Currently viewing the category: "Crane Fly"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug? North-Central Minnesota
Location: Duluth, MN
July 26, 2014 5:00 pm
Good evening,
We are trying to figure out what this bug is and we really have no idea. I would say it is between 2-4 inches long with antennae. Any help would be great!!
Signature: Stephen R

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Crane Fly

Dear Stephen,
This is a Giant Crane Fly,
Tipula abdominalis, and you can compare your image to this series from BugguideAccording to BugGuide:  “adults often attracted to light.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some sort of wasp?
Location: Unionville, IN
June 7, 2014 8:25 pm
My kids and I found this bug by our creek. We live at the base of a wooded ridge in a rural area. We are surrounded by both farms and forests in South Central Indiana. Got a clue?
Signature: Heather D

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Hi Heather,
While it does look quite wasp-like, this is actually a harmless Crane Fly.  We just posted a similar looking Crane Fly from the UK, but North America has its own distinct species.  Your Crane Fly is
Ctenophora dorsalisAccording to BugGuide:  “larvae develop in soft dead wood” and we believe the female uses her ovipositor to deposit her eggs in rotting wood.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you for getting back to me so quickly.  I did see the picture of the Crane Fly on your site after I posted my question, but I am yet to find a picture in any of the American sites.  All the Crane Flies I see here are the typical “Mosquito Hawk”.  Now that you have given me the species name, I’ll look again.  Where are you in the UK?  I studied at the University of Kent for a year in college.  …  Thank you so much for your help!
Best
… Heather

Hi again Heather,
The offices of What’s That Bug? are located in beautiful Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California, but we field identification requests from all over the world.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp dragonfly?
Location: Oxted, Surrey, UK
June 6, 2014 3:11 pm
Hi,
I spotted this today and have never seen anything like this in the uk. Curious to know what it is. It is early summer in the uk and was spotted at Oxted railway station in Surrey.
Thanks,
Signature: Simon

Crane Fly:  Female Tanyptera atrata

Crane Fly: Female Tanyptera atrata

Hi Simon,
This is a Crane Fly, and we quickly located a matching image on the Wild About Britain blog where it is identified as
Tanyptera atrata.  We also located a beautiful image of a female ovipositing on the Diptera Info forum.

Hi Daniel,
That’s very much for the identification.
Kind regards,
Simon

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Subject: Never seen a bug like this!!
Location: Westchester NY
May 30, 2014 7:50 am
My boyfriend is an electrician, and sent me this picture of a strange looking bug he came across in this early summer season. I tried looking it up to see what it may be, but I haven’t been able to get an exact match. I’d really appreciate any input you can provide. Thanks!
Signature: Tiffany

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Hi Tiffany,
This is a very distinctive species of Crane Fly,
Ctenophora dorsalis, and the presence of an ovipositor indicates she is a female.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Berkshire
April 8, 2014 2:02 am
I have hundreds of these bugs on my driveway, getting more each day
Signature: Sam Rutter

Leather Jackets

Leather Jackets

Dear Sam,
You have Leatherjackets, the larvae of Crane Flies.  They often become noticeable after a rain.  Getty Images has an image of a Leatherjacket that is identified as
Tipula padulosa.  According to The Garden Safari:  “The larvae, which may be up to 4 centimeters, are called leatherjackets. They are responsible for quite some damage in a lawn because it eats the roots of grass. And the lawn is most effected at times it is most vulnerable which is in winter. The larvae of the European Crane Fly are extremely able to sustain winter conditions and remain active even in spite of severe freezing temperatures. The adults are absolutely harmless as they don’t eat anything at all. This species is common all over Western Europe. It has also invaded the United States, where it is considered a real pest.”

Leatherjacket

Leatherjacket

   

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this
Location: uk
January 6, 2014 2:03 am
Hi I get these all over my patio and patio door what are they? Especially when it rains they are everywhere
Signature: Thanks

Crane Fly Larvae

Leatherjackets

We believe these are terrestrial Crane Fly Larvae or Leatherjackets, and your comment about them emerging after a rain is very consistent with their habits.  Here is a Getty Images file of a Leatherjacket from the UK identified as Tipula padulosa.  Lawn Science has an image and a video of Leatherjackets.

Leatherjacket

Leatherjacket

Hi
thankyou so much ive been going crazy!! How do I get rid of them please?
Regards
Lauren Maidment

Hi Lauren,
We do not provide extermination advice.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination