Currently viewing the category: "Soldier Flies"
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Subject: Bug identification
Location: Huntsville, Ontario, Canada
June 14, 2016 3:39 pm
Hello,
I noticed this interesting horsefly-like bug laying these green eggs on our car mirror in late spring (June 14th) in Huntsville Ontario. I was hoping you could help identify? It seems like a horse fly, but the eggs are green rather than milky white as many sites have suggested they would be. I wondered if it was a bee at first? I appreciate any help.
Thanks!
Signature: Matt

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Dear Matt,
We believe we have correctly identified your ovipositing Soldier Fly as either
Stratiomys adelpha or Stratiomys discalis based on images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “S. adelpha and S. discalis are very similar and may turn out to be the same species. The taxonomy of the Nearctic Stratiomys is a mess. There are a few easily distinguished species, but several spp. are defined based on coloration which is variable. The male genitalia have never been examined carefully, and they could be helpful. –N.E. Woodley, pers. comm.”

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp? Fly?
Location: Central Arkansas, USA
June 14, 2016 3:31 pm
Dear Bugman,
A friend took the attached picture. Sorry for the poor quality. I have had little luck in finding what it might be. Can you please help? Insect is about one inch long. Pic was taken June 14, 2016.
Signature: Thank you!!

Soldier Fly

Soldier Fly

This is a Solder Fly and we believe it is in the genus Hedriodiscus based on images posted to BugGuide.  Many harmless Soldier Flies mimic stinging wasps and bees for protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wingless soldier fly
Location: Sodwalls, NSW Australia
April 10, 2016 3:45 pm
Thank you for your reply to my query about how to add photos. Here is a photo of the bug which l finally identified as boreoides subulatus.
Signature: Elizabeth

Wingless Female Soldier Fly: Boreoides subulatus

Wingless Female Soldier Fly: Boreoides subulatus

Dear Elizabeth,
Thanks so much for submitting your high quality image of a flightless female Soldier Fly from Australia,
Boreoides subulatus.  The first time we received an image of this species, it created quite a stir in our offices. 

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Subject: Bug query
Location: Sydney Australia
November 21, 2015 7:38 pm
Hello
I am curious about what this bug is called. It is on my compost bin in sydney, Australia.
Could you please let me know? If I need to remove it or whether it is fine for it to be around the compost bin.
Thank you in advance.
Signature: Regards, Aaron

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Dear Aaron,
These are the larvae of Black Soldier Flies,
Hermetia illucens, and they are frequently found in compost piles where they are beneficial, helping to break down organic substances.  According to BugGuide:  “Wide ranging in Western Hemisphere, also in Australasia, Africa, Japan, Europe. Commercially distributed for composting” because “larvae compete with house flies in manure, compost piles, etc., and may thus be beneficial. Adults are harmless and not known to carry any human disease.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown bug species
Location: melbourne, Victoria, Australia
May 12, 2015 1:20 am
Hi,
I’m wondering what this insect is. I have found several outside my house. Do they fly? Are they harmful? What are they?
Regards,
Signature: Sharon

Flightless female Soldier Fly

Flightless female Soldier Fly

Dear Sharon,
Your unusual insect is
Boreoides subulatus, a flightless female Soldier Fly in the family Stratiomyidae, subfamily Chiromyzinae, and the last image we posted of this unusual insect was allegedly sighted in the UK.

Thank you so much for getting back to me. Very interesting.
Warm regards,
Sharon

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: England, uk
April 10, 2015 5:52 am
Just wondering what this is and if it’s harmless? Thank you
Signature: Kelly

Flightless Fly

What’s This Australian Soldier Fly doing in England???

Dear Kelly,
For now, we are calling this by the oxymoronic name of flightless Fly.  We are certain it is in the order Diptera, but beyond that, we cannot say at this time.  It does not appear to be the flightless Crane Fly Epidapus venaticus that we found pictured on the Earth Life Web Fly Page as the antennae are quite different from the linked drawing.
  We are going to seek some other opinions.

Chen Young provides some information
Hi Daniel,
Your doubt has its merit, this is not a crane fly and I don’t know off hand who she is.  I will need to ask my colleague about this one.  Could you provide me with the information as where this lady is from?  Please double check with your source, my friend does not believe that this fly has an European origin.
Thanks,
Chen

Hi Daniel,
My colleague Dr. Martin Hauser from California Department of Food and Agriculture has identified your wingless fly as a primitive soldier fly Boreoides subulatus  (family  Stratiomyidae) from Australia, and they are found only in Australia.  Perhaps your source did not understand the importance of locality of the bugs when come to identification.
I have done a little more checking around and noticed that you had a webpage about this wingless fly.  They might look slight different but I think it is caused by the camera angle and lighting effect.
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2010/04/03/mystery-of-the-month-mating-flies-from-australia/
Thanks,
Chen

Thanks so much for the response Chen.  We will try to get some verification from Kelly regarding the location of the sighting, and also if anyone in the area recently returned from Australia.

Eric Eaton Concurs
Gentlemen:
I looked this up online myself and came to the same conclusion as Martin Hauser, but did not reply because of the locality being the UK rather than Australia.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination