Currently viewing the category: "Tachinid Flies"
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Possibly Field Crescent

Possibly Field Crescent

Subject: A mystery white, and a checkerspot?
Location: Larimer county, CO, 8100′
October 10, 2014 8:46 am
A couple butterflies I hope you can help with. Both taken same location. Larimer county, Colorado foothills, 8100 feet elevation. October 8, 2014. Warm day, but well past 1st frost. … The second, I believe, is Gorgone checkerspot. Chlosyne gorgone, but not 100% certain. Sorry no pic of underside of this guy.
Signature: Matt in CO

Hi again Matt,
We are not fully convinced that this is a Gorgone Checkerspot, as your individual appears to have different markings than the individuals pictured on BugGuide.  We believe this might be a Field Crescent,
Phyciodes pulchella, which is also pictured on BugGuide, or perhaps a Painted Crescent, Phyciodes picta, which is also pictured on BugGuide.  Perhaps someone with better identification skills can assist us with this identification.  We believe the fly in the image might be a Tachinid Fly.

Thanks again. You may well be right. Both look good, but I especially like field crescent. My ID was largely based on http://www.birrellfineart.com/Big%20Picture%20Pages/c57%20gorgone%20checkerspot%200017%20big.htm, which, of course, could also be wrongly ID’d

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Subject: Another example of Tachinid Fly with Fungus Infection??
Location: Birmingham, United Kingdom
October 6, 2014 3:21 am
Hi all,
I think this is another example (found 6th October 2014) of a Tachinid Fly with the pathogenic fungus Enthomphthora Muscae, it just looks as if it flew straight into my back door and died on impact. Possibly the same as on your web page:  http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2009/12/25/tachinid-fly-we-believe/
Can you please confirm that it is a Tachinid Fly? As I don’t believe there are any ‘natural’ black and white stripped fly’s here in the UK that look like this one.
Kind regards
Signature: Milly – Birmingham (UK)

Tachinid Fly with Fungus Infection

Tachinid Fly with Fungus Infection

Hi Millie,
We agree with both your identification and your diagnosis.  As Karl indicated in the link you provided:  “There are numerous photos on the internet that look very similar to this this. The white banding occurs as the fungus bursts out between the abdominal segments (presumably just before the victim expires).”

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Subject: Bug Love – Flies from Italy
Location: Italy (Lazio)
October 6, 2014 3:59 am
Hey Bugman,
These two flies were flying around one on top of the other, and they eventually landed on a plant.
I am not particularly curious of the species. I just wanted to send you this for the Bug Love section.
Ciao, Saverio
Signature: Saverio

Mating Tachinid Flies

Mating Tachinid Flies

Dear Saverio,
Our hunch was that these were mating Tachinid Flies, and upon doing some research, we found we are correct.  We initially identified them as
Ectophasia crassipennis on the Insects of France website where we learned:  “This fly lives in southern Europe and in the warm parts of Central Europe. Not in the Netherlands like some other members of the subfamily. … Males and females are different. The brownish yellow abdomen of the male has a wide black stripe.  The female lays the eggs directly into the host  the shield bug (Pentatomidae)  Length 5 – 9 mm. May – September.”  We verified the identification on another French site.

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Subject: Fly on calico asters
Location: Kent County, Michigan USA
September 21, 2014 3:57 pm
What is the name of this cool fly I found enjoying calico asters in Michigan in late September? Thanks!
Signature: Patricia

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Patricia,
This is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, but we are not certain of the species.  Tachinid Flies are parasitic on other insects and arthropods.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

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Subject: What is it?
Location: Oceanside, NY
August 19, 2014 8:20 pm
Don’t have a clue. This bug, feasting on Japanese Knotweed, could be a bee, a fly or even a moth, as far as I know…..
Signature: CarlF

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Hi CarlF,
This is a beneficial, parasitic Tachinid Fly, but we cannot tell you the exact species at this time.  Tachinid Flies are often very host specific and they are often important biological control agents that parasitize other insects and arthropods.

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck is this?
Location: Creede Colorado
August 4, 2014 7:11 pm
I took this picture a few days ago about 30 miles west of Creede, Colorado. Would love to know what this thing is called.
Signature: P Padgham

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear P Padgham,
This is a Tachinid Fly, a member of an important family of parasitic flies that prey upon insects and arthropods.  Many Tachinid Flies are valuable biological control agents for agricultural pests.  Many Tachinid Flies look very similar and they are quite spiny.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination