Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ticky looking bug but not a tick I’m told.
Location: BIrch Bay, Wa (State Park)
October 16, 2013 4:31 pm
Do ALL ticks have 8 legs? Here’s a pic of a bug that I swore was a tic but was told it’s not ~ It acted like tick if you watch it. No one can tell me what it is.
Most say we don’t even have ticks here but I’ve got the vet bill to prove we do ~ Found one on our dog last year.
These are photos I took of this thing.
I would SO appreciate it if you could tell me what this is. We haven’t been walking in the park since because I’m afraid of these things. My friend and I found several on us and it was like they were trying to burrow into our jeans. It creeps me out to think of them in my hair or getting in my shirt.
Signature: Not sure what this means.

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Adult Ticks have eight legs, but it is our understanding that larval Ticks have six legs.  This is not a Tick.  It is a Louse Fly and they are blood suckers.  Female Louse Flies must have a blood meal prior to reproducing.  According to BugGuide:  “Females rear one offspring at a time, the larva feeding in utero from special ‘milk’ glands. The mature larva is ‘born alive’ and immediately pupates in the soil (or on the host in some cases). Most are host specific on bird species, with a few occurring on mammals.”  We suppose they might bite humans if no other host is available.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant mosquito! (seriously!)
Location: Houston, TX
October 15, 2013 2:19 am
Walked up to my front door on the west side of Houston, TX at 3 am, and the temperature was 23°C. Heard a loud buzzing, similar to a mosquito’s (but louder). Spotted it, and watched it land on a bush, so I swatted it in the attempt to stun it. Insect is still alive in these photos, but I think I did more than stun it. Insect is flying, is almost exactly 1 inch in length, has a sucker that seemingly could be a proboscis (did not wait around to see if it bites), however it didn’t seem to have any interest in biting me.
Thanks for your time, and I hope I haven’t discovered a mutant mosquito.
Signature: Hunter Mallette

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

Dear Hunter,
This is a predatory Robber Fly in the subfamily Dasypogoninae which contains the Hanging Thieves in the genus
Diogmites as well as other similar looking genera.  Hanging Thieves get their name because they often hang from a single leg while feeding.  It looks somewhat like this Diogmites angustipennis pictured on BugGuide.

Daniel,
Thank you for your time and insight. I’m always finding interesting bugs and have the hardest time identifying them. You’ve saved me a great deal of frustration, and satisfied my curiosity.
Thank you,
Hunter

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp maybe?
Location: Boise, Idaho
October 12, 2013 3:41 pm
I was photographing bees on Aster flowers and found this guy roaming around too. He kinda looks like a yellow jacket or wasp, but I can’t find out what exactly. I’m sure one of you would know right away.
Signature: John Howe

Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Hi John,
This is a Hover Fly or Flower Fly in the family Syrphidae, and many members in the family are amazingly effective mimics of wasps and bees.  We believe your Hover Fly is in the genus
Spilomyia, based on photos posted to BugGuide which indicates they can be identified as being “Very convincing mimics of wasps: pattern of pigment on eyes hides ‘fly eyes'; ‘V’ mark on thorax (scutum, in front of scutellum); short antennae.”  Our best guess is that this is Spilomyia foxleei based on photos posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Mimic Fly ?
Location: Greenville SC
September 30, 2013 1:16 pm
Have noticed this insect around my house for several years and finally got the attached photo from my cell phone Am wondering if this is a Yellowjacket Hover Fly (Yellowjacket Hover Fly, Milesia virginiensis) ?
Signature: James

Good News Bee is Yellow Jacket Hover Fly

Good News Bee is Yellow Jacket Hover Fly

Hi James,
Your identification is absolutely correct, though you didn’t mention the common name Good News Bee for the Yellow Jacket Hover Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crane Fly
Location: Putnam Valley, NY
September 30, 2013 10:20 am
Thanks to your website, I was able to identify this fascinating ”bug”, that was on the wall of my sister’s house in Putnam Valley, NY, a few days ago. The popular guess was ”a mosquito”…but I wasn’t convinced!
Signature: Gabe Laffy

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Hi Gabe,
The distinctive markings on the wings distinguish the Giant Eastern Crane Fly,
Pedicia albivitta.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Loud & Fast; Scares the Dog
Location: Missouri, 60 miles from St Louis
September 30, 2013 2:31 am
Several of these show up around our house each spring-early fall. They will hover in place for a while, then take off really fast, zooming around for a while before suddenly stopping to hover in place. The hum/buzz of their wings is loud, my dog even refuses to go outside when he hears them. They fly very fast when they aren’t hovering (my grandpa started calling them ’bullet bugs’). I finally managed to catch one with a grocery bag so I could photograph it. If you can identify it, I’d love to know what this is that scares my dog (and if he has good reason to be scared!)
Signature: Cassie

Horse Fly

Horse Fly

Dear Cassie,
This is a Horse Fly in the family Tabanidae, and according to BugGuide:  “Females (but not males) suck vertebrate blood which they need to produce eggs.”  We are not certain of the species, but your individual resembles 
Tabanus calens which is pictured on BugGuide.  Your individual appears to be a male, which will not bite.  If you dog has had a bad experience with one or more females buzzing prior to biting, you dog might be remembering the experience.  Horse Flies generally feed on livestock, but when livestock is not available, other warm blooded prey, including humans, will suffice.

Thanks so much for that! I searched around for a while trying to find out what they are, but didn’t have luck. I’m usually better at identification when it comes to spiders (Love them so much).
Next time I get really good spider pics, I’ll be sharing them like I did my fishing spider before.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination