Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
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Subject: i need to identify this insect
Location: fenton, missouri
July 28, 2015 3:49 pm
Can you please tell me what kind of bug this is?
Signature: however you want

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

This is a Hanging Thief, a predatory Robber Fly in the genus Diogmites.

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Subject: predatory fly
Location: Cardiff-by-the-Sea, CA
July 26, 2015 4:20 pm
Saw this fly in a neighbor’s dead bamboo. I got a look at it through binoculars, and it reminded me of deer flies I’ve seen in NorCal and So. OR, but those don’t live here, nor do they take other flies as prey. The first photo is a nice clear shot from underneath, and you can see the wings of the prey sticking out. In the, second, rather blurry photo (just could *not* get the camera to focus on anything but those intervening twigs), you can kind-of make out the relative position and size of the two. The predator was an inch (or so) long, and I’ve never knowingly seen another one in my 50+ years in this area.
Signature: Eric Simpson

Bee Killer

Bee Killer

Dear Eric,
This predator is a Robber Fly, and though the image is not the best for identification purposes, we suspect it is a Bee Killer,
Mallophora fautrix, the only member of the genus found in California.  These large Robber Flies are impressive and very adept hunters.

Sue Dougherty, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Di Lave Litz liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Essington Pa
July 25, 2015 9:38 am
Noticed them around the carpenter bees..which seem to be dying. Noticing bee carcasses. And no more carpenter bees…
Signature: Kristi Stewart

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Kristi,
This is a Tiger Bee Fly,
Xenox tigrinus, and according to BugGuide:  “Larva is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees, Xylocopa.  Adult food unknown. An adult has been observed on damp mud, lapping up fluids (pers. observation, P. Coin).”  What we do not know and what we plan to research is at what point the adult emerges from the host Carpenter Bee.  Were we Tiger Bee Flies planning responsible parenthood, we would wait until the adult Carpenter Bee (see image of western Valley Carpenter Bees) emerges from the wood to complete metamorphosis because Tiger Bee Flies, unlike Carpenter Bees, do not possess the necessary mouth parts to chew their way out of the wood.  If the adult Tiger Bee Fly emerges after the adult Carpenter Bee emerges and begins to fly, that would explain the Eastern Carpenter Bee carcasses you are finding and it might also explain this previous mystery posting from our archives.

Sue Dougherty, Ann Levitsky, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Alisha Bragg, David Bernstein liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a Bot Fly?
Location: South Windsor ct
July 24, 2015 4:08 pm
Hello I am in south Windsor ct and the almost 2 inch fly wondered into our shop.
I looked up bot fly and saw there was different types and did find one that looked like this.
Signature: Is this a bot fly?

Female Horse Fly

Female Horse Fly

This is most certainly NOT a Bot Fly, but a Horse Fly in the family Tabanidae, and based on the spacing between the eyes, it is a blood sucking female.  We believe it is Tabanus stygius based on this BugGuide image.

Thank you Daniel, I only asked because there was a Bot fly found in Westport Ct.
Ty,
Michael

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Subject: This type of bug bit my 1yr old
Location: NJ
July 20, 2015 4:17 pm
Hi,
I am trying to find out what type of bug this is. It bit my 1yr old on the side of his head and he swelled up instantly and pretty severly. We took him to the doctor and they put him on antibiotics as a precaution.
Signature: Jeremy Lynch

PIcture Winged Fly

PIcture Winged Fly

Dear Jeremy,
We are surprised to learn that you suspect this Picture Winged Fly,
Delphinia picta, of biting your child.  Are you certain this is the culprit?  If you are correct, this is the first we have ever heard of a person being bitten by a Picture Winged Fly, though Eric Eaton once informed us that “if it has a mouth, it can bite.”  You can get additional information on the Picture Winged Fly at BugGuide.

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Subject: Huge crazy fly
Location: McKinney, Texas
July 23, 2015 7:50 am
I went outside and heard an amazing ruckus in the bushes and found two of these very large, hairy, long, and huge-eyed flying buggers mating with each other. They look rather fierce and I’m not sure if they are a type of dragonfly? The picture shows the front of one of them, still attached to the other. Since they are obviously busy, I didn’t want to get too close or to be too intrusive!
Signature: Lover of bugs, Michelle

Mating Robber Flies

Mating Robber Flies

Dear Michelle,
There is not enough detail in your image to be certain, but we believe your mating Robber Flies may be Red Footed Cannibalflies.

Thank you so much!  I clicked the link to your site and that is exactly what it is.
And thank you for all you do.  I just love your site!

Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination