Currently viewing the category: "March Flies and Lovebugs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a type of fly?
Location: Lexington, MA
May 26, 2016 5:22 am
I live in Eastern Massachusetts and noticed these flying insects swarming all over our backyard. They don’t seem to bother humans but they really seem to like the grass seed on our overgrown grass. Can you please tell me what they are?
Signature: Gordon

March Flies

March Flies

Dear Gordon,
These are mating, sexually dimorphic March Flies in the family Bibionidae.  Males March Flies can be distinguished from females by their larger heads and bigger eyes.  We suspect because of your location they are most likely 
Bibio albipennis based on BugGuide information.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny Robber Fly?
Location: Andover, NJ
May 21, 2016 2:17 pm
I found several of these small (1/3 to 1/2 inch) flies which look like some sort of robber fly. I’ve just never seen a robber fly this small, so wondering if it is something else entirely. I’m in the far northern corner of NJ in a wooded area. These were found just at the edge of a shrubby area near the woods.
Any help you can give me will be much appreciated!
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Male March Fly

Male March Fly

Dear Deborah,
This is not a Robber Fly.  It is a March Fly in the family Bibionidae, and it can be identified as a male because of its large eyes.  The eyes of the females are much smaller as you can see in this image of a pair of mating March Flies.  We believe your individual may be
Bibio albipennis based on this BugGuide image.

Male March Fly

Male March Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flying bug
Location: Boston, MA
May 9, 2016 10:18 am
Help, see the attached photo. These flying insects seem to have appeared after I just moved 20 yards of straight compost into my back yard. They are there all day swarming around not sure about at night. They appear to be mating. TThey have not gone away and now its been close to 2 weeks. Anyway to remove them or at least limit the amount of them!
Signature: DaveLaf

Mating March Flies

Mating March Flies

Dear DaveLaf,
These are mating March Flies in the family Bibionidae, and probably in the genus
Bibio that is represented on BugGuide.  The male is the one with the larger head.  We do not provide extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee or ant ?
Location: Argentina
April 14, 2016 9:32 am
hello, i can’t see if this bugs are ants with wings or bees
Signature: Mario

Lovebugs

Lovebugs

Dear Mario,
These are neither ants nor bees, but rather, they are flies.  More specifically, they are March Flies and we believe they are in the genus
Plecia whose members are commonly called Lovebugs because they appear in large swarms that contain numerous mating pairs.  More on Lovebugs can be found on BugGuide and on University of Florida Entomology site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying night bug
Location: Charlottesville, va
November 6, 2015 9:09 pm
This bug was a pest around the fire pit. Now they have come into the house. Any ideas?
Signature: Paula stith

Male March Fly

Male Fall March Fly

Dear Paula,
This is a male Fall March Fly, probably
Bibio longipes based on this description on BugGuide:  “Males are all black with swollen hind tarsi and are hard to distinguish from Bibio slossonae, the other common fall-flying species.”  BugGuide also notes:  “Large swarms consisting of males are common in the fall.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified bugs
Location: Catskill, NY
September 28, 2015 3:26 am
On Sept 27, 2015, I photographed these two enjoying the after sun on my car door in Catskill, NY. They seemed to be enjoying themselves and so was I! Love to know what they are.
Thanks!
Signature: Ken Tannenbaum

Mating March Flies

Mating March Flies

Dear Ken,
These are mating March Flies in the family Bibionidae, and they exhibit sexual dimorphism in that the head of the male is larger to accommodate the larger eyes.  We believe we have correctly identified your March Flies as
Penthetria heteroptera thanks to images posted to BugGuide where it indicates they are active in the fall, distinguishing them from most March Flies that appear in the spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination