Currently viewing the category: "Bee Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a horsefly?
Location: Abbotsford, British Columbia. Canada
June 15, 2016 4:04 pm
Spotted this bug while sitting on my deck. I’ve never seen such transparent wings with spots like these.I’m in Abbotsford, British Columbia. Any idea what it is?
Signature: S.Scott

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear S.Scott,
This is a Bee Fly, not a Horse Fly, and we believe it is either
Anthrax irroratus or another member of the genus based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide, it is a “Parasitoid of hymenoptera” meaning that it kills its host, making it an effective, natural, biological agent for the control of True Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee? Fly? Wasp? Insect?
Location: Adairsville, Georgia, USA
May 30, 2016 4:43 am
These things with a pointy mouth like to float in my swimming pool for several minutes then fly off. I can approach them and touch them. Other than flapping their wings a little bit, they keep on floating. What are they? Can they bite or sting me? We’ve had this pool since 2009 and last year was the first time these showed up. There were only a couple last year at a time. This year there’s maybe a dozen in the pool at one time.
Signature: Darla

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Darla,
This is a harmless Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, a group of pollinating insects.  They do not bite nor sting.  We are curious what is attracting them to your pool.  This behavior does not seem normal, and we are guessing they are accidentally flying into the pool after visiting blossoms nearby.  We do not believe they are purposely taking a dip.  Because we will be out of the office for a spell in June, we are postdating your submission to go live to our site during our absence.

I’m very glad to hear this!  Our pool is an above ground pool in Adairsville, GA.  We were out there again yesterday and about 1:00 PM, they started stopping by again.  They float in the water for several minutes then fly away.  If we touch them, they flap their wings a little but go back to floating.  I cupped my hand under a couple of them and let the water roll off gently leaving the Bee Fly on my hand.  They would then fly off quickly.  Our pool has chlorine in it.  They were still there when we got out of the pool about 4:00 PM.  They come and go throughout the day.  If you figure out why they are coming to the pool, I’d love to know.  Sounds like it could be interesting!
Thank you,
Darla Williams

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee-Fly Hybrid
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
May 13, 2016 6:20 am
Hello!
This creepy fellow wandered into the office this afternoon.
It makes buzzing sounds, like a bee, has the furry coat and the black and yellow stripes.
Its thorax is more round and compact than a regular bee and the stripes are also much more condensed. It has a very long snout/needle/mouth, although it is very small.
Our office is located in a bushveld type of landscape, and we also use recycled water (not sewage, obviously) as irrigation for our very big garden.
I sincerely hope you can help identify this stinger!
Signature: Charlottha Kruger

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Charlotta,
While this is not a hybrid, it is a member of the family Bombyliidae whose members are called Bee Flies because they are true Flies that mimic Bees.  What you have called a stinger is actually the proboscis or mouth which is adapted to drink nectar from blossoms while the Bee Fly hovers.  We were not able to identify its species on iSpot.

Thank you tons for getting back to me! J Good luck with your future bug-identnifications!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Cambridge, England
April 19, 2016 3:19 am
Please could you tell me what this is I found it in my garden
Signature: Ann Clarke

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Dear Ann,
You did not specify which City of Cambridge, but since your Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, is found in both North America and Europe, it does not affect our identification.  The Greater Bee Fly is a harmless, beneficial pollinator.

Cambridge in England.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s This Bug? Mosquito-related?
Location: San Mateo, CA
March 2, 2016 8:40 pm
Found this critter flying around my house tonight in San Mateo. Fuzzy type of mosquito? Thought by sound it was a bumble bee until I caught it. Head seems mosquito-ish.
Signature: Renee, in San Mateo, CA

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Renee,
Though your images are quite blurry, they are nonetheless easily recognizable as being of a Bee Fly.  Flies and Mosquitoes are classified together in the insect order Diptera.

Thank you, Daniel.
The “Bee-Fly” was flying around so quickly, it was difficult to get an in-focus photo!  It’s abdomen is so flat that from the side it actually looks like a mosquito (& sounds like one) but from the top it’s more reminiscent of a barely-fuzzy bee.
Thank you for clarifying.
-Renee

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee or not?
Location: Alexander Bay, South Africa
February 18, 2016 2:19 am
Hi there! I found this little guy buzzing around in my garden, and can’t find any photo on Google that looks like it. Would love to know what it is!
Signature: Adri

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Adri,
Though it looks and acts like a Bee, this is actually a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae and we located this image on iSpot that looks like your individual, and it is identified as being in the genus
Bombomyia.  Here is another matching image from iSpot.  Bee Flies do not sting nor do they bite.  They are beneficial pollinators.

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination