Currently viewing the category: "Gnats"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the hell are these
Location: NWA
June 21, 2014 8:53 am
Hey Bugman,
Yesterday morning I came across 5 groups of these slugs (I believe that’s what they are). I live in North West Arkansas. So far I haven’t been able to find anything on web about what these little guys actually are. Most people are telling me that they are tent caterpillars, but I don’t believe that is correct.
Signature: J. Ramey

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Dear J Ramey,
This is a crawling mass of Fungus Gnat Larvae in the family Sciaridae.  According to the Home, Yard & Garden Newsletter at the University of Illinois:  “Fungus gnat larvae are more likely to be numerous in areas with an overabundance of water from rainfall or irrigation. Over-watering newly laid sod can result in large populations of these larvae eating young roots. Reducing irrigation will cause a reduction in the number of fungus gnat larvae and allow the sod to root.  These larvae are not likely to cause any damage to established turf and can be ignored or washed away with heavy streams of water. As adults, they are known as dark-winged fungus gnats, which are frequently very common in the spring and fall in Illinois, flying as large swarms up to several feet across.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying insect
Location: Hendersonville, TN
May 11, 2013 10:20 am
Hello,
I live in Hendersonville TN and recently painted the front of my home. In the past couple of days I have noticed hundreds of these bugs on the house, or flying around near the gutters. Can you please tell me what they are, and how to get rid of them. Are they termites?
Thanks
Signature: Greg Sisk

What's That Fly???

What’s That Fly???

Hi Greg,
We are uncertain how to classify this Fly.  We thought it resembled a March Fly, and that would explain the large numbers, but the antennae are wrong for typical March Flies.  Perhaps one of our readers can provide an identification.  We have also requested assistance from Eric Eaton.

Eric Eaton Responds:
Reminds me most of a dark-winged fungus gnat, family Sciaridae, but could be a gall midge, too….
Eric

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: need help with ID of worm masses
Location: North Carolina
July 7, 2012 3:43 pm
Hi,
Can you help ID this mass of Asheville, North Carolina worms sent to me to ID (no luck)? Several masses of worms were found on concrete on their property.
Signature: John

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Dear John,
This is an aggregation of Fungus Gnat Larvae.
  Here is some information from the University of Delaware Cooperative Education website:  “As a result of our unusually wet weather, I’ve been receiving some interesting inquiries and digital images from arborists, landscapers, and homeowners. Their questions or observations are usually described to me as if they’re seeing ‘worms’, ‘tapeworms’, ‘processionary caterpillars’, or ‘armyworms’ crawling across the landscape, sidewalk or driveway. The masses are slimy or wet looking and several inches to several feet long as they move over landscape timbers and other surfaces. Even though this behavior is not yet understood entomologically, past experiences have allowed me to accurately identify these masses of larvae as an aggregation of darkwinged fungus gnat larvae. Observations of these masses of larvae are usually associated with a rich organic soil environment such as a recently mulched area where turfgrass is being established or shady, damp regions of the landscape. The larval stage of a darkwinged fungus gnat is thin, white, and legless with a shiny black head capsule. They have a smooth, somewhat transparent exoskeleton that reveals digestive tract in the center of the abdomen. Mature larvae are about 3 mm (1/8 inch) long. When
hundreds of these larvae congregate together to form a ribbon-like mass it is indeed an unusual sight in a landscape. Darkwinged fungus gnat larvae feed on the roots of many different plants and organic matter in the United States. They are recognized as important pests in greenhouses and mushroom cellars. They are also pests of houseplants. Adults and larvae inhabit moist, shady areas. Adults are very small, sooty gray or nearly black, long-legged, slender flies that live about 1 week. Females deposit 100-300 eggs on soil, usually near the base of plants. Larvae reach maturity in about two weeks and then construct a pupal case in soil. There is no reason to treat these masses of darkwinged fungus gnat larvae. Use this unusual insect behavior as an opportunity to educate your clients regarding the diversity and importance of insects in their landscapes.”

Daniel, thanks so much!  This is my second request over the years and I continue to be impressed with your skills and your website.
I just made a $10 donation to support your website; … .
All the best!  -John
PS: I’m looking forward to sharing the fungus gnat info with my NC friend when I see her soon.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Maggots of some sort
Location: Hamlin, NY about 5 miles south of the Lake Ontario shore
November 7, 2011 11:03 pm
Hi. I found these pods of worms or maggots in the gutter on the side of the road in front of our house one early morning on September 15, 2004. We are in Hamlin, NY about 5 miles south of the Lake Ontario shore. These pods of worms moved together like a single unit. Notice there are two kinds of worms in the pods. The majority of the worms are about 1/32” in diameter. The larger maggots, there was one or two in a pod, looked like a typical large green bottle fly maggot. I have not seen anything like this before or since then. I have shown these pictures to a lot of people and no one even has a guess as to what these might be.
Signature: What’s that bug?

Fungus Gnat Larvae

This curious phenomenon is an aggregation of Fungus Gnat Larvae in the family Sciaridae.  Here is a photo from BugGuidewith some information.  We don’t believe there are two species here, rather we suspect that some of the individuals in the aggregation are larger.

Fungus Gnat Larvae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

mass of larvae
Location: suburbs of New York City
September 23, 2011 10:04 am
Hi,
What are these? Photo attached
Thanks
Signature: Jane

Fungus Gnat Larvae aggregation

Hi Jane,
You have an aggregation of Fungus Gnat Larvae.  According to BugGuide, they migrate when there is a population explosion. 

Fungus Gnat Larvae

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

small larve
Location: Randleman,NC
May 30, 2011 7:56 am
ifound this crawling accross my sidewalk one morning and it was unusual i have never seen anything like these before not knowing what they were i sprayed them with ant spray since we have a common problem around here with termites. the next morning same scenario in the pics you would see the dead ones from the day before. please help me identify the bugs in these pics. Thank You
Signature: IZZY

Fungus Gnat Larvae

Hi IZZY,
This is an aggregation of Fungus Gnat Larvae from the family Sciaridae.  We have profiled this phenomenon numerous times in the past on our website.  BugGuide provides this information:  “Sometimes abundant enough to form a crawling mass of several inches across and several feet long, similar to armyworm migrations. (2).  They feed on fungi in decaying plant matter (they often show up in potted plants that have been overwatered). [comment by Chris Borkent]  They can be pests in green houses.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination