Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is going on – two photos?
Location: Essex, UK
August 31, 2015 10:38 am
I photographed these at Thameside Nature Park on 30 August.
The fly appears to be sitting on a nest apparently containing tiny youngsters – and with a trapdoor at the end. Has the fly been caught and left as food for the youngsters? Is it eating them itself?
These is also this strange red thing which appears to be spinning itself a cacoon.
Signature: Karenina

Tachinid Fly Emerges from Puparium

Tachinid Fly Emerges from Puparium

Dear Karenina,
We believe this is a Tachinid Fly, a parasitoid, and we believe your image might have something to do with the adult Tachinid Fly emerging from its host insect.  The other image might have something to do with fungus.  This is all conjecture and we eagerly welcome any additional information.

Possibly a Fungus

Possibly a Fungus

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Subject: Huge fly out cicada?
Location: NW Iowa
August 30, 2015 8:26 pm
Found this sitting outside camper in Iowa and got a picture after the wife freaked out. Is this a horse fly?
Signature: Curious in Iowa

Female Black Horse Fly

Female Black Horse Fly

Dear Curious in Iowa,
Because of the spacing between the eyes, one can tell that this Black Horse Fly,
Tabanus atratus, is a female.  Only female Horse Flies bite and suck blood from mammals, and if they cannot find a four footed host, they will bite humans.  According to BugGuide:  “Although Tabanus atratus do not often bite humans, when it does happen it leaves painful memories. This fly can also transmit bacterial, viral, and other diseases such as surra and anthrax, to both humans and other animals through its bite.  The effect of T. atratus on livestock can be a serious problem. Blood loss and irritation from the flies can severely affect beef and milk production, as well as grazing. Livestock usually have no way of avoiding the painful bites, and millions of dollars have been spent trying to control these pests. (Long 2001)”

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Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Kingswinford west midlands
August 30, 2015 1:35 pm
Hi I saw this bug this morning and couldn’t be sure what it is.it looks like a wasp but was a lot slower and had different wings be great to find out what it was.
Signature: jtb

Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Dear jtb,
This is a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, and we believe it is
Volucella inanis, a species picture on Diptera Index.  We are greatly amused that one of the titles it landed near is “Lord of the Flies.”

Mike Coughlin liked this post
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Subject: what insec
Location: standerton, south africa
August 29, 2015 9:17 am
I have never seen this insect before, living in the same town for 30 years….
Signature: solene

PIcture Winged Fly

PIcture Winged Fly

Hi Solene,
This reminded us of a Fruit Fly in the family Tephritidae, so we searched iSpot for South African species, and though we did not find an exact match, we did find several images that looked very similar, including this iSpot posting, though it is only identified to the family level.  The common name for the family in South Africa is Picture Winged Fly, but that same name is used on iSpot for the family Ulidiidae as well.  We are confident that in South Africa, Picture Winged Fly is an appropriate name for your individual, though we cannot say for certain to which family it belongs.

Ann Levitsky, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty, Regis Swope, Tynisha Koenigsaecker liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Robber fly?
Location: Harpers Ferry, WV
August 28, 2015 6:54 am
Came across this beauty while on my morning walk. I think it’s some sort of robber fly? He/she was quite large (the reason it caught my eye) and not interested in moving even when I brushed it with a blade of grass. It was early morning so maybe still sleepy? Anyway, I’d love to know what to call it the next time I see one.
Thanks so much!
Signature: Barb

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Dear Barb,
Your Robber Fly looks like a Red Footed Cannibalfly,
Promachus rufipes, to us.  We generally get several identification requests for this magnificent predator each summer.

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Subject: Parasitic fuzzy black bee?
Location: San Antonio, TX
August 27, 2015 1:01 pm
Hello,
I hope this letter finds you well. I was in my back yard yesterday afternoon, in san antonio, TX, when I stumbled across a large, fuzzy, black, winged insect. It looks almost like a bee and had a large wasp under it. I was thinking a parasite of some sort? Thanks for your help!
Signature: – T

Belzebul Bee Eater

Belzebul Bee Eater

Dear T,
We want to begin by correcting your terminology.  A parasite lives in or on the body of a host creature, feeding on blood or other forms of nutrition that the body can offer.  A parasitoid is all of the above, but it also kills the host while feeding.  A predator catches and eats prey, and your image is of a predatory Robber Fly, the Belzebul Bee Eater,
Mallophora leschenaulti, but we are uncertain of the identity of the prey as your image is lacking in critical detail.

Thank you kindly for the clarification.  Are you quite sure that my image depicts the Mallophora leschenaulti?  It is just that I don’t recall seeing the white band across the it’s body.  They look a little different to me.  Thank you again for your time!
-T

We would need a better quality image to be more certain, but as there are only five members of the genus in North America, and since the others have more prominent yellow markings, we gave the identification our best guess.  High resolution, properly focused images from multiple angles are always preferred for identification purposes.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination