Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: big fly
Location: catoctin mountains, maryland
September 9, 2013 10:42 am
I saw this fly outside on the table and ran to snap a picture. Is it a horse fly? It is about an inch long and entirely black.
Signature: jenny

Black Horse Fly

Black Horse Fly

Dear Jenny,
Yes this is a Horse Fly, and as you noted, it is black, so it makes sense that it is commonly called a Black Horse Fly, Tabanus atratus.  Your individual is a blood sucking female Black Horse Fly as evidenced by the space between her eyes.  The males of the species, like all Horse Flies, have much larger, more close-set eyes.  One can only speculate that such sexual dimorphism is due to mating and sexual reproduction.  We guess that male Horse Flies use their large eyes with 360 degree vision to spot females.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Orange Belly Fly/mosquito
Location: Mississippi, United States
September 7, 2013 10:26 am
Can you please tell me what these are? They are the most annoying insects more annoying than flies or mosquitos!
Signature: ThomasOwens

Probably Lovebug

Probably Lovebug

Dear Thomas,
We wish you had a dorsal view of this insect, which we believe is a March Fly in the genus
Plecia, commonly called a Lovebug because mated pairs remain joined for an extended period of time.  They can get very common in the south when they form huge swarms.  According to BugGuide, they are also known as Honeymoon Flies.

Probably March Fly

Probably March Fly

Hi Thomas,
Thanks for sending a dorsal view.  We no longer believe this is a Lovebug, but we still believe it is some species of March Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Possible Bee Killer Robber Fly
Location: Auburndale, FL
September 4, 2013 1:16 pm
Not sure if this is a Southern or Florida Bee Killer, or just another type of Robber Fly. Super pretty, whatever it is.
Signature: Sharon

Bee Killer

Bee Killer

Hi Sharon,
This is a stunning photo of a stunning Robber Fly.  We agree that it is a Bee Killer in the genus Mallophora, however we are not certain of the species.  Unlike the images of the Southern Bee Killer on BugGuide which have a black tipped abdomen, your individual has a yellow tip on the abdomen.  There is one Bee Killer also from Florida on BugGuide with the identical markings to your Bee Killer, however it is not identified to the species level.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Two Larva Eat and Kill Mouse
Location: Mass USA
September 3, 2013 5:08 pm
I caught a mouse in my kitchen. I come to find I was able to because it was injured. I put it into a clear cage to show the kids. I come to find the mouse has a hole in its stomach and Two protruding round items imbedded inside. Which I thought were ticks. The mouse is almost dead anyways. So I decide to keep it in the container and wait to see what happens. I check the next day after work and find the bugs detached from the mouse. Each about a half inch long wiggling around. Not really moving in any direction but just wiggling. I also showed this to a friend who’s an exterminator and he says he’s never seen anything like it, also the mouse may be a rat. If that helps. I’ve always been into bugs and snakes, etc. I have never seen anything like this before. Should I be worried seeing as I caught the mouse in the house?
Signature: Matt

Bot Fly Larva emerges from Mouse

Bot Fly Larva emerges from Mouse

Dear Matt,
Bot Fly or Warble Fly Larvae in the family Oestridae are common endoparasites in mammals, especially rodents.  The adult Bot Fly resembles a bumble bee.  From what we have read, the larvae do not kill the host, so perhaps your mouse died of other causes, or perhaps in the case of small animals, the Bot Fly Larvae can do significant damage.  We will copy Bot Fly specialist Jeff Boettner to see if he can add any information.

Bot Fly Larvae

Bot Fly Larvae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Robber Fly with Green Eyes?
Location: Northeast Florida
September 2, 2013 1:28 pm
I’ve seen this big flying insect a few times in the past couple of days but today I was able to get some photos when it landed on a vine. Its body was about 1.25 inches long (35 mm) and its green eyes were very noticeable. It looks like a Robber Fly, maybe a Hanging Thief? Or is it too big for that?
Signature: Karen in Florida

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

Hi Karen,
Your Robber Fly is definitely a Hanging Thief in the genus
Diogmites, and there are several species found in Florida with green eyes, so we don’t feel comfortable taking the identification to the species level.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What are these things
Location: MD
August 30, 2013 3:10 pm
Okay these 2 are definitely we think matting but what are they. These were seen in MD on a wooden swing.. if that is any help. Thank you,
Signature: Edie

Red Footed Cannibalflies Mating

Red Footed Cannibalflies Mating

Dear Edie,
These are mating Giant Robber Flies in the genus
Promachus, and we believe they might be Red Footed Cannibalflies or Bee Panthers, Promachus rufipes.  We are not entomologists and there is not enough detail in your photographs to be certain, but we believe based on the markings, our identification is most likely correct.  You can compare your photos to those posted to BugGuide which reports:  “Preys on large flying insects. Has been reported to attack Ruby-throated Hummingbirds” with a link to the Hilton Pond Center website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination