in Australia. This is the female and is 6.4cm from head to tip of wing. It is a pale brown colour when alive with darker markings, but has gone darker and redder since freezing. They fly very fast and are difficult to catch! I have many in my suburban garden and plan to do a drawing of the specimen. It would be great if you could also give me the scientific description e.g. phylum, class, order, family and genus. Thank you.

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

The best we are able to provide for you at this time is the taxonomy to the family level.
Phylum Arthropoda – Arthropods
Class Insecta – Insects
Order Orthoptera – Grasshoppers, Crickets, Katydids
Suborder Caelifera – Grasshoppers
Family Acrididae – Short-horned Grasshoppers.

Grasshopper

Grasshopper

Grasshoppers

Grasshoppers

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug.
Location: North East Florida
March 15, 2014 3:43 pm
Saw this strange bug on the hood of my Step Dad’s car. It is about 3 inches long and appears to have only 4 legs. I’ve never seen anything like this before. What on Earth is it?
Signature: Brandon

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper

Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper

Dear Brandon,
This sure looks like a Cattail Toothpick Grasshopper,
Leptysma marginicollis, to us.  According to BugGuide, it:  “Inhabits wet areas, and is usually found on emergent vegetation such as cattails and sedges.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grasshopper (?) from Panama
Location: Panama
March 4, 2014 6:13 pm
Hello Bugman,
I photographed this -what I believe to be some kind of- grasshopper in Central Panama last month. It was sitting next to a similar looking mate with orange legs. They could both jump very far, that’s why I don’t think they were katydids. What makes me doubt my conclusion are the long and unusual antennae. Could you help with a positive ID? Would be glad to send you the picture of the other specimen if that helps. Thanks again!
Signature: Frank

Unknown Orthopteran

Wingless Grasshopper

Dear Frank,
We are relatively certain that this is an Orthopteran, a member of the insect order that includes Grasshoppers, but we don’t believe this is a Grasshopper.  We are going to contact Piotr Naskrecki, who is an expert in Katydids, another family within the straight winged order Orthoptera.

Piotr Naskrecki Responds
Hi Daniel,
This is wingless grasshopper of the subfamily Rhytidchrotinae (Acrididae), most likely Piezops or Opaon.
Cheers,
Piotr

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Denia, Alicante, Spain
February 18, 2014 8:18 am
Hi Bug People,
Wonder whether you can help with the identification of this one.
Had various sightings of the attached type over the last few years in Costa Blanca Spain. This one was pictured on 18/02/14, but we have seen them throughout the summer. This one is approx 8cm from nose to tail exluding antenae. Have fished a few out of the pool.
Signature: Andy Ball

Locust

Locust

Dear Andy,
We have not had any luck tracking down a species name for your Grasshopper, but we did track down this interesting article from Science Daily on the changes in appearance within the same unnamed species when it goes from a solitary existence to being a social hoard of Desert Locusts that devouring all vegetation in its path.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to substantiate if this is a Desert Locust, 
Schistocerca gragaria, which is pictured on the National Education Network Gallery.

Hi Daniel,
Many thanks for feedback. Sounds very scary! Would welcome any further confirmation of species.
Regards
Andy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination