Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly mating with dead fly?
Location: Northeast Florida
June 29, 2014 3:56 pm
I saw this fly (or these flies) today in northeast FL. I thought at first that it was a pair of mating flies and took a few photos. However, it appears that this is a live fly that had been mating with a fly that died, and it was now dragging the dead fly along with it as it walked and flew around. I’ve never seen anything like this before.
Signature: Karen in FL

Flesh Fly matings ends with death of the male!!!

Flesh Fly with dead mate

Dear Karen,
We are positively stunned by your images, which appear to have captured the mating of Flesh Flies in the family Sarcophagidae that ended with the death of one of the partners, from unknown causes.  We can assure you that Flesh Flies do not practice necrophilia, and that for some reason, the individual succumbed while in flagrante delicto, and for yet more unexplained reasons, the sexual bond was not broken after the death.  The red-tipped abdomen is a rather distinctive feature, and upon searching though images on BugGuide, we found at least three genera that have this characteristic:  
SarcophagaOxysarcodexia and Arachnidomyia.  Though they are not necrophiliacs, BugGuide does indicate that:  “Larvae: many species are necrophagous, but some feed in mammalian tissues or parasitize other arthropods (bees, cicadas, termites, grasshoppers/locusts, millipedes), earthworms, or snails(3). Adults feed on various sugar-containing materials such as nectar, sap, fruit juices and honeydew.”  Thanks for providing a very intriguing posting for our site.  Typical Flesh Fly mating should look like this.

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Hi Daniel,
I was pretty stunned too when I realized what was going on with that fly! I assumed both flies had been alive when mating began, but I couldn’t imagine what might have killed one partner while leaving the other looking perfectly fine and healthy, except for dragging the dead partner around everywhere it went.
Karen in FL

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the hell are these
Location: NWA
June 21, 2014 8:53 am
Hey Bugman,
Yesterday morning I came across 5 groups of these slugs (I believe that’s what they are). I live in North West Arkansas. So far I haven’t been able to find anything on web about what these little guys actually are. Most people are telling me that they are tent caterpillars, but I don’t believe that is correct.
Signature: J. Ramey

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Dear J Ramey,
This is a crawling mass of Fungus Gnat Larvae in the family Sciaridae.  According to the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter at the University of Illinois:  “Fungus gnat larvae are more likely to be numerous in areas with an overabundance of water from rainfall or irrigation. Over-watering newly laid sod can result in large populations of these larvae eating young roots. Reducing irrigation will cause a reduction in the number of fungus gnat larvae and allow the sod to root.  These larvae are not likely to cause any damage to established turf and can be ignored or washed away with heavy streams of water. As adults, they are known as dark-winged fungus gnats, which are frequently very common in the spring and fall in Illinois, flying as large swarms up to several feet across.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly relative / nymph?
Location: Austin, Texas
June 19, 2014 2:21 pm
I spotted this flying insect on a purple coneflower near an area with man-made ponds and lots of dragonflies, turtles and fish. When the insect flew away, there was a buzzing sound.
Signature: Susan

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Our automated Response:  Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Hi. I actually figured out (after much research) that the photo I submitted was of a robber fly (aka assassin fly), Asilidae…and further narrowed it down to a variety of Diogmites. I can’t seem to take it any further, as I haven’t seen any of these with abdomens as long as the one in my photo.

Hi Susan,
We were away from the office when you wrote, and we are trying to catch up on old mail, posting some of the more interesting images we received in our absence, including yours.  Your identification is only partially correct.  While this is a Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, it is not a Hanging Thief in the genus
Diogmites.  It is a Red Footed Cannibalfly, Promachus rufipes, and you can compare your excellent image to the images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs in Garden
Location: Detroit, Michigan
June 27, 2014 8:10 am
Hello, I am from Detroit, Michigan and there are at least 100 of these bugs in my organic garden of all different sizes. The larger sized bug seems to have more color but move much faster, I have a pretty big yard but they are only in the garden. Just trying to figure out what they are, I looked through the internet but cannot seem to identify them. June 27, 2014.
Signature: Alicia

Probably Soldier Fly

Probably Soldier Fly

Hi Alicia,
Your image lacks the necessary detail to be certain, but this appears to be a Soldier Fly, possibly
Ptecticus trivittatus which is pictured on BugGuide.  According to the Soldier Fly family Stratiomyidae page on BugGuide:  “Larvae in a variety of situations, but mostly associated with decaying plant matter from leaf litter to rotting fruits” which causes us to surmise that they are being attracted to the organic compost in your garden.  They will not harm your produce.

Looks like that is it! Thank you,

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Picture winged fly?
Location: Galesburg, Illinois
June 24, 2014 5:24 pm
Found this little fly preening itself in the car, next to an open window. Guessing it’s, maybe, a picture winged fly? Thank you very much.
Signature: Susurra Fonseca

Picture Winged Fly

Picture Winged Fly

Dear Susurra,
You are correct that this is a Picture Winged Fly, and as you can see by the matching image on BugGuide, it is
Delphinia picta.  Your image is quite stunning.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: New Jersey Fly, help with ID request
Location: North Eastern New Jersey
June 14, 2014 3:43 pm
Hello again, was wondering if when you have time, you could help me ID a fly from New Jersey. I was breaking out my macro lens to try and get some shots today. Came across this fly that I can not identify. My thoughts are either the picture wing family or the fruit fly family. (could be light years off). What was puzzling me was the way she was sticking her ovipositor into the tree bark, her almost wasp or bee like colors and the patterns on her wings. Definitely a fly, could see the halteres, mouth parts and antenna quite clearly. Medium size. Sorry I only have close ups of her face and some blurry shots of her digging into the tree bark. (Macro stinks on moving targets.)
Would love to hear your answer but understand you are VERY busy. So if you get to them great, if not you still have my thanks for the wonderful site.
Signature: Frank from NJ

Picture Winged Fly:  Idana marginata

Picture Winged Fly: Idana marginata

Dear Frank from NJ,
We have been away from the office since June 13, and we are just catching up on old requests, by attempting to post a single request from each day we have been away.  Your request is our final obligation for today, but we may continue later.  We have identified your Picture Winged Fly as
Idana marginata thanks to images posted to BugGuide.

Picture Winged Fly

Picture Winged Fly

Once again you have my thanks. I hope you are enjoying your down time! This one was driving me crazy.

You did narrow down the family nicely.

Picture Winged Fly

Picture Winged Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination