Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Horse fly moth?
Location: Buffalo NY
August 17, 2014 11:39 am
Curious as to what this bug is.
Signature: Cheryl

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Cheryl,
This is a harmless Tiger Bee Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Slug/worm-ish creepy crawler
Location: Southeast Louisiana
August 16, 2014 9:43 pm
Two separate times today, we saw one of these in our garage. Never seen anything like it before. Moved like a slug but didn’t have any visible antennae. It is flat shaped with a pointy “tail”. What exactly might it be? We are curious as every search we’ve made turns up only things we can rule out. 😉
Thanks!
Signature: Dana

Subject: Worm/slug/other!?!
Location: Southeast Louisiana
August 16, 2014 9:33 pm
Twice today, we found one of these in the garage. It moves like a slug, but has no visible antennae. It is flat with a pointed “tail”. Never seen anything like it before and just curious as to what it may be. Thanks!!
Signature: Dana

Fly Pupa

Fly Pupa

Dear Dana,
Twice yesterday, about ten minutes apart, we received similar identification requests from you with the same image attached.  This is the larva or pupa of a fly, but we are uncertain which family or species it belongs to, though it does bear a resemblance to this Horse Fly larva pictured on BugGuide or this possibly Soldier Fly Larva from our archives.

Sorry about the duplicate requests…we didn’t think the first one had gone through. :)
And thanks for your quick response! We didn’t even think of anything like that bc of it’s size…about 2.5 inches long. But that does look very similar.
Thanks again,
Dana

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thanks
August 16, 2014 12:38 pm
Thanks for a great site. How easy it is to find my bugs . So glad I found you and I’m going to buy your book can’t wait. I’m at the eastern end on the north fork of Long Island  and seem to find new bugs all the time.ITS SOOO KOOOOL! Will look to you again soon. Hairy Mary.
Signature: Mary manning

Subject: Peacock bug
August 16, 2014 12:09 pm
Saw one today 8-16-14 on my red bud tree hare in southold , L.I N.Y. Absolutely beautiful! Never saw one before and thought it was just so very cool had to find out.Thank you for your site. Will never forget  that one . Mary.
Signature: Mary manning

Dear Mary,
We are happy you are satisfied with our site and that you are interested in reading Daniel’s book, The Curious World of Bugs, however your second comment has us confused.  We are not certain what you mean by a “Peacock Bug” that is on your red bud tree since you did not include an image.

I couldn’t get a picture of the little peacock bug but found it on your site. Very tiny with wings that close over the back but not flat they stand up! Soo cute but no pic. I’ll look again and send pic when I can. Love your site!

Ed. Note:  We have Peacock Moths, Peacock Butterflies and a Peacock Fly on our site, but no Peacock Bugs.

I think it’s a peacock fly not bug not sure how to get you a pic. I’m new at this internet stuff. Thanks again!

Peacock Fly from Germany

Peacock Fly from Germany

Thanks Mary,
We do have a Peacock Fly from Germany, and since it is listed on BugGuide, it is a North American species that also has been introduced to Europe.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly eating a bee?
Location: Austin, tx
August 16, 2014 8:49 pm
Hi Bugman!
Found this dragonfly looking insect sucking down a bee in my back yard. Is it a dragonfly? It was definitely drinking the bee. Craziest thing. I have a giant oregano patch bit flower right now and the bees love it. We have a pool so sometimes see dragonflies, but this had some odd features I’d never seen on a dragonfly, like a clear abdomen and a feathery black tuft at the end of his backside. What’s that bug?
Laura
Austin, TX
Signature: Laura

Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Hi Laura,
You are mistaken in thinking that this is a Dragonfly, though like a Dragonfly, this Robber Fly is an adept predator capable of capturing large prey on the wing.  We believe we have correctly identified your Robber Fly as a member of the genus
Efferia due to its resemblance to many members in the genus, including this unidentified species that is pictured on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, there are “110 spp. in our area” and “in our area, the vast majority are restricted to sw. US, with some widely western spp. and just two widespread spp..”  We interpret that to mean that many species are very limited in their distribution.  Alas, we haven’t the necessary skills to attempt a species identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identifying wasp-like insect
Location: North East England
August 15, 2014 4:39 am
Hello there, I spotted a strange bug in my kitchen earlier today and took some pictures of it before I let it go out into my back garden. I was wondering if you could help me on the front of identifying it, as I’ve not seen anything like it before and I’m intrigued (I’m a biology student, so it has really got me wondering!). I live in the North East of England. Thank you in advance for any help!
Signature: Ryan Simmons

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Dear Ryan,
If you look closely, you will see that this insect has only one pair of wings, indicating that it is a fly and not a wasp.  It is a Crane Fly in the family Tipulidae.  It looks very similar to this
Ctenophora pectinicornis that is posted on this Dutch website.  Some Crane Flies are attracted to lights, which might explain why it was in your kitchen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Another Southern Bee Killer?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
August 14, 2014 9:55 am
I saw that you had many robber fly inquiries last week. Here is mine. :-)
You kindly identified a Southern Bee Killer for me several years ago. Is this insect the same? It was hiding in plain sight, holding perfectly still on a young crepe myrtle tree, which is a bee magnet due to its many fragrant clusters of blossoms.
Thank you!
Signature: Ellen

Southern Bee Killer

Southern Bee Killer

Dear Ellen,
Taking a closer look at your previous submission from 2009, we now believe neither is a Southern Bee Killer,
Mallophora orcina, as the individuals pictured on BugGuide all have black-tipped abdomens.  Your individual appears to have a yellow abdomen all the way to the tip, which is why we believe it is a different species in the same genus, Mallophora fautrix.  Compare your images to this individual on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it ranges from:  “Texas west to California, southward through Mexico.”  We would really love to get an expert opinion on this identification.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination