Currently viewing the category: "Mosquito"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A strange visitor
Location: Alicante, Spain
July 16, 2016 5:55 pm
Dear Bugman, I was wondering if you could help me to identify a bug I came across. I came across it in southern Spain in the summertime. It is quite a fascinating looking creature, pale white dots with almost neon blue body. I assume it’s some breed of mosquito but I’d love to know more.
Thank you for your help!
Signature: Daniel Owen

Male Asian Tiger Mosquito

Male Asian Tiger Mosquito

Dear Daniel,
The bad news is that this is an introduced Asian Tiger Mosquito,
Aedes albopictus, and according to Spanish News Today:  “The mosquito can carry more than 20 exotic diseases, including West Nile fever, dengue fever, yellow fever, chikungunya virus and two types of encephalitis and is strikingly distinct from other mosquitos due to its distinctive black and white striped markings.”  The Asian Tiger Mosquito has also been introduced to North America, and according to BugGuide:  “The ATM differs from most other mosquitoes in that it’s diurnal (active during the day).”  The good news is that the feathery antennae indicate your individual is a male and male Mosquitoes do not feed on human blood, but there are more than likely a few females in the vicinity that may try to bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Mosquito
Location: Southern Kentucky
July 3, 2016 9:39 pm
We were sitting outside and had these biting us. They are huge. They could bite us through our jeans and shirts. Never seen any mosquitos this big. What kind is it? And are they native to this area?
Signature: Zach

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Gallinipper

Dear Zach,
This large Mosquito is a Gallinipper and according to BugGuide:  “The word gallinipper originated as a vernacular term in the southeastern US referring to ‘a large mosquito or other insect that has a painful bite or sting’ and has appeared in folk tales, traditional minstrel songs, and a blues song referencing a large mosquito with a ‘fearsome bite’ (McCann 2006).”  BugGuide also notes:  “Females bloodfeed day and night and are able to bite through heavy clothing. “

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Gallinipper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this
Location: south carolina
June 4, 2015 7:10 am
I found these in my dogs water bowl. I thought they were tadpoles until I took a closer look. Any ideas?
Signature: megan

Mosquito Larvae

Mosquito Larvae

Hi Megan,
Out of curiosity, how often do you change your dog’s water?  These are Mosquito Larvae and they are generally found in stagnant water.

I normally change it daily, but last week was crazy and I missed a couple of days…never again. Thank you for letting me know what they are. They have been in a jar for 3 days (and are now disposed of).

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A flying, stick-like insect
Location: Arcata, CA; coastal, near redwoods
May 21, 2014 2:59 pm
Hello, this is my first time asking a question on this site and I do apologize if I am doing this wrong. I saw the strangest flying insect in Arcata, which is off the coast of Northern California, last week during my lunch break. It was a weird experience as I have never seen anything like it. I was at the community center park, specifically sitting on a grass field next to a small wooded area (deciduous), and this weird insect was flying around me for a few minutes. I was unfortunately not able to snap a picture of it before it left, so I will do my best at describing it in detail: It was about 2-2.5 inches in length and very thin. It was segmented and it’s torso looked very similar to that of a stick bug’s. The weird thing is that it’s body was bent like a U, so it’s head and bottom were higher than the middle part of it’s body. It seemed to have many (perhaps 20 or more) long, very thin legs that almost appeared as hairs falling from it’s t orso as it gracefully floated around. It’s head was a bit thicker than it’s body, and it had very thick, long antennae. I could not see it’s wings, as it was moving them rapidly, and it hovered around like a helicopter. It even got a few inches from my face twice, as if observing me. It was so alien and so freaky, I just had to let you guys know, and hopefully you can give me an idea as to what it was.
Thank you so much.
Signature: Nicole

Drone???

Drone???

Dear Nicole,
Please forgive the delay, but we really wanted to carefully craft our response to you.  This does not sound like any living creature that we know about, but it does sound like a hybrid of two adept predators we have represented in our archives: the Mosquito and the House Centipede.
  Mosquitoes are capable of hovering in place when deciding upon which part of the warm, human body part to puncture.  House Centipedes are fast runners that chase after prey.  We definitely would not want to have an encounter a House Centipede on our own scale.  We heard an interesting news story on NPR last week about the newest small Drones that look like insects, and that are so convincing that real insects have tried to mate with them.  Now, we here at WTB? could never imagine ourselves as the masterminds behind surveillance espionage, however, it we were to design a perfect Drone, we might consider morphing two unrelated species that have specific areas of near perfect mobility, in this case, air and ground.  A hybrid drone could fly to a location and then hit the ground running would be worth the research that went into it.  

Thanks for the reply. This is very interesting.
I appreciate the time you have put into investigating my experience with this unknown “bug”.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Baffled by Big Black Bug
Location: Beaverton, OR
April 26, 2014 7:41 pm
Daniel,
Just in case it’s interesting, here’s another picture from the same excursion of a tiny critter we found in a pond.  My “Pond Life” book leads me to believe it’s not a larva but a mosquito pupa. I had no idea that pupas could be free swimming, lively animals as opposed to motionless inside a cocoon!
Thank you again,
Laura

Tumbler, AKA Mosquito Pupa

Tumbler, AKA Mosquito Pupa

Hi Laura,
Thank you for sending in your excellent image of a Mosquito Pupa, or Tumbler as it is sometimes called.  Mosquito Pupae are incredibly mobile, and they are also capable of sensing danger, tumbling away from the water surface and into the depths.  Mosquito Larvae are called Wrigglers because of the way they move through the water, and the tumbling motion of the Pupae led to the common name Tumblers.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified larva in pond
Location: NNorthern Central Valley California.
March 14, 2014 10:09 am
I started a new frog pond and began seeing Mosquito larva. At first I hunted them down individually with a turkey baster and got rid of them until I suddenly had hundreds! I purchased a biological remedy safe for other wildlife and all the mosquito larva disappeared overnight thankfully. BUT there are some other larva that were unaffected. The behavior is similar to a mosquito larva as they wiggle underwater when I shine a flashlight on them but they are oval shaped when viewed from above as they keep their tailed curled underneath them. they have two tiny nubs of an antenna as well. I caught one and observed it (Too small for a picture really although I will make the attempt). But they resemble a small grammarian and most definitely have metallic green coloring as well as black. I put it right back into the pond thinking perhaps it may be a larva of something beneficial??? I absolutely love your site and use it often! Thanks!
I have already submitted this once but after poking around on the net I found a much better picture posted by someone from Colorado. I used a bacterial larvacide to get rid of the hundreds of mosquito larva in my newish pond yet these were unaffected. Behaviorally they act very much like mosquito larva but look very different. I have captured two and I am keeping them to see what develops. The other person who posted this image was unsuccessful after posting his picture on ten sites. I will not simply eradicate any animal no matter how small unless it is harmful. West Nile is active in my area so mosquitos are sentenced to death immediately but I want to give these little buggers a chance.
Signature: All life (unless it sucks blood) lover

Mosquito Pupa

Mosquito Pupa

Dear All life (unless it sucks your blood) lover,
Your remedy might have gotten rid of the Mosquito Larvae, but it did not eliminate the next stage in the metamorphosis process, the Mosquito Pupae.  This is a Mosquito Pupa, sometimes called a Tumbler, while the larvae are called Wrigglers.

Solved my own riddle!  They are Mosquito pupae and I imagine because they do not eat at this stage they are immune to the bacterial larvacide.  Luckily there are only a few that reached this stage and I am hunting them down with my trusty Turkey baster!  Love your site!  Thank you so much for the reply, I poked around on the internet and found an answer.  I am hunting these things down individually with a turkey baster and putting them into a jar with bleach.  Thank you so much for the reply.  I and my children use your site constantly.  Thank you again!

We fully understand your war on bloodsuckers.  Here at the offices of WTB?, we catch Mosquito Larvae and Pupae and feed them to our Angelfish.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination