Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly on calico asters
Location: Kent County, Michigan USA
September 21, 2014 3:57 pm
What is the name of this cool fly I found enjoying calico asters in Michigan in late September? Thanks!
Signature: Patricia

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Patricia,
This is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, but we are not certain of the species.  Tachinid Flies are parasitic on other insects and arthropods.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: thought it was a huge crane fly at first glance
Location: New York/Connecticut Border
September 21, 2014 6:58 pm
… but then I realized it was a bit different. it’s wings are swept back fully and it appears to have a sharper tail than most. also absent are the nubbins of secondary wings on the crane fly.
spotted on my car in southern NY state (Purdy’s, NY) this last Saturday. had driven from nearby Connecticut but I am pretty sure it landed on my car after having parked for dinner. I’d estimate he was almost 3 inches long from front legs to rear legs.
Signature: Eric R.

from perusing your site a bit more I see it is most likely is a giant crane fly. great site, will definitely refer to it in the future!

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Crane Fly

Dear Eric,
In comparing your image to images on BugGuide, we agree with your identification of a Giant Crane Fly,
Tipula abdominalis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I have never encountered this at work before
Location: Seattle, WA
September 19, 2014 7:27 pm
I work in Seattle, WA on commercial boilers. The location I took these photos (which are actually screenshots from much more informative HQ videos that I took) is on the ground near an outdoor steam boiler in September at the end of summer. It was 75°F that day and was the last day of an unusually long and hot summer. The water (and sludge) these things were living in was very warm, I did not measure the temperature of the water but because it was continually being fed by 212°F boiler water. Please let me know if you need more information, pictures or video. Oh and these things were about half an inch long.
Signature: Aaron in Seattle

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Dear Aaron,
One of your images appears to depict a Rat-Tailed Maggot, the larva of a Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax.  According to BugGuide:  “The larva of the Drone-Fly feeds on decaying organic material in stagnant water in small ponds, ditches and drains. Such water usually contains little or no oxygen and the larva breathes through the long thin tube that extends from its rear end to the surface of the water and that gives it its common name of ‘rat-tailed maggot’.”

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Rat-Tailed Maggot

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this thing?
Location: Durham, North Carolina
September 16, 2014 7:09 pm
Dear Bugman,
I came out of the store this afternoon and noticed these 2 creatures perched on my car. At first they were lined up, but then one turned around so their tails were touching. I’ve never seen anything quite like them! They appear to be a cross between a bee and a dragonfly? I’m quite curious to find out!
Signature: Thank You, Sarah Miles

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Dear Sarah,
We are amused that you encountered a mating pair of Red Footed Cannibalflies, yet you composed your images to show only half of the pair.

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red eyed flies
Location: Toledo District, Belize
September 13, 2014 3:42 pm
Hello again folks,
I took a few photos of new fungi and did not notice the flies until I downloaded the images. These are very small insects.
Thanks in advance.
Signature: Tanya

Vinegar Flies

Vinegar Flies

Dear Tanya,
These sure look like Vinegar Flies in the genus
Drosophila to us.  One member of the genus, Drosophila melanogaster, commonly called a Fruit Fly, is used to teach genetics and you can read more about it on the University of North Carolina web page called The Wonderful Fruit Fly.  Of the family, BugGuide notes they feed upon:  “Decaying fruit and fungi also fresh sap and nectar from flowers.”

Thanks so much, Daniel.  I will read more about these critters on the links you provided.  Your website is terrific; it’s the only one I go to daily and spend lots more time than I intended.
Mediterranean fruit flies are an agricultural pest in this area; it’s not uncommon to spot the little white cardboard triangle traps in fruit trees in the nearby town when there is concern about an outbreak.
Tanya

Hi again Tanya,
Thanks for the compliment.  Mediterranean Fruit Flies are in a different family, which is why we referred to your individuals as Vinegar Flies.  The Vinegar Flies can become a nuisance in the home with overly ripe fruit, but they are not considered an agricultural pest.  They are also associated with bars and taverns that serve sweet, sticky liquors and they are frequently found inside opened bottles with pour spouts.

Thanks, Daniel,  I was reading the UNC site about lab use of fruit flies just now.
The fruit flies we find in swarms in the kitchen from time to time are probably Vinegar flies then.  I never got a close look and certainly never thought to photograph them.  The red eyes were a surprise — very cool.
Thanks again.  I’m turning into a WTB addict.

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Subject: UNUSUAL CRAB SPIDER
Location: Fannie, Arkansas
September 10, 2014 2:43 pm
I know this is a crab spider but the coloration and design are new to me. The spider is white, pink and green with a pink combed effect on the sides, pink area on the abdomen and green on the thorax top. Do you know which crab spider it is?
Signature: Bill Burton

Crab Spider catches Fly

Crab Spider catches Fly

Dear Bill,
What wonderful Food Chain images you have submitted.  We believe that based on this image from BugGuide, your individual is a Whitebanded Crab Spider,
Misumenoides formosipes, which is a highly variable species.  Browsing through the images on BugGuide, you can see just how variable the colors and markings are on the Whitebanded Crab Spider.  We have run out of time this morning, and we can’t identify the fly at this time.  Perhaps one of our readers will provide a comment.

Crab Spider eats Fly

Crab Spider eats Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination