Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee or Fly?
Location: San Diego, California
April 17, 2013 4:43 pm
This bug was sipping nectar from a Tidy tips flower. The markings on the body seem distinctive. Is it a bee or a fly or something else?
Signature: Don Rideout

Flower Fly

Flower Fly

Dear Don,
This is a Flower Fly or Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae.  Many members of this family resemble bees and wasps.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bugs around almond trees
Location: 30KM South of Shiraz
April 16, 2013 9:50 am
Hello there,
I have a lot of these black insects around my almond trees in a garden near Shiraz, Iran.
I will be glad if you assist me identify these insects and if they are pest or not.
they look like peach tree borers but they are not.
They appear in early April every year and are present until mid May or end of May.
I can say almost 200 or 300 insects are flying or landing on each tree.
I can provide better images if needed, I will shoot using a professional camera next Friday and send the high quality images for you…
Kind Regards.
H. Razavieh
Signature: Hossein Razavieh

Male March Fly

Male March Fly

Dear Hossein,
These are March Flies in the family Bibionidae, and possibly in the genus
Bibio, and though we have not had any luck identifiying any Iranian species, you can see similar North American species on BugGuide as well as in our archive.  March Flies exhibit extreme sexual dimorphism, and the males have the larger heads with bigger eyes.  We are happy that you submitted a photo of each sex.  We would love to get better photos later in the month.  Please title the subject line March Flies from Iran.  We do not believe they are harming your almond trees.  According to BugGuide:  “larvae live gregariously in the top layers of soil and leaf litter, rotten wood, and dung; adults often found on flowers.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Adults emerge synchronously in huge numbers and often form dense mating aggregations. Males form loose “swarms” and copulate immediately with females as they emerge from the soil. After mating, female bibionines dig a small chamber in the soil with their fossorial fore tibiae, lay eggs, and die within the chamber (Plecia lay eggs on the soil surface). Adults are short-lived (3-7 days).”  BugGuide also states:  “larvae may damage cereal crops, vegetable crops, ornamental plants, nursery stock, grass, and forage crops; adult Bibio and Dilophus may be important pollinators in orchards and are the exclusive pollinators of some species of Orchidaceae and Iridaceae.”  Since they are short lived, they might not be around next week, but we would love to request a photo of a mating pair if possible.  One North American species found in Florida is known as the Love Bug because they are frequently found in flagrante delicto in large numbers.

Female March Fly

Female March Fly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Robber Fly from Elyria Canyon Park
Location: Elyria Canyon Park, Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
April 15, 2013
Yesterday while volunteering in Elyria Canyon Park, I noticed this fly in the tall grass that we were removing as part of brush clearance in the butterfly garden.  I thought it was a Soldier Fly and I asked Becky to take a photo.  I couldn’t find a matching Soldier Fly on BugGuide, so I requested assistance from Eric Eaton.  He quickly responded.

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

Eric Eaton provides an identification
Daniel:
It is a robber fly.  Looks to me like maybe Dioctria for genus, but no Bugguide records from there, so….?
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: BEE IDENTIFICATION
Location: Stanwood WA USA
April 12, 2013 11:12 am
Hello Bugman! I am an adiv gardener in Stanwood WA, USA about 50 miles north of Seattle. I love flowers but I have really become passionate about photographing critters that grace my garden, especially Bees. I was hoping if I include some photos, you could tell me what they are. Photo 1 has extremely long antennae and I have not seen this critrer since i took the picture, two years ago.
Photo #2 is a an almost triangle shaped bee that I call the Guard bee. This bee seems territorial and chases other bees away. Agressive even.
Phto# 3 is a larger bee that I named mickey mouse due to their large eyes and funny shaped wings. I have so many more! Let me know if you would like to see them! ~ Tracy
Signature: Tracy Sellers

Longhorned Bee

Longhorned Bee

Dear Tracy,
Your first photo of the bee with the long antennae is a Longhorned Bee in the tribe Eucerini which you can view on BugGuide.  We have several photos in our archive of male Longhorned Bees roosting communally in a formation commonly called a Bachelor Party.  Your third photo might be a Leaf Cutter Bee. 

Bee

Bee

We will continue to research that.  Your second photo, the one you called a Guard Bee, however is not a bee.  It is a Drone Fly, a nonstinging fly in the family Syrphidae.

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

Daniel, Thank you for the identifications. The Drone Fly was a surprise , but now that I think about it, it’s behavior does more closely resemble a fly.  I am excited to be able to put a name to  the Critters that grace my garden!
~* BEE Happy
Tracy

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Termite or predator?
Location: Bellevue, Washington
April 10, 2013 8:56 pm
Removing a flowering cherry tree that was rotting out from the inside. Seems to be a thriving termite colony inside. But in addition to the workers, larve, and soldiers, I saw some winged insects associated with colony, but they don’t seem to match any photos of winged termites. I was wondering if you could identify the mystery bug. Are they termites, or are they munching on termites?
Thanks
Signature: Tom

Cranefly

Cranefly

Dear Tom,
This is a Cranefly and we don’t believe it has any connection to the termites.  We found a matching photo on BugGuide that was found in a rotten stump.  Eric Eaton provided a comment stating:  “There is at least one common wood-boring species in the Pacific Northwest. I ran across a log full of the larvae and pupae once, before I knew what they were! Pretty bizarre.”

Thanks for the answer. I am familiar with the lawn variety crane fly, but these were new.
Tom

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this please?!
Location: Bedfordshire, England
April 8, 2013 7:16 am
Hello Bugman,
I’ve seen this insect for 2 days so decided to get some pictures! I have never seen anything like it and can’t indentify it from the internet.
It appears to have a ’sting’ or solid long thing coming from it’s head.
It has been seen 7th April and 8th April 2013 in Bedfordshire, England. Both times it was around 2pm
Please can you help?
Signature: Mrs B, England

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Dear Mrs B,
Your insect is a Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, and it is found “throughout most of NA (Canada and the US to Baja) and Eurasia” according to BugGuide.  The Greater Bee Fly is a harmless pollinating insect that uses its long proboscis to take nectar from flowers.  You may also read about them on UK Safari.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination