Currently viewing the category: "Galls"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: eggs on roses leaves
Location: Japan
June 4, 2016 6:08 pm
Hi!
I found these on the leaves of one of my roses in Japan.
Tried to google it, but couldn’t find them on the net….
It would be great to know !
Thank you!
Signature: Dasha

Spiny Rose Leaf Gall

Spiny Rose Leaf Gall

Dear Dasha,
These are not really eggs.  The are Galls, growths on plants that are usually caused by insects.  According to the University of Minnesota:  “Galls are abnormal plant growths caused by various organisms (insects, mites, nematodes, fungi, bacteria, and viruses). This publication will deal with galls caused by the feeding or egg- laying activity of insects and mites. Because of their unusual forms and colors, galls often cause homeowners to become concerned. However, galls seldom threaten plant health and their numbers are highly variable from season to season. For those reasons, control is generally not suggested. How are galls formed?  Galls are formed by insect/mite feeding or egg-laying activity. Either mechanical damage or salivary secretions (introduced by insects and/or mites) initiate increased production of normal plant growth hormones. These plant hormones cause localized plant growth that can result in increases in cell size (hypertrophy) and/or cell number (hyperplasia). The outcome is an abnormal plant structure called a gall.
Gall formation generally occurs during the accelerated growth period (late spring) of new leaves, shoots, flowers, etc. Mature plant tissues are usually unaffected by gall-inducing organisms. The gall-making organism develops inside the gall and the gall continues to grow as the insect/mite feeds and matures. Once gall formation is initiated, many galls will continue to form even if the insect dies. In addition, most galls are usually not noticed until they are fully formed and remain on plants for extended periods of time (more than a season).”  We believe your Galls are Spiny Rose Leaf Calls that are caused by the Gall Wasp,
Diplolepis polita, thanks to a matching image on Ereimer.net.  We verified the identification on BugGuide.  We will be postdating your wonderful submission to go live during our absence from the office next week.

Spiny Rose Leaf Gall

Spiny Rose Leaf Gall

Thank you Daniel for your quick and thorough response!
Wish you a lovely Sunday!
Dasha

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it
Location: Central florida
March 31, 2016 9:23 am
We found this on our blueberries
What is it?
Signature: Larry32773

Galls on Blueberries

Galls on Blueberries

Dear Larry32773,
This has been on our back burner for the past week, and though we have done some research, we have drawn a blank.  Our initial thought is this is some type of Gall.  A Gall is a growth on a plant that can be caused by an insect or by some other organism.  These Galls, if that is what they are, do not appear to be caused by an insect.  We will continue to research this matter.

Galls on Blueberries

Galls on Blueberries

Thank you.
I was thinking it might be a fungus if not an insect.
Larry Lackey

Some Galls are caused by fungus infections.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cocoon
Location: Westminster Maryland
April 3, 2016 10:43 am
In pine tree
Signature: Barry

Cedar Apple Rust Gall

Cedar Apple Rust Gall

Hi Barry,
This is not a cocoon.  It is a Gall.  According to Wayne’s Word:  “Galls are caused by many organisms living on plants, including insects, mites, mistletoe, fungi and bacteria.”  This marvelous website continues with “The mysterious origin of strange growths on the stems, leaves, flowers and roots of plants have intrigued naturalists for centuries. Called galls or hypertrophies, these tumorous (neoplasmic) outgrowths develop from rapid mitosis and morphogenesis of plant tissues and come in an astounding array of colors, shapes and sizes. Galls may be smooth, spiny or fuzzy, and resemble everything from marbles and ping-pong balls to dunce caps, saucers and sea urchins. Many galls provide the food and brooding structure for various species of harmless insects.”  The Propaedeuticist makes up in images what it lacks in information regarding your particular Gall, the Cedar Apple Rust Gall,
Gymnosporangium juniperivirginianae.  The Missouri Botanical Garden also refers to two additional, closely related species of fungus in stating:  “All three rusts can infect most varieties of eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) as well as many other junipers and an alternate host. Of these alternate hosts, cedar-apple rust is primarily a disease of apples and crabapples. Cedar-hawthorn rust, in addition to affecting apples and crabapples, sometimes infects pears, quince, and serviceberry. Cedar-quince rust has the broadest host range and can infect many genera in the rose family. In addition to those plants already mentioned, mountain-ash, flowering quince, cotoneaster, chokecherry, and photinia are also hosts for this disease.”  Your tree is a cedar, not a pine.  The Missouri Botanical Garden site also states:  “Symptoms on juniper: Brown, perennial galls form on twigs. When mature (usually in two years), the galls swell and repeatedly produce orange, gelatinous telial horns during rainy spring weather. The galls of cedar-apple rust are often over 2 inches in diameter, while cedar-hawthorn rust galls are rarely over 2 inches in diameter. Occasionally the twig beyond the gall dies, but usually no significant damage occurs on the juniper host.”  If you or a neighbor has an apple orchard, there may be additional cause for alarm as the site states as the leaves of apple trees are affected, according to the Missouri Botanical Garden, when:  “Circular, yellow spots (lesions) appear on the upper surfaces of the leaves shortly after bloom. In late summer, brownish clusters of threads or cylindrical tubes (aecia) appear beneath the yellow leaf spots or on fruits and twigs. The spores associated with the threads or tubes infect the leaves (needles) and twigs of junipers during wet, warm weather.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: eggs on cedar tree
Location: north alabama
December 16, 2015 10:00 am
approx 3 inches accross found on limb of small cedar tree. Probably deposited sometime in October.
Signature: Olin

Cedar Apple Rust Gall

Cedar Apple Rust Gall

Dear Olin,
This Gall is an abnormal growth on a plant, and though many Galls are produced by insects, this Cedar Apple Rust Gall is caused by the fungus
Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae.  According to the University of Minnesota Integrated Pest Management for home apple growers page:  “Cedar-apple rust is a fungal disease that spends half of its life cycle infecting apple or crab apple trees, and the other half infecting Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) or other species of juniper (Juniperus sp.). This disease can cause damage to leaves and fruit of very susceptible apple varieties, but is only a minor problem on resistant or partially resistant trees.”  According to the Jack Schmidling Productions, Inc. site, your image:  ” is the gall that appears on the Cedar tree in late Winter. When this gall gets wet from Spring rains, the jelly masses emerge from the pores to ripen the spores. When the jelly dries, the spores are carried by the wind to apple trees.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What eggs are these? Or are they not even bug eggs?
Location: North Andover, ma
June 5, 2015 5:33 pm
Hi,
Went on a hike with my 2 kids today and came across two plants with these long green vertical eggs* I was curious to see what bugs laid these eggs or if they were even eggs at all.
Thanks!
Signature: Maggie

Galls, we believe

Galls, we believe

Dear Maggie,
We believe these are Galls, and though they are theoretically not eggs, many Galls are produced when insects, like Gall Wasps, lay eggs and the developing larva causes a growth on a plant leaf, stem, root, or other plant part.  The growth acts as food for the larva, and the Gall does not harm the plant.  Other Galls can be caused by mites, viruses or injuries.  Knowing the plant species is often helpful in the identification of the insect that produces the Gall.  Though your Galls resemble those on the maple leaf on the Little Nature Museum site, your plant is not a maple and Galls are often very plant specific.
  We are postdating your submission to go live on our site next week while we are away from the office.

Probably Galls

Probably Galls

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pink Eggs?
Location: Northeast Florida, riverside
August 6, 2014 11:03 am
Hello there,
My kids and I were examining a bald cypress at a local park last week, checking out the neat cones and leaves, when we noticed many of these pink pods randomly distributed all over the leaves. I’ve searched far and wide, but haven’t figured out what they are. Are they even bug eggs? I only figured they were because no readings on cypress trees mention any growths like these, and they were so randomly placed.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Alana

Probably Galls on Cypress

Probably Galls on Cypress

Dear Alana,
Your request has been on our back burner for a few days while we have attempted an identification.  Though these are not theoretically insect eggs, we do believe they are Galls.  Galls are growths on plants that are often caused by insects (mainly Gall Wasps and certain types of Flies and Moths) or Mites, but sometimes they are caused by viruses or other means.  Galls can form on any part of the plant, but are most common on leaves and twigs, but roots, stems and other parts of plants are not exempt.  See Texas A&M AgriLIFE Extension for some general information on Galls.  Your Galls look nothing like the Cypress Twig Gall Midge pictured on Featured Creatures, but there are probably thousands of different types of Galls that are found on oak trees.
  Your Galls are also different from the Cypress Gall Midges pictured on BugGuide.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck identifying the Galls you found on the cypress in your park.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination