Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Large bee in North bay northern Ontario.
Location: Calendor northern Ontario
September 28, 2014 4:31 am
We noticed lots of bees on this particular fall day. Cannot seem to find any similar to identify.
Signature: Carol S Amour

Syrphid Fly, we believe

Syrphid Fly, we believe

Dear Carol,
This is not a bee.  If you inspect the image closely, you will see only one pair of wings, indicating that this is a fly, albeit one that mimics bees.  We believe your fly is in the family Syrphidae, the Hover Flies and Flower Flies, and many members in the family mimic bees and wasps as a means of protection.
  Though we have not had any luck locating an exact match, we believe your individual most closely resembles the members of the subgenus Eoseristalis that are pictured on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this a bee or a fly?
Location: San Diego, Ca
September 23, 2014 3:52 pm
This was taken just now in San Diego County at a horse ranch. I couldn’t see a stinger but it appeared to have one on its face! It was very fuzzy and quite frankly, very cute.
Signature: Suburban Adventuress

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Suburban Adventuress,
This Fly is commonly called a Bee Fly and it is in the family Bombyliidae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Insect identification
Location: Warren County, NJ
September 21, 2014 4:11 pm
Hey Bugman,
I saw this interesting character on my front window in western New Jersey.
I’m curious as to what it is.
Thanks!
Signature: Jojo

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Crane Fly

Hi Jojo,
We posted another image of a Giant Crane Fly earlier today.  Giant Crane Flies are attracted to lights.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fly on calico asters
Location: Kent County, Michigan USA
September 21, 2014 3:57 pm
What is the name of this cool fly I found enjoying calico asters in Michigan in late September? Thanks!
Signature: Patricia

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Dear Patricia,
This is a Tachinid Fly in the family Tachinidae, but we are not certain of the species.  Tachinid Flies are parasitic on other insects and arthropods.  According to BugGuide:  “Larval stages are parasitoids of other arthropods; hosts include members of 11 insect orders, centipedes, spiders, and scorpions. Some tachinids are very host-specific, others parasitize a wide variety of hosts. The most common hosts are caterpillars. Most tachinids deposit their eggs directly on the body of their host, and it is not uncommon to see caterpillars with several tachinid eggs on them. Upon hatching the larva usually burrows into its host and feeds internally. Full-grown larva leaves the host and pupates nearby. Some tachinids lay their eggs on foliage; the larvae are flattened and are called planidia; they remain on the foliage until they find a suitable host.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: thought it was a huge crane fly at first glance
Location: New York/Connecticut Border
September 21, 2014 6:58 pm
… but then I realized it was a bit different. it’s wings are swept back fully and it appears to have a sharper tail than most. also absent are the nubbins of secondary wings on the crane fly.
spotted on my car in southern NY state (Purdy’s, NY) this last Saturday. had driven from nearby Connecticut but I am pretty sure it landed on my car after having parked for dinner. I’d estimate he was almost 3 inches long from front legs to rear legs.
Signature: Eric R.

from perusing your site a bit more I see it is most likely is a giant crane fly. great site, will definitely refer to it in the future!

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Crane Fly

Dear Eric,
In comparing your image to images on BugGuide, we agree with your identification of a Giant Crane Fly,
Tipula abdominalis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I have never encountered this at work before
Location: Seattle, WA
September 19, 2014 7:27 pm
I work in Seattle, WA on commercial boilers. The location I took these photos (which are actually screenshots from much more informative HQ videos that I took) is on the ground near an outdoor steam boiler in September at the end of summer. It was 75°F that day and was the last day of an unusually long and hot summer. The water (and sludge) these things were living in was very warm, I did not measure the temperature of the water but because it was continually being fed by 212°F boiler water. Please let me know if you need more information, pictures or video. Oh and these things were about half an inch long.
Signature: Aaron in Seattle

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Dear Aaron,
One of your images appears to depict a Rat-Tailed Maggot, the larva of a Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax.  According to BugGuide:  “The larva of the Drone-Fly feeds on decaying organic material in stagnant water in small ponds, ditches and drains. Such water usually contains little or no oxygen and the larva breathes through the long thin tube that extends from its rear end to the surface of the water and that gives it its common name of ‘rat-tailed maggot’.”

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Rat-Tailed Maggot

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination