Currently viewing the category: "Flies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Predatory bee killer!
Location: Tucson, AZ
August 20, 2014 5:39 pm
This enormous predator buzzed down to enjoy its dinner on an elk antler in my yard – what is it?
Signature: Alicia

Giant Robber Fly eats Bee

Giant Robber Fly eats Honey Bee

Dear Alicia,
This is one of the best feeding Robber Fly images we have received all summer.  This is a Giant Robber Fly in the genus
Promachus, a genus well populated in our archives this season due to all the images we have received of Red Footed Cannibalflies.  This is a different member of the genus, and we believe it is Promachus albifacies, a species with no unique common name.  You can compare your individual to this image on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Stink bug eater
Location: Northwest Georgia USA
August 19, 2014 5:57 pm
I saw this huge fly eating on a stink bug at the pool. I took a photo of it thinking it may be a species of dragon fly. There were several Dragon flies around with honey bees in their mouths. . Any clue what this is?
Signature: Scott

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Stink Bug

Red Footed Cannibalfly eats Stink Bug

Dear Scott,
This is a marvelous image of a Red Footed Cannibalfly that we can tag as Food ChainRed Footed Cannibalflies are large, predatory Robber Flies.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Oceanside, NY
August 19, 2014 8:20 pm
Don’t have a clue. This bug, feasting on Japanese Knotweed, could be a bee, a fly or even a moth, as far as I know…..
Signature: CarlF

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

Hi CarlF,
This is a beneficial, parasitic Tachinid Fly, but we cannot tell you the exact species at this time.  Tachinid Flies are often very host specific and they are often important biological control agents that parasitize other insects and arthropods.

Tachinid Fly

Tachinid Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – What’s This Fly?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
August 19, 2014 6:19 pm
Hello,
I thought I’d discovered all of the flies that could possibly come to our little patch, but here’s another. Can you please help? It spent a lot of time on catnip blooms and the adjacent native geranium (I think I have it properly distinguished from geranium.) It is very shy and moves fast, but came back over and over again.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Hi Anna,
We believe we have correctly identified your Bee Fly as 
Dipalta serpentina based on this BugGuide image.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae are parasitoids of pupae, and perhaps also larvae, of antlions (Myrmeleontidae)” and “In Calif. species is most abundant in August and September” which makes your sighting right on schedule.

Bee Fly

Bee Fly

Thanks!  We just love sighting “new to us” creatures in the back.
Anna

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Lynwood Calfornia
August 17, 2014 7:16 pm
Can you help me identify this bug? I found him outside my door step
Signature: Not sure

Robber Fly:  Efferia species

Robber Fly: Efferia species

Dear Not sure,
This is a Robber Fly in the genus
Efferia, and though we went through numerous images on BugGuide, we could not find any that have the exact coloration of your individual.  You can compare your image to this image on BugGuide to see that the general physiology is the same.  According to BugGuide, there are:  “110 spp. in our area,” and “in our area, the vast majority are restricted to sw. US, with some widely western spp. and just two widespread spp.”  According to Eric Eaton, male Robber Flies in the genus Efferia:  “have the bulbous claspers, making them reasonably easy to identify.”  Just as we were about to post, we discovered this image of Efferia antiochi on Sardis & Stamm about the Antioch Dunes National Wildlife Refuge that looks identical to your Robber Fly.  According to the California Department of Fish and Game:  “Known only from Antioch, Fresno, and Scout Island in the San Joaquin River” which would indicate it is not the same species, but is sure looks close.

Robber Fly:  Efferia species

Robber Fly: Efferia species

We would strongly suggest that you contact the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History as this might be a significant find.

Robber Fly:  Efferia species

Robber Fly: Efferia species

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wasp? eating ?
Location: San diego
August 17, 2014 11:06 am
Hello Bugman,
Saw what looks like to be a white and black wasp hanging around the garden today. First time I have seen a wasp like this, it is fairly large, looks like it might be eating a small frog?
Signature: curious

Bee Killer eats Honey Bee

Bee Killer eats Honey Bee

Dear curious,
This predatory Robber Fly is a Bee Killer,
Mallophora fautrix, and it appears to be eating a Honey Bee.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination