Currently viewing the category: "Robber Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge crazy fly
Location: McKinney, Texas
July 23, 2015 7:50 am
I went outside and heard an amazing ruckus in the bushes and found two of these very large, hairy, long, and huge-eyed flying buggers mating with each other. They look rather fierce and I’m not sure if they are a type of dragonfly? The picture shows the front of one of them, still attached to the other. Since they are obviously busy, I didn’t want to get too close or to be too intrusive!
Signature: Lover of bugs, Michelle

Mating Robber Flies

Mating Robber Flies

Dear Michelle,
There is not enough detail in your image to be certain, but we believe your mating Robber Flies may be Red Footed Cannibalflies.

Thank you so much!  I clicked the link to your site and that is exactly what it is.
And thank you for all you do.  I just love your site!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what kind of flying bug is this?
Location: massachusetts, USA
July 23, 2015 12:18 pm
it was flying around my room and had a very loud buzz.
Signature: tim

Robber Fly Carnage

Robber Fly Carnage

Dear Tim,
This is a harmless, beneficial, predatory Robber Fly, and it will obviously buzz no more.  In an effort to educate our readership on the harmlessness of most insects, we are tagging this posting as Unnecessary Carnage  In the future, if you are able to trap an unwanted bug indoors in a glass, you can slip a postcard over the opening and relocate the critter outside.

Thank you for telling me what the bug was. I killed the insect because i saw the huge tail it had. It looked like a stinger that could do some damage. I don’t love killing anything, but i wasn’t going to take the chance to get a sting or a bite from a potentially poisonous insect.
I did read they can bite humans. They also have a toxic saliva that liquifies their prey.
Sometime i do catch the insects and let them outside. I wasnt going to take a chance with this unknown bug with a baby in the house though. Hopefully you understand.

Dear Tim,
Your explanation is fully understandable.  What you mistook for a stinger is actually the ovipositor of the female, an organ used to lay eggs, and interestingly,  in wasps, bees and some ants, the ovipositor has evolved into a stinger.  We imagine the bite of a Robber Fly might have some unpleasant side effects, but we have never received a report of a person being bitten by one, nor have we heard of anyone who tried to handle a Robber Fly, which we imagine might result in a bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant “bee”?
Location: Westwood MA 02090
June 30, 2015 7:25 pm
Found this rather Docile, Giant bee like bug today at my camp and could not identify.
About the length of my index finger (3″).
Much larger than a carpenter bee and someone thought it could be an invasive Asian Resin bee, but all pics look again, too small.
Both pics are the same bug.
Help!!
And thanks!
Signature: James R

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Dear James,
Your confusion is understandable.  This is a Bee-Like Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, most likely either Laphria virginica or Laphria flavicollis.  Of Laphria virginica, BugGuide states:  “Easy to confuse with L. flavicollis. The main gestalt things to look for are the hairiness of the black abdomen, very fuzzy in virginica but somewhat glossy in flavicollis. The golden hair on the top of the thorax looks more swept back and finely constructed in flavicollis. And in virginica, the legs have a reddish brown tone to the fuzz in good light.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large fluffy faced fly laying eggs in old board
Location: Colorado City, Colorado
June 5, 2015 11:49 am
What kind of bug is this little lady? She is about an inch long and I believe she was laying eggs while I was snapping these photos. This was taken in my backyard on June 5th, 2015
Signature: Connie

Robber Fly

Giant Robber Fly

Hi Connie,
This is a female Robber Fly, and we found a very similar looking individual on the Bandelier National Monument website, but alas, it is not identified to the species level.  Eric Eaton has an image of
Promachus albifacies from Colorado Springs that looks very similar, and researching that on BugGuide, we believe that at least the genus with members known as Giant Robber Flies is correct.  We are going to be out of the office later in June, so we are postdating your submission to go live during our absence.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Bug
Location: Toledo, Ohio
June 4, 2015 5:22 pm
It’s that time of year again where I love to visit your page because I find so many new bugs. I love bugs, but honestly, I hope this one never lands on me as it was HUGE. (Unless I find out it doesn’t sting. ) It was hanging out in an open field in Northwest Ohio with butterflies and other bees. Any idea what it is? I’ve never seen anything like it.
Thank you!
Signature: Ginny

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Dear Ginny,
This is a Bee-Like Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, but we cannot be certain which species you sighted.  You can find additional information on BugGuide.

Thank you!  You know, I actually looked up Robber Fly, but didn’t see anything that looked like it.  I will do further looking.  Thanks so much!!
…ginny

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant flying bug with green eyes
Location: mid texas
June 3, 2015 12:46 pm
this is about the size of the whole palm of my hand. We are located in mid Texas and it’s the beginning of June! It’s been sitting in a pot for about 5 hours and hasn’t moved.
Signature: Jessica

Robber Fly:  Microstylum morosum

Robber Fly: Microstylum morosum

Dear Jessica,
We verified the identity of your Robber Fly as
Microstylum morosum thanks to images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination