Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Sacramento, ca
January 18, 2016 11:22 pm
This past week we keep finding these outside our front door, and only at night. It doesn’t have legs, it does have weird black stuff at one end of it, everyone says it looks like a larvae or something but they move like a caterpillar.
Signature: Kaitlyn

Fly Pupa

Fly Pupa

Dear Kaitlyn,
This looks like the immature stage of a fly, a larva or a pupa, similar to this Black Soldier Fly larva on BugGuide.  Is there a nearby compost pile?

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: horse fly
Location: Cairns Australia
January 10, 2016 4:11 pm
Hi. Could you please tell me what kind of horse fly this is.
I live in Cairns Australia next to the rainforest I’m used to the smaller black ones but not this..
Unfortunately i had to kill it as it was attacking my two little boys under three years of age!!
Thanks
Signature: Marc

Hover Fly, we believe

Horse Fly, we realize

Dear Marc,
This is not a Horse Fly, commonly called a March Fly in Australia.  We believe this is a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae.  Hover Flies mimic stinging bees and wasps for protection, but they are in themselves perfectly harmless.  We have not had any luck determining the species.  We hope that should you encounter additional Hover Flies in the future, you will learn to recognize them and not kill them as they pose no threat to your family.

Many thanks on the info..
I do feel bad exterminating it now but now know for future reference!!!!
Thanks again…

Correction:  Horse Fly is Correct
Dear Marc,
There was an exchange of comments initiated by Christopher that resulted in a determination that this really was a Horse Fly like the one pictured on the Queensland Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug
Location: Florence, Mississippi
December 12, 2015 8:29 am
I found this bug in my house along with my dogs. I am concerned that it is some sort of parasite, but was not able to identify it yet. If you know what this is it would surely ease my mind and worrying.
Signature: In waiting Jamie Hancock

Rodent Bot Fly Pupa

Rodent Bot Fly Pupa

Dear Keith,
We believe this is a Rodent Bot Fly Pupa, an internal parasite that is usually very host specific.  Since you found it in the home, we are surmising the host may have been a mouse or rat.

Rodent Bot Fly Pupa

Rodent Bot Fly Pupa

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Black fly/cicada thing?
Location: Newcastle, NSW, Australia
December 5, 2015 12:28 am
Dear Mr. Bugman, I live in Newcastle NSW Australia where summer is just kicking off and I recently stumbled upon this demonic looking critter. It was first hanging off a leaf in my garden where I noticed it had a dark blue shine on its back. It’s eyes were a little apart and it had lots of tiny hairs around it’s snout? There was also a jagged edged plate looking thing beneath its belly. After hours of browsing I’m still not totally convinced it’s a female horsefly despite it being the most similar description I could find. If you could confirm what this creature actually is for me it would be much appreciated, it looks like such a fascinating creature. Thanks
Signature: Dom

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Hi Dom,
This is a very exciting submission for us.  Though Cicadas are frequently mistaken for flies, and though Australia does have a great diversity of Cicadas with creative common names, this is a True Fly, though not a Horse Fly.  We are relatively certain it is a Giant Blue Robber Fly,
Blepharotes spendidissimus, and though we are not 100% certain of the species, we are confident that the genus is correct.  We do not believe this is the closely related and even larger Giant Yellow Robber Fly.  The Brisbane Insect site has nice images of the Giant Blue Robber Fly and there are not many other images found online.  The individual pictured on Oz Animals appears to be a male, and we are relatively certain your individual is a female.  We believe this other individual from New South Wales that is in our archives is most probably Blepharotes spendidissimus as well.

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Giant Blue Robber Fly

Giant Blue Robber Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly identification
Location: Grand Police, Mahe, Seychelles
December 3, 2015 12:23 am
Hello! We are currently trying to identify present species within the wetlands on Mahe (Seychelles) and we found these flies on a palm leaf in the forest. Any idea what it could be? Your help will be greatly appreciated :)
Signature: Kristina

Fruit Flies

Signal Flies

Dear Kristina,
We are having a bit of a problem identifying your Fruit Flies beyond that we can state they are in the family Tephritidae.  Islands often present identification challenges because there is the possibility of endemic species that are not well documented, and there is also the strong possibility of introducing non-native species from distant locations.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to provide insight into the actual species represented in your image.

Dear Daniel,
thank you for your reply! Even having the family helps us a lot. i am aware that islands to pose certain difficulties identifying species and especially here on Mahe there are a lot of introduced species some of which are morpholocilally quite similar to endemic ones.

Correction:  December 15, 2015
Thanks to a comment directing us to one of our own postings, we now agree that this is a Signal Fly in the family Platystomatidae, that is classified along with the Fruit Flies in the family Tephritidae in the superfamily Tephritoidea.  We stand corrected.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Never seen one before in my life
Location: England
November 29, 2015 10:05 pm
This bug was on my leg and I took it off my leg and put it on some drawers and it only moved once and stood still for at least 10 minutes while I was looking at it.
Do you know what bug it is?
Thanks!
Signature: Josh

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Dear Josh,
This is a blood-sucking Louse Fly or Ked, and they are frequently found near livestock, but they are opportunistic, and they will feed off humans if no livestock is available.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination