Currently viewing the category: "Bee Flies"
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Subject:  Bee Flies are Dipalta serpentina
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
September 17, 2016 1:30 PM
Earlier in the week, we posted an image of a Bee Fly we identified as
Villa lateralis and we wrote about a brown Bee Fly that we were unable to capture as an image.  Well, today we took several images of the same brown Bee Fly species, and as the afternoon progressed, we got additional images.  At one point, we got images of four individuals taking nectar from the blooming chives, and after putting the camera away, we spotted a fifth individual.  We are relatively certain we have correctly identified these Bee Flies as Dipalta serpentina thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “For many years it was stated that Dipalta were parasitoids of antlion larvae. …  However, the 1989 paper by Leech & Leech demonstrated a clear instance of Dipalta serpentina parasitizing the pupal stage of an antlion (rather than the larval stage). D. serpentina might also parasitizes antlion larvae, though it seems to be in question (earlier observers may have not observed carefully enough to distinguish between larval & pupal parasitism).”

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Two Bee Flies

Two Bee Flies

And then there were four Bee Flies

And then there were four Bee Flies

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bee Fly, Villa lateralis
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
September 13, 2016 5:20 PM

Bee Fly:  Villa lateralis

Bee Fly: Villa lateralis

Late this afternoon, I noticed one more brown Bee Fly and two other black and white Bee Flies, that all looked quite similar except for the coloration, in a sunny area getting the late afternoon light.  The two black and white individuals were buzzing one another near the blossoming chives.  By the time I returned with the camera, only one individual remained, and we are pretty certain we have correctly identified it as Villa lateralis, first on the Natural History of Orange County site and then on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Widely distributed in North America including Puerto Rico and South to Panama.”  Upon viewing the other members of the genus on BugGuide, we can’t help but to wonder if the brown Bee Fly we saw was the related Villa miscella.  Though we did not get an image, our memory was of it having brown on the wings.

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Subject: What the heck is this?
Location: Chichester, Quebec
August 26, 2016 8:03 am
Hello bugman,
My mother recently took a picture of a strange bug she saw on her farm. I tried looking up what bug it is on google with no success and we are both really curious as to what it is. Can you help?
Thank you very much and have a nice day!
Signature: Angie

Bee Fly:  Lepidophora lutea

Bee Fly: Lepidophora lutea

Dear Angie,
This unusual fly is a harmless Bee Fly,
Lepidophora lutea.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying bug
Location: Flinton Ontario Canada
August 12, 2016 12:01 pm
Just want to know what this is and to learn more about it. Thank Kat
Signature: Kat

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Kat,
We are pretty sure we have identified your Bee Fly as
Lepidophora lutea on BugGuide because it has a more northerly range than the very similar looking Scaly Bee Fly, Lepidophora lepidocera, which is also pictured on BugGuide and looks quite similar.

Fantastic. Thanks so much for identifying the Bee Fly. How very interesting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: big black fly
Location: Thessaly, Greece
August 7, 2016 9:16 am
Hello,
I photographed this fly in an olive grove near the sea.
Any idea what it is?
Signature: afilitos

Bee Fly:  Satyramoeba hetrusca

Bee Fly: Satyramoeba hetrusca

Dear afilitos,
This is one stunning fly.  We thought it resembled a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, and our suspicions proved correct when we found it identified as a Bee Fly,
Satyramoeba hetrusca, on FlickR where it states:  “A relatively uncommon summer species on Lesvos. It is one of the larger bee flies, about 15-18 mm in length.”  We verified the ID on iNaturalist, and the French language site La faune de Crete et parfois aussi d’ailleurs has some information, but it is in French, which we do not read.  We could understand enough to deduce it is active on Crete from June or July until September or October, and like many Bee Flies, it parasitizes the nests of Carpenter Bees.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this a deerfly?
Location: Hampshire, Illinois
July 25, 2016 3:17 pm
Hello, Bugmam!
I live in Hampshire Illinois, this guy showed up on my deck, I thought it was a moth and approached it flew at me, and wouldn’t stop I had to run ….literally …run into the house.
Can you tell me what it is called, besides what I called it…lol
I think it is some type of Deerfly. I may be wrong.
Signature: Gerardine Baugh

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Gerardine,
This is a Tiger Bee Fly and it neither bites nor stings, nor does it have venom or poison, so it is perfectly harmless, but that it not to say it cannot hurt you.  Imagine, if you will, if while you were running away from this harmless creature you tripped and fell and broke your leg.  Though we don’t know why this harmless Tiger Bee Fly flew at you, there was really no harm it could have done had it landed on you.  According to BugGuide, the Tiger Bee Fly “is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees,
Xylocopa.”

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Daniel,
Thank you for this information. When I see it again I will take more pictures, and watch to see what it is up to.
Gerardine

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination