Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown Bug
Location: California Bay
November 20, 2012 11:30 pm
Hello there. There are these strange looking bugs that have been seen near where I live (Pacifica and San Bruno California) and I have no idea what they are. Can anyone identify them? I’ve never seen anything like this before!
I’ve seen more than one now, they are very hairy and squishy. They have at least 4 or 6 legs (near their head) and they are always attached to a hairy sack with a hallow black exoskeleton inside and next to what looks like an egg sack. They have wing-like appendages that are small and hairy near their heads.
Signature: Alexsis Johansen

Flightless Female Western Tussock Moth with Egg Mass

Dear Alexsis,
Your description is perfect and it could not be more accurate.  This is a flightless female Western Tussock Moth,
Orgyia vetusta, and we identified it on the Moth Photographers Group Flightless Females page, but there is even more information on the Moth Photographers Group Tussock Moth Parasitoids page that documents the life history as well as a significant parasitoid predator, a species of Tachinid Fly.  According to Joyce Gross of the University of Berkeley:  “Adult females are wingless. When they emerge from the cocoon (eclosure) they remain upon it and release a pheromone, a sex-attractant that brings males to her. The large antenna of the male is very sensitive to the species-specific pheromone and any males downwind of the female will quickly follow the scent to her location.”  There is also a very nice photo on BugGuide of a newly emerged female.  You can see photos of the caterpillars of the Western Tussock Moth in our archives.

Update from November 22
Now that I have viewed the website I have realized that I have been seeing those western tussock moth caterpillars my whole life and I never would have guessed they would turn into that moth! That is truly amazing. Here is a photo that I took of the caterpillar a few months ago. Thank you so much for your response!

Western Tussock Moth Caterpillar

Hi Alexsis,
More than a week has passes since you submitted the caterpillar photo, but we were away for Thanksgiving, and there is way more mail in our inbox than we can read.  We are updating the posting with your new photo.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Praying Mantis Ootheca?
Location: Southeast AR
October 23, 2012 12:00 am
Found this on the side of my house and not sure what it is. I’m thinking it’s a Praying Mantis Ootheca but am not sure.
Signature: Christine R.

Mantis Ootheca

Hi Christine,
You are correct.  This is the ootheca or egg case of a Preying Mantis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Freaky eggs!
Location: Champaign, Illinois
October 11, 2012 11:01 am
Good morning, Bugman! I took some photos this morning of some eggs I found on a tarp hanging from the side of our house (the joy of renovations!). We live in the Midwest, not near any bodies of water, and fall weather has been setting in lately. Any ideas on what hatched on the side of my house? (My thumbnail included for scale.)
Signature: Laura

Unknown Eggs

Dear Laura,
We are practically hypnotized by the subtle pattern of light, shadow, color and texture in this lovely photograph.  Eggs can be very difficult to identify with certainty, especially eggs that were not laid on a food source.  Our first guess might be some Hemipteran, like a Stink Bug, and our second choice is some type of Moth Egg, like a Tiger Moth.  Either way, we don’t believe the hatchlings will infest your home.

Hi Daniel,
Thank you so much for your time and sweet compliments on my photos!  *^_^*
Knowing my luck, it was probably a Stink Bug, hehe.  But our cats do enjoy alerting us to the wide variety of surprisingly diverse moth population, so I would not rule those out.  I’m very glad to hear that the likely bugs are the brave outdoorsy types, not the codependent infesting sorts!  ^_^
Thanks again!
~L

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Golden Orbweaver. I think…
Location: western mass
September 27, 2012 2:29 pm
Just saw this hanging out on a set of stairs. Thought it looked cool.
Signature: EJF

Golden Orbweaver guards her egg sac

Dear EJF,
Thanks for sending us your photo of this handsome female Golden Orbweaver,
Argiope aurantia, guarding her egg sac.  The Golden Orbweaver is a harmless species, though like many spiders, it is possible that they might be provoked into biting through careless handling.  Now that autumn has arrived and Orbweavers are reaching maturity, we expect to get numerous identification requests.

I was not 100% on it, but thought I was right. Lol. Anyway, I thought you guys would like that pic. Glad you did like it. Preston.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown eggs – distinctive formation
Location: Memphis, TN
September 17, 2012 8:32 am
These were on a passionvine leaf. I looked through all your egg photos and couldn’t find a match. I’ve been recording time lapse video of them, so maybe I’ll see what they are when they hatch.
Signature: Tim Doyle

Unknown Eggs

Hi Tim,
Eggs can often be very difficult to identify with certainty.  We suspect these are eggs of some True Bug in the suborder Heteroptera because of the barrel shape and double row arrangement.  Your eggs somewhat resemble these Stink Bug eggs on BugGuide.

Unknown Eggs

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggs on fencepost
Location: Edgewood, NM
September 15, 2012 7:20 am
Hello, what a wonderful site!!
I was walking our dogs around our property in Edgewood, NM and these little egg-like things caught my eye. They look like sesame seeds but I swear they’re not! (Yes, I’ve browsed your other readers’ letters…). Any ideas?
Signature: Laura and Paul

Unknown Eggs

Hi Laura and Paul,
While we do not want to discount that you or your neighbors might sit on the fence and eat sesame bagels, these are most definitely eggs and not seeds, but alas, it is often very difficult to identify eggs.  If eggs are laid on a food plant, it sometimes makes identifications easier, but we do not believe the fence post is a larval food chosen by the progenitor.  Your request has us stumped, though our first choice might be some species of Giant Silk Moth (These Promethea Moths laying eggs are not in your range, but other family members are.) as they often lay eggs in places other than food sources, though that generally happens when the short life span of the female is coming to an end if she has been attracted to a light source. 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination