Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – What’s This Egg?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
November 7, 2013 2:13 pm
Hi Daniel,
When I was out looking for Monarch Caterpillars on the Mexican Milkweed the other day, I spied these eggs on the bottom of a leaf. Can you please identify what laid them? I’m hoping something beneficial.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Moth Eggs, we believe

Moth Eggs, we believe

Hi Anna,
We just discovered this unanswered request that dates to our return after a short holiday.  The shape of the eggs and the quantity leads us to believe these are Moth Eggs.  Biophotonics has a photo of Milkweed Tiger Moth Caterpillars,
Euchaetes egle, that is attributed to Kailen Mooney of the University of California, Irvine, however, to the best of our knowledge, the Milkweed Tiger Moth is an eastern species.  See the BugGuide range map for confirmation.  We have not had any luck locating any moths that feed on Milkweed in California.

Hi Daniel,
I think these may have been Mourning Cloak eggs.  They all hatched out at once, ate their egg sacs, and left.  I thought it very strange that they would be on milkweed and  noted that these caterpillars sometimes feed on rose leaves.  There are rosebushes on either side of the milkweed plant in question, but I never spied any activity there.  I guess it will remain a mystery.
Thank you,
Anna

Eggs

Eggs

Hi again Anna,
According to Backyard Nature and BugGuide, Mourning Cloak eggs are yellow and ribbed.  We don’t think your eggs are Mourning Cloak eggs.

Hi Daniel,
I still think these are Mourning Cloak eggs, but have been known to be wrong on more than one occasion.  This picture was taken the day before they hatched and, now that I think back, they did not eat the egg sacs.  Here’s a photo of them just after hatching.
Anna

Hatchling Caterpillars

Hatchling Caterpillars

Hi Anna,
It might be very difficult to identify these Caterpillars from a photo, but they still look like hatchling Tiger Moth Caterpillars to us.  Mourning Cloak Caterpillars will stay together as they grow.  Too bad you lost track of them.  We may never know for certain.

Now I see that you are most likely correct.  I am confused, though because you say the Tiger Moth is an Eastern species.  I’ll try to do some research into this.  These caterpillars definitely did not stay together.  They disappeared, never to be seen again.
Anna

Hi again Anna,
Tiger Moths are a subfamily Arctiinae, not a single species.  See Bugguide.  There are many western species, but the Milkweed Tiger Moth (see BugGuide) is an eastern species.  We have numerous western species.  Perhaps it was a Painted Tiger Moth
The Painted Tiger Moth is a general feeder, but we don’t think it would feed on milkweed.  Female Painted Tiger Moths often lay eggs on buildings, but the caterpillars will not eat the buildings.  Upon hatching, the caterpillars soon disperse and begin feeding on a wide variety of plants in yards.
P.S.  We will be away for a week.  This entire correspondence is postdated to go live on January 20.  We will return to the office late next week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Ed. Note:  Happy New Year
What’s That Bug? has been appearing as an online column since 1998 (originally on the now defunct American Homebody website) and then as a unique website since 2002.  If we consider the development of the website to be our true date of birth, we are beginning our thirteenth year online.  Our first Bug of the Month was the Dobsonfly in June 2006, and each month since then, we featured some bug that is representative of the season or relevant for some other reason.  Since the beginning of the new year is always a kind of rebirth, we thought you might enjoy this positively gorgeous set of images of the Metamorphosis of the Ladybird Beetle that were shot on Barbados.

Ladybird Beetle Eggs

Ladybird Beetle Eggs

Subject: different stages in a ladybird’s development
Location: Barbados
December 30, 2013 8:39 pm
Hi Daniel,
That is good to know. i will send in some pics occasionally but for now i think this set will make a great addition to your site. It is a set of the different stages in a ladybird’s development. eggs > larvae > pupa > adult and one of an adult with a buffet of aphids.
Regards,
Signature: Niaz

Ladybird Larva

Ladybird Larva

Dear Niaz,
Thank you so much for sending us your beautiful images documenting the metamorphosis of a Lady Beetle on Barbados.  We haven’t had much luck determining the species, however we are thrilled to find it is not the invasive, exotic Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle, a species that has gotten a strong hold in North America, and which we fear might be resulting in a drop in the populations of native Lady Beetle species because of the fierce competition as well as aggressive predation.

Lady Beetle Pupa

Lady Beetle Pupa

It is the time of the month for us to select a Bug of the Month for January 2014, and we have selected your submission to run on our scrolling banner for the next month.  We thought metamorphosis would be a lovely subtext for the beginning of the new year.  So Happy New Year to all of our faithful readers as well as to our new visitors.

Lady Beetle from Barbados

Lady Beetle from Barbados

As an aside, the photo of the Lady Beetle feeding on the Aphids allows us to tag this as a Food Chain posting.

Lady Beetle feeds on Aphids

Lady Beetle feeds on Aphids

 

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: pupa?
Location: san diego ca.
December 27, 2013 10:32 am
found this on Christmas morning attached to my outdoor umbrella! I’ve looked through countless photos and can’t find it. Can you help ID it. Thanks
Signature: don’t understand queastion

California Mantis Ootheca

California Mantis Ootheca

The signature is the name you would like used when we post images and questions.  This is the Ootheca or Egg Case of a Preying Mantis, and based on the similarity to this image from BugGuide, it is an Ootheca from the native California Mantis, Stagmomantis californica.  The ootheca that are sold by nurseries as organic means of controlling pest species in the garden are generally from non-native Preying Mantids that are larger and more aggressive than our native mantids.  While we applaud the good intentions of gardeners who want to use natural means for pest control, we fear that our native Mantids are being displaced and perhaps eaten by their non-native relatives.  This Ootheca appears to have already hatched into approximately fifty tiny mantids.  Here is a photo from our archives of the hatching Ootheca a different species of Mantis.  We also recently photographed a nymph of a California Mantis in our own Mount Washington, Los Angeles garden. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: hairy Slater bug?
Location: Albany, western Australia
December 25, 2013 9:41 pm
I’ve got a bug about the size of a pinky finger nail on top of its eggs sitting beneath the hand rail of the verandah. It’s eggs are hairy as is the body of the animal. Very strange, its body shape looks like a cross between a Slater and a giant flea and the front half of a moth with its legs at the front near its nose.
Signature: here

Flightless Female Tussock Moth with Eggs

Flightless Female Tussock Moth with Eggs

We were struck by the resemblance between your photo and an image in our archive of a flightless female Western Tussock Moth with her egg mass, and we quickly learned that the genus Orgyia is represented in Australia as well.  Birds on the Brain pictures a flightless female Tussock Moth in the genus Orgyia, but she is not identified to the species level.  Butterfly House indicates that Orgyia australis is found in Australia, but does not even indicate that the female is flightless.  The Brisbane Insect website indicates the common name is the Painted Pine Moth and pictures a flightless female.  The Government of South Australia has an excellent pdf on the life cycle of Australian Tussock Moths.  Your photograph pictures a flightless female that has laid her eggs in and on the cocoon she emerged from.  Since she is flightless, she cannot move about in search of a mate, but since she releases a pheromone upon emergence, a winged male can locate her to mate.  The pdf states:  “On hatching, the female remains clinging to the outside of the cocoon where she mates and lays eggs. The eggs are laid in a mass amongst the hairs on the outside of the pupal cocoon. Each female may lay up to 700 eggs. The eggs hatch into tiny caterpillars which swarm over nearby twigs and needles.”

That’s fantastic and interesting! Thanks a lot, I’m so glad you got back to me! Hope you have a wonderful new year!
Linton

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pumpkin Spider? McLean, Virginia
Location: On our McLean, Virginia home
November 1, 2013 10:57 pm
Dear Bugman,
We live 6 miles from the White House in McLean, VA. Rain and wind the day after Halloween toppled one of the grim reapers standing guard outside our front door, revealing the perfect holiday decoration ever: a big bright orange spider, touched with black here and there carrying what looked to be a large orange sac on its back!!!
After attaching a note to our house forbidding anyone to disturb our spider, I photographed the new arrival and continued with my post-Halloween errands. A few hours later, the spider’s sac was covered in some sort of fuzzy material. The spider ’s legs were barely visible under its body.
Fast forward to early evening and the fuzzy sac was no longer attached to the body of the spider, who remained close by possibly spinning a web.
Is our new housemate a pumpkin spider? Enquiring minds want to know!
Signature: Brook

Pumpkin Spider with Egg Sac

Pumpkin Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Brook,
Because of your thoughtfulness to provide a note forbidding anyone from disturbing your Pumpkin Spider, we are tagging your post with the Bug Humanitarian Award.  We have a slightly different interpretation of your photos.  Your first image is of a female spider about to lay eggs and her body is swollen.  In the second image, the one we are posting, she has produced an egg sac and she is guarding it.  She will soon die and the egg sac will overwinter, hatching into several hundred spiderlings in the spring.

Bug Humanitarian Awardee:  Guarding a Pumpkin Spider and her Egg Sac

Bug Humanitarian Awardee: Guarding a Pumpkin Spider and her Egg Sac

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Location: Rose Hill/Montecito Heights
October 15, 2013
Hi Daniel,
Wow, if the Green Lynx has fans here are a few more shots.
She laid her eggs some time ago but I just around to photographing her this week. The first photo is from 10/10/13 and the other two I took just a few minutes ago so 10/15/13. As far as I can tell she has not been hunting and stays with her brood 24/7.
I hope all is well over the hill.
joAnn

Green Lynx Guards Brood:  October 13, 2013

Green Lynx Guards Brood: October 13, 2013

Hi joAnn,
Your photo of this magnificent Green Lynx Spider eating a male California Mantis did garner 15 “likes” on our site.  She probably gained enough on that single meal to enable her to lay this clutch of eggs.  She will continue to guard them after they hatch, and indeed until the spiderlings disperse.  If she survives, she will begin feeding again and she may even produce a second or even a third brood.  Green Lynx Spiders do not build webs to snare food, but they do build webs to guard their young.

Green Lynx Guards Brood:  October 15, 2013

Green Lynx Guards Brood: October 15, 2013

Nearly six years ago, a Green Lynx Spider and her egg sac was featured as our Bug of the Month.  Thanks for sending us your excellent photos.

Green Lynx Guards Brood:  October 15, 2013

Green Lynx Guards Brood: October 15, 2013

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination