Currently viewing the category: "Syrphid Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee / wasp id
Location: North Devon
September 9, 2016 9:13 am
Can you please tell me what this bee / wasp is
Signature: Any way

Hornet Hoverfly

Hornet Hoverfly

This is a Hornet Hoverfly, Volucella zonaria, and according to the South West Grid for Learning Trust:  “This species is one of the larger hoverflies. It is sometimes seen in the UK in the late summer and autumn feeding on the flowers of Ivy. Hoverflies often mimic species of wasp or in this case a hornet.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly
Location: My home in West Yorkshire UK
August 19, 2016 8:24 am
I found this fly in the house and only after “disposing” of it did I notice the white band around it’s body and the wing markings.. I’ve looked in my small book but found no record of it. I’m assuming it’s not a rarity but just wondered if you guys knew the species.
Thanks
Signature: Joe Lyman

Hover Fly

Great Pied HoverFly

Dear Joe,
This is a Hover Fly, , which we identified on British Hoverflies.  According to Nature Spot:  “Sometimes called the Pellucid Hoverfly, this is one of the largest flies in Britain. It has a striking ivory-white band across its middle and large dark spots on its wings.”  Nature Spot also states:  “Its larvae live in the nests of social wasps and bumblebees, eating waste products and the bee larvae.”  According to UK Safari:  “The Pellucid Hoverfly can be found in most wooded areas in the UK.  It’s shape and size are very bumblebee-like.  The name ‘pellucid’ literally means translucently clear, and if you catch this hoverfly in a certain light you can see right through its middle.  The other popular common name for this hoverfly is the ‘Great Pied Hoverfly’ on account of its black and white colouring. ”  According to Opal Westmidlands:  “
V. pellucens is by far the most common species of the genus and widely distributed across the UK.”

Great Pied Hoverfly

Great Pied Hoverfly

Wow… Cheers for a comprehensive identification..
Thanks and regards Joe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Three Lined Hover fly
Location: Karori, Wellington, NZ
August 16, 2016 8:35 pm
Just photographed this fly inside my house, and looked up on the internet to find what it was. Will go and liberate it now that I know it is a “good” insect. Thought that you might like to see the photos.
Signature: Heuchan Hobbs

Threelined Hover Fly

Threelined Hover Fly

Dear Heuchan,
Thank you ever so much for sending your excellent images of a Threelined Hover Fly,
Helophilus seelandicus, to our site, especially since you did not require an identification.  We have but a single image of a Threelined Hover Fly in our archives, and it is a ventral view, which is not ideal for identification purposes.  Your dorsal views are marvelous.  According to Landcare Research:  “Attracts attention because of its noisy flight  Important pollinator of flowers  Larvae are rat tailed maggots which live in liquid containing rotting plants or animals.”  According to iNaturalist, it “is a native hoverfly of New Zealand. The name corresponds to the three black lines behind the insect’s head.”  We are tagging this posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award since you captured and released.

Threelined Hover Fly

Threelined Hover Fly

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for your reply to my email re the Threelined Hover Fly.
I give you permission to use my photos, if you wish in your “What’s that bug” archives.
I have also included two extra images taken after I liberated the fly onto some retaining wall timber. I don’t know how long the fly stayed there, it was gone about 30 minutes after liberation. Didn’t stay “on watch”, was getting cold, late afternoon time.
Thanks again for your informative email,
Regards,
Heuchan

Three-LIned Hoverfly

Three-LIned Hoverfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Predation
Location: Andover, NJ
July 28, 2016 8:16 am
I was lurking around my butterfly garden this morning and happened to see this small wasp (Eumenine maybe?) subduing a large syrphid. Amazingly, the wasp took off with her prize with seemingly little effort!
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Square Headed Wasp preys upon Hover Fly

Square Headed Wasp preys upon Hover Fly

Good Mornind Deborah,
What an amazing image.  This is a Square Headed Wasp in the subfamily Crabroninae, and we believe that based on this image from BugGuide, that it is in the genus
Ectemnius.  According to BugGuide:  “most nest in decayed wood (logs, stumps), sometimes in sound wood; provision the nests with Diptera.”   The prey appears to be a Drone Fly.

Thanks so much, Daniel!  I was a bit off on my wasp ID, wasn’t I?  Even with multiple field guides, I still find it rather challenging to get the subfamily correct.  But it sure is fun trying!  I just wish our summers lasted longer – once winter comes, I’m lucky to find a shield bug.
Debbi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee mimic
Location: Dixon, CA
May 6, 2016 3:39 pm
Hello Mr. Bugman,
I took this attached photo a couple days ago and thought you might like it. This particular critter was hanging out on a crape myrtle leaf in my backyard. I found its wings to be quite pretty!
Happy Adventures!
Signature: Eric

Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Dear Eric,
Many Hover Flies or Flower Flies in the family Syrphidae mimic wasps and bees for protection.  The flies are perfectly harmless, but they benefit from mimicking stinging insects.  We believe your Hover Fly may be in the genus Syrphus based on images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Northern ca
April 16, 2016 1:21 pm
Hey Mr Bugman
What the heck is this…..all of a Sudden they are all over our garden.
Thanks
Signature: Dennis

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Dear Dennis,
This Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae is a beneficial insect.  The Syrphid Fly larvae feed on Aphids and other agricultural and ornamental plant pests, and the adults are beneficial pollinators.  Many adult Flower Flies mimic stinging bees and wasps, though they are themselves quite harmless as they neither sting nor bite.  We will attempt to identify your Flower Fly by species, but BugGuide has an enormous archive to sift through.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination