Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
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Subject: What am I?
Location: Pennsylvania
June 5, 2015 10:13 pm
Can’t seem to find what this guy is.
Signature: Heather Cookson

Mystery Thing

Horse Fly Egg Mass

Dear Heather,
Your mystery thing has us quite stumped.  It does not look like an insect, but it appears that it might have been produced by an insect.  We do not believe this is an egg mass, but it might be some type of shelter.  The “scales” look somewhat like seeds.  Could you please provide more details on where it was found and regarding its size.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to contribute some valuable information.

Update:  Horse Fly Egg Mass
Immediately after posting, we received a comment identifying this as a Tabanid or Horse Fly Egg Mass, and a link to BugGuide.  Mystery solved thanks to a diligent reader. 

Eric Eaton Confirms
Hi, Daniel:
That is a batch of horse fly or deer fly eggs.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Bug
Location: Toledo, Ohio
June 4, 2015 5:22 pm
It’s that time of year again where I love to visit your page because I find so many new bugs. I love bugs, but honestly, I hope this one never lands on me as it was HUGE. (Unless I find out it doesn’t sting. ) It was hanging out in an open field in Northwest Ohio with butterflies and other bees. Any idea what it is? I’ve never seen anything like it.
Thank you!
Signature: Ginny

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Bee-Like Robber Fly

Dear Ginny,
This is a Bee-Like Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, but we cannot be certain which species you sighted.  You can find additional information on BugGuide.

Thank you!  You know, I actually looked up Robber Fly, but didn’t see anything that looked like it.  I will do further looking.  Thanks so much!!
…ginny

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this
Location: south carolina
June 4, 2015 7:10 am
I found these in my dogs water bowl. I thought they were tadpoles until I took a closer look. Any ideas?
Signature: megan

Mosquito Larvae

Mosquito Larvae

Hi Megan,
Out of curiosity, how often do you change your dog’s water?  These are Mosquito Larvae and they are generally found in stagnant water.

I normally change it daily, but last week was crazy and I missed a couple of days…never again. Thank you for letting me know what they are. They have been in a jar for 3 days (and are now disposed of).

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant flying bug with green eyes
Location: mid texas
June 3, 2015 12:46 pm
this is about the size of the whole palm of my hand. We are located in mid Texas and it’s the beginning of June! It’s been sitting in a pot for about 5 hours and hasn’t moved.
Signature: Jessica

Robber Fly:  Microstylum morosum

Robber Fly: Microstylum morosum

Dear Jessica,
We verified the identity of your Robber Fly as
Microstylum morosum thanks to images posted to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp or fly????
Location: Cape Coral, FL
June 1, 2015 7:51 am
Found this on the porch yesterday. It’s at least an inch long and doesn’t appear to have a stinger. We live in SW Florida by the Caloosahatchee River. It was found in the middle of the afternoon. I’ve tried to ID it, but can’t find exactly what it is. But everything leads me to some sort of fly…but man does it look waspy. Please help, want to make sure it’s not dangerous. Thanks.
Signature: Jessica

Mydas Fly

Mydas Fly

Dear Jessica,
This harmless Mydas Fly in the family Mydidae is a magnificent insect, and many of the members of the family mimic wasps as a defense since the flies do not sting, but they benefit from resembling stinging insects.  We believe we have correctly identified your Mydas Fly as
Phyllomydas parvulus based on images posted to BugGuide.  The Beautiful Wildlife Garden site has some great images and information.

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Subject: An Elegant looking fly
Location: Andover, NJ
June 1, 2015 4:50 pm
I spotted this insect which I believe is some sort of fly on my storm door over the weekend. It is near what appears to be an exuvia, perhaps its own? The insect was between 1/2 and 3/4 inch in length with very striking wing patterns. Not a great shot, but hopefully shows enough detail for an ID.
Your help is always most appreciated!
Signature: Deborah E. Bifulco

Snipe Fly

Common Snipe Fly

Dear Deborah,
Flies do not emerge from exuvia, a term that usually applies to the shed skin of a nymph.  The only insects that have wings on the exuvia are Mayflies, which have an initial molt into a winged subadult, quickly followed by a second molt.  Flies emerge from puparia.  We believe what you have mistaken for an exuvia is a dead insect, but we are unsure which insect.  We quickly identified your Common Snipe Fly as
Rhagio mystaceus, which as luck would have it, was one of the first images we found on BugGuide when attempting the identification.  There is no real information on BugGuide, and the information on iNaturalist is limited to the physical description.

Thank you very much for the ID, as well as the great info re the exuvia.  It makes more sense that it is a dead insect, especially with the wings.  I should have known that!
Debbi

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination