Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A Fly Or A Bee?
Location: Torrance, California
July 24, 2014 9:49 am
Dear Bugman,
By the end of June of this year, we found a couple of these insects in our front yard. The bigger one was about one inch long. We live in Torrance, California, and have never seen them before. Could you help us to identify them?
Thanks.
Signature: Daniel.

Bee Killer:  Mallophora fautrix

Bee Killer: Mallophora fautrix

Dear Daniel,
This Robber Fly in the genus
Mallophora goes by the collective general name of Bee Killer.  Your particular Bee Killer is Mallophora fautrix, a species with no specific common name, but according to BugGuide, it is:  “The only one of its genus in California.”  As you can see from the images in our links, Bee Killers prey on large flying insects other than Bees, and it is a rare, top of the insect food chain predator that preys upon adult, stinging wasps.  Though you are not the discoverer of a new species, you can spearhead a campaign to nominate the only Bee Killer in California as the California Bee Killer, even though its range extends beyond our fair state.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown fly with golden fur
Location: Fiskeboda, Sweden
July 24, 2014 6:37 am
I found this yellow hovering fly sun bathing on my concrete stairs on a hot summer day in the beginning of June. First I thought it was some kind of hoverfly, but I was unable to find one that looked like the one I saw. I would be very happy to get some help identifying this fly.
Signature: Andreas R

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Andreas,
This is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, probably in the genus
Bombylius.  The wing pattern is similar to, but not exactly like that of the Large Bee Fly pictured on the Natural History Museum website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black bug
Location: Gunnison, Colorado
July 21, 2014 5:08 pm
I found this bug in my home. I thought it was a bee at first but then with a closer look it seemed to be an oversized fly. I looked up horseflies but the bug I found had widest eyes. What is it?
Signature: Audrey

Bot Fly

Bot Fly

Dear Audrey,
There is enough detail in your images for us to determine that this is a Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra, the Rodent Bot Flies, but we haven’t the necessary skills, and we suspect there is not enough image detail for even an expert to determine a species identification.  You can compare your image to this individual from BugGuide that also is identified only to the genus level.  According to BugGuide:  “Females typically deposit eggs in the burrows and “runs” of rodent or rabbit hosts. A warm body passing by the eggs causes them to hatch almost instantly and the larvae glom onto the host. The larvae are subcutaneous (under the skin) parasites of the host. Their presence is easily detected as a tumor-like bulge, often in the throat or neck or flanks of the host. The larvae breathe by everting the anal spiracles out a hole (so they are oriented head-down inside the host). They feed on the flesh of the host, but only rarely does the host die as a result.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting fly
Location: North Kingstown, RI
July 21, 2014 6:47 am
This fly (at least I think it’s a fly) was on my car in North Kingstown, RI on July 20, 2014. I’ve never seen one like this before.
I tried searching google images, but nothing came up that looked like this.
Can you tell me what it is?
Thanks,
Signature: Gary Brownell

Male Horse Fly

Male Horse Fly

Hi Gary,
The close-set eyes indicate that this Horse Fly in the family Tabanidae is a non-biting male.  Biting female Horse Flies have a space between the eyes.  See this Horse Fly eye comparison from our archives.  A dorsal view would make species identification easier.

Thanks. I guess I’ve never looked closely at one of these before. It was the white eyes that caught my attention…
Gary Brownell

We believe the faceted eyes are most likely not pigmented white, but rather reflecting the light from the sky.

Interesting. They didn’t seem to change color as the fly changed position. Unfortunately, I only got pictures from this one angle, so I can’t be sure about all that in hindsight. But it was definitely the white eyes that drew my attention.
Thanks,
Gary Brownell

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’ve never seen this bug before….
Location: Delaware
July 20, 2014 5:29 pm
I’d really like to know what this bug is, why I’ve been seeing them so often lately, and why I have not seen them before (if that’s possible to answer).
I live in Delaware (the state in the US) and this summer I’ve been seeing these everywhere I go.
Signature: ….I don’t really have a preference?

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

We just posted a lengthy description of a Hanging Thief.  As to why you have seen them recently, we can only respond that insect populations fluctuate due to weather conditions, food supplies and other factors.  Then again, perhaps you have just gotten more observant.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: what is this?
Location: North carolina (central)
July 20, 2014 10:23 am
Please tell me name of this bug never have seen anything like it–was on my back porch
Signature: c santana

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

Dear c santana,
This impressive, predatory Robber Fly in the genus
Diogmites is commonly called a Hanging Thief because they frequently hang by one or two legs while feeding.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination