Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these things
Location: MD
August 30, 2013 3:10 pm
Okay these 2 are definitely we think matting but what are they. These were seen in MD on a wooden swing.. if that is any help. Thank you,
Signature: Edie

Red Footed Cannibalflies Mating

Red Footed Cannibalflies Mating

Dear Edie,
These are mating Giant Robber Flies in the genus
Promachus, and we believe they might be Red Footed Cannibalflies or Bee Panthers, Promachus rufipes.  We are not entomologists and there is not enough detail in your photographs to be certain, but we believe based on the markings, our identification is most likely correct.  You can compare your photos to those posted to BugGuide which reports:  “Preys on large flying insects. Has been reported to attack Ruby-throated Hummingbirds” with a link to the Hilton Pond Center website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Yellow jacket or hoverfly?
Location: Long Island, NY
August 25, 2013 8:43 pm
I don’t see a wasp waist so I’m guessing fly.
Signature: Carl

Hover Fly:  Spilomyia longicornis

Hover Fly: Spilomyia longicornis

Hi Carl,
Your Hover Fly or Flower Fly,
Spilomyia longicornis, is a very effective Yellowjacket mimic.  You can also compare your image to photographs posted to BugGuide.

Many thanks!
I plan a photo exhibit in the spring so I’d like to get my educational info right…
c

Good luck with the exhibit Carl.  This is a lovely photo.  We imagine it looks fantastic at a higher resolution.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Parasitic larvae explode from lizard a la Alien
Location: Gainesville, Fl
August 25, 2013 8:49 am
So my friend found an ailing lizard (Anolis carolinensis) yesterday in north-central Florida. He thought it might die, so he took it with him in some sort of rescue attempt. Anyway, he looks at it an hour later, the lizard was dead, and the small black dot behind the lizard’s front leg had exploded into a gaping hole filled with large wriggling larvae of some sort. It certainly appears as though they were trying to escape after their host had died. He knew I’m into reptiles, so he showed it to me. The lizard was quite familiar, but the parasites less so. They look kind of like maggots to me, but most fly maggots are in dead things, when these were clearly inside the living lizard and killed it.
Signature: lizard guy

Lizard with Maggots

Lizard with Maggots

Dear lizard guy,
We agree that these look like maggots, but we do not know of any flies that parasitize lizards.  We will continue to do some research, but we are posting your letter and photos in the hope that one of our readers can come to our assistance.

Maggots emerge from Lizard

Maggots emerge from Lizard

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect Identification Request
Location: East side suburb of Cleveland, Ohio
August 6, 2013 5:14 pm
Need help identifying this insect. Appears to fly but possible that it just jumps far distances. Didn’t appear to be a spider…not sure. Daylight, outside, driveway of house, today, 8-6-13. Jumped or flew from arm to nearby ivy. Photos are of insect and ivy. Bit four times on forearm. Bites look similar to mosquito. Itchy. I have a short video if you’d like it. The front ’pinchers?’ would move open and closed, and open and closed.
Signature: Deb from Ohio

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Hi Deb,
We might have been in Cleveland when you sent this request several weeks ago.  We were out of the office and not responding to any mail for 2 1/2 weeks because of a family emergency.  This is an Asian Tiger Mosquito,
Aedes albopictus, an invasive introduced species.  According to BugGuide:  “The ATM differs from most other mosquitos in that it’s diurnal (active during the day).  Eggs are laid singly above the water surface on the sides of water-holding containers such as tires, animal watering dishes, birdbaths, flowerpots and natural holes in vegetation. Multiple generations per year; overwinters in the egg stage in temperate climates” and “The Asian tiger mosquito is an invasive and aggressive species that was introduced to the United States during the mid-1980s. It was first collected in Texas in 1985, apparently having traveled from Asia in a shipment of used tires. These mosquitoes are vicious biters and have been known to transmit disease.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: bug found on house
Location: Jacksonville, North Carolina
August 22, 2013 3:07 pm
I found this ant looking bug on my house the other day, and have no clue what type it is. I’ve tried looking on various websites and haven’t found anything. It looked like a large ant with what I’m pretty sure are wings.
Signature: S. Andersen

Stilt Legged Fly

Stilt Legged Fly

Dear S. Anderson,
This appears to be a Stilt Legged Fly in the family Micropezidae.  According to BugGuide:  “Odd little flies, known for their displaying (?) behavior of walking around and lifting their prominently marked front legs. Abdomen attached to thorax by “wasp-waist”. Likely ant or wasp mimics. The posture of the forelegs may imitate ant and/or wasp antennae and provide them with some protection from predators.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown flying insect
Location: northern Illinois
August 24, 2013 2:03 pm
Hi Bugman,
While lounging in my backyard in Lake County Illinois, this insect flew around me several times before perching on the canopy of my lawn chair. It was very loud while in flight. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Gardening Goddess

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Hi Gardening Goddess,
This harmless insect is a Tiger Bee Fly, Xenox tigrinus.  According to BugGuide:  “Female lays eggs at entrance of carpenter bee nests. Larvae waits until carpenter bee’s larvae reach the pupal stage to parasitize it Urban Wildlife.

Thank you soooo much for getting back to me. As an organic gardener I come across an amazing range of insects. Now I know not to fear this guy!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination