Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee or Fly?
Location: Andover, New Jersey
April 19, 2014 9:10 am
I found several of these little guys sucking up nectar on some hyacinths this morning. Haven’t seen these before and am thinking that it is some sort of mimic fly? Hoping you can help.
Signature: Deborah Bifulco

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Hi Deborah,
These are amazingly detailed images of a Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, a species that if found in Europe as well as North America.  As you have surmised, this is a fly that mimics a bee, and it is a pollinating species.  Greater Bee Flies generally make their appearance early in the spring.

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Masonry Bee?
Location: London, South East England.
April 11, 2014 1:15 pm
Hi! I would just like some clarification please! We noticed today that we had what appear to be bees flying in and out of a hole in the wall on our flat. We’ve lived here for years & it’s the first year we’ve noticed it. We’ve done googling and suspect them (it?) to be Masonry Bees but would love clarification as we’re both wimps when it comes to flying stinging things and would love to know where we stand for our own sakes but also that of the cats who seem to think the hole provides them with flying toys! And we obviously don’t want either to get hurt. It doesn’t look quite right for a masonry bee but doesn’t look like honey bees / bumble bees / hornets etc so we turn to your expertise! Thank you!
Signature: Tofu K

Drone Fly

Drone Fly

Dear Tofu K,
This is a harmless Drone Fly,
Eristalis tenax, and we were puzzled by your observations that is was “flying in and out of a hole in the wall,” and we learned something very interesting on Nature Spot where it states they can be observed:  “Virtually all year round. The female hibernates in buildings and crevices but will emerge on warm days in late winter, leading to it being seen in virtually every month of the year.”  Larval Drone Flies are known as Rat-Tailed Maggots.  More information is available on UK Safari.

Daniel,
Thank you for your prompt reply! I was expecting to wait a little while as the websites state you may have to.
Thank you for putting our minds at ease! I was concerned it was some beastly giant buzzing bee we were going to have to live with! And very “pleased” that they sometimes mimic bees – it means we’re not going completely crazy!
Glad you learnt something new about them too!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bee/Wasp??
Location: Medway, Kent, UK
April 10, 2014 5:28 am
Hi, I’m from Medway, Kent in the UK.
Whilst on my lunch break today in the park I noticed this bug hoovering by my feet. It had 6 legs, wings, was orangey in colour, with a pointy thing (to collect nectar??) at the front of it’s face? and it’s body when viewed from above was triangular.
I’ve never seen this before? The weather here has been a misture of cloudy sun and rain with an average temperature of 13 degrees. It was approx the size of an average bee or wasp.
Signature: Claire

Greater Bee Fly

Greater Bee Fly

Hi Claire,
This is a Greater Bee Fly,
Bombylius major, a fly that mimics bees and it does gather nectar with that long proboscis.  You can read more about the Greater Bee Fly on the Natural History Museum website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug
Location: Berkshire
April 8, 2014 2:02 am
I have hundreds of these bugs on my driveway, getting more each day
Signature: Sam Rutter

Leather Jackets

Leather Jackets

Dear Sam,
You have Leatherjackets, the larvae of Crane Flies.  They often become noticeable after a rain.  Getty Images has an image of a Leatherjacket that is identified as
Tipula padulosa.  According to The Garden Safari:  “The larvae, which may be up to 4 centimeters, are called leatherjackets. They are responsible for quite some damage in a lawn because it eats the roots of grass. And the lawn is most effected at times it is most vulnerable which is in winter. The larvae of the European Crane Fly are extremely able to sustain winter conditions and remain active even in spite of severe freezing temperatures. The adults are absolutely harmless as they don’t eat anything at all. This species is common all over Western Europe. It has also invaded the United States, where it is considered a real pest.”

Leatherjacket

Leatherjacket

   

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird toilet worm
Location: SOUTH AFRICA
April 6, 2014 6:37 am
Hi, i found this worm in the toilet this morning. it has a long black tail or flagellum or something. 2 eyes, its covering is transparent and you can see all its insides move around when it moves. It reminds me of the micro-organism paramecium.
its still alive, want to keep it that way until i find out what it is..AZ
Signature: LETITIA

Rat-Tailed Maggot

Rattailed Maggot

Dear Letitia,
This is a Rattailed Maggot, the larva of a Drone Fly.  It is harmless, and we suspect it traveled through the sewage pipes to get into your toilet, but we would not rule out it entering through the fresh water taps.  Back in 2006, we reported on Rattailed Maggots entering homes in Capetown through the potable water pipes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Please help me identify this bug
Location: Needham, Ma
April 5, 2014 8:41 pm
Dear Bugman,
Could you please help me identify this bug, I thought it was a wasp, but someone commented that it is a hoverfly. I am very grateful if you have the time to help me. I am identifying it for my involvement in Project Noah.
Sincerely,
Signature: Cynthia West

Hover Fly

Hover Fly

Dear Cynthia,
This is indeed a Hover Fly in the family Syrphidae, but mistaking it for a wasp is understandable as many Hover Fly species mimic stinging insects like wasps and flies.  We believe this might be
Helophilus fasciatus based on photos posted to BugGuide.  Additionally it is a species that appears early in the spring.   Was your photo really taken this spring?  We thought it might be too early to have flowers blooming this spring as the winter was so severe.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for your quick response! I appreciate it very much. The photo was taken last fall, October 2013 in Massachusetts. I had never heard of a Hover fly before so I guess I have learned something new and exciting! I can now rename it a Hover fly on my Project Noah page. I hope you have a great rest of the weekend!
Cynthia

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination