Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ident request
Location: 33°43′S 150°20′E
December 2, 2016 7:19 pm
David,
2 years ago I was in Leura, a small town in the Blue Mountains just west of Sydney Australia, when I saw a number of these bugs on a concrete driveway. Next to the driveway was a small bamboo grove which seemed to be the source of the bug. The maximum size was about 35 mm but most were about 20 mm long. None had any feelers/antennae. They tended to move towards a persons shoe if one went within a metre of them.
It was 11 am in mid April which is mid autumn (Fall) here. It was an overcast day, not raining, but with high humidity. Leura is 90 km (55 miles) from the Pacific ocean and is generally at 950 metres (3000 feet) above sea level. The vegetation is lush.
Any ideas?
Best Wishes
RobT
Signature: Robert T

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Dear Robert,
This is a flightless female Soldier Fly,
Boreoides subulatus, a species with pronounced sexual dimorphism, with the males being much smaller and winged.  According to the Atlas of Living Australia:  “Female Wingless Soldier Flies are seen on walls and fences, laying masses of long white eggs. Larvae live in damp soil or rotting vegetation, especially in or near compost.”

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Flightless Female Soldier Fly

Dear Daniel,
That is wonderful. I have lived here on the east coast of Australia for 30 years and prior to that in Southern Africa also for 30 years and was totally stumped.
Hope you and your family have a wonderful Christmas.
Regards
RobT

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I think it is a fly
Location: Uruguay
December 5, 2016 10:37 am
Greeting, last year I sent in a request and you were very helpful in identifying a bug for me, thank you for that!
On my walk this morning I saw what I thought were a few sick-looking bees so I snapped some photos. Looking at the pictures when I got inside however they look more fly-like to my untrained eye. Either way their bodies appear swollen and weird.
The only specimens I have seen are on these plants that attract mostly flies, bees, wasps, hornets, and beetles. It is mid-spring now and I have just noticed them for the 1st time this morning. The pictures attached are front, back, and top-down respectively. Thanks!
Signature: Louis

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Louis,
You are correct that this is a Fly.  More specifically, it is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, a family whose members are parasitic.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Thanks again! You guys really know your stuff.
Louis

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My Moroccan Insect Pix
Location: Morocco
November 24, 2016 10:09 am
Dear Daniel Marlos:
Just happened upon your site and decided to let you know about my own minor efforts in entomology. I spend a good deal of my time (retired) in Morocco and one thing I do is take photos of all sorts of subjects, including plenty of ‘bug’ pictures – especially bees and butterflies. Many are as yet to be uploaded since I’m trying to learn the basics about taxonomy but, alas, it’s slow going!
Perhaps you could take a few minutes and look at some of the galleries. If you, or another entomologist, might see scientific value in helping with identification, that would certainly reinforce me efforts. I just did a Google image search for ‘Bees of Morocco’ and see that the majority of images that come up are my own.
The website is: darbalmira.com You’ll see the table of contents on the left side with the various insects photos as submenus. As I said, I have lots more photos but have been holding back since I think it’s important to put a name on living creature – not just ‘bee’ or ‘bug’.
Thanks for any help or suggestions you might offer.
Jearld Moldenhauer
Signature: Jearld Moldenhauer

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Gearld,
Your images are beautiful, especially that of the only one we can identify to the family without research.  It is the green-eyed Bee Fly from the family Bombyliidae.  Today is American (USA) Thanksgiving and our staff is cooking, so we will attempt a species identification at a later time, as well as trying to identify your Hymenopterans.  In the future, please only submit one insect per submission.  It makes it easier to classify.  The only exception would be insects in the same family or those that have a symbiotic or predator/prey relationship.  You should know that our editorial staff is composed of artists, not entomologists, so we cannot commit to identifying your unknown critters, but if you send them to us, one individual per submission, we will be happy to research to the best of our ability. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found Bug
Location: Wind Gap, PA
November 17, 2016 11:43 am
We found this on a student today. Any ideas?
Signature: Doug Bartek

Louse Fly

Louse Fly

Dear Doug,
This is a blood-sucking Louse Fly or Ked in the family Hippoboscidae.  There are both winged and wingless species, and some winged species lose their wings once they find a host.  Hosts include deer, sheep or birds, depending upon the species of Louse Fly, but they are also opportunistic feeders that will bite humans if no preferred animal host is available. We found a marvelous article on Louse Flies by Meredith Swett Walker on the Entomology Today website where it states:  “Hippoboscid flies are fairly particular about their hosts. Sheep keds are not found on birds or vice versa. There are more than 200 species of Hippoboscidae, and 75 percent of these parasitize birds of various types ranging from tiny swifts to huge albatrosses. Some louse-flies even exhibit distinct preferences for a particular species of bird. One species of hippoboscid is found exclusively on frigate birds and another species parasitizes only boobies. This specificity is seen even when the two seabirds nest in densely-packed, mixed colonies where it would be easy for a hippoboscid to fly from one bird to another.
Thankfully, hippoboscids do not parasitize humans. In 1931, G. Robert Coatney conducted an experiment to determine if pigeon louse flies, Pseudolynchia canariensis, would bite humans and survive on human blood. He must have been very persuasive because he convinced two friends to join him in playing host to the flies. The answer is yes — hippoboscids will bite humans when given no other choice of host, and their bites are definitely itchy. But the flies did not survive long or reproduce when fed only human blood. Granted, Coatney’s experiment was limited in sample size and scope, but hopefully no one feels the need to repeat it.”

That is awesome!! Thank you so much for the info!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Big Black Flying bug at night
Location: Kingsville, Tx
November 15, 2016 10:12 pm
I live in South Texas, Kingsville. This is the first time I have ever seen this kind of bug. It likes my yellow bug light, but goes crazy with a flash. Anyway, it is about 1-2 inch long. Sending a picture.
Signature: Marko

Male Black Horse Fly

Male Black Horse Fly

Dear Marko,
Your images are really underexposed and lacking in detail, but they definitely reveal that your visitor is a Horse Fly.  Once we lightened the image by adjusting the levels, we could see that the eyes are spaced closely together, indicating this is a male.  We believe you have a male Black Horse Fly,
Tabanus atratus, and the good news is that only female Horse Flies are blood-suckers.

Hey thanks guys. I’m glad it wasn’t a female. I already had enough bloodsucking ex wives. JK LOL or am I.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a dengue mosquito?
Location: Ranger street, Matina, Davao, Philippines
November 10, 2016 10:46 pm
Hi bugman,
I was just stung my a mosquito and when it was bellying out on the wall, I noticed it had some white markings on its legs. I know Dengue mosquitos have this too, and I am currently also coming down with flu (slight headaches, sore throat, but no bleeding or rashes or anything). I’m living in the outskirts of Davao City in the Philippines and dengue is known to be present in this region (Mindanao).
I managed to take a few pictures of the mosquito. They’re not 100% sharp, but hopefully it will give you some clue.
I did kill the mosquito by the way. Sorry for that, I know you’re not a fan of that. Neither am I, but in the case of mosquitos (in relation to dengue) I’m not taking any chances.
Thanks in advance for your time. Hope you can identify it!
Greets,
Signature: Hugo Peek

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Asian Tiger Mosquito

Dear Hugo,
In no way would we ever tag accuse a person of Unnecessary Carnage for swatting a Mosquito.  Based on this BugGuide image, we believe this is an Asian Tiger Mosquito,
Aedes albopictus, and according to BugGuide:  “The Asian Tiger Mosquito is so named because of its conspicuous stripes, ferocious feeding behavior and its Asian origin.”  BugGuide provides the following medical importance information:  “Aedes albopictus is most well known for transmitting dengue and chikungunya viruses but it has also been found infected in nature with the following viruses: West Nile, Eastern equine encephalitis, Japanese encephalitis. It can also transmit dog heartworm parasites. (CDC) Ae. albopictus is a competent laboratory vector of at least 22 arboviruses.  Ae. albopictus may have played a major role in ZIKV transmission in Gabon in 2007. (13) Armstrong et al. (2013) tested > 34,000 Ae. albopictus from New Jersey over a 3-yr period to evaluate its importance as a regional arbovirus vector.”

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your quick reply.
I think you’re right about the Tiger mosquito. We’re all up in arms here now to keep them out and get rid of their breeding grounds, but it’s kind of baffling to me how many people don’t know (or don’t care) much about the risks and keep their doors and windows open as usual. Even after you warn them. I’ve read that the death toll was already in the hundreds nation wide around juli / august and some 80.000 diagnosed cases, which is significantly more than the year before, so it sounds like it’s quite a substantial issue. Our area was apparently designated as “dengue hot zone” in August, but we had no idea.
Well I knew it was there of course, but not like this.Yet as soon as you start a compost heap in the back yard, the neighbors will be screaming their lungs out about snakes. Still have to see the first one after six months here, but I spotted the second Aedes already today. As long as the fever stays away.. But I fear that if Zika arrives (and it seems to be on its way), the doors will literally be wide open. Not the most comforting foresight, since my girlfriend and I are in the baby making phase right now..
Anyway, I should be directing my concerns towards the department of health here, not you 🙂 Thanks for helping me ID the mosquito and best of luck with whatsthatbug. I was browsing the site a little more, and only now am I realizing what a unique and amazing project this actually is. Or more like a work of love probably, with this much effort.
Thanks again and keep it up!
All the best,
Hugo

Thanks for the compliment Hugo, and good luck with your Mosquito control.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination