Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: hairy Cicada?
Location: Leesburg, VA
August 30, 2014 12:26 pm
Thought this might be a cicada, but I’ve never seen such a hairy one before or with such huge eyes.
Signature: Alicia

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Dear Alicia,
This magnificent, predatory Robber Fly is commonly called a Red Footed Cannibalfly, and this summer we have received more than the typical number of identification requests of Red Footed Cannibalflies from our readership.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: African jewelery-like bug
Location: becket, ma
August 27, 2014 10:41 am
Hi there! Awesome website, excited that I can possibly learn the name of this bug. It’s sitting on someone’s finger.
Signature: katy

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Eastern Crane Fly

Dear Katy,
The pattern on the wings and body of this Giant Eastern Crane Fly does look vaguely African.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bot Fly Larva
Location: North Bay, Ontario, Canada
August 21, 2014 10:25 pm
Hi there,
I am located in North Bay, Ontario, Canada. I have recently found a mouse inside my house walking around pretty slowly. I put gloves on and picked him up to put him outside and when I looked at him I saw a weird brown thing protruding from his side. Upon closer examination I determined it was alive and I recognized it as a bot fly larva that I had read about online a while ago while researching animal parasites. I pulled it out carefully with tweezers, plus about 5 other ones. They were quite large. I have a video of this extraction. I estimate the larger ones were roughly 3cm, maybe slightly larger. Definitely matched the description of rodent bot fly larva. I kept the mouse in a container and fed him until his wounds healed and let him go.
A couple days later (before I let the other mouse go) I was cleaning out and removing a big work tent that was in our backyard that had been used for our house renovations. It was damp, lots of wood scraps etc. I emptied a basket of garbage wood and a mouse emerged from the stuff I was dumping. He was slow and you could actually see two huge bot flies hanging out of him. Very disturbing.
Due to the fact that I have worked extensively in that gross work tent, plus the other mouse was found in our house full of the parasites, some serious questions have come up.
Firstly, how concerned should I be regarding bot fly infections on/in me or my two cats? Is there something I should be looking for on the three of us (obviously a gross black worm thing, but I would prefer to catch it waaaay before that).
Secondly, is this normal??? Are bot flies common this far north? Should I be reporting this, and if so, then to who?
Lastly, how do I avoid coming into contact with the eggs? Are there common types of material they are laid on or environments I could perhaps minimize in order to dissuade them from being laid near my house?
Thank you for your help with this.
Signature: Kate Griese

Bot Fly Larva

Bot Fly Larva

Dear Kate,
Thank you for your thorough and engaging request.  You are correct that this is the larva of a Rodent Bot Fly.  A link from that posting is no longer valid, however we did quote from what might have been the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University which stated:  “
Cuterebra is a normal bot fly of rodents and rabbits, but can also infect cats, dogs, and man. “  This online library seems to support that cats can become hosts to Rodent Bot Fly larvae.  Companion Animal Parasite Council indicates:  “Cats and dogs are accidental hosts.”  VCA Animal Hospitals indicates:  “Cats are accidental hosts of Cuterebra larvae. They are most commonly infected when they are hunting rodents or rabbits and encounter the botfly larvae near the entryway to a rodent’s burrow. Most cases of warbles in cats occur around the head and neck.”  BugGuide data on sightings indicates that you are in the normal range for Rodent Bot Flies.  We believe it is highly unlikely that a human will be parasitized by a Rodent Bot Fly.  We will attempt additional research on this when time permits.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Predatory bee killer!
Location: Tucson, AZ
August 20, 2014 5:39 pm
This enormous predator buzzed down to enjoy its dinner on an elk antler in my yard – what is it?
Signature: Alicia

Giant Robber Fly eats Bee

Giant Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Dear Alicia,
This is one of the best feeding Robber Fly images we have received all summer.  This is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, a genus well populated in our archives this season due to all the images we have received of Red Footed Cannibalflies.  This is a different member of the genus, and we believe it is Promachus albifacies, a species with no unique common name.  You can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stink bug eater
Location: Northwest Georgia USA
August 19, 2014 5:57 pm
I saw this huge fly eating on a stink bug at the pool. I took a photo of it thinking it may be a species of dragon fly. There were several Dragon flies around with honey bees in their mouths. . Any clue what this is?
Signature: Scott

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Stink Bug

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Stink Bug

Dear Scott,
This is a marvelous image of a Red Footed Cannibalfly that we can tag as Food ChainRed Footed Cannibalflies are large, predatory Robber Flies.

Thank you very much. I hope this fly stays around and eats all the stink bugs they can. I’m finding stink bugs in my home. The Red footed cannibal fly is welcome to eat all the stink bugs they can.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Oceanside, NY
August 19, 2014 8:20 pm
Don’t have a clue. This bug, feasting on Japanese Knotweed, could be a bee, a fly or even a moth, as far as I know…..
Signature: CarlF

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Hi CarlF,
This is a beneficial, parasitic Tachinid Fly, but we cannot tell you the exact species at this time.  Tachinid Flies are often very host specific and they are often important biological control agents that parasitize other insects and arthropods.

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination