Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee fly
Location: Williams, AZ
July 28, 2014 12:41 pm
Could this be some type of bee fly? It was pretty large–maybe about an inch long.
Signature: Chris

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Chris,
Yes, this is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, however we are not certain of the genus or species.  Our best guess at this time is the Sinuous Bee Fly,
Hemipenthes sinuosa, and this image on BugGuide looks very close.  The pattern on the wing seems correct, but the body is lighter than the individuals pictured on BugGuide where it states:  “black area of wing has irregular sinuous (wavy) border with a small rounded blob near the apex – a distinguishing feature abdomen, thorax, and head black or very dark with no banding or other obvious markings”.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug? North-Central Minnesota
Location: Duluth, MN
July 26, 2014 5:00 pm
Good evening,
We are trying to figure out what this bug is and we really have no idea. I would say it is between 2-4 inches long with antennae. Any help would be great!!
Signature: Stephen R

Giant Crane Fly

Giant Crane Fly

Dear Stephen,
This is a Giant Crane Fly,
Tipula abdominalis, and you can compare your image to this series from BugguideAccording to BugGuide:  “adults often attracted to light.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What bug is this?
Location: Maple Grove, MN
July 26, 2014 4:57 pm
Found in our flower garden today. What is this bug?
Signature: William Huybrecht

Bot Fly

Bot Fly

Hi William,
This is a Rodent Bot Fly in the genus
Cuterebra, and they do not feed as adults.  The larvae are subcutaneous parasites on rodents and rabbits.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: red footed
Location: alabama
July 26, 2014 2:49 pm
Does this thing bite or sting humans?
Signature: freaked out

Redfooted Cannibalfly eats Paper Wasp

Red-Footed Cannibalfly eats Paper Wasp

Dear freaked out,
Though the Red-Footed Cannibalfly,
Promachus rufipes, is a very adept hunter capable of taking stinging wasps like this Paper Wasp on the wing, they are not aggressive towards humans.  With that said, if a human ever tried to capture a Red-Footed Cannibalfly or other large Robber Fly with bare hands, a bite may result.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: A Fly Or A Bee?
Location: Torrance, California
July 24, 2014 9:49 am
Dear Bugman,
By the end of June of this year, we found a couple of these insects in our front yard. The bigger one was about one inch long. We live in Torrance, California, and have never seen them before. Could you help us to identify them?
Thanks.
Signature: Daniel.

Bee Killer:  Mallophora fautrix

Bee Killer: Mallophora fautrix

Dear Daniel,
This Robber Fly in the genus
Mallophora goes by the collective general name of Bee Killer.  Your particular Bee Killer is Mallophora fautrix, a species with no specific common name, but according to BugGuide, it is:  “The only one of its genus in California.”  As you can see from the images in our links, Bee Killers prey on large flying insects other than Bees, and it is a rare, top of the insect food chain predator that preys upon adult, stinging wasps.  Though you are not the discoverer of a new species, you can spearhead a campaign to nominate the only Bee Killer in California as the California Bee Killer, even though its range extends beyond our fair state.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown fly with golden fur
Location: Fiskeboda, Sweden
July 24, 2014 6:37 am
I found this yellow hovering fly sun bathing on my concrete stairs on a hot summer day in the beginning of June. First I thought it was some kind of hoverfly, but I was unable to find one that looked like the one I saw. I would be very happy to get some help identifying this fly.
Signature: Andreas R

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Dear Andreas,
This is a Bee Fly in the family Bombyliidae, probably in the genus
Bombylius.  The wing pattern is similar to, but not exactly like that of the Large Bee Fly pictured on the Natural History Museum website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination