Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: wtb
Location: san marcos tx
September 21, 2013 8:41 am
cant find anything like this in my books. hanging out by crepe myrtles. very small, half inch or less.
Signature: scott

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Hi Scott,
This is a Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae.  We believe we have correctly identified it as
Ocyptamus fascipennis thanks to images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae prey on scale insects” which makes it a very beneficial insect in the garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown bug sparked my curiousity
Location: Flushing,Queens,New York
September 17, 2013 5:32 am
Hello there!
I was photographing on a beautiful sunny day at the Queens Botanical Garden in NY, when suddenly this guy came into my view. I was photographing the bees pollinating when my curiosity was sparked. I have never seen wings like these before. It was like this little insect had personality. I came into the frame, walked up to the lens, looked right at it and turned around an walked away.
Can you shed some light on what this is?
Signature: Natali S. Bravo

Picture Winged Fly

Picture Winged Fly

Hi Natali,
Your Picture Winged Fly,
Delphinia picta, is well documented on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help! Totally stumped with this insect!
Location: Newfoundland, Canada
September 16, 2013 5:37 pm
Hi there! I’m writing from Newfoundland, Canada. Today, sept 16, 2013 I came across an insect I have never seen before. I’m usually good with bugs – but this one has me stumped!
While walking through an alder bed with goldenrod I first observed the insect flying around and then landing on goldenrod. It looked a d behaved wasp like, pumping up and down. I never seen anything like it. Then I found a group of them ! They were attracted to a group of flies that had landed on something small and deceased. The flies were landing and walking on the carcass and the insects in question were skulking around – and then I watched one sneak up and grab a fly! Then I realized they were all doing this.
I had considered Robber Fly – but the antenna look totally wrong, so does everything else! But the behaviour is very similar! It’s predatory. I’d estimate the insect to be almost an inch in length.
Sorry for the long letter but I hope the details will help! Thank you so very much!!!
Signature: Jenny in Newfoundland

Brown and Gold Rove Beetle eats Blow Fly

Gold and Brown Rove Beetle eats Blow Fly

Dear Jenny,
This is one of the most exciting letters we have received in a very long time, and we are featuring it because of your thrilling personal observations and the gorgeous photos you have taken as proof of your observations.  In our untrained minds, you have made a significant scientific observation.  This is a Gold and Brown Rove Beetle,
Ontholestes cingulatus, and it appears to be preying on a Blow Fly.  According to BugGuide, the Gold and Brown Rove Beetle can be identified because it is “Large for a rove beetle. Dark brown and hairy. Clumps of hair forms dark spots on much of body. Yellow hair forms “belt” under thorax, covers parts of last abdominal segments. Head wider than pronotum. Eyes large, prominently placed on sides of head. Found on carrion and fungi. Often turns yellow tip of abdomen upward when walking.”  BugGuide also states its habitat is:  “on carrion wherever found” and “Eggs are laid near carrion or fungi,” but this is a rare BugGuide Information Page that does not discuss what the adult Gold and Brown Rove Beetle eats.  The large eyes are mentioned, and large eyes placed on the sides of the head would make a good hunter.  We suspect that the reason the Gold and Brown Rove Beetles are attracted to the Carrion is to prey upon flies as well as to lay eggs.  The developing Fly Maggots would compete with the larval Gold and Brown Rove Beetles’ food source, so eating the flies before they can breed on the carrion probably helps more Rove Beetles to survive to the adult stage.  Thanks again for your exciting submission.  We are going to feature it on our scrolling header as well.

Brown and Gold Rove Beetle preys upon Blow Fly

Gold and Brown Rove Beetle preys upon Blow Fly

Oh that’s so fascinating! Thank you for getting back to me so quickly!
It was just the most incredible thing watching those beetles hunt the flies. It took me by surprise at first! So I grabbed my camera and decided to photograph them grabbing and eating the flies. They moved so swiftly. They actually snuck up on the fly and then just grabbed them! There were about 7 of them around the carcass, and each one had a fly in it’s legs! So interesting! Especially since I never seen one before! I could have watched them for hours. Thank you so much for identifying this insect for me! I couldn’t figure out what it was and was going crazy! I’m so happy!
Many thanks!
Jennifer

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A botfly in the far North?
Location: Far North, Ont., Can.
September 15, 2013 9:23 am
I caught a mouse one night and found that there were four huge bumps on its back. I looked closer and saw what appeared to be botfly larvae in holes on each bump. I froze it and gave it to our local science teacher who dissected it with her class. Here’s a picture of what they dissected. Sure looks like a botfly to me!
I live in Fort Albany First Nation, Ontario, Canada, and I am surprised that there are botflys this far North! But is it really a botfly?
Signature: FAFN Resident

Rodent Bot Fly Larva removed from Dissected Mouse

Rodent Bot Fly Larva removed from Dissected Mouse

Dear FAFN Resident,
We concur that this is a Rodent Bot Fly Larva.  According to BugGuide Data, Bot Flies are found in Canada.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly, beetle or spider hybrid
Location: baldwin park, ca
September 15, 2013 4:17 am
I have found three of these guys in my house. One just flew away with his life never to be heard from again, one my daughter accidently squashed and then this guy seemed to take a liking to my room, bunked who knows where & occasionally made either a strutting appearance on my wall or did a fly by. I didn’t see him again for a few days (definitely male, sheesh!) only to have the misfortune of walking on the nape of my neck whilst laying in my bed engrossed in a book & I slapped the back of my neck, jumped up and found him clinging to the back of my pj’s via one leg, taking a few last breaths. Anywho, I am curious to know what type of fly/beetle/spider this is as I have never seen this before I moved here. He was the size of a house fly but the body is flat and and diamond shaped and appeared to have a hard shelled body opposed to a fly.
Signature: mr serojo

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Dear mr serojo,
This is a Louse Fly in the family Hippoboscidae.  Louse Flies feed on the blood of mammals or birds, and some species are very particular about the host animal.  Hosts include pigeons, deer and sheep.  If you live near an agricultural community, it might explain the number of recent sightings.  Some species of Louse Flies attach to a host animal and then lose their wings, continuing to feed and no longer needing any mobility.  Without a preferred host, the individual you swatted on your neck might have been preparing to take a bite out of you.  Louse Flies are also called Keds.

Thank you kindly for the reply. I so seldom receive an answer from sites.  We just moved to a condo and a whole family of pigeons live in the central a/c unit that’s atop our roof. We have been pestering our landlord to properly cover the unit as they bunker inside, come out mornings and leave their gifts on our windows and patio. I have to admit I was more comfortable with my hybrid super bug; hearing the word louse is never pleasant, especially knowing you may have been the subpar – you will have to do” meal.
Again, thanks for the reply!

While we cannot speak for other websites, we do try our best to respond to as many requests as possible, but the fact of the matter is that we receive more mail than our tiny staff can handle.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: parasite update!
Location: Hugh MacRae Park Wilmington, NC
September 13, 2013 11:18 am
Hi Curious Creature Catcher here!!
I have an update from my last message:
September 13, 2013 2:09 pm
Three new parasites have exited the body of the cicada. My thoughts would be that they feasted on the insides, as they have left the shell of the body intact. I know for sure that they did come from the inside, but I do not know how they exited other than through the anus. Could these be Cicada Parasite Beetles?
Thanks in advance!!

Cicada with Parasites

Cicada with Parasites

my last comment:
”September 13, 2013 8:55 AM
Hello! I was in a park in Wilmington N.C. and picked up a cicada that was lying on a black paved walkway. It seemed to have just recently died, as it’s limbs and body were not stiff. I decided to take it home and placed it in the center of an empty console of my car. Upon arriving home in addition to the cicada I saw what appeared to be a parasite wiggling around in the console that measures just over a half of an inch. In observing the cicada even closer I have noticed that several body parts (head, beak and anus) are moving as if something is inside of it! Back to the parasite- it seems to have one tooth or claw like feature in the front that helps it move about. If it did come from inside the cicada I am not sure how it came out unless it was through the opening of the anus, as there are no other openings that appear on the cicada. Could this be the larva stage of a cicada killer wasp? If so, could the wasp have laid more than one egg and there are more inside of th e cica
da. Also, I thought the wasp would have taken the cicada underground- not left it on a paved walkway…”
Signature: Curious Creature Catcher

Cicada and Parasite

Cicada and Parasite

Dear Curious Creature Catcher,
This will require a bit more research on our part, but we want to post it with our initial reaction.  We do not think this parasite looks like it will metamorphose into a beetle.  You are correct that Cicada Killers drag the prey to a burrow where a single egg is laid.  Our gut instinct is that this is a fly larva, perhaps that of a Tachinid Fly.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination