Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s this bug??
Location: georgia
July 19, 2013 9:26 am
hello! It’s a hot summer here in georgia and this year we have been flooded with theses flying insects. at first I thought they were wasps but now I’m not so sure. please help if you can!
Signature: any

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

This sure looks to us like another Tiger Bee Fly, Xenox tigrinus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big black insect with clear, spotted wings
Location: Columbus, OH
July 19, 2013 8:20 pm
Saw two of these creatures on some potted flowers on my deck tonight. I’m in Columbus, OH – photo taken in the evening of July 19, 2013. Very hot out, nearing the end of a week+ of 90-degree days. The body is about the length of a man’s thumbnail. Even with a steady and sometimes strong breeze, they never moved an inch. Would love to know what they are!
Signature: Emily

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Emily,
We believe we have identified your Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae as a Tiger Bee Fly,
Xenox tigrinus.  This is a harmless species whose “Larva is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees, Xylocopa” according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Give me an ”H”! Bee Fly fun
Location: Stuttgart, Germany
July 19, 2013 2:07 pm
I checked and there is no Bee Fly like this one on your site yet. :)
I had a completely unexpected day in Stuttgart recently and rather than go to the Porsche or Mercedes Museums I walked around and found cool bugs. Really. :)
This one I just knew had to be a Bee Fly even though I didn’t know that existed as a general name (it seemed too simple). She had me fooled at first glance but then I was suspicious because despite the coloring and size, she didn’t act like a bee (or bumble bee which is a flurry of activity). In fact, she seemed quite annoyed that I even noticed her. :D
In looking her up I stumbled upon a story of people playing with ”H” Bees as kids who were annoyed, even in denial they might have been playing with icky flies. Ha ha! We are so bug conditioned. I actually have found all new respect for flies since I discovered this great site.

http://www.beementor.com/they-are-not-all-bees/

Would be great to know more if you are able.
Thanks!
Signature: Curious Girl

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

Dear Curious Girl,
Alas, you are mistaken.  This is not a Bee Fly, but rather it is a Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, more specifically a Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax.  Many members of the family mimic bees and wasps.  We do have several images of adult Drone Flies on our site, and curiously, though they are a native European species, they have been introduced to North America.  Drone Fly larvae are found in stagnant water and they are known as Rat Tailed Maggots.

Well, that’s why I send the pics in to you. I am really amateur but I love finding out what something really is. Now though I am wondering why they get called “Drone” and “Flower” fly (especially rather than Bee). Funnily enough I had heard of rat-tailed maggots before but never would have put the two together. Thanks for the quick and proper ID.
My apologies for sending in a commonly submitted bug. :)

Dear Curious Girl,
Please do not apologize.  We do not have many Drone Fly images in our archives, and we are thrilled to have a recent image.  If you noticed, the link to the image we provided you is five years old.  We get considerably more images of Rat Tailed Maggots than we do of adult Drone Flies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dangerous bug or not?
Location: Rhode Island
July 17, 2013 3:24 pm
Dear Bugman,
I have this insect that looks like a type of wasp that has been hanging around my daughter’s swing set. We built a wooden frame and placed wood chips/mulch in it for the swing set area. The insect wasn’t aggressive and it let me take some close up pictures with my cell phone. I just want to make sure it is safe since it is spending a large amount of time around her swing set. I tried googling images and didn’t realize there are SO many types of wasps. Could you please help?
Signature: Sincerely,

Mydas Fly

Mydas Fly

Though it effectively mimics a stinging wasp, this is actually a harmless Mydas Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Creepy Fly Eating Bug??
Location: Backyard of home in Antelope Valley, CA
July 14, 2013 6:05 pm
This is the second day I have seen this bug and finally got a good picture! I live in the High Desert of Antelope Valley, CA. and have never seen it before. Did not realize it was eating a fly until I loaded the picture and wow…..CREEPY!
Signature: CheckingOutBugs

Robber Fly feeds upon Blow Fly

Robber Fly feeds upon Blow Fly

Dear CheckingOutBugs,
The predator is some species of Robber Fly and the appears to be a Blow Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Horse fly?
Location: NY lower Hudson Valley
July 12, 2013 11:23 am
Hello!
I found this large fly sunning itself on my deck umbrella this afternoon here in NY’s lower Hudson Valley. It’s body is shaped like a horse fly, but it’s markings do not match up with any horse fly pics that I’ve found. It is over an inch long in length. Is it a horse fly?
Signature: Don’t Bite Me

Horse Fly

Horse Fly

This certainly is a Horse Fly, and she does appear to be a female because of the space between her eyes.  Only female Horse Flies bite and feed on mammalian blood.  We believe we have correctly identified your Horse Fly as Tabanus trimaculatus based on photos posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination