Currently viewing the category: "Bot Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

GIANT fly
Location: Dallas, TX
October 17, 2011 9:53 pm
I’ve lived in Dallas, TX for 40 years and have never seen such a thing. Found today on our hydrangea plant. It has a fat head, thorax & abdomen, is mostly black with awesome horizontal red stripes across the top of its huge eyes, has white fuzz between the thorax & abdomen, and it’s wings fold in a crossed fassion, unlike most flies. Its legs are just like a common house fly (only larger) and it rubs them together and walks/behaves like a fly. When it flies it sounds loud like a bee. It’s about an inch long!
Signature: Grasshopper

Rodent Bot Fly

Dear Grasshopper,
This amazing fly is a Rodent Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra, but alas, we don’t recognize the species.  It doesn’t seem to match any of the species posted to Bugguidewhich describes the life cycle as:  “Females typically deposit eggs in the burrows and ‘runs’ of rodent or rabbit hosts. A warm body passing by the eggs causes them to hatch almost instantly and the larvae glom onto the host. The larvae are subcutaneous (under the skin) parasites of the host. Their presence is easily detected as a tumor-like bulge, often in the throat or neck or flanks of the host. The larvae breathe by everting the anal spiracles out a hole (so they are oriented head-down inside the host). They feed on the flesh of the host, but only rarely does the host die as a result.”

Rabbit Bot Fly

GIANT Fly – much better picture!
Location: Dallas, TX
October 17, 2011 10:30 pm
Please refer to my previous submission today.
thanks
Signature: Grasshopper

Rabbit Bot Fly

We will add this to the posting we already created for your amazing beautiful Rodent Bot Fly which we now believe to be a Rabbit Bot Fly, Cuterebra buccata, based on photos posted to BugGuide.

Wow, that is awesome!  Will definitely comment back!  Thanks Daniel.
Greg Hotchkiss, aka Grasshopper (my best friends actually have called me that since college)


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Grub Guy
Location: NE Pennsylvania
September 11, 2011 11:34 am
This is one of the strangest bugs I have ever seen. It appears to be some kind of grub as it has no feet. It moves slowly using a wave technique. It has two puffy orange objects by either its head or bottom.
We found it under our kitchen table. My mom thought it was a terd! It is almost black but a bit lighter nearer its orange orbs. We would love to know what this is
Signature: Thank You

Bot Fly Pupa

This is either a Pupa or a Pre-Pupal Larva of a Rodent Bot Fly in the genus Cuterebra which you can verify by comparing to this photo on BugGuide.  The mystery is how it go under your kitchen table.  Perhaps your household feline recently caught a rodent that was being parasitized by this endoparasitic Bot Fly.

Species Identification Courtesy of George Jeff Boettner and Eric Eaton
Hi, Daniel:
Can you copy and paste this to WTB?
Eric

Hi Eric,
George Jeff Boettner commented on your link.
George Jeff wrote: “Hi Eric, I can’t seem to post to the original site. If you can let them know this is a mouse bot, Cuterebra fontinella. It likely emerged out of a mouse walking across the table. So they should look around for signs of mice too! If put in soil and kept dry and outdoors for a year, they would likely get an adult bot next July or August.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

huge black fly
Location: northwest
August 6, 2011 10:55 pm
I live in the country. Eagle creek Oregon. Found this in the laundry room. Its huge! All black. Little wings on top of its shoulders. Is it a horse fly? I’ve never seen a fly this huge before. Its crawling on a quarter!
Signature: Tina

Rodent Bot Fly

Hi Tina,
This is a Rodent Bot Fly, and we believe it is
Cuterebra tenebrosa which we identified on BugGuide.  These Bot Flies are skin parasites on rodents, and the host insect for Cuterebra tenebrosa is the wood rat.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

upstate ny, came out of dead rabbit
Location: Greene County, NY
July 24, 2011 4:44 pm
Have no clue.. it is alive and crawls around.. found it while cleaning a dead rabbit can you help
Signature: FoX83

Bot Fly Larva

Hi FoX83,
This is the larva of a Rodent Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra.  The larvae are endoparasites found on certain mammals.  The Bot Fly larva forms a warble, generally on the neck of the infested host, and though they look quite nasty, they are alleged to not harm the host.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Black & white bee?
Location: Washington wetland field
July 19, 2011 10:58 am
Help me find out what this is. It was seen in a wetland field here in the state of Washington. It’s the same size as a bumble bee. I didn’t see it fly, it does appear to have wings. It is also fuzzy like a bumble bee. Thanks
Signature: P Lind

Rodent Bot Fly

Dear P Lind,
You have encountered a Rodent Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra.  According to BugGuide:  “Females typically deposit eggs in the burrows and “runs” of rodent or rabbit hosts. A warm body passing by the eggs causes them to hatch almost instantly and the larvae glom onto the host. The larvae are subcutaneous (under the skin) parasites of the host. Their presence is easily detected as a tumor-like bulge, often in the throat or neck or flanks of the host. The larvae breathe by everting the anal spiracles out a hole (so they are oriented head-down inside the host). They feed on the flesh of the host, but only rarely does the host die as a result.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Looks like a bumblebee with a fly bottom?
Location: Petawawa, Ontario
June 8, 2011 10:36 pm
When I found this lovely critter beside my pool, I thought it must be a half-drowned bumblebee as it’s about the same size and shape as a bumblebee. I poked it gently with a stick to see if it was alive,and it squirted something out of it’s rear end in a stream of what I figured was some sort of venom. (It got some distance with the spray, too, about 12 inches in a fine arc onto my lawn!)
I quickly got a bottle (and lid) from the house to carefully capture it and get a better look. It didn’t seem to have a mouth or a stinger, and had a fuzzy head but shiny bottom like a fly. Also, I noticed it didn’t have the same kind of wings as a bee. After I did some online searching and overcame the heebee jeebees, we got some clearer pics, this hefty fella was flushed down the toilet… just to be safe.
After you correctly identified our Luna Moth visitor, I knew exactly where to go for an answer on this one. Am I close with my guess that this is some type of botfly? It doesn’t have the red stripes on it’s eyes that I’ve seen from some other images, but the shape of the body and other features look familiar.
Signature: Anderson Family

Bot Fly

Dear Anderson Family,
We will leave the species identification to the experts, but you are absolutely correct in your guess that this is a Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra.  Of the species on bugGuide, out best guess would be Cuterebra emasculator, and there is a comment posted that includes this information:  “This is our only golden haired bot in the Northeast and this species can be found anywhere east of the Mississippi although rarely seen. It is primarily host specific in the Northeast on chipmunks, Tamias striatus.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination