Currently viewing the category: "Maggots and Puparia"
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Immature Dipterans

Immature Dipterans

Subject: Bug found in bedroom
Location: Swingfield Street, Kent
October 15, 2014 4:45 am
Found several of these bugs on the carpet in the bedroom on returning from a week or so away from the house.
What are they?
Signature: Anthony

As you can not tell from the pictures, I should have said that it is soft and moves a bit like a caterpillar and that the dark portion is at the tail end not the head.
I had a video that showed the above but it was rather big so I did not send it.
I am attaching the photos again in case it is difficult to tie up the 2 emails.
Regards,
Anthony.

Immature Dipterans

Immature Dipterans

Dear Anthony,
We are unable to provide anything more than a very general identification at this time.  This is an immature Dipteran, the insect order that includes Flies.  They remind us of the larvae of a Bot Fly, but we cannot be certain.  See this posting on BugGuide.

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Subject: I have never encountered this at work before
Location: Seattle, WA
September 19, 2014 7:27 pm
I work in Seattle, WA on commercial boilers. The location I took these photos (which are actually screenshots from much more informative HQ videos that I took) is on the ground near an outdoor steam boiler in September at the end of summer. It was 75°F that day and was the last day of an unusually long and hot summer. The water (and sludge) these things were living in was very warm, I did not measure the temperature of the water but because it was continually being fed by 212°F boiler water. Please let me know if you need more information, pictures or video. Oh and these things were about half an inch long.
Signature: Aaron in Seattle

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Dear Aaron,
One of your images appears to depict a Rat-Tailed Maggot, the larva of a Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax.  According to BugGuide:  “The larva of the Drone-Fly feeds on decaying organic material in stagnant water in small ponds, ditches and drains. Such water usually contains little or no oxygen and the larva breathes through the long thin tube that extends from its rear end to the surface of the water and that gives it its common name of ‘rat-tailed maggot’.”

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Rat-Tailed Maggot

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Subject: Weird Bug From Pond
Location: Lake View, AL, 35111
September 9, 2014 11:00 am
Hey Bugman,
I have some strange bug crawling around my pond and sidewalks. They seem to move like worms.
They’re greyish brown and I haven’t been brave enough to pick one up and check it out.
I live in Lake View, AL
Thanks,
Jared
Signature: McCalla Bugster

Horse Fly Larva

Horse Fly Larva

Dear McCalla Bugster,
This looks to us like the immature stage of a fly, possibly a Horse Fly.

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Subject: Slug/worm-ish creepy crawler
Location: Southeast Louisiana
August 16, 2014 9:43 pm
Two separate times today, we saw one of these in our garage. Never seen anything like it before. Moved like a slug but didn’t have any visible antennae. It is flat shaped with a pointy “tail”. What exactly might it be? We are curious as every search we’ve made turns up only things we can rule out. ;)
Thanks!
Signature: Dana

Subject: Worm/slug/other!?!
Location: Southeast Louisiana
August 16, 2014 9:33 pm
Twice today, we found one of these in the garage. It moves like a slug, but has no visible antennae. It is flat with a pointed “tail”. Never seen anything like it before and just curious as to what it may be. Thanks!!
Signature: Dana

Fly Pupa

Fly Pupa

Dear Dana,
Twice yesterday, about ten minutes apart, we received similar identification requests from you with the same image attached.  This is the larva or pupa of a fly, but we are uncertain which family or species it belongs to, though it does bear a resemblance to this Horse Fly larva pictured on BugGuide or this possibly Soldier Fly Larva from our archives.

Sorry about the duplicate requests…we didn’t think the first one had gone through. :)
And thanks for your quick response! We didn’t even think of anything like that bc of it’s size…about 2.5 inches long. But that does look very similar.
Thanks again,
Dana

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Subject: Little black pods?
Location: Mid Atlantic, Maryland, USA
July 10, 2014 7:28 am
I’m finding these pods around my house lately. I’ve squished them because I wanted to check and see if they were mouse droppings. They’re not. They are insect egg pods but I have no idea what I’m dealing with here. They look like grains of wild rice. Can you help me figure this out? Want to make sure we don’t have some kind of an infestation!
Signature: Nervous about pods

Fly Puparium

Fly Puparium

Dear Nervous about pods,
This is the Puparium of a Fly and if you are finding them in your home, we are guessing that somewhere in the home maggots were feeding on something.  When they are ready to pupate, the Maggots travel some distance from the food source and there they molt and transform into a Puparium.  Once back in the 1980s, our editorial staff discovered that Flesh Flies had discovered a bag with some rotting potatoes under the kitchen sink, and our first awareness was the Fly Puparia that appeared along the baseboard in the kitchen.  If you don’t find undiscarded garbage somewhere in the home, we would speculate on the possibility of a dead mouse or other creature between the walls.  Forensics for Fiction has a nice image of Fly Puparia.

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Subject: What the hell are these
Location: NWA
June 21, 2014 8:53 am
Hey Bugman,
Yesterday morning I came across 5 groups of these slugs (I believe that’s what they are). I live in North West Arkansas. So far I haven’t been able to find anything on web about what these little guys actually are. Most people are telling me that they are tent caterpillars, but I don’t believe that is correct.
Signature: J. Ramey

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Dear J Ramey,
This is a crawling mass of Fungus Gnat Larvae in the family Sciaridae.  According to the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter at the University of Illinois:  “Fungus gnat larvae are more likely to be numerous in areas with an overabundance of water from rainfall or irrigation. Over-watering newly laid sod can result in large populations of these larvae eating young roots. Reducing irrigation will cause a reduction in the number of fungus gnat larvae and allow the sod to root.  These larvae are not likely to cause any damage to established turf and can be ignored or washed away with heavy streams of water. As adults, they are known as dark-winged fungus gnats, which are frequently very common in the spring and fall in Illinois, flying as large swarms up to several feet across.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination