Currently viewing the category: "Maggots and Puparia"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Slug/worm-ish creepy crawler
Location: Southeast Louisiana
August 16, 2014 9:43 pm
Two separate times today, we saw one of these in our garage. Never seen anything like it before. Moved like a slug but didn’t have any visible antennae. It is flat shaped with a pointy “tail”. What exactly might it be? We are curious as every search we’ve made turns up only things we can rule out. ;)
Thanks!
Signature: Dana

Subject: Worm/slug/other!?!
Location: Southeast Louisiana
August 16, 2014 9:33 pm
Twice today, we found one of these in the garage. It moves like a slug, but has no visible antennae. It is flat with a pointed “tail”. Never seen anything like it before and just curious as to what it may be. Thanks!!
Signature: Dana

Fly Pupa

Fly Pupa

Dear Dana,
Twice yesterday, about ten minutes apart, we received similar identification requests from you with the same image attached.  This is the larva or pupa of a fly, but we are uncertain which family or species it belongs to, though it does bear a resemblance to this Horse Fly larva pictured on BugGuide or this possibly Soldier Fly Larva from our archives.

Sorry about the duplicate requests…we didn’t think the first one had gone through. :)
And thanks for your quick response! We didn’t even think of anything like that bc of it’s size…about 2.5 inches long. But that does look very similar.
Thanks again,
Dana

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Little black pods?
Location: Mid Atlantic, Maryland, USA
July 10, 2014 7:28 am
I’m finding these pods around my house lately. I’ve squished them because I wanted to check and see if they were mouse droppings. They’re not. They are insect egg pods but I have no idea what I’m dealing with here. They look like grains of wild rice. Can you help me figure this out? Want to make sure we don’t have some kind of an infestation!
Signature: Nervous about pods

Fly Puparium

Fly Puparium

Dear Nervous about pods,
This is the Puparium of a Fly and if you are finding them in your home, we are guessing that somewhere in the home maggots were feeding on something.  When they are ready to pupate, the Maggots travel some distance from the food source and there they molt and transform into a Puparium.  Once back in the 1980s, our editorial staff discovered that Flesh Flies had discovered a bag with some rotting potatoes under the kitchen sink, and our first awareness was the Fly Puparia that appeared along the baseboard in the kitchen.  If you don’t find undiscarded garbage somewhere in the home, we would speculate on the possibility of a dead mouse or other creature between the walls.  Forensics for Fiction has a nice image of Fly Puparia.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the hell are these
Location: NWA
June 21, 2014 8:53 am
Hey Bugman,
Yesterday morning I came across 5 groups of these slugs (I believe that’s what they are). I live in North West Arkansas. So far I haven’t been able to find anything on web about what these little guys actually are. Most people are telling me that they are tent caterpillars, but I don’t believe that is correct.
Signature: J. Ramey

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Dear J Ramey,
This is a crawling mass of Fungus Gnat Larvae in the family Sciaridae.  According to the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter at the University of Illinois:  “Fungus gnat larvae are more likely to be numerous in areas with an overabundance of water from rainfall or irrigation. Over-watering newly laid sod can result in large populations of these larvae eating young roots. Reducing irrigation will cause a reduction in the number of fungus gnat larvae and allow the sod to root.  These larvae are not likely to cause any damage to established turf and can be ignored or washed away with heavy streams of water. As adults, they are known as dark-winged fungus gnats, which are frequently very common in the spring and fall in Illinois, flying as large swarms up to several feet across.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird toilet worm
Location: SOUTH AFRICA
April 6, 2014 6:37 am
Hi, i found this worm in the toilet this morning. it has a long black tail or flagellum or something. 2 eyes, its covering is transparent and you can see all its insides move around when it moves. It reminds me of the micro-organism paramecium.
its still alive, want to keep it that way until i find out what it is..AZ
Signature: LETITIA

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Rattailed Maggot

Dear Letitia,
This is a Rattailed Maggot, the larva of a Drone Fly.  It is harmless, and we suspect it traveled through the sewage pipes to get into your toilet, but we would not rule out it entering through the fresh water taps.  Back in 2006, we reported on Rattailed Maggots entering homes in Capetown through the potable water pipes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mystery bug
Location: arizona
March 2, 2014 8:32 pm
found these on a compost bin after a lot of rain in arizona
Signature: jas

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Dear Jas,
These are Black Soldier Fly Larvae,
Hermetia illucens, and they are beneficial in the compost bin as they help break down organic matter.  The rains probably caused the larvae which were living comfortably in the bin to evacuate.  You can try the Black Soldier Fly blog for additional information.

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: rattailed maggot safety
December 21, 2013 6:43 pm
we have found rattailed maggots in our soaking seaweed and also in our fish fertilizer barrel. My questions are these.
Would these not be there unless a fly had accessed the water?
How safe are these maggots to feed to chickens( who love insects)?
Humans safety:Is there any problem with watering our vege garden with this water? with these in it ?
Signature: Margarette

Rattailed Maggots (from our archives)

Rattailed Maggots (from our archives)

Hi Margarette,
Rattailed Maggots are the larvae of Drone Flies and they are generally found in situations associated with decomposition, like foul water or compost piles.  To the best of our knowledge, they do not pose any threat to humans and you should be able to use your fertilizer as well as feed the chickens.  We once wrote an extensive response to someone who found Rattailed Maggots in a Comfrey Tea they were brewing.  You are correct that the female Drone Fly would have been attracted to the decomposition in the water and laid the eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination