Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What type of fly is this?
Location: Chatham, ON, Canada
July 26, 2016 6:31 am
Hi. Recently, I took a picture of this fly on my car and I’m not sure what kind it is. Most people say it’s a horse fly but I’m not sure. Any idea?
Signature: Al

Horse Fly

Horse Fly

Dear Al,
This certainly is a Horse Fly, and upon scrolling through BugGuide pages, we believe we have correctly identified it as
Tabanus stygius.  According to BugGuide‘s data, this wide ranging species is found in Ontario.  We cannot tell from your image if this is a female or a male as the space between the eyes is not visible, but only female Horse Flies are blood-sucking biters.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this a deerfly?
Location: Hampshire, Illinois
July 25, 2016 3:17 pm
Hello, Bugmam!
I live in Hampshire Illinois, this guy showed up on my deck, I thought it was a moth and approached it flew at me, and wouldn’t stop I had to run ….literally …run into the house.
Can you tell me what it is called, besides what I called it…lol
I think it is some type of Deerfly. I may be wrong.
Signature: Gerardine Baugh

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

Dear Gerardine,
This is a Tiger Bee Fly and it neither bites nor stings, nor does it have venom or poison, so it is perfectly harmless, but that it not to say it cannot hurt you.  Imagine, if you will, if while you were running away from this harmless creature you tripped and fell and broke your leg.  Though we don’t know why this harmless Tiger Bee Fly flew at you, there was really no harm it could have done had it landed on you.  According to BugGuide, the Tiger Bee Fly “is a parasitoid of Carpenter Bees,
Xylocopa.”

Tiger Bee Fly

Tiger Bee Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small fly with huge front legs
Location: Southwest Missouri
July 25, 2016 3:06 am
I’ve been searching to ID this bug and think it’s a type of fly. I have an interesting video of it working it’s front legs to stir up food. It was on a leaf blade that was floating in a pond. Thank you for helping!
Signature: Linda Bower

I found it – a Mantis Fly!
Linda Bower
“I spent the summer traveling; I got halfway across my back yard.” – Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz

Shore Fly

Shore Fly

Dear Linda,
The trouble with common names in English is that they are not universal and many insects can have the same common name.  The beauty of the binomial (Genus species) method of taxonomy is that it is universal, though not necessary permanent when reclassification happens, nor is it easy to learn because names are often in dead languages and often have consonants combined that we have never pronounced together before.  The only insect we know with that common name “Mantis Fly” is a Neuropteran in the Family Mantispidae but the name Mantisfly is a compound word.  See BugGuide for those Mantisflies.  We did locate your insect on BugGuide classified as a Shore Fly in the genus
Ochthera, subcategorized as being in the “mantis complex.”   Nowhere on the genus page does BugGuide use the name Mantis Fly, however it is stated:  “Adults feed on small insects, grasped and held with raptorial forelimbs, and take a variety of prey, including small flies and planthoppers (NC Insect Museum), and can excavate prey from soil using protibial spines; larvae prey primarily on the immature forms of Chironomidae.”  At least one poster to BugGuide used the common name Mantis Fly, however it does not seem that the site editors of BugGuide recognize that designation.  We are quite excited that your posting is allowing us to create a new page for the Shore Fly family Ephydridae that includes your fly’s genus Ochthera.

Shore Fly

Shore Fly

Daniel, thank you very much for the information.  I’ve updated my postings on Facebook and YouTube.  I completely understand what you mean about common names, but very difficult to do when self-taught!  You may be interested in these three videos, not for identification, but for weird behavior that I’ve not found in any books or websites.
1)      Fragile Forktail Damselfly adult attack: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqhEDu0Jc-E
2)      The attack in slow motion: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPV961HDzpQ
3)      Fragile Forktail larva attack: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8SBXfCU8OA
I appreciate you and the BugGuide,
Linda


What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this creature?
Location: Huntsville Alabama, outskirts of city
July 24, 2016 5:46 pm
Hi
I live in Huntsville Alabama and saw these insects on the railing of my deck. Never seen this creature before. Any id assistance would be appreciated! It’s been close to 100 degrees here, has now cooled off for the evening to about 80-85.
Signature: Carolyn Sanders

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Dear Carolyn,
We have a few images in our archive of mating Red Footed Cannibalflies,
Promachus rufipes, a large impressive species of predatory Robber Flies, but nothing comes close to your amazing images.  It looks like you were several inches away.  Though they are not aggressive toward humans, Red Footed Cannibalflies look quite frightening, so we applaud your courage in securing these awesome images.  We are also quite impressed the amorous pair did not fly away when you got close.  Though not aggressive toward humans, Red Footed Cannibalflies are able to take down very large prey, including stinging wasps and bees, on the wing, and we have read on Hilton Pond Center that a large Robber Fly can even prey upon a hummingbird.  We would also caution against trying to handle a living Red Footed Cannibalfly with bare hands as that would most likely result in a painful bite.

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

Mating Red Footed Cannibalflies

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What kind of bug is this?!
Location: Warsaw, IN. Northern Indiana close to the country.
July 19, 2016 12:52 pm
we found this on our grill when we were watering our plants & we are dumbfounded by what kind of bug this is.. thank you!
Signature: Britney England

Mydas Fly

Mydas Fly

Dear Britney,
We believe we have correctly identified your Mydas Fly in the family Mydidae as
Mydas tibialis which is described on BugGuide as:  “Black body, smoky wings, brown legs.”  BugGuide describes the harmless members of this family as being:  “Large flies, often wasp mimics. Have prominent, clubbed antennae and distinctive wing venation.”  Though they mimic wasps, Mydas Flies neither sting nor bite and they pose no threat to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: strange moth like bug?
Location: northern Virginia
July 18, 2016 12:12 pm
Hello! My mom and I noticed this bug on our outdoor umbrella and would like to know what it is. it’s a bit bigger than a grape, mostly black except for the eyes, which are sort of iridescent and translucent. it looks like a moth except for the eyes, which look like a fly’s. can you help?
Signature: signed, Julie

Male Black Horse Fly

Male Black Horse Fly

Dear Julie,
The close placement of the eyes indicates that this is a male Black Horse Fly,
Tabanus atratus.  There is a greater space between the eyes on the female Black Horse Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination