Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly ID
Location: Starr County, Texas
March 25, 2013 5:05 pm
We found this fella feeding on suflowers in South Texas. Long longs, long proboscis – definitely designed for feeding on these flowers. Can you identify?
Signature: Tim

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Tim,
This is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae.  We would prefer to leave a species identification to a Dipterist or someone else who specializes in the family or order.  Bee Flies are pollinating insects and you can read more about them on BugGuide.  It appears this might be a member of the genus
Bombylius, but often superficial visual similarities exist across genera.  You may also read about Bombylius on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bizarre Stripey-Eyed Alien-Looking Fruit Fly?
Location: Del Mar, CA
March 20, 2013 5:48 pm
Hi, it’s Darlene, the bug wrangler from last year’s moth night. I found this bizarre looking bug on May 7, 2011 in Del Mar, CA on a cold and cloudy day. It was hanging out on a railing at a delicious burrito stand. I’ve never seen striped eyes like that. I believe it’s a fruit fly. I love the white dots and the white border on the wings.
Signature: Darlabutterfly

Fruit Fly

Fruit Fly

Hi again Darlene,
Bingo on the Fruit Fly identification.  We believe we have correctly identified it as a member of the genus
Eutreta thanks to images posted to BugGuide where it states they are:  “gall-formers on Asteraceae.”

Fruit Fly

Fruit Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Aquatic grubs
Location: Northeast Los Angeles
March 20, 2013 2:06 pm
Hello, Bugman! It turns out that I’ve been following your site for quite a while, and recently discovered that we’re neighbors, as I also live in the Mt. Washington area. So these are pretty local critters!
I have found these aquatic grubs in our (non-working) backyard water feature a few times while trying to keep the mosquito larvae population under control. I came across these two specimens yesterday and had the presence of mind to take a picture to send to you, along with a dime for scale. I have tried before to find something on the web, and today I tried the term ”aquatic grub”, and ended up here: http://www.aquatax.ca/miscdip.html – a website devoted to Saskatchewan Aquatic insects, which has a picture of a grub that looks very similar.
I realize we may not be able to nail down the species, but this looks like it could be a Dipterid grub. I love syrphid flies, and would be happy to know if that’s what they are. In any case, just wondering if you can identify or possibly confirm my conjecture. Thanks very much!
Signature: Jonathan V

Rat-Tailed Maggots

Rat-Tailed Maggots

Hi Neighbor Jonathan,
Rat-Tailed Maggots are the aquatic larvae of a large Syrphid Fly known as a Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax.  You might be interested in our Mount Washington Tag.  We archive most of our own photos there.

Fantastic, Daniel, thanks! I don’t think I realized that maggots could have their own name, but that’s certainly an apt one.  (And, you’ll be happy to know that I returned them to the pond.)
Thanks for the tip about the Mt. Washington tag, too. If I come across more unknown insects, I’ll be sure to check there, first.
Take care!
Jonathan

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Three Lacewing larvae attacking Oleander aphids…
Location: Chicago
March 19, 2013 8:05 pm
I took this picture of three lacewing larvae attacking a colony of Oleander aphids right before I blasted them off my milkweed plant with the hose last August here in Chicago.
Signature: Justin

Syrphid Fly Larvae eat Oleander Aphids

Syrphid Fly Larvae eat Oleander Aphids

Hi Justin,
Thanks for sending us an awesome documentary photo, but you have misidentified the predators.  While Lacewing Larvae are known to feed ravenously on Aphids, these are actually Syrphid Fly Larvae.  Adults are often called Hover Flies or Flower Flies.  While we commend your use of a hose to remove the Aphids, a greener alternative than pesticides, we would like to offer our perspective.  By hosing off the Aphids, you also removed the predators.  We would have let nature take its course on this leaf, and we believe the Syrphid Larvae would have eaten all the Aphids in the vicinity.  The Flies would then have matured and produced a new generation of predators and if you have a properly balanced garden with predator species, the need to control Aphids in the future might become an unnecessary action.
  We would have hosed off Aphids from plants that had no predators nearby.

Syrphid Larva eats Oleander Aphid

Syrphid Larva eats Oleander Aphid

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant yellow robber fly from Australia?
Location: -36.131866,146.926785
March 10, 2013 7:50 am
Hey there, I found a fly today (deceased) and took a few pictures of it. I was curious as to what the hell it was, so I searched and came up with your site featuring some examples of large flies with a yellow abdomen which looked fairly identical to the one I saw. This particular specimen was found on top of Huons Hill, Wodonga, Victoria, Australia. The large Mitsubishi key you see in a couple of the photos is exactly 92.9mm or 3.657” long.
Sorry about the poor photography, I only had an iphone with me, and couldn’t see the screen to ascertain whether or not it was focusing properly on the fly, which it wasn’t.
Feel free to contact me via email – thesixthwheel@gmail.com
Signature: Cheers, Nick.

Giant Yellow Robber Fly

Giant Yellow Robber Fly

Hi Nick,
We agree that this looks like a Giant Yellow Robber Fly,
 Blepharotes coriarius.  We received a comment on a posting last week and Wolfgang said he would send a photo, so we thought these might be the anticipated images, but we were mistaken unless you also wrote to us under a pen name.  Large Robber Flies are magnificent creatures and your photo of the underside of the body shows the long legs that can be used to snatch prey while in flight.

Giant Yellow Robber Fly

Giant Yellow Robber Fly

More images of the Giant Yellow Robber Fly can be found on the Brisbane Insect website.

Thanks for the reply. I am not Wolfgang, nor do I have anything to do with a posting from last week. Like I mentioned in my original communication to you, I had only found the fly on the same day (yesterday).
Are they rare to see? I’ve never seen one before.
Thanks for your time.

We are not certain how common Giant Yellow Robber Flies are in Australia.  Predators are generally not as common as prey.  By the way, the photography is just fine.

Giant Yellow Robber Fly

Giant Yellow Robber Fly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on snowy mountain in NH
Location: New Hampshire USA
March 3, 2013 9:13 pm
Hello – I spotted this insect last weekend while back country skiing near Jackson NH in the white mountains, elevation 2200 feet. It was walking around on the snow. I was surprised to see an insect active this time of year but perhaps it is common.
Signature: Tom

Wingless Winter Crane Fly

Wingless Winter Crane Fly

Hi Tom,
This is an exciting posting for us.  There are several unrelated insects commonly found on the surface of the snow that are lumped together under the common name Snowflies.  This Wingless Winter Crane Fly, most likely in the genus
Chionea, is a true fly, albeit without wings.  More photos and information can be found at The Backyard Arthropod Project and The Crane Flies of Pennsylvania.  Adaptation to life on the surface of the snow is not very common with insects and arthropods, so we are always excited to post new documentation.  

Thanks Daniel. Let me know if you need any more information about this bug.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination