Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Tiny Robber Fly?
Location: Andover, NJ
May 21, 2016 2:17 pm
I found several of these small (1/3 to 1/2 inch) flies which look like some sort of robber fly. I’ve just never seen a robber fly this small, so wondering if it is something else entirely. I’m in the far northern corner of NJ in a wooded area. These were found just at the edge of a shrubby area near the woods.
Any help you can give me will be much appreciated!
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Male March Fly

Male March Fly

Dear Deborah,
This is not a Robber Fly.  It is a March Fly in the family Bibionidae, and it can be identified as a male because of its large eyes.  The eyes of the females are much smaller as you can see in this image of a pair of mating March Flies.  We believe your individual may be
Bibio albipennis based on this BugGuide image.

Male March Fly

Male March Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange and a rare bug starts appearing more and more often
Location: East Europe, Lithuania, Kaunas
May 20, 2016 2:29 pm
Good evening.
In the past 11 days I managed to find 6 of these bugs at my flat. From what I noticed, it can climb on the walls, is highly resistant to pressure – I can’t crush it if it’s in my fist. I saw them both at day and night.
I asked my mother and she hadn’t seen anything like this before. Could you help me?
Signature: Deivydas

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Dear Deivydas,
This is a blood-sucking Louse Fly.  They generally feed off the blood of livestock, especially sheep, and there are species that feed off the blood of deer.  Do you live in an area where there are either livestock or woodlands with deer?  Some species feed off the blood of birds and there are frequently pigeons and other host species found near homes.  Perhaps there are nesting birds in your immediate vicinity.  If their preferred host is not available, they are opportunistic, and they will also feed off the blood of other large animals, including pets and humans.

I live in bedroom districts and there aren’t any deers or other animals as we are still further from the forests. There are some swallow nests in the holes of the roof, maybe it could be the cause? We have been living in this flat for over 12 years and we have never seen any bugs like this.
I’m pretty scared now, as I have two cats. Is there any way to terminate Louse flies?

The bird nests seem like the likely source.  Though we do not provide extermination advice, there is not much chance that the Louse Flies will proliferate much with these BugGuide reproductive statistics:  “Females rear one offspring at a time, the larva feeding in utero from special ‘milk’ glands. The mature larva is ‘born alive’ and immediately pupates in the soil (or on the host in some cases). Most are host specific on bird species, with a few occurring on mammals.”

Good news. Anyways, thank your help. It is really amazing that there are some nice people who are willing to help in identifying some unknown animals like in my case, Louse fly, which both me nor my family have not seen all their life before. I am happy to know that they are not dangerous to people and can not proliferate much.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ctenophora (Cnemoncosis) ishiharai in Barcelona?
Location: Barcelona
May 16, 2016 3:42 pm
Hi from Barcelona :)
I’m a little confused since I realised this crane fly may be a japanese Ctenophora (Cnemoncosis) ishiharai.
May be it possible? I’m doubting with abdomen and wings.
Thank you Bugman 😀
Signature: Óscar

Crane Fly

Crane Fly

Hi Oscar,
In our opinion, you have the genus correct but the species wrong.  This looks to us like like a male Ctenophora ornata that we identified on Alamy and verified on Eakring Birds.  Only males have feathered antennae, and females have an ovipositor.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee-Fly Hybrid
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
May 13, 2016 6:20 am
Hello!
This creepy fellow wandered into the office this afternoon.
It makes buzzing sounds, like a bee, has the furry coat and the black and yellow stripes.
Its thorax is more round and compact than a regular bee and the stripes are also much more condensed. It has a very long snout/needle/mouth, although it is very small.
Our office is located in a bushveld type of landscape, and we also use recycled water (not sewage, obviously) as irrigation for our very big garden.
I sincerely hope you can help identify this stinger!
Signature: Charlottha Kruger

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Charlotta,
While this is not a hybrid, it is a member of the family Bombyliidae whose members are called Bee Flies because they are true Flies that mimic Bees.  What you have called a stinger is actually the proboscis or mouth which is adapted to drink nectar from blossoms while the Bee Fly hovers.  We were not able to identify its species on iSpot.

Thank you tons for getting back to me! J Good luck with your future bug-identnifications!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Fly
Location: Houston
May 11, 2016 9:22 am
Can you id this fly? About size of blow fly. Found outside warehouse, near septic tank.
Signature: Richard

American Horse Fly

American Horse Fly

Dear Richard,
We quickly identified your female Horse Fly on BugGuide as
Tabanus americanus, but we cannot fathom why it was not given the common name American Horse Fly based on its scientific species name.  According to BugGuide:  “Planet Earth’s largest tabanid.”  That would make it a pretty large Horse Fly.  Only female Horse Flies bite and feed on blood, and when there is no livestock available, they will bite humans.  The Encyclopedia of Life does refer to this as the American Horse Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: flying bug
Location: Boston, MA
May 9, 2016 10:18 am
Help, see the attached photo. These flying insects seem to have appeared after I just moved 20 yards of straight compost into my back yard. They are there all day swarming around not sure about at night. They appear to be mating. TThey have not gone away and now its been close to 2 weeks. Anyway to remove them or at least limit the amount of them!
Signature: DaveLaf

Mating March Flies

Mating March Flies

Dear DaveLaf,
These are mating March Flies in the family Bibionidae, and probably in the genus
Bibio that is represented on BugGuide.  The male is the one with the larger head.  We do not provide extermination advice.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination