Currently viewing the category: "Bee Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – What’s This Fly?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
August 19, 2014 6:19 pm
Hello,
I thought I’d discovered all of the flies that could possibly come to our little patch, but here’s another. Can you please help? It spent a lot of time on catnip blooms and the adjacent native geranium (I think I have it properly distinguished from geranium.) It is very shy and moves fast, but came back over and over again.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Hi Anna,
We believe we have correctly identified your Bee Fly as 
Dipalta serpentina based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are parasitoids of pupae, and perhaps also larvae, of antlions (Myrmeleontidae)” and “In Calif. species is most abundant in August and September” which makes your sighting right on schedule.

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Thanks!  We just love sighting “new to us” creatures in the back.
Anna

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Horse fly moth?
Location: Buffalo NY
August 17, 2014 11:39 am
Curious as to what this bug is.
Signature: Cheryl

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Cheryl,
This is a harmless Tiger Bee Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big, scary fly?
Location: Montclair, NJ
August 13, 2014 8:22 am
Hi there,
Every sunny day this summer I have had to run a gauntlet up and down my stairs, which are outdoor deck stairs, past two or three yellowjackets and one or two of these guys. At first, seeing them in flight, I thought they were black and white hornets but then I saw one landed and it rather looks like a huge fly with delta-shape wings. They buzz threateningly as they fly past. I’m wondering if they bite. I’m terrified to walk past them, but I found a very dead one on the pavement to photograph.
Signature: Amanda, Montclair NJ

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Amanda,
While Yellowjackets defending a nest might be cause for concern, this Tiger Bee Fly,
Xenox tigrinus, is perfectly harmless.  See BugGuide for additional information.  This dead individual may have fallen prey to another impressive and scary but harmless fly, a Robber Fly.

Thank you very much!  I was afraid it was like a horsefly that bit me once, and I won’t forget that!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee Fly?
Location: Las Vegas, NV
August 6, 2014 5:29 pm
I recently encountered this beautiful insect at the Springs Preserve in Las Vegas, NV. I immediately noticed it because of the beautuiful markings on it’s wings and its lovely reddish brown coloration. I tried looking it up in a few books and scoured the internet, but I’ve not found an exact match. Any guesses?
Signature: Renee M. Grayson

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Hi Renee,
We agree that this is a Bee Fly, and we are going to try to identify it more specifically.
  After a bit of searching, we believe we have correctly identified your Bee Fly as Poecilanthrax effrenus because of the numerous similar images on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide“A southwestern and Mexican species which has the abdominal ground color broadly marked with orange, the black color usually triangular in shape and confined to the dorsum. The hair on the abdomen is predominately black; on the sides there is black hair from segments two to six. The wings are evenly colored with dark brown, the veins at the base of the wing are bright orange. The second submarginal cell is nearly entirely hyaline and the hyaline spot in the discal cell is quite definite.”

Bee Fly:  Poecilanthrax effrenus

Bee Fly: Poecilanthrax effrenus

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth or Fly?
Location: Baltimore, MD
August 6, 2014 10:44 am
This guy was on my “golden jubliee” agastache, the last week of July, in Baltimore, Maryland. I live in the city itself, but we have a park nearby and lots of neighbors have nice gardens.
I’ve never seen anything like this one before. I was thinking a clearwing moth, but it doesn’t look like any I’ve seen. Do you know?
Signature: Summer

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Summer,
This large fly is commonly called a Tiger Bee Fly and its scientific name is
Xenox tigrinus.  You can view a nice matching image on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Larva is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees, Xylocopa.  Adult food unknown. An adult has been observed on damp mud, lapping up fluids (pers. observation, P. Coin).”  Many Bee Flies in the family Bmbyliidae are important pollinators, and your observation on the agastache (See High Country Gardens) would indicate that despite the lack of information on the feeding habits of the Tiger Bee Fly on BugGuide, it is also a pollinator like other members of the family.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee fly
Location: Williams, AZ
July 28, 2014 12:41 pm
Could this be some type of bee fly? It was pretty large–maybe about an inch long.
Signature: Chris

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Chris,
Yes, this is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, however we are not certain of the genus or species.  Our best guess at this time is the Sinuous Bee Fly,
Hemipenthes sinuosa, and this image on BugGuide looks very close.  The pattern on the wing seems correct, but the body is lighter than the individuals pictured on BugGuide where it states:  “black area of wing has irregular sinuous (wavy) border with a small rounded blob near the apex – a distinguishing feature abdomen, thorax, and head black or very dark with no banding or other obvious markings”.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination