Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
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Subject: Seed like things in drawer
Location: central MA
December 10, 2014 9:49 am
Hello,
Recently I noticed the bottom drawer of my desk was sticking and little hard black seed like things were falling out to the floor when I opened it. Today I pulled the whole drawer out and found it was loaded with these seeds in the runner area of the drawer. They are black, hard, and fairly circular. They do not look like mouse droppings to me. Any ideas?
Thanks!
Danielle
Signature: Danielle

Unknown Black Pellets

Unknown Black Pellets

Dear Danielle,
We do not believe these are mouse droppings, and interestingly, we just posted a nearly identical identification request from Connecticut
We do not believe they are either eggs or seeds.  Our best guess is Termite Pellets at this time, but the black coloration is unlike any Termite Pellets we have seen.  We will continue to research this matter and perhaps one of our readers has a better suggestion.

Unknown Black Pellets

Unknown Black Pellets

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: unknown bug eggs
Location: Portland, Ct.
December 7, 2014 7:23 pm
for the past few years I have discovered piles (100+) of these tiny bead sized, black, shiny, hard shelled eggs. There only found in my basement. two piles were found in my garage. One was in a drawer of a RubberMaid rolling cart and the other large pile was on a open cabinet shelf piled high in a corner. when I touched the pile they all collapsed as if they were wet at one point. the other piles were in the cellar in a large plastic storage bin and also in my storage bag for my Christmas tree.
I took a picture with a microscope app the magnified 8xs and I will also include a few in my hand for a prospective.
Signature: Susan Popielaski

Seeds, we believe

Seeds, we believe

Dear Susan,
These look more like seeds than bug eggs to us, but we have no explanation regarding why you found them or what they might be.
  Interestingly, we just received another nearly identical identification request from Massachusetts, so we feel compelled to research this more.  Termite Pellets also come to mind, but they look different from Termite Pellets we have seen in the past.

Seeds, we believe

Seeds, we believe

Thanks for replying. We don’t have termites..we did have a ant problem that we eradicated. I’ve done research as well and found that some insects eggs are seed imposters,?
The piles are sort of glued together in a type of thin transparent sac. As soon as you touch them with slight pressure they break free and the tidy pile collapses.
Keep me posted, my FB friends are as curious as I.
Best,
Susan.

Some ants may stockpile seeds, but we believe that is a very remote possibility.

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Subject: Small round bug – South Africa
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
December 8, 2014 3:52 am
Hi, I took this photo of these insects and what looks like eggs, on an outside panel of my door. It is tiny – the whole lot measures probably just under 1cm in diameter. I took the photo on Sunday, 7 December, which is in the middle of our rainy, hot summer season. I am in Johannesburg, South Africa. It looks like they are protecting the eggs or something, but what kind of bug is that? Hope you can assist! Thanks! :)
Signature: Erna Pieterse

Hatchling Stink Bugs

Hatchling Stink Bugs

Dear Erna,
These are newly hatched Stink Bugs in the family Pentatomidae.  We know they are most likely not the same species, but you can compare your image to this North American sighting of newly hatched Brown Marmorated Stink Bugs.

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Subject: Insect eggs on citrus leaf
Location: Houston TX
November 20, 2014 8:14 pm
This was on the top leaf of a 2 year old grafted citrus. I haven’t seen it before and was interested to know what it is.
Thanks
Signature: Mickey

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Hi Mickey,
These are Katydid EggsKatydids are relatives of Grasshoppers and most North American Katydids are green.  They are solitary feeders, and though they eat leaves (and rose blossoms in our garden) they do not do significant damage.  We allow Katydids to feed off the plants in our garden because they in turn provide food for other predators, including insect eating birds.

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Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider

Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider

Subject:  Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
November 18, 2014
This weekend while working in the garden, I finally decided to pull out the camera and shoot the Egg Sacs of the Bolas Spider that lived on the pole in the garden all summer.

Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider

Egg Sacs of a Bolas Spider

 

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unidentified pinkish insect eggs. Help!
Location: Bangalore, India.
October 7, 2014 9:20 pm
I was at a friend’s house, photographing parakeets, when I found these eggs stuck on the leaf of a banana plant. They looked really pretty, with the red dot in the middle and the lines radiating from it. None of the people we asked seemed to be able to identify what insect these eggs belonged to. Could you help us out here?
The picture was taken on October 1st, at 11 am. The weather around here is rainy right now.
Thank you! :)
Signature: Mollika M.

Banana Skipper Eggs

Banana Skipper Eggs

Our Automated Response:  Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can!

Hello,
Thank you for the response. I did a bit of searching myself, and I have figured out where the eggs came from. They belong to a Banana Skipper Butterfly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erionota_thrax). The species is very common around here, so it checks out.

Thanks for letting us know.  Eggs can be very difficult to identify, and knowing the plant upon which the eggs are found is a great help.  We did find an image of Banana Skipper eggs on Hawaii Plant Disease.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination