Currently viewing the category: "Syrphid Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: horse fly
Location: Cairns Australia
January 10, 2016 4:11 pm
Hi. Could you please tell me what kind of horse fly this is.
I live in Cairns Australia next to the rainforest I’m used to the smaller black ones but not this..
Unfortunately i had to kill it as it was attacking my two little boys under three years of age!!
Thanks
Signature: Marc

Hover Fly, we believe

Horse Fly, we realize

Dear Marc,
This is not a Horse Fly, commonly called a March Fly in Australia.  We believe this is a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae.  Hover Flies mimic stinging bees and wasps for protection, but they are in themselves perfectly harmless.  We have not had any luck determining the species.  We hope that should you encounter additional Hover Flies in the future, you will learn to recognize them and not kill them as they pose no threat to your family.

Many thanks on the info..
I do feel bad exterminating it now but now know for future reference!!!!
Thanks again…

Correction:  Horse Fly is Correct
Dear Marc,
There was an exchange of comments initiated by Christopher that resulted in a determination that this really was a Horse Fly like the one pictured on the Queensland Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wierd bug i named Jefery
Location: Meredith, Nh
October 2, 2015 7:05 pm
Found this in a rotten tree in Nh, what is it? Mostly see thru, seemed to have a stinger at the end of its tail.
Signature: Douglas Hewitt Jr

Rattailed Maggot

Rattailed Maggot

Dear Douglas,
This is the larva of a Drone Fly, commonly called a Rattailed Maggot.
  According to BugGuide:  ” larvae feed on rotting organic material in stagnant water” so we are wondering if there was any water in the rotten tree.

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Subject: Beautiful Bug
Location: Gettysburg, PA
September 15, 2015 6:36 am
Hello,
This is a bug that flies and seemed to like the stems of grasses and wildflowers at Gettysburg National Military Park. I haven’t been able to find it anywhere. I thought it was a beetle, but someone said it’s a fly that mimics a beetle. Please help.
Signature: Clueless but Hopeful

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Dear Clueless bug Hopeful,
We have identified your beautiful Flower Fly or Hover Fly from the family Syrphidae as
Eristalinus aeneus thanks to this image on BugGuide.  It really does have distinctive eyes and the space between the eyes indicates your individual is a female.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to Europe, adventive in NA and now widespread in e. NA (ON-FL)” and “In Europe, larvae often found associated with decaying seaweed.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Kingswinford west midlands
August 30, 2015 1:35 pm
Hi I saw this bug this morning and couldn’t be sure what it is.it looks like a wasp but was a lot slower and had different wings be great to find out what it was.
Signature: jtb

Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Dear jtb,
This is a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, and we believe it is
Volucella inanis, a species picture on Diptera Index.  We are greatly amused that one of the titles it landed near is “Lord of the Flies.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Warble Fly ? Or ?
Location: Plymouth Devon UK
August 10, 2015 12:21 pm
Taken in Devon UK 10 August 2015
Signature: Jacko

Hoverfly:  Volucella inanis

Hoverfly: Volucella inanis

Dear Jacko,
Your Hoverfly is
Volucella inanis, and you can read more about it on the UK Diptera Index site.  According to UK Safari:  “These hoverflies resemble wasps for a very good reason.  The adults lay their eggs in wasp nests where the larvae feed on the larvae of the wasps.  The scientific name ‘inanis‘ is Latin for ‘inane’ or ’empty’.  Possibly a reference to the lack of stinging organ on this wasp-like insect.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect Id
Location: Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Northeast Ohio
June 30, 2015 12:58 pm
Ok, folks, this isn’t the best image I’ve ever taken, but I still like it.
My only problem is that I have no idea what it is !!!
At first I thought it was a species of wasp; then, after some research, I thought it was some sort of Hover Fly, but it’s WAY too big for that…a GOOD inch to inch and a half in length; recently, I saw an image of a Cicada Killer that was similar, but…ONLY similar.
I’ve only seen one other just like it (and to be truthful, it may very well have been the same one…it flew past me in the exact same place the next summer.
I saw it near the Park Headquarters in The Cuyahoga Valley National Park in Northeast Ohio.
If anyone can help me with an Id I would appreciate it; I’ve been looking for it for close to 30 years.
Signature: Mike Davis-Mick’s Pix Photos

Hover Fly:  Good News Bee

Hover Fly: Good News Bee

Dear Mike,
You initially discounted that this was a Hover Fly because of its size, but it is in fact a Hover Fly,
Milesia virginiensis, a species commonly called a Yellow Jacket Hover Fly or Good News Bee.  According to the Bug Eric blog:  “At 18-28.5 millimeters in body length, and brightly colored in yellow, brown, and black, this fly could easily be mistaken for a European Hornet or queen yellowjacket. The ominous droning buzz it makes only heightens the visual mimicry. Some speculate that this species mimics the Southern Yellowjacket, Vespula squamosa. Indeed, Southern Yellowjackets were also active in the area, but the workers are substantially smaller than this fly. It is too early for the yellowjacket queens to be appearing, but they make for a better ‘model’ in both size and color pattern.  Milesia virginiensis figures in American folklore and superstition. It is still known in many hamlets as the ‘News Bee,’ for it will sometimes hover in front of a person, as if it were ‘giving them the news.’ It is also considered to be good luck if one of these flies alights on your finger. I was surprised that this particular individual allowed me a very close approach, so maybe it is not out of the realm of possibility than one of these insects could perch on a patient person.”

Thank you very much, Daniel. Very informative !! And, with your permission, I’d like to attach your answer to the image in my Fine Art America, and FB sites
Mike Davis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination