Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Diogmites salutans (I think)
Location: Ocala, FL
August 2, 2013 10:53 am
I got lucky today and this guy landed on the fence right by me to devour his waspish meal. I believe he is a Diogmites salutans. I thought you might enjoy the photo, it was great to get to watch this strange creature. We are in Ocala, Florida and I get a lot of wasps feeding on my Spanish Needles but this is only the second time I’ve seen a Robber Fly.
Signature: Jenifer in Ocala

Hanging Thief eats its prey

Hanging Thief eats its prey

Dear Jenifer,
Thanks to your photo, it is easy to see how Hanging Thieves in the genus
Diogmites get their common name.  While we cannot confirm the species, you have correctly identified the distinctive genus for this Robber Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue-eyed Robber Fly (Megaphorus megachile?)
Location: Yallowstone National Park, Wyoming
August 17, 2013 3:14 pm
Hi Daniel!
Just back from Yellowstone/Grand Teton – a spectacular vacation. I saw lots of beautiful winged creatures, but this little blue-eyed fly caught my attention. I am pretty sure it’s a robber fly, and I am pretty sure it’s clutching some prey. I apologize for the bad photo, but it let me get one shot from a distance before it took off. I hope all is well with you!
Signature: Dori Eldridge

Robber Fly with Prey

Robber Fly with Prey

Hi Dori,
We cannot say for certain which species of Robber Fly you have photographed, however we do agree that based on images posted to BugGuide, this looks very similar to the members of the genus
Megaphorus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Upland, CA.
July 30, 2013 3:07 pm
Hi!
We found this bug, and it seemed to be one body, with two heads. I have never seen anything like this and was hoping you can tell me what kind of bug it is. My email address is [edited for content], as soon as you figure it out please tell me what it is!!
Thank you!
Signature: Melissa Pleasant

Mating Bee Killers

Mating Bee Killers

Hi Melissa,
These are mating Robber Flies in the genus
Mallophora, commonly called Bee Killers.  The only member of the genus reported in California according to BugGuide is Mallophora fautrix.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’m guessing it’s a robber fly. Am I right or wrong?
Location: Little River, Va
July 28, 2013 4:46 pm
This is the first time I have encountered this insect.
It flew into our cabin & would not leave.
I was scared to mess with it too much because it looks like it could fight back.
After some googling, I am guessing it is a robber fly.
Am I right or wrong?
Thank you.
Signature: Heather

Robber Fly, we presume

Robber Fly, we presume

Dear Heather,
We apologize for the tardy response.  We spent a bit of time trying to identify your insect, which we also believe to be a Robber Fly, but we were unable to find an identification prior to leaving town for two and a half weeks.  Then time just got away from us and we never created the posting which we have now remedied.  We will send this image to Eric Eaton to see if he can provide any information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large winged insect in car grill
Location: Western Washington
July 27, 2013 3:03 am
I apologize for the nature of the picture, and know it can be tough to identify an insect that has been mangled in this fashion, but was wondering if you could give me any clues to its type. It was found yesterday morning on my sister’s car, she had come back late one night & did not notice it til the next morning. I didn’t know until later, or I would have taken it off to try to ID it myself or at least get some more pictures, and unfortunately it detached on her way to work. We’re in the Seatac area, she works in Tacoma, if that helps at all. Any help you can provide would be appreciated, thanks in advance!
Signature: Mike

Great Western Crane Fly struck by car

Great Western Crane Fly struck by car

Hi Mike,
This appears to be a Great Western Crane Fly,
Holorusia hespera, and we are pretty certain it is the largest Crane Fly in western North America.  Here is a photo on BugGuide for comparison.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Southeastern PA Insect
Location: SE Pennsylvania
July 25, 2013 4:44 pm
Hello! I failed to ID this on any site!
Here’s the deets*:
-Can fly (not gracefully) with its transparent, black-tinted wings
-3 dark brownish stripes/raindrops on its upper abdomen, running parallel with its body
-Drags its 2 back legs (of 6 total) behind it in a wasp-like way
-A bit bigger than a quarter
-Found under a bush; wasn’t aggressive nor fleeting, but kind of stupid. It would take a flutter hop or two when we excited it with a blade of grass.
*Yes, that was a pun. Thanks all!
Signature: Kait

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

Dear Kait,
Do not judge what your perceived to be a lack of grace in this Hanging Thief, a Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, too harshly.  While they may seem ungainly on the ground, Hanging Thieves are very adept aerial predators that take large prey, often wasps and bees, on the wing.  The common name Hanging Thief refers to their manner of feeding.  After catching their winged prey, Hanging Thieves alight and feed, often dangling from a single leg like a circus performer.  This posting will go live during our unexpected trip in early August.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination