Currently viewing the category: "Soldier Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ident request
Location: 33°43′S 150°20′E
December 2, 2016 7:19 pm
David,
2 years ago I was in Leura, a small town in the Blue Mountains just west of Sydney Australia, when I saw a number of these bugs on a concrete driveway. Next to the driveway was a small bamboo grove which seemed to be the source of the bug. The maximum size was about 35 mm but most were about 20 mm long. None had any feelers/antennae. They tended to move towards a persons shoe if one went within a metre of them.
It was 11 am in mid April which is mid autumn (Fall) here. It was an overcast day, not raining, but with high humidity. Leura is 90 km (55 miles) from the Pacific ocean and is generally at 950 metres (3000 feet) above sea level. The vegetation is lush.
Any ideas?
Best Wishes
RobT
Signature: Robert T

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Dear Robert,
This is a flightless female Soldier Fly,
Boreoides subulatus, a species with pronounced sexual dimorphism, with the males being much smaller and winged.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia:  “Female Wingless Soldier Flies are seen on walls and fences, laying masses of long white eggs. Larvae live in damp soil or rotting vegetation, especially in or near compost.”

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Dear Daniel,
That is wonderful. I have lived here on the east coast of Australia for 30 years and prior to that in Southern Africa also for 30 years and was totally stumped.
Hope you and your family have a wonderful Christmas.
Regards
RobT

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange bug In Austin, Texas
Location: TX
October 17, 2016 7:15 pm
I found this bug in my gym bag on 10/13/16. I found the bug on the University of Texas at Austin campus. The bug has a long black body divided into two parts. Half of the bottom of the back is transparent. I captured the bug (because it got into my room) and released it outside. The attached photos are the bug in a plastic case.
Signature: TKR

Black Soldier Fly

Black Soldier Fly

Dear TKR,
Because of the transparent part of the body you observed, the Black Soldier Fly,
Hermetia illucens, is sometimes called a Window Fly.  It is described on BugGuide as being:  “Large soldier fly, all black with bright white tarsi. Underneath, first abdominal segment has clear areas. Wings have purplish sheen. Likely a wasp mimic, it buzzes loudly.”  This is a harmless species that does not sting nor bite.  Because of your catch and release handling of this sighting, we are tagging the posting with the Bug Humanitarian Award.   

Black Soldier Fly

Black Soldier Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Grubs found in rotting wood of coral tree
Location: Los Angeles
August 19, 2016 9:30 am
Good morning, Bugman.
We discovered today a large area of rot on the base of our coral tree. Excavating the rot, I found several communities of this grub pictured. The animals seemed at first not to move at all, but after some time, it became evident that they do move, very slowly.
I am inclined to believe that they are taking advantage of the rotted wood, and are not the cause of it.
They were surely not expecting this sudden exposure!
Can you identify them?
Signature: Swami M

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Dear Swami,
We are nearly certain these are Black Soldier Fly larvae,
Hermetia illucens, which you may find pictured on BugGuide.  Black Soldier Fly larvae are frequently found in compost piles, where they are beneficial as they aid in decomposition.  According to BugGuide:  “Commercially distributed for composting” and “Larvae live in compost, dung, rotting vegetation.”

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Om
Dear Daniel,
Thanks so much for getting back to me. Yes, I agree the larvae match the images of Black Soldier Fly larvae on your website.
I am hoping we can save our tree; it seems to be infected with some kind of rot that turns the wood right under the bark to mush. Apparently these larvae love it, as there are quite a few.
Best wishes,
Mahayogananda
ps I’m at the Vedanta Society in Hollywood

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mydas fly maybe?
Location: Easton ct
August 13, 2016 2:50 pm
Greetings,
These appeared in the house after roof work.
Any help appreciated !
Signature: Many thanks, chip

Black Soldier Fly

Black Soldier Fly

Dear Chip,
We actually believe that even though your image does not show the clear areas of the abdomen that are responsible for the common name of Window Fly, that this is a Black Soldier Fly,
Hermetia illucens, because of the white tarsi on the legs, which are evident in this BugGuide image.  Black Soldier Fly larvae develop in compost piles, and a nearby compost pile might have some relevance to the sudden appearance of Black Soldier Flies in your home.  Black Soldier Flies do not bite and they are considered harmless.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Huntsville, Ontario, Canada
June 14, 2016 3:39 pm
Hello,
I noticed this interesting horsefly-like bug laying these green eggs on our car mirror in late spring (June 14th) in Huntsville Ontario. I was hoping you could help identify? It seems like a horse fly, but the eggs are green rather than milky white as many sites have suggested they would be. I wondered if it was a bee at first? I appreciate any help.
Thanks!
Signature: Matt

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Dear Matt,
We believe we have correctly identified your ovipositing Soldier Fly as either
Stratiomys adelpha or Stratiomys discalis based on images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “S. adelpha and S. discalis are very similar and may turn out to be the same species. The taxonomy of the Nearctic Stratiomys is a mess. There are a few easily distinguished species, but several spp. are defined based on coloration which is variable. The male genitalia have never been examined carefully, and they could be helpful. –N.E. Woodley, pers. comm.”

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp? Fly?
Location: Central Arkansas, USA
June 14, 2016 3:31 pm
Dear Bugman,
A friend took the attached picture. Sorry for the poor quality. I have had little luck in finding what it might be. Can you please help? Insect is about one inch long. Pic was taken June 14, 2016.
Signature: Thank you!!

Soldier Fly

Soldier Fly

This is a Solder Fly and we believe it is in the genus Hedriodiscus based on images posted to BugGuide.  Many harmless Soldier Flies mimic stinging wasps and bees for protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination