Currently viewing the category: "Bee Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What the heck is this?
Location: Chichester, Quebec
August 26, 2016 8:03 am
Hello bugman,
My mother recently took a picture of a strange bug she saw on her farm. I tried looking up what bug it is on google with no success and we are both really curious as to what it is. Can you help?
Thank you very much and have a nice day!
Signature: Angie

Bee Fly:  Lepidophora lutea

Bee Fly: Lepidophora lutea

Dear Angie,
This unusual fly is a harmless Bee Fly,
Lepidophora lutea.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying bug
Location: Flinton Ontario Canada
August 12, 2016 12:01 pm
Just want to know what this is and to learn more about it. Thank Kat
Signature: Kat

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Kat,
We are pretty sure we have identified your Bee Fly as
Lepidophora lutea on BugGuide because it has a more northerly range than the very similar looking Scaly Bee Fly, Lepidophora lepidocera, which is also pictured on BugGuide and looks quite similar.

Fantastic. Thanks so much for identifying the Bee Fly. How very interesting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: big black fly
Location: Thessaly, Greece
August 7, 2016 9:16 am
Hello,
I photographed this fly in an olive grove near the sea.
Any idea what it is?
Signature: afilitos

Bee Fly:  Satyramoeba hetrusca

Bee Fly: Satyramoeba hetrusca

Dear afilitos,
This is one stunning fly.  We thought it resembled a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, and our suspicions proved correct when we found it identified as a Bee Fly,
Satyramoeba hetrusca, on FlickR where it states:  “A relatively uncommon summer species on Lesvos. It is one of the larger bee flies, about 15-18 mm in length.”  We verified the ID on iNaturalist, and the French language site La faune de Crete et parfois aussi d’ailleurs has some information, but it is in French, which we do not read.  We could understand enough to deduce it is active on Crete from June or July until September or October, and like many Bee Flies, it parasitizes the nests of Carpenter Bees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this a deerfly?
Location: Hampshire, Illinois
July 25, 2016 3:17 pm
Hello, Bugmam!
I live in Hampshire Illinois, this guy showed up on my deck, I thought it was a moth and approached it flew at me, and wouldn’t stop I had to run ….literally …run into the house.
Can you tell me what it is called, besides what I called it…lol
I think it is some type of Deerfly. I may be wrong.
Signature: Gerardine Baugh

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Gerardine,
This is a Tiger Bee Fly and it neither bites nor stings, nor does it have venom or poison, so it is perfectly harmless, but that it not to say it cannot hurt you.  Imagine, if you will, if while you were running away from this harmless creature you tripped and fell and broke your leg.  Though we don’t know why this harmless Tiger Bee Fly flew at you, there was really no harm it could have done had it landed on you.  According to BugGuide, the Tiger Bee Fly “is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees,
Xylocopa.”

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for this information. When I see it again I will take more pictures, and watch to see what it is up to.
Gerardine

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a horsefly?
Location: Abbotsford, British Columbia. Canada
June 15, 2016 4:04 pm
Spotted this bug while sitting on my deck. I’ve never seen such transparent wings with spots like these.I’m in Abbotsford, British Columbia. Any idea what it is?
Signature: S.Scott

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear S.Scott,
This is a Bee Fly, not a Horse Fly, and we believe it is either
Anthrax irroratus or another member of the genus based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, it is a “Parasitoid of hymenoptera” meaning that it kills its host, making it an effective, natural, biological agent for the control of True Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee? Fly? Wasp? Insect?
Location: Adairsville, Georgia, USA
May 30, 2016 4:43 am
These things with a pointy mouth like to float in my swimming pool for several minutes then fly off. I can approach them and touch them. Other than flapping their wings a little bit, they keep on floating. What are they? Can they bite or sting me? We’ve had this pool since 2009 and last year was the first time these showed up. There were only a couple last year at a time. This year there’s maybe a dozen in the pool at one time.
Signature: Darla

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Darla,
This is a harmless Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, a group of pollinating insects.  They do not bite nor sting.  We are curious what is attracting them to your pool.  This behavior does not seem normal, and we are guessing they are accidentally flying into the pool after visiting blossoms nearby.  We do not believe they are purposely taking a dip.  Because we will be out of the office for a spell in June, we are postdating your submission to go live to our site during our absence.

I’m very glad to hear this!  Our pool is an above ground pool in Adairsville, GA.  We were out there again yesterday and about 1:00 PM, they started stopping by again.  They float in the water for several minutes then fly away.  If we touch them, they flap their wings a little but go back to floating.  I cupped my hand under a couple of them and let the water roll off gently leaving the Bee Fly on my hand.  They would then fly off quickly.  Our pool has chlorine in it.  They were still there when we got out of the pool about 4:00 PM.  They come and go throughout the day.  If you figure out why they are coming to the pool, I’d love to know.  Sounds like it could be interesting!
Thank you,
Darla Williams

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination