Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Spider Egg Sac
Location: Adelaide, Australia
February 4, 2016 8:45 pm
Dear Bugman,
We found a spider’s egg sac hanging on our painting easel. It was round and white and grey, and it was hanging on a thread. We looked it up and decided it looked like the egg sac of a two-tailed spider, but we aren’t sure if these spiders live where we are.
Yesterday we noticed it had started to open. We looked inside with our microscope and saw baby spiders! Do you know what type they are? What sort of home or food do they need?
We really like spiders, especially peacock spiders!
Signature: From the Kangaroo’s Room (3 to 6 year olds)

Spider Egg Sac

Spider Egg Sac

Dear Kangaroo’ Room kids,
We will attempt to identify your Spider Egg Sac, but our gut feeling is that this is an Orbweaver Egg Sac.  What we find most surprising is the few individual spiderlings inside.  They also seem quite large to be hatchlings.  Normally we expect to see hundreds of spiderlings emerge from an Egg Sac.  Perhaps a survival strategy for this species is to have the hatchlings cannibalize one another while still in the egg sac, ensuring that the strongest survive, and freeing them from having to hunt for food while very young.  Spiders are predators.  Try feeding them small insects like Aphids.

Spider Egg Sac

Spider Egg Sac

Spiderlings in Egg Sac

Spiderlings in Egg Sac

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in South Africa
Location: Fish Hoek, Western Cape, South Africa
January 30, 2016 2:21 pm
Hi – can anyone help us identify these ‘bugs’ found in Fish Hoek, Western Cape, South Africa. Image showing them ‘hatched’ from eggs, and then a crop in closer. Many thanks Robyn
Signature: Robyn

Owlfly Hatchlings

Owlfly Hatchlings

Dear Robyn,
We are quite sure these are Neuropteran Hatchlings, but not until we found this matching image in iSpot of Owlfly Hatchlings, could we determine that they are in the family Ascalaphidae.

Owlfly Hatchlings

Owlfly Hatchlings

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Australian Inquiry
Location: Dorrigo, New South Wales, Australia
January 28, 2016 7:43 pm
Hello Bugman!
Im writing to you from Australia, the East Coast NSW. I have found this nest on my fathers property and its got us all puzzled. (Obviously, otherwise I wouldn’t be writing to you for help!)
Its a group of small nests/cocoons (?) suspended in an olive tree. you can see by the photo that there are seven sub-dwellings dangling down, each approximately 5-7cm (2-3″) and what you can’t quite see from the picture is that there is a egg/sphere-shaped object tucked up in the mass of leaves that are all swathed in that goldy-orange web. there has been no movement noticed to or from the nests, but over the 4 weeks we have noticed that a pinprick hole appeared overnight in only one of the seven nests top…(perhaps a visiting parasite, it didn’t look like an obvious entry/exit hole for the resident in question.) Other details are the 7 nests are hollow/hard paper sounding constructions. the web has carcasses of beetles and flies stranded in it – seemingly in a certain area above which indicates they have been eaten by a resident… thats about all the information I have… I do hope you can help out, curiosity is peaked as we wait and watch!
Signature: Kind Regards, Naomi Drage

Egg Sacs of the Magnificent Spider

Egg Sacs of the Magnificent Spider

Dear Naomi,
We are really enjoying researching your request.  Our initial impression that these resembled the Egg Sacs of Orbweaver Spiders proved to be correct when we discovered the Australian Museum page on the Magnificent Spider,
Ordgarius magnificus.  According to the Australian Museum site:  “Very little is known about the courtship and mating of Magnificent Spiders, but once egg development starts, the female’s abdomen swells up quite remarkably. She constructs a series of spindle-shaped egg sacs over several nights, and each one is filled with about 600 eggs. The egg sacs are attached to a branch, and may number up to seven. They are often parasitised by wasps and flies.  The mother spider usually dies off over winter. The baby spiders emerge in late winter to early spring and disperse by ballooning.”  The site also notes:  “During the day, the Magnificent Spider hides in a retreat made by binding leaves together with silk. Preferred trees include natives such as eucalypts in dry or wet sclerophyll forests, but these spiders are also found in suburban gardens. Often the spider’s characteristic spindle-shaped egg sacs are hanging near the retreat.”  The retreat is evident in the upper right hand corner of your excellent image.  Butterfly House also has some wonderful images and notes:  “These spiders are quite amazing. They catch their prey by creating a line of silk with a sticky blob on the end, then swinging it round and round. They emit the pheromones of some female moths to attract the male moths within range of their bolas, catching the moths rather like the Incas hunted game and the gauchos of Argentina catch their cattle.”  The Find a Spider Guide has a marvelous image of the Magnificent Spider and notes:  “The two yellow cones and red marbling on the dorsal surface of the abdomen of this spider are distinctive. Also very useful for identification purposes are the egg sacs. These are very large (about 5 cm long) and spindle-shaped, and hang in groups of about five.”  Your especially fecund female has produced seven egg sacs.  Thanks so much for providing our site with this wonderful posting for our archives.  Perhaps you will be able to get an image of the Spider herself.  She is undoubtedly the “egg/sphere-shaped object tucked up in the mass of leaves that are all swathed in that goldy-orange web” you mentioned.  The information provided on Arachne.Org may help you get that image which may require a flash on your camera.  Here is that information:  “These spiders are active at night, with a simple web in trees or tall shrubs, rarely less than 2 metres above the ground. Their presence is usually indicated by a cluster of large, brown egg sacs hanging among foliage. The egg sacs are conspicuous, up to 5 cm long – many are targeted by flies and wasps that parasitise spiders’ eggs. Up to 9 sacs may be made by a spider in a season, each with several hundred eggs. The male spiders mature within the egg sac, emerging with fully functional mating organs. At night the female spins a trapeze line from twigs above an open space in the branch or foliage. She hangs from this trapeze and spins into the space a short, single line of silk with a large droplet of very sticky silk, the bolas, at its end. The upper end of the line is held by the female’s second leg. The spider emits an airborne pheromone attractive to male moths of the family Noctuidae. Vibration sensitive hairs on the spider’s outstretched legs can sense the wing beats of an approaching moth. The spider begins to swing the bolas around in a circle beneath the moth until it is hit by the sticky bolas. It flutters in tethered flight while the spider hauls it in. The moth is then bitten, wrapped and either eaten or hung. Several moths may be caught in a night.”

Egg Sacs of a Magnificent Spider

Egg Sacs of a Magnificent Spider

Thats so great, thank you. Its an impressive (or magnificent!) looking creature! I look forward to getting out there at night and seeing if we can sight it! Will send you an update photo if we manage to catch it in action :)
There has been a change to the centre egg since I emailed, its sac surroundings have coloured in patches of rusty orange. So perhaps hatching will begin shortly!
Keep up the great work, thanks again!
Naomi Drage

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wheel bug nymph hatching in November?
Location: Dacula, GA.
January 24, 2016 9:00 am
Hey there! Thanks to your awesome website here, I was able to identify a wheel bug “clutch” of eggs hatching in my kitchen attached to the inside of my window screen. This late November(2015) I started noticing these small ant like bugs with big red butts crawling on my window sill and counter tops. It wasn’t hard to find where they were coming from as there we’re still SEVERAL hatching from the nest and were hanging out in a cluster on the nest. So my question is, after all the research I’ve done on them(most you supplied), aren’t these guys supposed to hatch in early to mid spring? I live in central northern GA. US, and our fall was mild and warm(70-80° on most days). With the warm humid temps, along with them being indoors, is it possible that it was the perfect environment to hatch early? I guess what I’m really curious about is how common this occurs to wheel bug nymphs. We live on acerage and our house backs up to woods, so I’ve seen my fair share of weird bugs in my house. I have a rule for all these weird bugs- Their home is outside, mine is inside. If you are in my house and look suspicious, you will unfortunatley meet your untimley death. I understand that wheel bugs are huge helpers outside. However, with small children and pets, and no way to safely remove the nest, I had to spray them. The picture I’m submitting is after I sprayed them. I just couldn’t risk them stinging us. Anyway, thanks for any info you can give me!
Signature: Merideth

Wheel Bug Eggs

Wheel Bug Eggs

Dear Meridith,
You are correct that these are Wheel Bug Eggs and you are also correct regarding the early hatching.  We suspect that both the mild weather and the location affected by indoor warmth were factors in the early hatching.  It is also fair to presume that similar conditions would result in a similar outcome in the future.  We understand your reservations with young children.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red eggs?
Location: Wahroonga, NSW, Australia
January 20, 2016 8:54 pm
Hey there,
I work in bush regeneration near the headwaters of the Lane Cove River in NSW. We’re in a fairly rainy sort of area.
One of my colleagues sent me this picture of what appear to be red insect eggs. I searched through your egg posts for several pages, but the closest thing to these seemed to be ladybeetle eggs, however those are only yellow.
Unfortunately I don’t know what plant these eggs have been laid on. It actually looks like a weed.
Cheers :)
Signature: Frances

Possibly Phasmid Eggs

Assassin Bug Eggs

Dear Frances,
Eggs can be very difficult to properly identify.  The color looks like an exact match and the general shape is very close to this egg cluster pictured on Getty Images that is identified as a clutch of Stick Insect or Phasmid eggs.  We have not been able to locate any other corroborating images.

Update:  Assassin Bug Eggs
Thanks to a comment from Cesar Crash, we researched Assassin Bug Eggs and we found this image that exactly matches on FlickR.  No particular species is identified, but the eggs were found in Australia.  BunyipCo supports that ID.  Assassin Bugs are beneficial predators.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird gray bug and its eggs
Location: Gastonia, NC
January 16, 2016 12:37 pm
I’ve been finding these strange gray bugs on the exterior of my hard-coat stucco home. They’re easy to kill/knock off and don’t seem to fly, but they’re super annoying because they keep coming back and laying these hard egg things (which I also destroy).
Signature: BB

Flightless Female Moth lays eggs

Flightless Female Moth lays eggs

Dear BB,
This is a flightless female moth in the family Geometridae, and there are several genera in the family with flightless females.  Our first thought is this might be a Winter Moth,
Operophtera brumata, and though it looks similar to this BugGuide image, BugGuide does not report them as far south as North Carolina.  Another possibility is the Woolly Gray, Lycia ypsilon, and it is found in nearby South Carolina according to BugGuide, but there are no images of the female or the eggs there. The closest visual match to your moth we can find is the female Fall Cankerworm Moth, Alsophila pometaria, and according to BugGuide they are active “Fall through early winter”  but the eggs pictured on BugGuide look very different from your eggs.  Pest Control Canada has an image identified as the Fall Cankerworm, but again, the eggs of that species look different.  So, while we are confident this is a flightless, female Geometrid Moth, we cannot identify the species for certain.  The Moth Photographers Group has a nice page devoted to flightless female moths.

Hi Daniel:
Thanks so much for your response! I’m glad they’re just moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination