Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp? Bee?
Location: Suwanee, GA
June 21, 2016 7:58 am
This beastie was resting on my mailbox. An inch long, maybe. No visible stinger.
Signature: Anthony Trendl

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

Dear Anthony,
Our money is on this being a Robber Fly in the family Asilidae, and many members of the family mimic bees and wasps, but alas, we have not had any luck with a conclusive species identification.  The closest match we could find is
Cyrtopogon lutatius pictured on BugGuide, and we suspect your “beastie” is closely related.  We will attempt to get a second opinion on this.

Eric Eaton provides feedback:
This is more likely an Atomosia sp.
http://bugguide.net/node/view/20268
Not uncommon in the eastern U.S., though you don’t say where it is from.
Eric

Thanks … I’ll look it up. I’m near Atlanta, in a burb just northeast of it. Suburbs but I have a lot of trees as creeks nearby.
I’d love to buy a book (books) focused on the fauna of this area. Any recommendations?
Tony

Hi Tony,
Specifically regional guide books are not that common.  We recommend The Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America.  A WTB? contributor, Eric Eaton is one of the authors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: ID bug please
Location: Ohio, USA
June 13, 2016 1:05 pm
Here’s an interesting bug I found around home in northeast Ohio. It was a cool day, so he wasn’t moving very fast. Any thoughts?
Signature: htvmm

Golden Backed Snipe Fly

Golden Backed Snipe Fly

Dear htvmm,
This is a beautiful image of a Golden Backed Snipe Fly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large Flying Bug
Location: Maryland Eastern Shore
June 12, 2016 5:58 pm
I found this guy with a large bumblebee in its grasp. I searched extensively but got nowhere. Thanks for your help!
Signature: Nick

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Bumble Bee

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Bumble Bee

Dear Nick,
Large Robber Flies are arguably the most adept aerial predators in the insect world.  Dragonflies are larger, but they don’t tend to prey on larger insects, mainly satisfying themselves with mosquitoes and smaller prey.  Not so large Robber Flies that tend to prey on bees and wasps.  Your individual is a Red Footed Cannibalfly,
Promachus rufipes, a species that begins to make a regular appearance among our identification requests beginning in June, and continuing through the hot summer months.  The Red Footed Cannibalfly is also called a Bee Panther.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Friendly fly from Manitoba
Location:  Pacey Lake, Manitoba, Canada
June 12, 2016
Hi Daniel.  I haven’t posted on this site for a while, so I thought I might share this one that I photographed a few days ago. The ‘smiley face’ image is a surprisingly common theme in insect decoration; especially if you have an active imagination. This, however, is by far the most perfect and obvious that I have ever seen. It’s a Marsh Fly (Sciomyzidae: Tetanocera plebeja), sometimes called snail-killing flies because their larvae are parasitoids of snails. Cheers. Karl

Marsh Fly

Marsh Fly

Hi Karl,
We were away from the office when you sent your wonderful image.  There was no Marsh Fly category on the site, so a new category was created to accommodate your awesome image of a smiley faced Marsh Fly.  According to BugGuide:  “‘Noting the pattern on the wings is the quickest means of determining this common and widespread species.’ — Bill Murphy”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Huntsville, Ontario, Canada
June 14, 2016 3:39 pm
Hello,
I noticed this interesting horsefly-like bug laying these green eggs on our car mirror in late spring (June 14th) in Huntsville Ontario. I was hoping you could help identify? It seems like a horse fly, but the eggs are green rather than milky white as many sites have suggested they would be. I wondered if it was a bee at first? I appreciate any help.
Thanks!
Signature: Matt

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Dear Matt,
We believe we have correctly identified your ovipositing Soldier Fly as either
Stratiomys adelpha or Stratiomys discalis based on images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “S. adelpha and S. discalis are very similar and may turn out to be the same species. The taxonomy of the Nearctic Stratiomys is a mess. There are a few easily distinguished species, but several spp. are defined based on coloration which is variable. The male genitalia have never been examined carefully, and they could be helpful. –N.E. Woodley, pers. comm.”

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp? Fly?
Location: Central Arkansas, USA
June 14, 2016 3:31 pm
Dear Bugman,
A friend took the attached picture. Sorry for the poor quality. I have had little luck in finding what it might be. Can you please help? Insect is about one inch long. Pic was taken June 14, 2016.
Signature: Thank you!!

Soldier Fly

Soldier Fly

This is a Solder Fly and we believe it is in the genus Hedriodiscus based on images posted to BugGuide.  Many harmless Soldier Flies mimic stinging wasps and bees for protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination