Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: golden eggs
Location: barnwell, sc, usa
August 10, 2014 2:43 pm
Was curious as to what these might grow up to be? The seem to be iridescent. Found them on a clothes pin.
Signature: heather

Probably Coreid Bug Eggs

Probably Coreid Bug Eggs

Dear Heather,
We found a matching image on BugGuide to your golden eggs, and they are only identified to the family level of Coreidae, the Leaf Footed Bug family.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Egg Mass on Window
Location: Denver, Colorado
July 17, 2014 6:33 am
Good morning,
This morning I discovered an egg mass on the outside of one of our windows. Wondering what it might be? The closest I found was the Colorado Potato Beetle, but the eggs don’t look quite right. The mass is probably the size of a couple of quarters. The eggs are very small – pencil tip diameter, perhaps.
Signature: The Greens

Moth Eggs

Moth Eggs

Dear Greens,
These are Moth Eggs, most likely those of a Tiger Moth or those of a Giant Silkmoth.  The links that we provided are not necessarily species found in Colorado, but rather they are used as examples from the respective families.

Thanks!  We’re experiencing a Miller Moth invasion!!  Maybe that’s it…  Thanks!!

We do not believe these are Miller Moth eggs.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: microlep?
Location: Midland, MI
July 17, 2014 6:47 am
Hi bug man,
…  For fun and unrelated, I am sharing a photo of hatching cecropia eggs that I took yesterday :)
Signature: Elly

Hatchling Cecropia Caterpillar

Hatchling Cecropia Caterpillar

Hi Elly,
The newly hatched Cecropia Moth Caterpillar is a wonderful addition to our archives.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue Insect Eggs
Location: Vancouver Washington
June 12, 2014 1:57 pm
While trimming a Hawthorn tree I found this clutch of eggs on a twig, about the size of a cocktail straw. I’m a fan of bugs so I’m not inclined to destroy them, but I am very curious about what they are going to be. There are a lot of insect eggs on the web, however nothing that looks like this.
Signature: Thank you, Brenda Bateman

What laid the Eggs???

What laid the Eggs???

Hi Brenda,
We agree that these appear to be eggs, but we know not their identity.  Based on the size, nearly 1/16 inch, the only possible insect suspect we can think of is a Giant Silkmoth in the family Saturniidae, however, our brief research did not produce any likely candidates for laying blue eggs on Hawthorn.  Perhaps one of our readers will write in with a comment that leads to an answer.

Eggs??? or Other?????

Eggs??? or Other?????

Thank you for the response! I appreciate the effort and will watch the site for additional comments.
Brenda

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Slug eggs
Location: Houston, TX
May 31, 2014 5:57 pm
Found this under a pot planter on a warm day 5-31-14 in Houston/Galveston, TX area. It appears to be a slug with its eggs. However, it doesn’t seem like a typical slug. The dorsal side is more rough while the underside is more slimy. As we messed with it, it snugged up with the eggs more. When we left it alone for a minute, the eyes came out and it began moving quite a bit.
Signature: W. Parks

Sluglike Creature Guards clutch of eggs

Leatherleaf Slug with clutch of eggs

Dear W. Parks,
Thanks for commenting on an Unknown Eggs posting from our archives and then sending your own documentation.  The creature in your image does appear to be sluglike, but we are not certain of its identity.  The clutch of eggs looks identical to that from our archives, and it is also from Texas.  We are going to feature your submission as our Bug of the Month for June 2014 even though we cannot identify it at this time.  We will attempt to research this matter.

Sluglike Creature guards clutch of eggs

Leatherleaf Slug with clutch of eggs

We did a search for “Slug Eggs” and quickly found a matching image (figure 2) on the University of Florida Featured Creatures page and it is identified as the egg cluster of Leidyula floridana, the Florida Leatherleaf Slug.  Further down the page (figures 16 and 17) the Florida Leatherleaf Slug is pictured, and it is described as being:  “native to the Caribbean (Cuba to Jamaica) and southern Florida. Formerly found only in southern and central Florida, it has since has spread to northernmost Florida, and also is found in Louisiana, Texas, and northeastern Mexico, suggesting either that the species is more widespread than previous records indicated or that it is being relocated via commerce.”

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Chalcid wasps from katydid eggs
Location: Kirksville, Missouri
April 10, 2014 1:02 pm
I discovered your site last fall in my search to identify some katydid eggs attached to a sweet gum ball. I kept the eggs on my desk in the hopes of seeing katydids hatching, but ended up having parasitized eggs–I had about a dozen chalcid wasps emerge from the eggs. Sadly, they didn’t survive.
I used this site and bugguide to figure out that they were chalcid wasps, but I’d like to narrow down the identification if possible.
Thanks!
Signature: AC Moore

Katydid Eggs Parasitized by Chalcid Wasp

Katydid Eggs Parasitized by Chalcid Wasp

Dear AC Moore,
We actually found your answer much faster than we anticipated.  We found this posting to BugGuide of Parasitized Katydid Eggs and a comment reads:  “The holes you are seeing are actually the emergence holes of wasps that parasitize the eggs of katydids. The wasps produce these circular holes to escape the confines of the egg in which they develop. When a katydid hatches it splits the side of the egg open. I know wasps in the genus
Anastatus (Eupelmidae) and Baryconus (Scelionidae) attack katydid eggs having reared some myself.”  We then searched for images of wasps in the two mentioned genera, and this image of a Baryconus species on zsi.gov looks nothing like your wasp, however the Anastatus that is pictured on BugGuide looks very much like your wasp.  You are correct.  It is a Chalcid.

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

Anastatus species Chalcid Wasp

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination