Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flattened out legless pill bug thing
Location: north texas
October 23, 2014 8:28 am
My parents have this device that makes compost from old bits of banana peels and whatnot, and every once in a while it will leak, so we put this metal tub underneath it. Now the tub has these strange bugs that move like caterpillars, or slugs, and have a back similar to a flattened out “pill bug”. We do not want the bugs in our garage, but are not sure what to do with them, because we don’t want to simply kill them.
Signature: nathan

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Dear Nathan,
These are Black Soldier Fly Larvae, and they are commonly found in compost piles where they contribute to the decomposition of organic materials.  They will not negatively affect the compost or your family.  They are benign and they should be left to do the job that they do so well.

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

Black Soldier Fly Larvae

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange red lumps
Location: Styx Valley, Tasmania, Australia
October 23, 2014 4:21 am
Hi there,
I would like an ID on both the insect (a crane fly?) and the strange red lumps on its thorax. Are they mites? I found this specimen on the car after a drive through a forestry logging track. Its body (excluding the legs) was probably around 2cm long.
Thanks for the help.
Signature: Curious

Crane Fly with Mites

Crane Fly with Mites

Dear Curious,
You are correct that this is a Crane Fly, and we don’t know if we are going to be able to provide you with a more specific identification beyond the Infraorder Tipulomorpha.  The red lumps do appear to be Mites, and we do have several images in our archives of Crane Flies with Mites.  We found an example from UK on The Ranger’s Blog.  We suspect the Mites are phoretic, but we are not certain.

Crane Fly with Mites

Crane Fly with Mites

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Need help identifying this bug
Location: Vermont
October 22, 2014 3:44 am
We are trying to figure out what type of bug this is. My son felt something on the back of his neck yesterday and took this bug off the back of his neck. He first thought it was a tick but looking at it, it does not appear to be a tick. It has six legs, with hair that you can see on them. It is kind of flat. It was walking sideways (like a crab) on the napkin after taking it of his neck. Any help identifying this would be appreciated.
Signature: Megan

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Dear Megan,
This is a blood sucking Louse Fly, and we just posted another image of a Louse Fly from Vermont a few days ago.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Subject: fake wasp
Location: switzerland
October 20, 2014 4:49 am
At first, I thought this was a wasp but it looks like a fly.
thx for your answer
Signature: A.zanos

Dear A.zanos,
You are correct that this is a fly.  Hover Flies or Flower Flies in the family Syrphidae often mimic stinging insects like bees and wasps, which affords the nonstinging flies some protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Subject: Unidentified hitchhiker found in arm hair
Location: Newbury, VT
October 18, 2014 7:50 pm
I returned from a walk in the woods and felt a crawler under my shirt sleeve. I pulled my sleeve back expecting a tick and found this tiny critter instead. He was hanging on for dear life and could not be extracted by hand. We used my “mustache comb” to disentangle it and then snapped some pictures . The last picture shows how small it is compared to a tweezer. It seemed rather soft-bodied…
Signature: Dan in the NEK, VT

Hi Dan,
This is a Louse Fly in the family Hippoboscidae.  According to BugGuide:  “This group includes wingless and winged forms. Most winged ones are dark brownish and smaller than house flies. Flat shape and leathery appearance.”
  Winged species have feeble flight and often loose their wings upon landing on a host animal where they can suck blood.  BugGuide also notes:  “Most are found on birds, others on mammals” and we have discovered that some species are found on livestock and others on deer.  Louse Flies can be opportunistic, and if they cannot locate their typical prey, some will feed on human blood.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination
Immature Dipterans

Immature Dipterans

Subject: Bug found in bedroom
Location: Swingfield Street, Kent
October 15, 2014 4:45 am
Found several of these bugs on the carpet in the bedroom on returning from a week or so away from the house.
What are they?
Signature: Anthony

As you can not tell from the pictures, I should have said that it is soft and moves a bit like a caterpillar and that the dark portion is at the tail end not the head.
I had a video that showed the above but it was rather big so I did not send it.
I am attaching the photos again in case it is difficult to tie up the 2 emails.
Regards,
Anthony.

Immature Dipterans

Immature Dipterans

Dear Anthony,
We are unable to provide anything more than a very general identification at this time.  This is an immature Dipteran, the insect order that includes Flies.  They remind us of the larvae of a Bot Fly, but we cannot be certain.  See this posting on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination