Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chalcid wasps from katydid eggs
Location: Kirksville, Missouri
April 10, 2014 1:02 pm
I discovered your site last fall in my search to identify some katydid eggs attached to a sweet gum ball. I kept the eggs on my desk in the hopes of seeing katydids hatching, but ended up having parasitized eggs–I had about a dozen chalcid wasps emerge from the eggs. Sadly, they didn’t survive.
I used this site and bugguide to figure out that they were chalcid wasps, but I’d like to narrow down the identification if possible.
Thanks!
Signature: AC Moore

Katydid Eggs Parasitized by Chalcid Wasp

Katydid Eggs Parasitized by Chalcid Wasp

Dear AC Moore,
We actually found your answer much faster than we anticipated.  We found this posting to BugGuide of Parasitized Katydid Eggs and a comment reads:  “The holes you are seeing are actually the emergence holes of wasps that parasitize the eggs of katydids. The wasps produce these circular holes to escape the confines of the egg in which they develop. When a katydid hatches it splits the side of the egg open. I know wasps in the genus
Anastatus (Eupelmidae) and Baryconus (Scelionidae) attack katydid eggs having reared some myself.”  We then searched for images of wasps in the two mentioned genera, and this image of a Baryconus species on zsi.gov looks nothing like your wasp, however the Anastatus that is pictured on BugGuide looks very much like your wasp.  You are correct.  It is a Chalcid.

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Sac??
Location: Virginia
April 4, 2014 11:59 am
What is that??
Signature: -thank you

Golden Orbweaver Egg Sac

Golden Orbweaver Egg Sac

This is the Egg Sac of a large, beautiful and harmless spider, the Golden Orbweaver or Black and Yellow Orbweaver, Argiope aurantia.

Thank you so much.. it stays

We are very happy to hear that you are tolerant of harmless spiders in your garden.  We hope some of the spiderlings that hatch will remain in your garden, but they will also disperse on the wind, a process known as ballooning.  It is possible that the wind may carry some of the young spiderlings many miles from their birth location.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crazy scale like bug!
Location: Indianapolis Indiana
April 3, 2014 6:09 am
Greetings!
I have a mature clematis vine in my garden. While pruning it. I came across this symmetrical, armor-looking growth on the vine. I picked one off and it seemed sticky on the underside. It reminds me of some sort of scale or maybe some insect larvae. I’ve searched the internet and googled EVERY POSSIBLE combination of words and I cannot find ANYTHING. Please help me identify this creature! Blessings
Signature: Lacey O.

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Hi Lacey,
These are actually the eggs of a Katydid.

Wow. Thank you! What a quick response! I will let them be then. :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Crusty thing on fence
Location: Denver, Colorado
April 1, 2014 8:06 pm
We found thes crusty pupa thing on our fence. We live near Denver, Colorado. Does anyone know what it is.
Signature: Thank you for your help.

Preying Mantis Oothicae

Preying Mantis Oothicae

These are Oothicae or egg cases of Preying Mantids.  Each will release up to several hundred hatchling mantids when they are ready to emerge.

Thank you for the answer-it’s been stumping me for about 6months. I am so glad we found your web site. Keep up the awesome work.
Thanks from Denver.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Flat bug on Sanseviera (Mother in law tongue)
Location: Northeast Ohio
February 17, 2014 7:03 am
A friend received a piece of a Sanseviera plant (Mother in law tongue) so that he could grow his own at home. On one of the blades of the plant, there were these brown, oval, flat things that could be bugs…all sat in a line along the blade of the plant. I’m from Northeast Ohio and have never seen them before. Your help is much appreciated.
Signature: Bug Struck in Ohio

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Dear Bug Struck in Ohio,
These are Katydid Eggs.  According to the Missouri Botanical Garden site:  “They do not pose any particular problem for the home gardener, but do feed on shrub and tree foliage.”  Though Katydids feed on leaves and blossoms (in our garden they love roses), we do not eradicate them.  They are solitary feeders and we do not believe they do much damage other than cosmetic damage.  We do not exhibit our roses, so if there are some bites taken out of the petals, we don’t fret.  Katydids are wonderful insects that are among the most vocal (though sound is produced by rubbing body parts together rather than through vocal cords) and their “songs” cheer us up.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: aussietrev strange egg sac?
Location: Queensland, Australia
February 3, 2014 9:21 pm
Here is the strange object I found on the back of a cucumber leaf in my yard. I assume it is an egg sac, and it has the extruded foam sort of texture of a mantis but it doesn’t look like any that I have ever seen before. Any ideas guys?
Signature: aussietrev

Mantis Oothica or other???

Mantis Ootheca or other???

Hi Trevor,
Our first thought, prior to reading what you wrote, was that this mystery object looks like extruded foam and that led us to contemplating the possibility that this might be some odd Mantis Ootheca, so we are in agreement with what it seems most like.  It also appears that whatever this mystery object might have held has gone, possibly by hatching.  How large was it?  Alas, all the images on The Insect Store mantis ootheca identification guide do not appear to be showing at this time.  We also just realized that for years we have been spelling the word Ootheca with an “i” and we will need to contact our webmaster to see if he can do a site fix on that error.  Another possibility is that this might be a Cockroach ootheca.  Hopefully, we will soon find an answer.

Hi Daniel,
The thing is about an inch overall. It has similarities to a bark mantis Ootheca but the pictures on Brisbane Insects are of still closed one making it a bit harder to compare. They also appear to be flat against the trunks where as this one has a crescent moon type shape. Given the number of suitable trees nearby I would think it unlikely that a bark mantis would suddenly change to greenery and lose the camouflage advantage for its young though.
regards,
Trevor

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination