Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

eggs on a tomato leaf
Location: Canterbury, NH, USA
August 22, 2011 10:52 am
I live in New Hampshire in the US. Today in my greenhouse I found an array of tiny pinkish-tan eggs laid on top of a plum tomato leaf. I have never seen these before – the color is wrong for squash bug eggs and as I said, they were on the top of the leaf at the top of the plant. Anyone know what laid these? I put the leaf in a jar to see what hatches, but I garden organically and like to practice preventive care, so if I can take some preemptive action soon if they’re bad guys, I’d love to.
Signature: Hilnel

Whose Eggs are These???

Dear Hilnel,
We believe these are Moth Eggs, but we are not certain of the species.  The two species of
Manduca typically associated with tomatoes, Tomato Hornworm and Tobacco Hornworm, lay green eggs singly on leaves.  This is something else.  We found a blurry photo on Our Engineered Garden that looks similar, but they are not identified.  We would really love to know what you have.  Would you consider allowing them to hatch in a confined location and then photographing the critters when they emerge?  We would love a followup report as we continue to research this.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Found this laying eggs on my aluminum fence pole
Location: North shore suburbs of Chicago
August 15, 2011 8:25 am
I saw this colorful insect laying eggs on a pole in our backyard. It moved slowly and left a pod of about 10-15 tightly stuck together eggs in about 4 rows. Any idea what this insect is?
Signature: Bill Marcus

Stink Bug Lays Eggs

Hi Bill,
This is a Stink Bug and eggs laid in that manner are very typical of Stink Bugs.  This sure looks to us like
Banasa dimiata, a species BugGuide reports “from the entire United States, southern Canada and northern Mexico.”  BugGuide also indicates:  “Many different possible host plants are listed for this species, including birch (Betula spp.), bearberry (Arctostaphylos spp.) and chokeberry (Photinia spp.).”

Daniel, wow I had no idea that stink bugs were that colorful or relatively (to my preconceived vision) large. Thank you for the quick info
Bill

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Eggs? Galls? Magic space bubbles? A mystery!
Location: Toledo, OH
August 1, 2011 6:33 pm
Hey there! Oakworm (or so I think I remember) season is just starting around here, and most of the small oak trees at the park are ALREADY defoliated! Oy, it’ll be a bad year. Anyhow, I am curious if these are eggs coating the underside of the leaf or something else. It was very pretty, in a creepy sort of way.
Signature: Katy

Oakworms and Eggs

Hi Katy,
These Oakworms are the caterpillars of moths in the genus
Anisota (see BugGuide).  When they are really plentiful, Oakworms can defoliate trees.  It is our theory that the eggs, yes they are eggs, in the photos are also Oakworm eggs, but alas, when they hatch, they will not have anything to eat.  Thanks for sending us your great photographs.

Oakworms and Eggs

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

unknown bug
Location: Lincolnton, GA
August 2, 2011 10:30 pm
8/1/11
These started showing up a week ago a few at a time and have increased to hundreds today (pic 1). Some have laid what seems to be an egg pattern similar to the Harlequin Bug (pic 2).
Thanks
Signature: Jeff McKinney

Lablab Bugs

Hi Jeff,
Your home has been invaded by a recent introduced Invasive Exotic species, the Bean Plataspid,
Megacopta cribraria, also knows as the Globular Stink Bug or Lablab Bug.  The Bean Plataspid was recently introduced to Georgia from India or China, where it is native.  It has since been reported in South Carolina as well, according to BugGuide which reports:  “in Oct. 2009 was invading homes in large numbers in GA”.  The University of Georgia Cooperative Education website has a very informative PDF entitled Megacopta cribraria as a Nuisance Pest.  The Lablab Bug is known to invade homes when cool weather sets in. 

Lablab Bugs

According to BugGuide, known food plants are legumes including soybeans, and though this Invasive Exotic species has many negative attributes, a benefit is that its primary host plant is reported to be kudzu, owing to yet another common name, Kudzu Bug.  If you have kudzu growing nearby, you might want to consider trying to control the invasive vine before the insect population reaches an uncontrollable level, though your photo indicates that time may have already passed.  The Nature Closeups photography blog has some great photos of the Lablab Bug.

Eggs of the Lablab Bug

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Mystery Moth
Location: Niagara Falls, Ontario
July 13, 2011 4:36 pm
Hi,
We’re trying to identify this moth – it was about 1.5 to 2 inches wide.
Thanks!
Signature: Rob

Blinded Sphinx

Hi Rob,
We continue to get photos of the Blinded Sphinx,
Paonias excaecatus, and it appears as though this female has laid a green egg on the right side of your photo.  See Sphingidae of the Americas for additional information and photos.

Thanks – that’s it!  I can’t believe we didn’t even notice the egg.
Rob

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

what is this bug?
Location: Minneapolis NC
July 8, 2011 8:45 pm
Found this on my back window porch area, it looks like a fly with fly eggs, hope it can be identified. thanks, tklb2011
Signature: tklb2011

Mysterious Things

Dear tklb2011,
We have no idea what these mysterious things are, but they do seem to resemble eggs.  Hopefully our readership may be able to contribute some information.

Eggs or Not???

Ed. Note: July 13, 2011
We received a comment from Jessi indicating that these might be Moth Eggs from the family Geometridae.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination