Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crazy scale like bug!
Location: Indianapolis Indiana
April 3, 2014 6:09 am
Greetings!
I have a mature clematis vine in my garden. While pruning it. I came across this symmetrical, armor-looking growth on the vine. I picked one off and it seemed sticky on the underside. It reminds me of some sort of scale or maybe some insect larvae. I’ve searched the internet and googled EVERY POSSIBLE combination of words and I cannot find ANYTHING. Please help me identify this creature! Blessings
Signature: Lacey O.

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Hi Lacey,
These are actually the eggs of a Katydid.

Wow. Thank you! What a quick response! I will let them be then. :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crusty thing on fence
Location: Denver, Colorado
April 1, 2014 8:06 pm
We found thes crusty pupa thing on our fence. We live near Denver, Colorado. Does anyone know what it is.
Signature: Thank you for your help.

Preying Mantis Oothecae

Preying Mantis Oothecae

These are Oothecae or egg cases of Preying Mantids.  Each will release up to several hundred hatchling mantids when they are ready to emerge.

Thank you for the answer-it’s been stumping me for about 6months. I am so glad we found your web site. Keep up the awesome work.
Thanks from Denver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flat bug on Sanseviera (Mother in law tongue)
Location: Northeast Ohio
February 17, 2014 7:03 am
A friend received a piece of a Sanseviera plant (Mother in law tongue) so that he could grow his own at home. On one of the blades of the plant, there were these brown, oval, flat things that could be bugs…all sat in a line along the blade of the plant. I’m from Northeast Ohio and have never seen them before. Your help is much appreciated.
Signature: Bug Struck in Ohio

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Dear Bug Struck in Ohio,
These are Katydid Eggs.  According to the Missouri Botanical Garden site:  “They do not pose any particular problem for the home gardener, but do feed on shrub and tree foliage.”  Though Katydids feed on leaves and blossoms (in our garden they love roses), we do not eradicate them.  They are solitary feeders and we do not believe they do much damage other than cosmetic damage.  We do not exhibit our roses, so if there are some bites taken out of the petals, we don’t fret.  Katydids are wonderful insects that are among the most vocal (though sound is produced by rubbing body parts together rather than through vocal cords) and their “songs” cheer us up.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: aussietrev strange egg sac?
Location: Queensland, Australia
February 3, 2014 9:21 pm
Here is the strange object I found on the back of a cucumber leaf in my yard. I assume it is an egg sac, and it has the extruded foam sort of texture of a mantis but it doesn’t look like any that I have ever seen before. Any ideas guys?
Signature: aussietrev

Mantis Ootheca or other???

Mantis Ootheca or other???

Hi Trevor,
Our first thought, prior to reading what you wrote, was that this mystery object looks like extruded foam and that led us to contemplating the possibility that this might be some odd Mantis Ootheca, so we are in agreement with what it seems most like.  It also appears that whatever this mystery object might have held has gone, possibly by hatching.  How large was it?  Alas, all the images on The Insect Store mantis ootheca identification guide do not appear to be showing at this time.  We also just realized that for years we have been spelling the word Ootheca with an “i” and we will need to contact our webmaster to see if he can do a site fix on that error.  Another possibility is that this might be a Cockroach ootheca.  Hopefully, we will soon find an answer.

Hi Daniel,
The thing is about an inch overall. It has similarities to a bark mantis Ootheca but the pictures on Brisbane Insects are of still closed one making it a bit harder to compare. They also appear to be flat against the trunks where as this one has a crescent moon type shape. Given the number of suitable trees nearby I would think it unlikely that a bark mantis would suddenly change to greenery and lose the camouflage advantage for its young though.
regards,
Trevor

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you identify this tree borer by the egg sack?
Location: Omaha,Ne
January 27, 2014 11:06 am
Hello, I recently took a new job as a groundskeeper after many years doing landscape work. This property has a tree borer that I haven’t identified before. Can you help me identify it by the egg sack? Picture attached.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Nick

Preying Mantis Ootheca

Preying Mantis Ootheca

Hi Nick,
While we are not disputing that you may have some type of borer on the grounds, both of the images you have attached are of Oothecae or Egg Cases of Preying Mantids, and by all accounts, they are considered beneficial predators.

Preying Mantis Ootheca

Preying Mantis Ootheca

Cool! That’s actually really good to hear. I have over 50 sugar maples that look like they have been shot with buckshot. It’s nice to know Mother Nature is trying to fix the situation for me!
Thank you vey much! I appreciate your time
Nick

Hi again Nick,
Should you happen to get a photo of the Borer, we would glady give a try at identifying it for you.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Daniel – What’s This Egg?
Location: Hawthorne, CA
November 7, 2013 2:13 pm
Hi Daniel,
When I was out looking for Monarch Caterpillars on the Mexican Milkweed the other day, I spied these eggs on the bottom of a leaf. Can you please identify what laid them? I’m hoping something beneficial.
Signature: Thanks, Anna Carreon

Moth Eggs, we believe

Moth Eggs, we believe

Hi Anna,
We just discovered this unanswered request that dates to our return after a short holiday.  The shape of the eggs and the quantity leads us to believe these are Moth Eggs.  Biophotonics has a photo of Milkweed Tiger Moth Caterpillars,
Euchaetes egle, that is attributed to Kailen Mooney of the University of California, Irvine, however, to the best of our knowledge, the Milkweed Tiger Moth is an eastern species.  See the BugGuide range map for confirmation.  We have not had any luck locating any moths that feed on Milkweed in California.

Hi Daniel,
I think these may have been Mourning Cloak eggs.  They all hatched out at once, ate their egg sacs, and left.  I thought it very strange that they would be on milkweed and  noted that these caterpillars sometimes feed on rose leaves.  There are rosebushes on either side of the milkweed plant in question, but I never spied any activity there.  I guess it will remain a mystery.
Thank you,
Anna

Eggs

Eggs

Hi again Anna,
According to Backyard Nature and BugGuide, Mourning Cloak eggs are yellow and ribbed.  We don’t think your eggs are Mourning Cloak eggs.

Hi Daniel,
I still think these are Mourning Cloak eggs, but have been known to be wrong on more than one occasion.  This picture was taken the day before they hatched and, now that I think back, they did not eat the egg sacs.  Here’s a photo of them just after hatching.
Anna

Hatchling Caterpillars

Hatchling Caterpillars

Hi Anna,
It might be very difficult to identify these Caterpillars from a photo, but they still look like hatchling Tiger Moth Caterpillars to us.  Mourning Cloak Caterpillars will stay together as they grow.  Too bad you lost track of them.  We may never know for certain.

Now I see that you are most likely correct.  I am confused, though because you say the Tiger Moth is an Eastern species.  I’ll try to do some research into this.  These caterpillars definitely did not stay together.  They disappeared, never to be seen again.
Anna

Hi again Anna,
Tiger Moths are a subfamily Arctiinae, not a single species.  See Bugguide.  There are many western species, but the Milkweed Tiger Moth (see BugGuide) is an eastern species.  We have numerous western species.  Perhaps it was a Painted Tiger Moth
The Painted Tiger Moth is a general feeder, but we don’t think it would feed on milkweed.  Female Painted Tiger Moths often lay eggs on buildings, but the caterpillars will not eat the buildings.  Upon hatching, the caterpillars soon disperse and begin feeding on a wide variety of plants in yards.
P.S.  We will be away for a week.  This entire correspondence is postdated to go live on January 20.  We will return to the office late next week.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination