Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: whats this bug?
Location: Refrigerator and freezer
October 26, 2013 8:53 pm
Hello,
I just signed the lease of my new apartment (10/25/2013) and started moving in (10/26/2013). I typically do a thorough cleaning from top to bottom of any new place I move into. When I went to the kitchen to clean I opened the refrigerator and saw what looked like fried rice or pieces of brown rice sticking to the top and a few were on the bottom. I opened the freezer and there were a few in there as well. These bugs were not moving so I assumed that it was just that, perhaps old food left behind so I got the cleaning supplies and went to work. Once I finished, I placed a pack of bottled water in the refrigerator, shut the door and continued to clean the rest of the apartment. An hour or two I came back to grab a bottle of water and these ”brown rice” looking bugs were back!! a few were on my pack of bottled water and at the bottom of the frige again. DISGUSTING!! The refrigerator is kinda old and has some rust on the inside in some places. I also noticed th e refrigerator does not get that cold at all Im extremely pissed and will be heading to the rental office first thing Monday morning!!!! What are your thoughts on what this could be?
Signature: as professional as possible

Blurry Bugs in Refrigerator

Blurry Bugs in Refrigerator

Dear asap,
Your photos are quite blurry and we cannot make an exact identification due to the poor quality, however, we suspect you may have Carpet Beetle Larvae.  Our second guess would be Fly Puparia.

Blurry Bugs on Water Bottle

Blurry Bugs on Water Bottle

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny, graceful, and apparently not a fairyfly
Location: southern California
October 25, 2013 9:19 pm
Hi again! I’ve written in a few times, and am very grateful for the identifications. I found this little flying beauty on one of my bug walks in southern California today (October 25). It is in a garden; there is a stream nearby, but not immediately proximate to this plant. The insect is about the size of a mosquito. With its long, delicate abdomen, it looked like a fairy to me when it was in flight, but as far as I can tell the term ”fairyfly” is applied to a totally different kind of insect. After spending some time unsure of where to even begin in identifying this lovely creature, I’m conceding defeat. Can you help me?
Signature: Amanda

Possibly Syrphid Fly

Robber Fly

Dear Amanda,
We really wish your photo revealed some individual features of this unusual insect.  The head and eyes look like those of a Fly in the order Diptera, and the body most closely resembles that of a wasp in the order Hymenoptera.  The fly family Syrphidae contains many individuals that mimic stinging Hymenopterans, so that is our best guess.  We were unable to find any matching images on BugGuide, but we did locate two that are somewhat similar, including
Baccha elongata and Pseudodoros clavatus.  Though they look somewhat similar, we are quite certain neither of those is your species.  The hind legs on your individual are very distinctive, which should aid in the correct identification.  We are going to contact Eric Eaton for assistance.

Possibly Syrphid Fly

Robber Fly

Update:  Bee Fly is Another Possibility
We are now entertaining the possibility that this might be a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae as there is a similarity to the genus
Systropus that is pictured on BugGuide.

Correction Courtesy of Eric Eaton
Hi, Daniel:
This is actually a robber fly in the subfamily Leptogastrinae.  Most of the genera have this skinny appearance.
Eric

Thanks very much to you and Eric! I had actually briefly entertained the idea of a robber fly because of the way it was hanging, but I just thought it was much too small so I didn’t look closer at that idea. That’s great to know.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dead Head Flower Fly
Location: Hyde Park, London, England
October 21, 2013
Thank you Daniel. I was pretty sure I was forgetting something and glad you were able to find the Latin name.
Just realized I saw another Dead Head fly in London’s Hyde Park a couple weeks ago. This time a female who has a more pointed bottom. :~) as you’ll see with the additional pics I’m enclosing (it’s quite interesting how they work that illusion of a waspy waist).
I’ve been finding so many interesting bugs and I think it’s the flies I enjoy the most. They are so variable and seem to have such personalities. But there are several more I’ll share with you soon hopefully. Some are very, very tiny!

Dead Head Fly in London
Dead Head Fly in London

Hi again Curious Girl,
Thanks for sending us additional photos of a female Dead Head Fly,
Myatropa florea.  We are going to add this to your original posting as well as create a new posting.  Since we can only have one location per posting, your sightings in Portugal and London should be archived distinctly from one another.

Dead Head Fly from London
Dead Head Fly from London
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dead Head Flower Fly (Portugal)
Location: Porto, Portugal
October 20, 2013 3:39 am
Hello Daniel,
After you identified my Drone Fly I thought I had found another but on closer inspection (thank goodness for photos) I believe it’s another variety called a ”Dead Head” because the pattern on the shoulders resembles a skull.
I found what I believe is a skittish female the first day but the second day the male was much more patient with my curiosity.
They are quite big as flies go. This was mid-July or so.
Anyway, did not see any Dead Head flies on your site, so thought I would share (though tried to wait till submissions might be more manageable — which is sad as it means not as many bugs to discover outside) . I adore the yellow hair halo they seem to have (which is how I realized first they were different than the drone fly — thanks to you I’m learning how to identify myself and it’s fun). :)
Signature: Curious Girl

Dead Head Fly

Dead Head Fly

Hi Curious Girl,
Thanks for your sweet email.  Since you did not provide a scientific name, we searched for Dead Head Flower Fly and found a photo on TrekNature identified as
Myatropa florea.  Further searching turned up this interesting dialog on BugGuide when an individual was photographed in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco in 2005.  According to BugGuide:  “Its larvae live in rotholes in logs and other wood, so it probably has been shipped with timber or something like that.”  NatureSpot has some good images showing the thoracic markings.

Dead Head Fly

Dead Head Fly

Thank you Daniel. I was pretty sure I was forgetting something and glad you were able to find the Latin name.
Just realized I saw another Dead Head fly in London’s Hyde Park a couple weeks ago. This time a female who has a more pointed bottom. :~) as you’ll see with the additional pics I’m enclosing (it’s quite interesting how they work that illusion of a waspy waist).
I’ve been finding so many interesting bugs and I think it’s the flies I enjoy the most. They are so variable and seem to have such personalities. But there are several more I’ll share with you soon hopefully. Some are very, very tiny!

Dead Head Fly in London

Dead Head Fly in London

Hi again Curious Girl,
Thanks for sending us additional photos of a female Dead Head Fly.  We are going to add this to your original posting as well as create a new posting.  Since we can only have one location per posting, your sightings in Portugal and London should be archived distinctly from one another.

Dead Head Fly from London

Dead Head Fly from London

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Huge Southern Yellow Jacket
Location: Augusta, Georgia
October 17, 2013 4:19 am
What is this huge yellow jacket? Wasp? Hornet? In Georgia.
Signature: Terrified of things that sting

Good News Bee

Good News Bee

Dear TTTS,
This is a Yellow Jacket Hoverfly or Good News Bee.  It is perfectly harmless.  Your fall leaves are a lovely background.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ticky looking bug but not a tick I’m told.
Location: BIrch Bay, Wa (State Park)
October 16, 2013 4:31 pm
Do ALL ticks have 8 legs? Here’s a pic of a bug that I swore was a tic but was told it’s not ~ It acted like tick if you watch it. No one can tell me what it is.
Most say we don’t even have ticks here but I’ve got the vet bill to prove we do ~ Found one on our dog last year.
These are photos I took of this thing.
I would SO appreciate it if you could tell me what this is. We haven’t been walking in the park since because I’m afraid of these things. My friend and I found several on us and it was like they were trying to burrow into our jeans. It creeps me out to think of them in my hair or getting in my shirt.
Signature: Not sure what this means.

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Adult Ticks have eight legs, but it is our understanding that larval Ticks have six legs.  This is not a Tick.  It is a Louse Fly and they are blood suckers.  Female Louse Flies must have a blood meal prior to reproducing.  According to BugGuide:  “Females rear one offspring at a time, the larva feeding in utero from special ‘milk’ glands. The mature larva is ‘born alive’ and immediately pupates in the soil (or on the host in some cases). Most are host specific on bird species, with a few occurring on mammals.”  We suppose they might bite humans if no other host is available.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination