Currently viewing the category: "Flesh Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: California valley
November 11, 2016 11:58 am
Working in California Valley and have seen a few of these insects slowly crawling around. There are flies everywhere, tons of them, but just today caught a slow mover munching on one of the flies, hence becoming a welcome addition to my home. They’ve been doing well too as they’ve left a pile of leftover carcasses at the base of their attack.
Just wondering what it is.
Thanks,
Signature: Chris

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Leafhopper Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Dear Chris,
The predator is an Assassin Bug in the genus
Zelus, and the prey appears to be a Flesh Fly.  We believe the Assassin is a Leafhopper Assassin Bug, Zelus renardii, based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Generalist predator (despite its common name suggesting host specificity).”  Zelus Assassin Bugs seem to bite humans more readily than most other Assassin Bugs, with the exception of blood-sucking Kissing Bugs, and though their bite is not considered dangerous to humans, it may leave the bite site tender and swollen.  They should be handled with caution to avoid bites.

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Assassin Bug eats Flesh Fly

Thank you..  They do keep the flies at bay

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: larvae
Location: richardson, tx
May 12, 2015 9:46 pm
Does anyone know what this could be? Just found about 2 dozen in my son’s room. They were primarily found under some laundry sheets that had been cleaned 2 days prior. Also some found around the baseboard in the room. Please help. . also have an unidentified smell coming from the same room around the same time these were found.
Signature: Jesse

Fly Puparia

Fly Puparia

Dear Jesse,
These look like the Puparia of Flies.  Perhaps something crawled into your son’s room and died, or perhaps some food was left to rot.  It is also possible there might be a dead animal in the walls that could have attracted the flies that laid the eggs that hatched into maggots that fed on the rotting organic material and that eventually metamorphosed into these Puparia.
  The likeliest candidates are Flesh Flies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly mating with dead fly?
Location: Northeast Florida
June 29, 2014 3:56 pm
I saw this fly (or these flies) today in northeast FL. I thought at first that it was a pair of mating flies and took a few photos. However, it appears that this is a live fly that had been mating with a fly that died, and it was now dragging the dead fly along with it as it walked and flew around. I’ve never seen anything like this before.
Signature: Karen in FL

Flesh Fly matings ends with death of the male!!!

Flesh Fly with dead mate

Dear Karen,
We are positively stunned by your images, which appear to have captured the mating of Flesh Flies in the family Sarcophagidae that ended with the death of one of the partners, from unknown causes.  We can assure you that Flesh Flies do not practice necrophilia, and that for some reason, the individual succumbed while in flagrante delicto, and for yet more unexplained reasons, the sexual bond was not broken after the death.  The red-tipped abdomen is a rather distinctive feature, and upon searching though images on BugGuide, we found at least three genera that have this characteristic:  
SarcophagaOxysarcodexia and Arachnidomyia.  Though they are not necrophiliacs, BugGuide does indicate that:  “Larvae: many species are necrophagous, but some feed in mammalian tissues or parasitize other arthropods (bees, cicadas, termites, grasshoppers/locusts, millipedes), earthworms, or snails(3). Adults feed on various sugar-containing materials such as nectar, sap, fruit juices and honeydew.”  Thanks for providing a very intriguing posting for our site.  Typical Flesh Fly mating should look like this.

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Flesh Fly mating ends with death of a partner!!!

Hi Daniel,
I was pretty stunned too when I realized what was going on with that fly! I assumed both flies had been alive when mating began, but I couldn’t imagine what might have killed one partner while leaving the other looking perfectly fine and healthy, except for dragging the dead partner around everywhere it went.
Karen in FL

 

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Subject: Parasitic larvae explode from lizard a la Alien
Location: Gainesville, Fl
August 25, 2013 8:49 am
So my friend found an ailing lizard (Anolis carolinensis) yesterday in north-central Florida. He thought it might die, so he took it with him in some sort of rescue attempt. Anyway, he looks at it an hour later, the lizard was dead, and the small black dot behind the lizard’s front leg had exploded into a gaping hole filled with large wriggling larvae of some sort. It certainly appears as though they were trying to escape after their host had died. He knew I’m into reptiles, so he showed it to me. The lizard was quite familiar, but the parasites less so. They look kind of like maggots to me, but most fly maggots are in dead things, when these were clearly inside the living lizard and killed it.
Signature: lizard guy

Lizard with Maggots

Lizard with Maggots

Dear lizard guy,
We agree that these look like maggots, but we do not know of any flies that parasitize lizards.  We will continue to do some research, but we are posting your letter and photos in the hope that one of our readers can come to our assistance.

Maggots emerge from Lizard

Maggots emerge from Lizard

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Passenger Flies (Serbia to Slovenia)
Location: Originally Serbia, now Slovenia
February 14, 2013 5:00 am
There was an accident in a tunnel just after we crossed from the Bulgarian border that created a huge backup on the road. While we were at a complete stop on a very warm day in late August we picked up some uninvited passengers we couldn’t seem to shake. 4 Humans and 3 Flies in a BMW wagon. So, to amuse myself I took pictures of them. One in particular was much more interesting than I was expecting.
If you are able to help with identification that would be lovely. 🙂
Next up, flies in Germany. 🙂
Signature: Curious Girl

Flesh Fly with hitchhiking Mites

Dear Curious Girl,
How sad that your human passengers were less interesting than this fly.  We believe this is a Flesh Fly in the family Sarcophagidae.  You can see additional images and read about North American species on BugGuide.  Interestingly, it appears that this Flesh Fly has picked up some hitchhikers of its own.  The red dots on the thorax and leg are most likely phoretic mites that are hoping to be transported to their next meal.

Oh, that makes sense except this fly was no bigger than the others and they were all what I would call, “standard” fly size not one of those big ones like the North American versions seem to be from descriptions but my understanding is these are worldwide and there are many different varieties and sizes?
However, up till now I had thought the red was just pretty decorations adding interest to the fly.
As for the Sarchophagidae it would seem the other two flies I sent with the Flesh Fly could then be Satellite (metopia) Flies which puts them in the same family (? is that correct? Family? I get so confused by classificiations).
http://bugguide.net/node/view/53650/bgpage
Pretty cool they have live births instead of laying eggs.
Anyway, the day I sent these last pics to you I went out here in Cyprus to an explosion of bug life so captured pictures of dozens of interesting flies and little (+ bigger) bees among other things. So, expect more from me soon. 🙂
And thanks so much for the assist. It’s soooo cool to know these have names and descriptions in the world. 🙂

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

More bug love
Location: s. indiana
October 11, 2011 7:33 pm
Found these little guys doing the deed on the hood of my SUV. Are these are regular house flies?
Signature: brian

Mating Flesh Flies

Hi Brian,
These are not House Flies.  We believe they are Flesh Flies in the family Sarcophagidae.  According to BugGuide, they are:  “Similar to blowflies, but generally blackish with gray thoracic stripes (never metallic); 3 black racing stripes on a gray background” and they often have red eyes.

October 13, 2011 5:54 am
You are right these are flesh flies
Signature: brian

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination