Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Southeastern PA Insect
Location: SE Pennsylvania
July 25, 2013 4:44 pm
Hello! I failed to ID this on any site!
Here’s the deets*:
-Can fly (not gracefully) with its transparent, black-tinted wings
-3 dark brownish stripes/raindrops on its upper abdomen, running parallel with its body
-Drags its 2 back legs (of 6 total) behind it in a wasp-like way
-A bit bigger than a quarter
-Found under a bush; wasn’t aggressive nor fleeting, but kind of stupid. It would take a flutter hop or two when we excited it with a blade of grass.
*Yes, that was a pun. Thanks all!
Signature: Kait

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

Dear Kait,
Do not judge what your perceived to be a lack of grace in this Hanging Thief, a Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites, too harshly.  While they may seem ungainly on the ground, Hanging Thieves are very adept aerial predators that take large prey, often wasps and bees, on the wing.  The common name Hanging Thief refers to their manner of feeding.  After catching their winged prey, Hanging Thieves alight and feed, often dangling from a single leg like a circus performer.  This posting will go live during our unexpected trip in early August.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange fly looks like wasp in flight
Location: north east Alabama
July 27, 2013 12:02 am
recently had home invaded by this strange fly,has black and clear body with white socks on legs no stinger but looks much like a wasp when in flight.
Signature: dan

Window Fly "Invasion" ends in Carnage

Window Fly “Invasion” ends in Carnage

Dear Dan,
These are Black Soldier Flies, Hermetia illucens, also known as Window Flies because of the clear spaces in the abdomen which causes them to resemble stinging Thread Waist Wasps, which might be a defense mechanism for this benign and harmless species.  Do you have a nearby compost pile?  The larvae of Black Soldier Flies are beneficial in the compost pile.  You can read more about Black Soldier Flies on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Queen Bald Face Hornet??
Location: Alstead, NH
July 28, 2013 7:30 pm
Hello…I can’t seem to find a clear picture of the Queen Bald Face Hornet. Is that what this is? Thanks. :)
Signature: AnnMarie

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Hi AnnMarie,
Your photographs are awesome.  Though it resembles a Bald Faced Hornet, this is actually a Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae.  Count the wings.  Flies have two wings and other winged insects have four wings.  Your Flower Fly is
Spilomyia fusca and according to BugGuide:  “Black with white markings that mimic Baldfaced Hornet (Dolichovespula maculata). Second tergite entirely black. Eyes pale, with dark spots and vertical bands. Antennae short, fly-like.”

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bot fly larva found in house!
Location: Cherokee County, NC
July 24, 2013 7:28 am
We found this fat little fellow slowly inching across the floor of our family room earlier this morning. Last night our cat decided to entertain herself by bringing in a dead mouse, so I think the little maggot likely came from the unfortunate rodent. It measured about an inch when scrunched up in the shape pictured, and a little longer when tying to move.
The mouse appeared to be a common house mouse, so I’m thinking it might be a Rodent bot fly, perhaps?
Signature: Jacob

Bot Fly Larva

Bot Fly Larva

Dear Jacob,
Your Bot Fly Larva photo is a welcome addition to our site.
  Your speculation that it came from the mouse your cat brought in is most likely correct.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Silver & Black Insect
Location: Maryville, TN
July 22, 2013 11:29 am
This particular insect was found by a co-worker of mine today (07/22/2013) at approximately 1:30 p.m. in Maryville, Tennessee. To me, it seems to have many similarities to a horse fly but I have never seen one quite like this. Could you please help me indentify this insect? Thank you kindly.
Signature: Cody Moyers

Black Horse Fly

Male Black Horse Fly

Hi Cody,
This is a Horse Fly, and we believe it is a Black Horse Fly, Tabanus atratus.  This photo from BugGuide shows a similar coloration and we believe the eyes are reflecting back light, making them appear silvery.  The close-set eyes indicates this is a male.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Bumble Bee?
Location: Central New Hampshire
July 20, 2013 4:28 pm
Black and white markings, about the size of a Bumble Bee. Have never seen a bee
quite like this. It was very near a DogWood Tree in our yard.
Signature: Psquare

Bot Fly

Bot Fly

Dear Psquare,
It is easy to mistake this Bot Fly for a Bumble Bee.  Bot Flies are true flies and they are parasitic in the larval form, and according to BugGuide:  “The larvae are subcutaneous (under the skin) parasites of the host. Their presence is easily detected as a tumor-like bulge, often in the throat or neck or flanks of the host. The larvae breathe by everting the anal spiracles out a hole (so they are oriented head-down inside the host). They feed on the flesh of the host, but only rarely does the host die as a result.”  We are going to copy Jeff Boettner in our response in the hope that he can identify the species of Bot Fly you have photographed.

Hi Daniel and Psquare,
Your bot fly is a Cuterebra fontinella fontinella bot. This bot is a parasite of white footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus. Its a little hard to see the key features (a side view is helpful) but there are only a handful of bots in NH and this is the most common bot in your area. The other bots have either red eyes (rabbit bots) or more white or yellow on their backs. So I am confident of this ID. By the distance between the eyes, this one is a female.
Thanks for the post.
Jeff Boettner

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination