Currently viewing the category: "Bee Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee fly
Location: Williams, AZ
July 28, 2014 12:41 pm
Could this be some type of bee fly? It was pretty large–maybe about an inch long.
Signature: Chris

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Chris,
Yes, this is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, however we are not certain of the genus or species.  Our best guess at this time is the Sinuous Bee Fly,
Hemipenthes sinuosa, and this image on BugGuide looks very close.  The pattern on the wing seems correct, but the body is lighter than the individuals pictured on BugGuide where it states:  “black area of wing has irregular sinuous (wavy) border with a small rounded blob near the apex – a distinguishing feature abdomen, thorax, and head black or very dark with no banding or other obvious markings”.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown fly with golden fur
Location: Fiskeboda, Sweden
July 24, 2014 6:37 am
I found this yellow hovering fly sun bathing on my concrete stairs on a hot summer day in the beginning of June. First I thought it was some kind of hoverfly, but I was unable to find one that looked like the one I saw. I would be very happy to get some help identifying this fly.
Signature: Andreas R

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Andreas,
This is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, probably in the genus
Bombylius.  The wing pattern is similar to, but not exactly like that of the Large Bee Fly pictured on the Natural History Museum website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Some sort of tachnid fly?
Location: Andover, NJ (Sussex Cty)
July 16, 2014 10:45 am
Hi,
Hoping you can help me with an id on this small fly. It was about 1/4 inch in length, and was in my flower garden just sitting on a leaf. The eyes make me think it is some sort of fly, maybe in the tachnid family?
Thanks!
Deborah
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Fly

Bee Fly

Hi Deborah,
You are correct that this is a Fly, but we are not prepared at this time to provide a family identification.  We are posting your image as an Unknown Fly and we hope to be able to provide you with a more specific identification in the future.

Update:  July 19, 2014
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash of the Brazilian site Insetologia, we now know that this Bee Fly is
Anthrax argyropygus.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “widespread in United States into Mexico, also Cuba.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: White Bee with partial black wings?
Location: Central New Mexico, USA
July 10, 2014 9:17 pm
Hi! I’ve been a fan of your site for many years now, so when I found this little cutie I knew just who to ask. I had looked up pictures of white bees but none of them had the partial black wings as this one did. Genetic mutation perhaps? New species? Or just a different bee? He seemed very docile, let me hold the leaf he was on for a good bit, and even let me get up close and personal for the pictures. He left sometime later when I wasn’t paying him any attention. Please, what kind of bee do we have?
Signature: The bee finder

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear bee finder,
You are going to have to change your moniker from “the bee finder” to “the bee fly finder” if you are referring specifically to the individual in the images.  Bee Flies in the family Bombyliidae are very effective mimics of our apian friends, and like bees, Bee Flies are efficient pollinators.  It sure looks like
Hemipenthes celeris, which we located on BugGuide, where it indicates New Mexico as part of the range.  Alas, this pretty creature has no common name other than the nonspecific family name.  That is very patriotic nail polish.  Was is special for Independence Day?

Thank you very much for such a fast response!
It’s no wonder I wasn’t getting anywhere with my searches, I was looking completely in the wrong places. Now I can put my search efforts in the right direction and learn all I can about these pretty little flies. Oh, and thank you! The nail polish was done for the Independence day holiday. :)

The post we created right after your posting is another example of patriotic nail polish.  We love posting images of women who are not afraid to handle bugs.

Awesome! :) As long as it’s not a Wasp or a Blisterbug I’m good, haha

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee or Fly?
Location: Andover, New Jersey
April 19, 2014 9:10 am
I found several of these little guys sucking up nectar on some hyacinths this morning. Haven’t seen these before and am thinking that it is some sort of mimic fly? Hoping you can help.
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Hi Deborah,
These are amazingly detailed images of a Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, a species that if found in Europe as well as North America.  As you have surmised, this is a fly that mimics a bee, and it is a pollinating species.  Greater Bee Flies generally make their appearance early in the spring.

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee/Wasp??
Location: Medway, Kent, UK
April 10, 2014 5:28 am
Hi, I’m from Medway, Kent in the UK.
Whilst on my lunch break today in the park I noticed this bug hoovering by my feet. It had 6 legs, wings, was orangey in colour, with a pointy thing (to collect nectar??) at the front of it’s face? and it’s body when viewed from above was triangular.
I’ve never seen this before? The weather here has been a misture of cloudy sun and rain with an average temperature of 13 degrees. It was approx the size of an average bee or wasp.
Signature: Claire

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Hi Claire,
This is a Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, a fly that mimics bees and it does gather nectar with that long proboscis.  You can read more about the Greater Bee Fly on the Natural History Museum website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination