Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bright red/orange just hatched
Location: West county, St Louis, MO
May 29, 2016 7:49 am
We found these on a chair outside this morning. They seem to take the shape of an assassin type bug or an ant of some sort. They hatched out of an egg sac about 3 inched long in a straight line.
Signature: Joe

Leaf Footed Bug Hatchlings

Leaf Footed Bug Hatchlings

Dear Joe,
Hatchlings can be difficult to identify correctly, but we believe these are Leaf Footed Bugs from the family Coreidae.

Leaf Footed Bug Hatchlings

Leaf Footed Bug Hatchlings

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Hard cocoon on chain link fence
Location: Massachusetts
May 18, 2016 3:55 pm
Hi bug man, I spotted this cocoon on the chain link fence in our backyard. I’ve tried Googling with no luck, and I’ve become very curious about it. It’s very hard. It’s currently late spring here, in the north Eastern United States.
Signature: Jen

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Jen,
This is the Ootheca or Egg Case of a Preying Mantis, and you can expect several hundred hatchlings this spring.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Cocoon identification
Location: Melbourne
May 10, 2016 10:17 pm
I found this on my Magnolia tree today. I am in Melbourne, Australia. I am interested to know what it is. I have removed it from the tree. It is currently Autumn.
Signature: Regards Sharon

Bird Dropping Spider Egg Sacs

Bird Dropping Spider Egg Sacs

Dear Sharon,
These look like the Egg Sacs of a Spider.  We found a matching image on Museum Victoria where it states:  “Another interesting feature of this spider is its egg sacs. Bird-dropping Spiders can produce up to 13 egg cases. They are dark brown with black markings and, when suspended in the web, look like a bunch of dark grapes. The female keeps watch over the egg cases until the young emerge, usually in late winter to early spring.”  The scientific name of the Bird Dropping Spider is
Celaemia excavata.  The adult Bird Dropping Spider is pictured on the Australian Museum site.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggs on underside of parsley leaf
Location: Gary, IN
April 12, 2016 9:06 am
Hello, Bugman:
Have you any idea what insect would put these eggs on this parsley leaf? Thank you.
Mary Ann Sumner
Signature: Mary Ann

Stink Bug Eggs

Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Mary Ann,
Our money is on these being Stink Bug Eggs, but we cannot say for certain which species.  Here is a relatively similar looking clutch of eggs from BugGuide.

Thank you, Daniel.  I was cutting parsley leaves to add to a salad dressing and luckily spotted them before I whizzed them in the blender.  I guess I could say I almost ate them :-}    . . .  and it probably wouldn’t have been a first.
I posted the pic on Facebook and it created quite a stir.
Thanks, again.
Mary Ann

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Bugs hatching from line of eggs
Location: Houston, Tx
April 10, 2016 9:29 am
Helloooooo
My wife, our 3 yr old and I would like some help identifying these interesting bugs we found hatching out of a line of eggs on our wooden gate.
Season: spring (April 10th)
Location: Houston, Tx
Signature: James, Carly and BoBo

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

Dear James, Carly and BoBo,
These are hatchling True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera, and we believe they are hatchling Leaf Footed Bugs or Big Legged Bugs in the family Coreidae.  Hatchlings can be very difficult to identify to the species level.  Your individuals look like those represented in this BugGuide image. 

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth Beauty in Northern AZ w/possible endangered eggs
Location: Flagstaff, AZ
April 8, 2016 12:21 pm
I found this gorgeous moth outside my work building this morning, April 8th, in Flagstaff, Arizona (7000 ft. in a ponderosa pine forest). Unfortunately, I didn’t get a look at the top side of her wings, but was entranced by the eyes and camouflage of the displayed side. Many coworkers reported walking right past her. I believe she’s female due to the string of eggs(?) next to her. My best (extremely novice) guess is that she’s a variety of hawk moth, but I would love a proper identification.
Also, I’m worried about the eggs. I imagine they are typically attached to tree trunks. With the nearest tree about 50 feet away, do you think they’ll find food? Is there anything I can do to help them?
Thank you!
Signature: Moth Lover

Glover's Silkmoth

Glover’s Silkmoth

Dear Moth Lover,
This is NOT a Hawkmoth.  Rather, it is a Giant Silkmoth, more specifically, a Glover’s Silkmoth
, Hyalophora columbia gloveri, the western subspecies of the Columbia Silkmoth.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is “Usually Alpine and Riparian (scattered in and among adjacent suitable habitats incl. foothills of the western prairies)” and the larval food plants include “Several Trees and Shrubs in the Rosaceae esp.. Prunus spp., Willows, and Larch … additional hosts are numerous incl. many other woody plants larvae may eat leaves of alder, birch, Antelope Bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), buckbrush (Ceanothus spp.), buffaloberry, cherry, rose, Russian Olive (Eleagnus angustifolius), willow.”  It is difficult to speculate on the survival rate for the eggs laid on your brick building.  The first meal for the newly hatched caterpillars include feeding off the egg shell.  The young caterpillars then disperse and they may be lucky enough to find a host plant.  A mated female is heavy with eggs, and she may just be unloading some cargo before flying off the search for an appropriate tree or shrub.  If she is not mated, she will still be quite heavy with eggs, and she may be lightening her load pursuant to flying off the next night.  At any rate, we recommend letting nature take its course unless you can reach the eggs, in which case you can try to transfer the freshly hatched caterpillars to an appropriate food plant.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination