Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee?
Location: Midland, Texas
July 31, 2015 11:16 am
This looks like a bee but the hairy legs and wings look strange.
Signature: TLW

Bee Killer

Bee Killer

Dear TLW,
This magnificent predatory Robber Fly is a Bee Killer in the genus
Mallophora, and we believe we have correctly identified it as Mallophora fautrix by comparing your images to this image on BugGuide.

Bee Killer

Bee Killer

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s going on here?
Location: SW Virginia
July 31, 2015 10:39 am
What is this interesting insect? We spotted it in a flower pot and filmed it emerging from a caterpillar or pupa. (See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6hoz8cytRU). It’s about an inch long. Thanks!
Signature: Curious

Metamorphosis of a Crane Fly

Metamorphosis of a Crane Fly

Dear Curious,
Your images of the metamorphosis of a Crane Fly in the family Tipulidae are a very exciting addition to our archives.  Crane Flies do not bite despite their resemblance to giant Mosquitoes.

Newly emerged Crane Fly

Newly emerged Crane Fly

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you please name my bug
Location: Mandurah Western Australia
July 28, 2015 1:25 pm
Can you please identify this little fly
Thank you Tracey Marinkovic
Signature: Just a name

Bristle Fly

Bristle Fly

Dear Tracey,
We are more than prepared to supply you with a response, and we hope you respond to our questions as well.  This looks very much like a Bristle Fly,
Amphibolia vidua, a species in the family Tachinidae from Australia that has caused a bit of confusion on our site in the past.  According to the head of Entomology of Csiro regarding a previous posting:  “Its larvae feed as a parasite internally on other insects.  On sunny days in summer the adults often rest on smooth eucalypt tree trunks, and similar structures such as poles and pipes.”  We also know that adult Tachinid Flies frequently visit flowers.  We are very curious for you to explain why you titled your images “snail parasite” and we hope you can provide us with an explanation. 

Bristle Fly

Bristle Fly

The only reason my bug had Snail Parasite written on it was I seen the pic of one on the Internet and thought it looked like one. I was just guessing cheers and thank you

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Subject: Large insect with wasp prey
Location: West coast of British Columbia
July 29, 2015 3:43 pm
I took these photos on July 29/15 in the town of Nanaimo, on the west coast of British Columbia. This awesome creature was on a salal leaf, in a dry forest of Douglas fir, hemlock, and arbutus. I wanted to get a side view shot as well, but it must have been bothered by my intrusion into its juicy meal, and flew away. Can you tell what species it is? I think I’ve narrowed it down to the Laphria genus, Robber flies.
Thanks a lot. Love your site!
Signature: John Segal

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket

Dear John,
Because of the thick antennae that helps to identify the genus, we agree that this is a Bee-Like Robber Fly in the genus
Laphria, and after searching through 10 pages of species on BugGuide, we have narrowed down the possibilities to five species that have yellow thoracic hair and that generally resemble your individual, which appears to be feeding on a Yellowjacket based on this facial closeup on BugGuide.    The abdomen on Laphria fernaldi appears too orange to be your species.  In alphabetical order, the most similar looking species on BugGuide are:  Laphria astur Laphria janusLaphria partitor and Laphria unicolor.  Of those, we believe the images of Laphria astur on BugGuide look the closest, but we are by no means experts in the identification of Robber Flies.  Thanks for your excellent Food Chain contribution, and in the future, we can accept larger digital files to ensure the highest quality of the images on our site.

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellow Jacket

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket

Hi Daniel,
Thanks very much for helping me identify an insect I’ve never seen before.  I really appreciate it.
Those photos are about 650 X 450 KB; the size I use for email. Let me know if you’d like me to send them again, as larger files, and what the maximum size is that you can receive.
Thanks again.  Excellent website you have there!
John

Hi John,
We can easily accept 5MB files.  We are then able to crop into details like the antennae on this Bee-Like Robber Fly.  You may send them larger and we will crop to some details.

Hi Daniel,
Great! Okay, here are my two photos, each about 1.7 MB.
Thanks again for your great website, and all the work you do for us bug-curious types!
John

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket

Bee-Like Robber Fly eats Yellowjacket

Thanks for sending the higher resolution files.  Since you already cropped the images the first time, we were not able to magnify much more, but we did move a bit closer.

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Subject: What is this?
Location: Illinois
July 29, 2015 8:41 am
This bug literally flew onto my patio door right as I was about to let my dog out. Noticing the weird thing, i had to stop and take pictures. It looks like it almost is a conjoined twin? I have no idea what it could be, either.
Signature: Hayley P

Mating Crane Flies

Mating Crane Flies

Dear Hayley,
While this may look like conjoined twins, it is actually a pair of Crane Flies in flagrante delicto.  Mating Crane Flies are not the only insects that are able to fly while in the act, but their gangly appearance with their long legs makes them an especially memorable sighting.

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Subject: i need to identify this insect
Location: fenton, missouri
July 28, 2015 3:49 pm
Can you please tell me what kind of bug this is?
Signature: however you want

Hanging Thief

Hanging Thief

This is a Hanging Thief, a predatory Robber Fly in the genus Diogmites.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination