Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Modernist Bug
Location: Vail, AZ
July 4, 2013 11:28 am
This is the first of this kind I have noticed. Was photographed on the Arizona Trail near Three Bridges. Landed in front of me like a grasshopper.
Signature: Carl

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

Hi Carl,
This is a Robber Fly and your individual is one impressive looking predator.  We are not certain of the species, but it does resemble members on the genus
Polacantha pictured on BugGuide where the information provided states that Polacantha arctuata is found in Arizona.  All of the photos on BugGuide of the species are males and we cannot locate any photos of females.  We believe your Robber Fly is a female.  We cannot locate any other images of Polacantha arctuata on the internet.  Your individual appears to lack the striped abdomen found on Promachus sackeni which is pictured on BugGuide.  While we cannot be certain of the species, we can tell you that Robber Flies are very adept predators and they often take large winged prey in flight.  Many species feed on large bees and wasps.  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck with a species identification.

Wow! Thank you!

Eric Eaton Responds to our request
Daniel:
Eric Fisher is the go-to person for robber flies.  I’m sorry, I don’t have his e-mail address in my contact file….
This one appears to be a male in the genus Proctacanthus, if I know anything at all (which is sometimes suspect with asilids!).
Eric 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this beautiful guy?
Location: Columbus, OH
July 3, 2013 8:44 pm
Saw him on our burning bush out front. Didn’t want to get too close. Guessing a solitary wasp/fly of some kind? Thanks for any help!
Signature: Thanks, Nick

Mydas Fly

Mydas Fly

Dear Nick,
The Mydas Fly,
Mydas clavatus, that you submitted is a very effective wasp mimic, but we are not entirely certain of the connectivity of this species to other orders in the Complex Web of Life.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White Fly
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
June 30, 2013 6:55 pm
I’ve never seen a white fly before, there are some black stripes on it’s back, and big red eyes. I saw it on a tree while walking my dogs in early spring. I tried to find it online, but nothing looked like this. Do you know what it is?
Signature: Emily Rose

Unknown Fly

Root Maggot Fly

Hi again Emily,
We haven’t the time to try to identify this Fly at this time, so we are posting it as unidentified and we hope one of our readers might be able to provide some information.

Instantaneous Update:  Root Maggot Fly
Thanks to Katy for providing an identification and a link to BugGuide and the Root Maggot Fly, Anthomyia oculifera.

Excellent, a community effort! I also posted to fb for identification too, and everyone is stumped so far on this guy.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?!
Location: United Kingdom
June 27, 2013 2:18 am
Found in the UK, Summer. Looks very similar to a crane fly (daddy long legs), but it’s larger, and black/yellow!
Signature: Cory

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Dear Cory,
This actually is a Crane Fly.  We cannot say for certain that it is  
Nephrotoma crocata which is pictured on Diptera Info, but it is very similar looking.

Thank you for you reply, I didn’t think I’d get one, but much appreciated!
Regards,
Cory.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A couple curious bugs
Location: Camden, South Carolina
June 26, 2013 6:29 am
Hello! I found the fly outside my work on a window, it had metallic eyes and wasn’t too happy about flash. I was thinking drone fly, but then I started looking up pictures and that didn’t seem right.
The second bug I believe to be some sort of aphid? I found it on my squash, after noticing holes in the leaves. It’s absolutely adorable though with its fluffy little tail. I think I’ll share :P
Signature: Veronica Roma

Horse Fly

Horse Fly

Hi Veronica,
This is a photo of a very impressive female Horse Fly.  The space between the eyes identifies her as a female.  Female Horse Flies are the blood sucking biters.  Males feed on fruit juices and do not bite.  Your Horse Fly looks like it might be
Tabanus fulvulus based on photos posted to BugGuide.  The other insect looks like an immature Plant Hopper which places it in the same order as Aphids.  Plant Hoppers do not chew holes in leaves, but they do suck fluids from plants and many are considered to be agricultural pests.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black Flying Thing
Location: Mt Washington, Los Angeles, CA
June 23, 2013 10:59 pm
We have no idea what this is. It just appeared on our office desk at about 10pm, just hanging out staring at the computer. Looks like a wasp, so I caught it to take some pictures in case we need to be weary of getting stung if we see them again.
Thank you!
Signature: Paul and Barb

Black Soldier Fly

Black Soldier Fly

Dear Paul and Barb,
Greetings neighbors.  The offices of What’s That Bug? are on Mount Washington in Los Angeles.  This is a perfectly harmless Black Soldier Fly,
Hermetia illucens.  They are sometimes called Window Flies because of the transparent “windows” on the abdomen.  If you or a neighbor have a compost pile, you can expect to see more Black Soldier Flies as the larvae live in rotting organic materials, including compost piles.  According to BugGuide:  “Very rarely, accidentally ingested larvae cause intestinal myiasis in humans and domestic animals. However, larvae compete with house flies in manure, compost piles, etc., and may thus be beneficial. Adults are harmless and not known to carry any human disease.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination