Currently viewing the category: "Crane Fly"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: African jewelery-like bug
Location: becket, ma
August 27, 2014 10:41 am
Hi there! Awesome website, excited that I can possibly learn the name of this bug. It’s sitting on someone’s finger.
Signature: katy

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Dear Katy,
The pattern on the wings and body of this Giant Eastern Crane Fly does look vaguely African.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identifying wasp-like insect
Location: North East England
August 15, 2014 4:39 am
Hello there, I spotted a strange bug in my kitchen earlier today and took some pictures of it before I let it go out into my back garden. I was wondering if you could help me on the front of identifying it, as I’ve not seen anything like it before and I’m intrigued (I’m a biology student, so it has really got me wondering!). I live in the North East of England. Thank you in advance for any help!
Signature: Ryan Simmons

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Dear Ryan,
If you look closely, you will see that this insect has only one pair of wings, indicating that it is a fly and not a wasp.  It is a Crane Fly in the family Tipulidae.  It looks very similar to this
Ctenophora pectinicornis that is posted on this Dutch website.  Some Crane Flies are attracted to lights, which might explain why it was in your kitchen.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mosquito or some stinger?
Location: Switzerland
August 10, 2014 1:20 pm
Hi, should I be worried about this flying around my daughter’s room?
Signature: Cathy

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Dear Cathy,
This is a Crane Fly, and it is perfectly harmless. In an attempt to identify the species, we found this FlickR image from Portugal identified as
 Nephrotoma crocata luteata, and it looks very similar to your image, though your image is quite blurry.  This image of Nephrotoma quadrifaria from France on Superstock looks even closer. We also located this image of Nephrotoma crocata from France on iGoTerra.

Wow, that’s it! Thank you so much! :-D

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Identification
Location: NE Ontario Canada
July 31, 2014 2:28 pm
What is it? We saw an insect today, six legs, in between the legs what looked like very small feathers. On the end of each leg, little tiny wing like things that were fluttering. It moved through the air much like a spider web on the breeze, but with deliberate direction contrary to the breeze direction. It was flying. The legs were black and white, the whole thing about 1.5″ in diameter. It was very difficult to see, it was almost transparent and when you got close to it it seemed to vanish. Leaving everyone saying “Where did it go?” It was in the upper level of the ground brush. About 3-4 feet above ground weaving it’s way through branches and grasses. Any ideas? We have been googling it trying to figure out what we saw. Never seen anything like it. It looked more like something you might find in the sea.
Sorry no camera, so sketched it a little.
Signature: Thanks!

Drawing may be a Phantom Crane Fly

Drawing may be a Phantom Crane Fly

Our best guess is a Phantom Crane Fly, Bittacomorpha clavipes.

Phantom Crane Fly

Phantom Crane Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug? North-Central Minnesota
Location: Duluth, MN
July 26, 2014 5:00 pm
Good evening,
We are trying to figure out what this bug is and we really have no idea. I would say it is between 2-4 inches long with antennae. Any help would be great!!
Signature: Stephen R

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Crane Fly

Dear Stephen,
This is a Giant Crane Fly,
Tipula abdominalis, and you can compare your image to this series from BugguideAccording to BugGuide:  “adults often attracted to light.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some sort of wasp?
Location: Unionville, IN
June 7, 2014 8:25 pm
My kids and I found this bug by our creek. We live at the base of a wooded ridge in a rural area. We are surrounded by both farms and forests in South Central Indiana. Got a clue?
Signature: Heather D

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Hi Heather,
While it does look quite wasp-like, this is actually a harmless Crane Fly.  We just posted a similar looking Crane Fly from the UK, but North America has its own distinct species.  Your Crane Fly is
Ctenophora dorsalisAccording to BugGuide:  “larvae develop in soft dead wood” and we believe the female uses her ovipositor to deposit her eggs in rotting wood.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for getting back to me so quickly.  I did see the picture of the Crane Fly on your site after I posted my question, but I am yet to find a picture in any of the American sites.  All the Crane Flies I see here are the typical “Mosquito Hawk”.  Now that you have given me the species name, I’ll look again.  Where are you in the UK?  I studied at the University of Kent for a year in college.  …  Thank you so much for your help!
Best
… Heather

Hi again Heather,
The offices of What’s That Bug? are located in beautiful Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California, but we field identification requests from all over the world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination