Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth identification
Location: Pacific Northwest
June 23, 2013 8:02 pm
Can you help me identify this lovely lady? I thought she was a cocoon of some sort until I got up close to her. It was not until after I snapped the photo and zoomed in on her that I realized the reason for her extreme stillness, notice the tiny green eggs she is laying. Photo taken by me, approximately 6 PM, 06/23/2013, Seattle, WA. Coincidentally, the evening of the supermoon!
Signature: Sincerely, K. P. Sullivan

Unknown Moth lays eggs

Prominent Moth lays eggs

Dear K.P. Sullivan,
We didn’t think this would be a difficult identification, however, we were not successful at getting an identification.  We aren’t even certain of the family.  Perhaps one of our readers will post a comment today and help us successfully provide you with an identification.

W.C. Eddie provides an identification:  Prominent Moth
See BugGuide for information on Nadata oregonensis.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: eggs and babies
Location: Columbus, Ohio
June 17, 2013 5:06 am
Hi! I am hoping you can help me identify what I found on the underside of a peach tree leaf. I’ve never gotten peaches off the tree thanks to squirrels and am wondering if these bugs are horning in on the animals territory.
Signature: David

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Stink Bug Hatchlings

Hi David,
These are newly hatched Hemipterans, and we believe they are Stink Bugs in the family Pentatomidae.  Further research indicates that they are most likely hatchlings of the invasive exotic Brown Marmorated Stink Bug,
Halyomorpha halys.  See this matching image on Featured Creatures where it states:  “The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys Stål, is a pest that was first officially reported from the western hemisphere in Allentown, Pennsylvania in 2001 (Hoebeke and Carter 2003). This stink bug may become a major agricultural pest in North America, similar to the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula (L.). Both species are polyphagous pests of various crops, but in the U.S. it has been primarily reported as a household nuisance and ornamental pest. However, in eastern Asia where the BMSB is native or indigenous, it is a pest on fruit trees and soybeans.”

Thank you for letting me know–and so quickly too! This is a different stink bug than I have encountered before. I will have to get more vigilant now.
Thank you!
David

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ants
Location: Pittsburgh PA
May 20, 2013 7:26 am
I found these ants outside my back door on the bricks. This colony poped up over night.
Signature: Joe

Wheel Bug Hatchlings

Wheel Bug Hatchlings

Dear Joe,
We corrected what we perceived to be an overwhelming cyan cast to your photo and it accentuated the red in the abdomens of these newly hatched Wheel Bugs.  You can still see their empty egg mass in the lower left quadrant.  We will be flying
into Pittsburgh in two weeks.

Wheel Bug Hatchlings with empty Egg Mass

Wheel Bug Hatchlings with empty Egg Mass

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Thought u may like this…
Location: Cleveland, GA
May 9, 2013 3:43 pm
Wolf spider with egg sac? Picture taken in northeast Georgia last night. :)
Signature: Frog

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Dear Frog,
Thank you for your photo.  We often get photos of female Wolf Spiders covered with spiderlings, but we don’t have many photos of them with their egg sacs.  The female Wolf Spider cares for her eggs and hatclings until they begin to disperse.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified, Unusual Egg Case
Location: Southern Michigan
April 27, 2013 7:39 pm
Dear Bugman:
I found this unusual looking egg case, while hunting for fossils. It was in a crumbly, sedimentary boulder, along with dozens of sow bugs, which were exposed when I split the rock open. The eggs are visible as round bumps through the papery/silky covering. Was wondering if some type of spider made this, or another kind of arthropod such as the sow bugs?
Signature: Chris O

What's That with the Sow Bugs???

What’s That with the Sow Bugs???  A Spider Egg Case.

Dear Chris,
We do not recognize this thing, but we would not rule out a fungus.  We are posting this as unidentified and we hope that either we or our readership might find and answer for you.

Dear Daniel:  After looking all over the internet for similar photos & an answer, I found a link on Bug Guide which has an almost identical photo of this type of egg sac.  It appears to be the creation of a type of ground spider.  Species mentioned during my searching are gnaphosid, zelotes and corrinidae.  Here’s a link to the pic on Bug Guide:  http://bugguide.net/node/view/181688/bgpage

Dear Chris,
Thanks so much for following up on this posting.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I named him Ryno
Location: Costa rica Jungle
April 27, 2013 5:07 pm
This is a little friend I found deep in the Jungle in Costa Rica. Anyone who what he is?
Signature: Ryno

What's That Caterpillar???

What’s That Caterpillar???

Dear Ryno,
We do not recognize this unusual looking caterpillar.  Generally Butterfly Caterpillars are not hairy, but we suspect this might be a Nymphalid Caterpillar.

Keith Wolfe responds to our identification request
Greetings “Ryno” and Daniel, this is a last-instar Caligo atreus (http://janzen.sas.upenn.edu/caterpillars/dblinks/searchplaycat4.lasso?-Search=GCAcaterpillars337&herbivore%20species=atreus).  Note the numerous white tachinid (http://www.nadsdiptera.org/Tach/Gen/tachintr.htm) eggs behind the head capsule, the inevitable doom of which it might possibly escape if pupation occurs before the maggots hatch.
Best wishes,
Keith

Hi Keith,
Thanks for getting back to us on this.  We didn’t realize those were Tachinid Fly eggs.  Good to know.  We hope this Owl Butterfly Caterpillar escapes being eaten alive by the fly larvae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination