Currently viewing the category: "Syrphid Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee mimic
Location: Dixon, CA
May 6, 2016 3:39 pm
Hello Mr. Bugman,
I took this attached photo a couple days ago and thought you might like it. This particular critter was hanging out on a crape myrtle leaf in my backyard. I found its wings to be quite pretty!
Happy Adventures!
Signature: Eric

Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Dear Eric,
Many Hover Flies or Flower Flies in the family Syrphidae mimic wasps and bees for protection.  The flies are perfectly harmless, but they benefit from mimicking stinging insects.  We believe your Hover Fly may be in the genus Syrphus based on images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this
Location: Northern ca
April 16, 2016 1:21 pm
Hey Mr Bugman
What the heck is this…..all of a Sudden they are all over our garden.
Thanks
Signature: Dennis

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Dear Dennis,
This Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae is a beneficial insect.  The Syrphid Fly larvae feed on Aphids and other agricultural and ornamental plant pests, and the adults are beneficial pollinators.  Many adult Flower Flies mimic stinging bees and wasps, though they are themselves quite harmless as they neither sting nor bite.  We will attempt to identify your Flower Fly by species, but BugGuide has an enormous archive to sift through.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee or wasp, Tampa, FL
Location: Tampa, Florida
April 8, 2016 8:50 am
Tried finding this online with no results. Looks similar to a yellow jacket, but orange and yellow and black instead of just yellow and black.
Signature: Luke

Yellow Jacket Hover Fly, AKA Good News Bee

Yellow Jacket Hover Fly, AKA Good News Bee

Dear Luke,
This is neither a Yellow Jacket nor a Bee, but it is a very effective mimic of both.  This is a Yellow Jacket Hover Fly or Good News Bee,
Milesia virginiensis, a species of Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae.  Though they mimic stinging insects, Hover Flies neither sting nor bite.  Pure Florida has a wonderful article on Hover Flies that is illustrated with images of a Yellow Jacket Hover Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: horse fly
Location: Cairns Australia
January 10, 2016 4:11 pm
Hi. Could you please tell me what kind of horse fly this is.
I live in Cairns Australia next to the rainforest I’m used to the smaller black ones but not this..
Unfortunately i had to kill it as it was attacking my two little boys under three years of age!!
Thanks
Signature: Marc

Hover Fly, we believe

Horse Fly, we realize

Dear Marc,
This is not a Horse Fly, commonly called a March Fly in Australia.  We believe this is a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae.  Hover Flies mimic stinging bees and wasps for protection, but they are in themselves perfectly harmless.  We have not had any luck determining the species.  We hope that should you encounter additional Hover Flies in the future, you will learn to recognize them and not kill them as they pose no threat to your family.

Many thanks on the info..
I do feel bad exterminating it now but now know for future reference!!!!
Thanks again…

Correction:  Horse Fly is Correct
Dear Marc,
There was an exchange of comments initiated by Christopher that resulted in a determination that this really was a Horse Fly like the one pictured on the Queensland Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wierd bug i named Jefery
Location: Meredith, Nh
October 2, 2015 7:05 pm
Found this in a rotten tree in Nh, what is it? Mostly see thru, seemed to have a stinger at the end of its tail.
Signature: Douglas Hewitt Jr

Rattailed Maggot

Rattailed Maggot

Dear Douglas,
This is the larva of a Drone Fly, commonly called a Rattailed Maggot.
  According to BugGuide:  ” larvae feed on rotting organic material in stagnant water” so we are wondering if there was any water in the rotten tree.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Bug
Location: Gettysburg, PA
September 15, 2015 6:36 am
Hello,
This is a bug that flies and seemed to like the stems of grasses and wildflowers at Gettysburg National Military Park. I haven’t been able to find it anywhere. I thought it was a beetle, but someone said it’s a fly that mimics a beetle. Please help.
Signature: Clueless but Hopeful

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Dear Clueless bug Hopeful,
We have identified your beautiful Flower Fly or Hover Fly from the family Syrphidae as
Eristalinus aeneus thanks to this image on BugGuide.  It really does have distinctive eyes and the space between the eyes indicates your individual is a female.  According to BugGuide:  “Native to Europe, adventive in NA and now widespread in e. NA (ON-FL)” and “In Europe, larvae often found associated with decaying seaweed.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination