Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
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Subject: Which fly?
Location: Pune, India
March 27, 2015 9:39 pm
Hello,
I came across this fly on the bark of a Mahogany tree.
It’s got a single pair of wings and measures about 2cms or so.
Any clues much appreciated.
Thanks & Regards,
Signature: Rahul

Unknown Fly from India

Unknown Fly from India

Dear Rahul,
We do not recognize your colorful Fly, but we will post the image in the hope that one of our readers will be able to assist in the identification.

Thanks for trying Daniel!
Cheers,
Rahul

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Subject:  Wingless Crane Fly?
Location:  Wrightwood, California
March 17, 2015
Found this guy in Wrightwood, California about a week ago.   It moved like a spider but when I picked it up I realized it was not!   It looked line a crane fly to me and a search for “wingless crane fly” brought me to Whatsthatbug..  Most of the images I have seen here and elsewhere  are of much heavier bodied examples with much thicker legs.  I have not found one that looks like this anywhere else but I am fairly sure it is a crane fly.    I’m hoping you’ll find this one as interesting as my son and I did.

I really hope you guys see this.  With all the web resources out there (often your website) I am still stumped!  I have not been able to find an image of anything quite like this.  I am certain it’s a crane fly but all the wingless crane flies I can find online are very grizzly looking.  This one is much different.
Sorry for the filthy hands, we were repairing a sprinkler system.
Kevin

Wingless Insect

Wingless Crane Fly

Dear Kevin,
Thanks for resending this interesting request.  We went back through our unanswered mail and we could not locate your original submission, which is very curious.  Zooming in on your excellent image, we do not believe the antennae and mouthparts are those of a Crane Fly.  It reminds us more of a member of the order Mecoptera, the Scorpionflies.  We are going to seek some additional opinions, including Eric Eaton and Crane Fly expert Chen Young.

Wingless Insect

Wingless Crane Fly

Dr. Chen Young identifies Crane Fly
Hi Daniel,
Yes, it is a crane fly and it is a male crane fly, thus it is probably not in the family Tipulidae, instead it is in the family Limoniidae.  I sure wish I could get a small part of his leg and run a DNA sequence (just a wish till I move to CA).
Thank,
Chen

Close up of curious winged insect

Close up of Wingless Crane Fly

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Subject: Tiny weird moth
Location: Abu Dhabi United Arab Emirates
March 17, 2015 6:50 am
These little moths are all over my house and stick to the walls. They are about a half cm wide and a half cm tall. I just have no idea what they feed on or how to get rid of them. Please let me know! Thanks!
I live in Abu Dhabi… Very hot weather.
Signature: Busjam

Bathroom Fly

Bathroom Fly

Dear Busjam,
This Bathroom Fly or Moth Fly is a common cosmopolitan household pest.  They are generally found in bathrooms as the larvae live in the sludge that accumulates in plumbing pipes.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Crane Fly
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, CA
Ides of March:  March 15, 2015
We just wrote back to Dr. Chen Young who identified a wingless Crane Fly for us, and we saw a Crane Fly on the window.  Sadly, the dorsal view is out of focus.

Crane Fly (ventral view)

Crane Fly (ventral view)

Hi Daniel,
The images are sort of out of focus and it kept me from making any further identification beyond the genus Tipula.
Thanks,
Chen

Crane Fly (dorsal view)

Crane Fly (dorsal view)

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Subject: Orthopteran? Wingless Crane Fly? in Alameda, California
Location: Alameda, California USA
March 14, 2015 9:59 pm
I have been trying to figure out what bug this is all day. Body and legs seem vaguely Orthopteran, but then the back legs aren’t really bigger like they are in grasshoppers and crickets. The head looks a bit like a crane fly, but then where are the wings? I’m stumped. This bug is approximately one inch long, spotted bayside in Alameda, California.
Signature: msLaura

Wingless Crane Fly

Brachypterous Crane Fly

Dear msLaura,
This is most definitely not an Orthopteran, and we agree with you that it appears to be a Crane Fly.  We have posted images of wingless Crane Flies also known as Snow Flies in the past, but your individual does not look much like a member of the genus
Chionea.  Your individual may have experienced some type of trauma causing the loss of wings, or there may be another explanation.  We will attempt to contact Dr. Chen Young of The Crane Flies of Pennsylvania to see if he has any ideas.  We will also contact Eric Eaton.

Dr. Chen Young responds
Hi Daniel,
This is a normal brachypterous form (small winged, short winged) female crane fly, most likely in the Tipula (Triplicitipula) group, it will need a male specimen to know the identity of this female.

Thanks,
Chen

Fantastic, thank you very much!
Warmly,
Laura

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Subject: Bee? Fly? Friend or Foe?
Location: TN
February 27, 2015 8:47 am
I’m hoping someone can help me identify this bug. I’ve found 3 of them thus far. They appear to have been created in my large pot of amaryllis that I drag indoors and outdoors each year. Last fall, I quit watering the large pot and stored it in cool, darkish conditions (unheated garage) for about 4 months. After moving it to a warm sunny location – these gentle creatures are making their appearance. Google hasnt helped. Thanks for any information you can share!
Signature: Green thumb – newbie apridarist

Narcissus Bulb Fly

Narcissus Bulb Fly

Dear Green thumb-newbie apridarist,
This is a Narcissus Bulb Fly,
Merodon equestris, which we identified on BugGuide, and though they are generally associated with daffodil and narcissus bulbs,  according to the North Carolina State University Insect and Related Pests of Flowers and Foliage Plants site:  “Distribution -The narcissus bulb fly occurs wherever narcissus are grown throughout the United States. This pest was introduced from Europe in about 1869.  Host Plants -The narcissus bulb fly has been reported to infest amaryllis, daffodil, Galtonia, Flanthus, hyacinth, Iris, lilies, Leucofum, Narcissus, Scilla, tulips, and Vallota.  Damage -The center of the bulb is hollowed out and the flower bud is destroyed. Many infested bulbs rot away although some survive to send up a few scrawny grasslike blades the following year.”

Narcissus Bulb Fly

Narcissus Bulb Fly

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination