Currently viewing the category: "Bee Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee/Wasp??
Location: Medway, Kent, UK
April 10, 2014 5:28 am
Hi, I’m from Medway, Kent in the UK.
Whilst on my lunch break today in the park I noticed this bug hoovering by my feet. It had 6 legs, wings, was orangey in colour, with a pointy thing (to collect nectar??) at the front of it’s face? and it’s body when viewed from above was triangular.
I’ve never seen this before? The weather here has been a misture of cloudy sun and rain with an average temperature of 13 degrees. It was approx the size of an average bee or wasp.
Signature: Claire

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Hi Claire,
This is a Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, a fly that mimics bees and it does gather nectar with that long proboscis.  You can read more about the Greater Bee Fly on the Natural History Museum website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly identification
Location: Colorado
March 21, 2014 6:51 pm
Hi,
I have a couple of flies that I haven’t been able to identify.
The first I thought would be easy, however, I’m coming up empty! I’ve Googled lots of phrases, and gone through the photos on here (I think I hit them all), but didn’t see any matches. This one was in late June of 2010 in the Garden of the Gods in Colorado Springs, CO.

Thank you so much for your help! (Also, your book is fabulous!)
Signature: Amy

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Hi Amy,
Your first image is of a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, and this image of
Exoprosopa caliptera that we found on BugGuide is a very close match.  Exoprosopa dorcadion, also pictured on BugGuide, is another possibility, so we are confident with the genus, but we would have to defer to someone with more experience to definitively identify the species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I think this is a big furry fly
Location: Colima, Mexico
September 24, 2013 8:13 pm
I found this fly (i think it is a fly) sitting on the patio table, late September 2013, not long after Tropical Storm Manual and Hurricane Ingrid slammed into southern Mexico at the same time, one from the Pacific and one from the Atlantic. It is not moving much. It has a thick, velvety coat with a white stripe horizontally across the top side of the lower thorax. I would say the body part (without wings) is about 2cm. I haven’t seen this bug before and would be interested to have an ID. The bit of white at the end of the thorax does not belong to the bug but is a bit of debris on the table. Thanks bugman
Signature: Beverly

Probably Tachinid Fly

Bee Fly

Hi Beverly,
We believe, but we are not certain, that this is some species of Tachinid Fly.  Members of the Tachinid Fly family are parasitic in the larval stage, and adults often take nectar from flowers.  Tachinids prey on a wide variety of insects and other arthropods, and caterpillars are probably the most common host insect.  See BugGuide for more information on Tachinid Flies.

Probably Tachinid Fly

BeeFly

Update and Correction:  January 11, 2014
We got a pretty confident correction from Stephen who agrees with the comment from James, so even though we cannot locate a link with a matching photo, we have correct the posting to read Bee Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown flying insect
Location: northern Illinois
August 24, 2013 2:03 pm
Hi Bugman,
While lounging in my backyard in Lake County Illinois, this insect flew around me several times before perching on the canopy of my lawn chair. It was very loud while in flight. Any idea what it is?
Signature: Gardening Goddess

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Hi Gardening Goddess,
This harmless insect is a Tiger Bee Fly, Xenox tigrinus.  According to BugGuide:  “Female lays eggs at entrance of carpenter bee nests. Larvae waits until carpenter bee’s larvae reach the pupal stage to parasitize it Urban Wildlife.

Thank you soooo much for getting back to me. As an organic gardener I come across an amazing range of insects. Now I know not to fear this guy!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what’s this bug??
Location: georgia
July 19, 2013 9:26 am
hello! It’s a hot summer here in georgia and this year we have been flooded with theses flying insects. at first I thought they were wasps but now I’m not so sure. please help if you can!
Signature: any

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

This sure looks to us like another Tiger Bee Fly, Xenox tigrinus.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big black insect with clear, spotted wings
Location: Columbus, OH
July 19, 2013 8:20 pm
Saw two of these creatures on some potted flowers on my deck tonight. I’m in Columbus, OH – photo taken in the evening of July 19, 2013. Very hot out, nearing the end of a week+ of 90-degree days. The body is about the length of a man’s thumbnail. Even with a steady and sometimes strong breeze, they never moved an inch. Would love to know what they are!
Signature: Emily

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Emily,
We believe we have identified your Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae as a Tiger Bee Fly,
Xenox tigrinus.  This is a harmless species whose “Larva is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees, Xylocopa” according to BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination