Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Egg Cluster
Location: Central Florida
November 13, 2016 11:48 am
Found these eggs attached to the aerial roots of an orchid this morning. Mid Fall and mid morning.
I have both intact and another picture where they had hatched.
Signature: A Constant Florida Gardener

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Eggs, we believe

Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle Eggs, we believe

Dear Constant Florida Gardener,
These sure look like the Eggs of a Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle that are posted to BugGuide.  Though they will eat Aphids, we consider the Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle to be an Invasive Exotic species that might be partially responsible for the decline in native Lady Beetle populations.  We would not rule out that they are the eggs of a native Lady Beetle.

Thank you so much for the reference and quick response.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: caterpillars
Location: Marburg, Germany
October 16, 2016 1:24 am
Hi! I am living in central Europe (Germany), at the edge of a mixed forest. I have built up a container garden last year which attracts many different insects. In September this year I found many eggs fixed to a leaf of gladiola Acidanthera bicolor. Some time later very small caterpillars hatched which started to rope down on very thin threads. I could not find out what that is and wanted to ask for your help. Thank you very much.
Signature: Sabine

Probably Arctiid Eggs

Probably Tiger Moth Eggs

Dear Sabine,
We suspect that these are Tiger Moth Eggs from the subfamily Arctiinae.  We are reluctant to provide an actually species identification.  Many Tiger Moths are generalist feeders with caterpillars that eat plants often classified as weeds.  Tiger Moths also lay eggs on surfaces where there is no food, like the outdoor wall of a home near a light.  When the Caterpillars hatch, they begin feeding on the egg shell and then they disperse to hunt for edible plants.  Tiger Moth Caterpillars are often called Woolly Bears.

Hatchling Tiger Moth Eggs, we believe

Hatchling Tiger Moth Eggs, we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Green Lacewing eggs
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana, USA
October 14, 2016 8:36 am
I think these are Green Lacewing larva hatching. I took this photo today.
Signature: Brady Reed

Hatching Green Lacewing Eggs

Hatching Green Lacewing Eggs

Hi Brady,
Your image of hatching Green Lacewing Eggs is a marvelous addition to our archives.  We have read that the larvae of Green Lacewings are such gregarious hunters, that the species has evolved so that the eggs are laid on stalks to help prevent cannibalism.

Hatching Green Lacewing Eggs

Hatching Green Lacewing Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug on tomato leaves
Location: San Antonio texas
October 14, 2016 8:14 am
What is this??
Signature: Ms. Garza’s first grade class

Hatched Stink Bug Eggs

Hatched Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Ms. Garza’s first grade class,
These are hatchling Stink Bugs, probably Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: I’ve lived here for 40 years. Never noticed anything like her before now. What us she?!?
Location: Wildomar, CA USA.. Southwest Riverside County
October 3, 2016 6:58 am
Good morning. We have had a visitor on our garage. She was laying eggs for more than 2 days. She arrived in the late hours on last day of September. She was gone on the morning of October 3. I’ve never seen anything like her before. Please help us identify her. Also, any infornation on how to ensure her little ones the best possible start would be great! We have become oddly attached to all their welfare in the last couple days. She is about 2.5 to 3 inches long and about 1.5 inches tall.
Signature: Molly W.

Hubbard's Small Silkmoth laying Eggs

Hubbard’s Small Silkmoth laying Eggs

Dear Molly,
This is a Hubbard’s Small Silkmoth,
Sphingicampa hubbardi, and it is not a common species in California.  BugGuide lists the range as “Extreme eastern California, southern Nevada and southern Arizona to western Texas” but BugGuide has no records from California.  According to BugGuide:  “Larvae feed on Wright’s acacia, honey mesquite and catclaw acacia.”  Hopefully you have some native acacia plants in the vicinity and you can transfer the caterpillars to the plants when they hatch.  Though there are several similar looking species in the genus found in the Southwest, to the best of our knowledge, this is the only species found in California.  The caterpillars are also quite impressive.  We will send your images to Bill Oehlke for verification, and we hope you allow him to post your images to his own very comprehensive site as he has no images of eggs posted. 

Eggs of Hubbard's Small Silkmoth

Eggs of Hubbard’s Small Silkmoth

Post her eggs to your heart’s content. I will purchase the necessary Acacia for her babies in the morning, as we have none in the area. Thank you so much for your help!

If you are successful at rearing the caterpillars, we would love to continue postings of the life cycle of Hubbard’s Small Silkmoths.

I’ll do my best. How long until the eggs are expected to hatch? What shall I purchase to increase the odds? These eggs are on the side of the garage. I can’t imagine it the right environment. Also, more moths are in the area. We have now seen about 4 of them. So I expect more eggs in the near future. 🙂  I have more moths. Two more laying eggs. Our friend has one, too. The other moth is in La Cresta. They are very far from their normal home, yes?

We suspect the eggs should hatch within two weeks.  If you have so many adult moths, there must be a nearby food plant.  As we stated earlier, California is considered part of the normal range, but there are always pockets within the ranges of insects where populations are higher as well as areas where a species is absent.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Interesting Structure on Tree Trunk
Location: Shipton Reserve, New Zealand
October 2, 2016 2:13 pm
I found this interesting looking structure attached to a tree trunk. Would you be able to identify it for me?
Signature: Thanks

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

This is the ootheca or egg case of a Preying Mantis.  We located similar looking images on Friends of Te Henui and on T.E.R:R.A.I.N where it the species is identified as Orthodera novaezealandiae and the following information is posted:  “They lay eggs in foamy egg case called an ootheca. The ootheca has a woody appearance and has straight uniformed sides. They are usually attached to a leaf, stem, wall or fence. The young hatch out as small versions of the adult.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination