Currently viewing the category: "Mosquito"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a dengue mosquito?
Location: Ranger street, Matina, Davao, Philippines
November 10, 2016 10:46 pm
Hi bugman,
I was just stung my a mosquito and when it was bellying out on the wall, I noticed it had some white markings on its legs. I know Dengue mosquitos have this too, and I am currently also coming down with flu (slight headaches, sore throat, but no bleeding or rashes or anything). I’m living in the outskirts of Davao City in the Philippines and dengue is known to be present in this region (Mindanao).
I managed to take a few pictures of the mosquito. They’re not 100% sharp, but hopefully it will give you some clue.
I did kill the mosquito by the way. Sorry for that, I know you’re not a fan of that. Neither am I, but in the case of mosquitos (in relation to dengue) I’m not taking any chances.
Thanks in advance for your time. Hope you can identify it!
Greets,
Signature: Hugo Peek

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Dear Hugo,
In no way would we ever tag accuse a person of Unnecessary Carnage for swatting a Mosquito.  Based on this BugGuide image, we believe this is an Asian Tiger Mosquito,
Aedes albopictus, and according to BugGuide:  “The Asian Tiger Mosquito is so named because of its conspicuous stripes, ferocious feeding behavior and its Asian origin.”  BugGuide provides the following medical importance information:  “Aedes albopictus is most well known for transmitting dengue and chikungunya viruses but it has also been found infected in nature with the following viruses: West Nile, Eastern equine encephalitis, Japanese encephalitis. It can also transmit dog heartworm parasites. (CDC) Ae. albopictus is a competent laboratory vector of at least 22 arboviruses.  Ae. albopictus may have played a major role in ZIKV transmission in Gabon in 2007. (13) Armstrong et al. (2013) tested > 34,000 Ae. albopictus from New Jersey over a 3-yr period to evaluate its importance as a regional arbovirus vector.”

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your quick reply.
I think you’re right about the Tiger mosquito. We’re all up in arms here now to keep them out and get rid of their breeding grounds, but it’s kind of baffling to me how many people don’t know (or don’t care) much about the risks and keep their doors and windows open as usual. Even after you warn them. I’ve read that the death toll was already in the hundreds nation wide around juli / august and some 80.000 diagnosed cases, which is significantly more than the year before, so it sounds like it’s quite a substantial issue. Our area was apparently designated as “dengue hot zone” in August, but we had no idea.
Well I knew it was there of course, but not like this.Yet as soon as you start a compost heap in the back yard, the neighbors will be screaming their lungs out about snakes. Still have to see the first one after six months here, but I spotted the second Aedes already today. As long as the fever stays away.. But I fear that if Zika arrives (and it seems to be on its way), the doors will literally be wide open. Not the most comforting foresight, since my girlfriend and I are in the baby making phase right now..
Anyway, I should be directing my concerns towards the department of health here, not you 🙂 Thanks for helping me ID the mosquito and best of luck with whatsthatbug. I was browsing the site a little more, and only now am I realizing what a unique and amazing project this actually is. Or more like a work of love probably, with this much effort.
Thanks again and keep it up!
All the best,
Hugo

Thanks for the compliment Hugo, and good luck with your Mosquito control.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water insect
Location: Salisbury, North Carolina
September 8, 2016 6:22 am
Good morning!
I found this little guy in water on my deck. It’s about 9/16 inches long and wiggles like a mosquito larvae. Any information on this would be very much appreciated.
Signature: Todd

Mosquito Larva

Mosquito Larva

Dear Todd,
This is a Mosquito Larva, commonly called a Wriggler.  It will soon pupate into a Tumbler, a very active aquatic pupa.  With the Zika scare, Southerners are being cautioned about standing water, which is a breeding ground for Mosquitoes.  Mosquito larvae and pupae both need air to survive, and they generally congregate at the surface of the water where they can breed, but any disturbance sends them wriggling and tumbling beneath the surface for several minutes.

Thanks for getting back to me so quickly.  I had no idea mosquito larva got this large.
Although I feel a little like I wasted your time, I appreciate it, just the same.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A strange visitor
Location: Alicante, Spain
July 16, 2016 5:55 pm
Dear Bugman, I was wondering if you could help me to identify a bug I came across. I came across it in southern Spain in the summertime. It is quite a fascinating looking creature, pale white dots with almost neon blue body. I assume it’s some breed of mosquito but I’d love to know more.
Thank you for your help!
Signature: Daniel Owen

Male Asian Tiger Mosquito

Male Asian Tiger Mosquito

Dear Daniel,
The bad news is that this is an introduced Asian Tiger Mosquito,
Aedes albopictus, and according to Spanish News Today:  “The mosquito can carry more than 20 exotic diseases, including West Nile fever, dengue fever, yellow fever, chikungunya virus and two types of encephalitis and is strikingly distinct from other mosquitos due to its distinctive black and white striped markings.”  The Asian Tiger Mosquito has also been introduced to North America, and according to BugGuide:  “The ATM differs from most other mosquitoes in that it’s diurnal (active during the day).”  The good news is that the feathery antennae indicate your individual is a male and male Mosquitoes do not feed on human blood, but there are more than likely a few females in the vicinity that may try to bite.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Mosquito
Location: Southern Kentucky
July 3, 2016 9:39 pm
We were sitting outside and had these biting us. They are huge. They could bite us through our jeans and shirts. Never seen any mosquitos this big. What kind is it? And are they native to this area?
Signature: Zach

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Gallinipper

Dear Zach,
This large Mosquito is a Gallinipper and according to BugGuide:  “The word gallinipper originated as a vernacular term in the southeastern US referring to ‘a large mosquito or other insect that has a painful bite or sting’ and has appeared in folk tales, traditional minstrel songs, and a blues song referencing a large mosquito with a ‘fearsome bite’ (McCann 2006).”  BugGuide also notes:  “Females bloodfeed day and night and are able to bite through heavy clothing. “

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Gallinipper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this
Location: south carolina
June 4, 2015 7:10 am
I found these in my dogs water bowl. I thought they were tadpoles until I took a closer look. Any ideas?
Signature: megan

Mosquito Larvae

Mosquito Larvae

Hi Megan,
Out of curiosity, how often do you change your dog’s water?  These are Mosquito Larvae and they are generally found in stagnant water.

I normally change it daily, but last week was crazy and I missed a couple of days…never again. Thank you for letting me know what they are. They have been in a jar for 3 days (and are now disposed of).

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A flying, stick-like insect
Location: Arcata, CA; coastal, near redwoods
May 21, 2014 2:59 pm
Hello, this is my first time asking a question on this site and I do apologize if I am doing this wrong. I saw the strangest flying insect in Arcata, which is off the coast of Northern California, last week during my lunch break. It was a weird experience as I have never seen anything like it. I was at the community center park, specifically sitting on a grass field next to a small wooded area (deciduous), and this weird insect was flying around me for a few minutes. I was unfortunately not able to snap a picture of it before it left, so I will do my best at describing it in detail: It was about 2-2.5 inches in length and very thin. It was segmented and it’s torso looked very similar to that of a stick bug’s. The weird thing is that it’s body was bent like a U, so it’s head and bottom were higher than the middle part of it’s body. It seemed to have many (perhaps 20 or more) long, very thin legs that almost appeared as hairs falling from it’s t orso as it gracefully floated around. It’s head was a bit thicker than it’s body, and it had very thick, long antennae. I could not see it’s wings, as it was moving them rapidly, and it hovered around like a helicopter. It even got a few inches from my face twice, as if observing me. It was so alien and so freaky, I just had to let you guys know, and hopefully you can give me an idea as to what it was.
Thank you so much.
Signature: Nicole

Drone???

Drone???

Dear Nicole,
Please forgive the delay, but we really wanted to carefully craft our response to you.  This does not sound like any living creature that we know about, but it does sound like a hybrid of two adept predators we have represented in our archives: the Mosquito and the House Centipede.
  Mosquitoes are capable of hovering in place when deciding upon which part of the warm, human body part to puncture.  House Centipedes are fast runners that chase after prey.  We definitely would not want to have an encounter a House Centipede on our own scale.  We heard an interesting news story on NPR last week about the newest small Drones that look like insects, and that are so convincing that real insects have tried to mate with them.  Now, we here at WTB? could never imagine ourselves as the masterminds behind surveillance espionage, however, it we were to design a perfect Drone, we might consider morphing two unrelated species that have specific areas of near perfect mobility, in this case, air and ground.  A hybrid drone could fly to a location and then hit the ground running would be worth the research that went into it.  

Thanks for the reply. This is very interesting.
I appreciate the time you have put into investigating my experience with this unknown “bug”.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination