Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bee Flies are Dipalta serpentina
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
September 17, 2016 1:30 PM
Earlier in the week, we posted an image of a Bee Fly we identified as
Villa lateralis and we wrote about a brown Bee Fly that we were unable to capture as an image.  Well, today we took several images of the same brown Bee Fly species, and as the afternoon progressed, we got additional images.  At one point, we got images of four individuals taking nectar from the blooming chives, and after putting the camera away, we spotted a fifth individual.  We are relatively certain we have correctly identified these Bee Flies as Dipalta serpentina thanks to this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “For many years it was stated that Dipalta were parasitoids of antlion larvae. …  However, the 1989 paper by Leech & Leech demonstrated a clear instance of Dipalta serpentina parasitizing the pupal stage of an antlion (rather than the larval stage). D. serpentina might also parasitizes antlion larvae, though it seems to be in question (earlier observers may have not observed carefully enough to distinguish between larval & pupal parasitism).”

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Two Bee Flies

Two Bee Flies

And then there were four Bee Flies

And then there were four Bee Flies

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flying insect
Location: Canarian island
September 17, 2016 4:05 am
I foundation this insect on my Windows in Gran Canaria
Thatcher insect is +/- 4cm long.
It is dangerous?
Signature: Insect

Robber Fly

Robber Fly

This is a Robber Fly, and here is a very similar looking individual posted to Getty Images.  While a large Robber Fly might bite a person if it is carelessly handled, they are not aggressive towards humans, but they are predators that frequently hunt on the wing.  Based on this Alamy image, your individual might be Promachus latitarsatus.  The species is also pictured on Biodiversidad Virtual, and an image on Diptera Info shows a large Robber Fly eating a Dragonfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Bee Fly, Villa lateralis
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
September 13, 2016 5:20 PM

Bee Fly:  Villa lateralis

Bee Fly: Villa lateralis

Late this afternoon, I noticed one more brown Bee Fly and two other black and white Bee Flies, that all looked quite similar except for the coloration, in a sunny area getting the late afternoon light.  The two black and white individuals were buzzing one another near the blossoming chives.  By the time I returned with the camera, only one individual remained, and we are pretty certain we have correctly identified it as Villa lateralis, first on the Natural History of Orange County site and then on BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Widely distributed in North America including Puerto Rico and South to Panama.”  Upon viewing the other members of the genus on BugGuide, we can’t help but to wonder if the brown Bee Fly we saw was the related Villa miscella.  Though we did not get an image, our memory was of it having brown on the wings.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee / wasp id
Location: North Devon
September 9, 2016 9:13 am
Can you please tell me what this bee / wasp is
Signature: Any way

Hornet Hoverfly

Hornet Hoverfly

This is a Hornet Hoverfly, Volucella zonaria, and according to the South West Grid for Learning Trust:  “This species is one of the larger hoverflies. It is sometimes seen in the UK in the late summer and autumn feeding on the flowers of Ivy. Hoverflies often mimic species of wasp or in this case a hornet.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Giant fly/bee thing?
Location: Maryland
September 10, 2016 5:28 am
Today on my bus route I had an unexpected passenger. I live in Maryland and we had a heat index of 108 at the time. He/she was a very loud flyer and looks like a cross between a bee and a fly and did not seem to want to go outside. Please help me identify him/her.
Signature: Notsocrazy

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Red Footed Cannibalfly

Dear Notsocrazy,
This predatory Robber Fly is commonly called a Red Footed Cannibalfly.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Water insect
Location: Salisbury, North Carolina
September 8, 2016 6:22 am
Good morning!
I found this little guy in water on my deck. It’s about 9/16 inches long and wiggles like a mosquito larvae. Any information on this would be very much appreciated.
Signature: Todd

Mosquito Larva

Mosquito Larva

Dear Todd,
This is a Mosquito Larva, commonly called a Wriggler.  It will soon pupate into a Tumbler, a very active aquatic pupa.  With the Zika scare, Southerners are being cautioned about standing water, which is a breeding ground for Mosquitoes.  Mosquito larvae and pupae both need air to survive, and they generally congregate at the surface of the water where they can breed, but any disturbance sends them wriggling and tumbling beneath the surface for several minutes.

Thanks for getting back to me so quickly.  I had no idea mosquito larva got this large.
Although I feel a little like I wasted your time, I appreciate it, just the same.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination