Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Is this Gray Hairstreak laying eggs?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
May 14, 2015 6:17 pm
Hello,
I was filming this little butterfly this afternoon, trying to catch the fascinating forward-and-backwards wing action, when I noticed that it seemed to be laying eggs. Is it another Gray Hairstreak? You kindly identified one for me several years ago. This rather worn and battered butterfly stayed on this native plant, Malvaviscus drummondii, for a long time.
We had a brief dry spell between rain showers, and it’s raining again now, temperature in the low eighties.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Ellen

Gray Hairstreak laying Eggs

Gray Hairstreak laying Egg

Hi Ellen,
We agree with your evaluation that your images are documenting the process of a female Gray Hairstreak laying eggs.  Thanks so much for providing the name of the plant from the family Malvaceae, and according to BugGuide, the caterpillars feed upon:  “Flowers and fruits from an almost endless variety of (usually) herbaceous plants; most often from pea (Fabaceae) and mallow (Malvaceae) families including beans (Phaseolus), clovers (Trifolium), cotton (Gossypium), and mallow (Malva).”  The MrsRoadrunner Photography site has similar oviposition images.  Raising Butterflies has some great information on Gray Hairstreaks, and many images of the caterpillars, but alas, no images of oviposition or of the eggs. 

Gray Hairstreak Laying Egg

Gray Hairstreak Laying Egg

Female Gray Hairstreak

Female Gray Hairstreak

Sue Dougherty, Jessica M. Schemm, Claire Kooyman liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Wolf Spider
Location: Ohio, United States
April 30, 2015 1:16 am
I came across this beauty today that I believe to be an H. lenta. She was carrying an egg sack with her. I’m very curious to see the spiderlings and the mother’s care, so I set up a large escape proof terrarium to watch her in for a bit. Confirmation on her species would be well appreciated.
Signature: SillyToadGirl (Lexi)

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Lexi,
The manner with which the female Wolf Spider transports her egg sac is quite characteristic, dragging it about from her spinnerets, so your family identification is definitely correct.  According to BugGuide,
Hogna lenta is found in Ohio, so the species is a possibility, but we cannot be certain.  Perhaps one of our readers can confirm the species identity for you.

Ann Levitsky, Tynisha Koenigsaecker, Château Bettina liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What Are These?!
Location: Southern California
April 25, 2015 3:52 am
I work at a convenience store, and OVER NIGHT something laid seseme seed-like eggs in all if our employee cups!!
Ive searched the internet looking for answers, but found nothing! Is it dangerous, poisonous? Help us!
Signature: InconvenientEmployee

What's In The Cup???

What’s In The Cup???

Dear Inconvenient Employee,
We are flummoxed by your request.  This is so strange we don’t know where to start.  Were these things found anywhere but inside the cups?  Their rapid appearance and the specificity of their location seems to suggest a disgruntled employee, or perhaps there is a prankster in your midst. 

What Left This???

What Left This???

Sandra Mason Comer, Tim Rogers liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Small hanging pods
Location: Interior – Northern Wisconsin
April 15, 2015 12:40 pm
Found these small pods (the size of a deer ick) hanging from an interior door. Do you know what they are?
Signature: P. Menz

Lacewing Eggs

Lacewing Eggs

Dear P. Menz,
These are Lacewing EggsLacewings are beneficial predators and it is believed that the eggs have evolved to being laid on stalks to prevent the ravenous Aphid Lions or larval Lacewings from devouring one another when they hatch.

Jerry Pittman, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Mary Lemmink Lawrence, Margie Hudson, Sue Dougherty liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggy Weggs
Location: Los Ranchos De Albuquerque, NM
April 12, 2015 6:06 pm
I recently planted a Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick in my back yard. While watering it this evening my wife pointed out these seven white eggs and I was wondering if they will hatch into something that wants to eat my little tree. I am hoping it will turn out to be something carnivorous that would help eat all of the aphids in our yard instead. Please advise, Bugman.
Signature: Ethan Firestone

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Dear Ethan,
It sounds like you love your garden very much, and any gardener knows that a lush garden provides habitat for many native species, including butterflies, birds and many other creatures.  A pesticide free garden provides much more diversity than one in which the caretaker uses chemicals to help control insect populations.  These are the eggs of a Katydid, and though Katydids will eat the leaves of plants, they are actually quite welcome in our own garden.  Katydids are sound producing insects that help contribute to the orchestra of night noises, and though they eat leaves, no permanent damage is done to the plants as they are solitary feeders that you are more likely to hear than to see as they are so well camouflaged.

Leslie Gist, Sue Dougherty, Rickie Louise Hill liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Aliens?
Location: Aurora, CO
April 7, 2015 2:43 pm
Found this on my bottle tree, so not on growing wood.
Signature: gesche

Mantis Oothecae

Mantis Oothecae

Dear gesche,
Each Mantis Ootheca should hatch into several hundred hungry baby Mantids.  We wonder if they are a native or an introduced species.  Introduced Mantids from Europe and China are larger and more aggressive than native Mantids and they may be responsible for dwindling numbers of native species.

Alisha Bragg, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Sue Dougherty, Becky Hahn liked this post
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination