Currently viewing the category: "Crane Fly"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this flying bug?
Location: Wales
June 11, 2015 8:26 am
This flew into my house the other day and I’m stumped at what it is. It looks like a wasp/mosquito flying thing.
Signature: Inglebee

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Dear Inglebee,
We believe we have correctly identified your Crane Fly as
Nephrotoma crocata, thanks to an image on the Alamy stock photo site, an identification we then verified on both Diptera Info and iSpot using the Natural History Museum’s UK Species Inventory.  Crane Flies are harmless and they do not sting.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown insect
Location: Ronald Twp, Ionia Cnty, Michigan
June 5, 2015 5:40 pm
We live on a small lake , located in the center part of Michigan.
Can you help me with this incects identification.
I have attached photo.
Signature: Terry Mcpherson

Phantom Crane Fly

Phantom Crane Fly

Dear Terry,
This amazing creature is a harmless Phantom Crane Fly,
Bittacomorpha clavipes.  We will be postdating your submission to go live next week while we are away from the office.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: mosquito hawk or other?
Location: Blacksburg VA
May 15, 2015 9:50 am
This is the notorious bug we’ve all been talking about! The debate is, “Does it sting?” I would say from my experience “yes”. I cupped it in my hand to place outside and Whammy! It got me. I have to admit the mosquito hawk and the wasp type bug look very similar. So that could be a contributing factor in this hub bub of ” to sing or not to sting”
Signature: Wendy g

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Dear Wendy,
Thanks for submitting an image of a Crane Fly, the subject to much debate in our comment section regarding stinging.  According to all reputable information we have found, including the input from Dr. Chen Young, an expert in Crane Flies, they do not sting.  Dr. Chen Young commented:  “Here is the link and in the Introduction there is statement in the first paragraph that indicates crane flies are harmless. “They are often mistaken for mosquitoes, but they belong to a group of harmless flies.” http://iz.carnegiemnh.org/cranefly/introduction.htm#Introduction
We continue to stand by that position and we will continue to allow our readership to debate the issue in our comment section of postings, but we prefer to provide no additional What’s That Bug? feedback regarding the matter.  According to Washington State University:  “Adult crane flies do not damage your lawn, nor do they bite or sting. They are harmless.”

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Help with identification
Location: Northern CA, Pacific coast
May 12, 2015 12:15 pm
This photo was taken on May 2, 2015. In a broken branch of a cherry blossom tree. We live on the far northern Pacific coast in CA. Not far from the Oregon state line. Please help in determining what this is. At first I thought wasp, but not sure about that. Can’t seem to find any photos online that match this one. Hopefully it is a simple ID for you. My daughter and her friend initially discovered it, and I felt bad that I couldn’t tell them what it was with any certainty.
Thanks for any help!
Signature: Matt in NorCal

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Dear Matt,
This impressive insect is a Tiger Crane Fly, a harmless species that benefits from its resemblance to a stinging wasp.

Daniel, just wanted to say Thanks for the information and quick turn around time! Fantastic site – I’m disappointed I only recently discovered it.
Have a great day,
Matt

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: insect identification
Location: central New Jersey
April 22, 2015 7:38 am
I live in New Jersey and I want to know the name of an insect with a skinny body and black and white striped legs. The legs look as if they are lit up
Signature: Don’t Bug me!

Phantom Crane Fly

Phantom Crane Fly

This distinctive Crane Fly is commonly called a Phantom Crane Fly, a name that refers to the appearing and disappearing act that occurs when it flies feebly from sun to shade, an optical illusion created because of the boldly striped legs.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying insect identification
Location: Pacific Northwest, Southwest Washington state
April 11, 2015 11:21 am
Hello,
I live in a wooded area of southwest Washington state and saw this insect on the door of our shed. I tried to look up something on it, but can’t seem to find anything. You you please help?
Thank you
Signature: Tia Miller

Crane Fly

Tiger Crane Fly

Dear Tia,
This distinctive insect is a Tiger Crane Fly,
Phoroctenia vittata angustipennis.  As it does not sting nor bite, it is a harmless insect.

Crane Fly

Tiger Crane Fly

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination