Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Eggs on underside of parsley leaf
Location: Gary, IN
April 12, 2016 9:06 am
Hello, Bugman:
Have you any idea what insect would put these eggs on this parsley leaf? Thank you.
Mary Ann Sumner
Signature: Mary Ann

Stink Bug Eggs

Stink Bug Eggs

Dear Mary Ann,
Our money is on these being Stink Bug Eggs, but we cannot say for certain which species.  Here is a relatively similar looking clutch of eggs from BugGuide.

Thank you, Daniel.  I was cutting parsley leaves to add to a salad dressing and luckily spotted them before I whizzed them in the blender.  I guess I could say I almost ate them :-}    . . .  and it probably wouldn’t have been a first.
I posted the pic on Facebook and it created quite a stir.
Thanks, again.
Mary Ann

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Red Bugs hatching from line of eggs
Location: Houston, Tx
April 10, 2016 9:29 am
Helloooooo
My wife, our 3 yr old and I would like some help identifying these interesting bugs we found hatching out of a line of eggs on our wooden gate.
Season: spring (April 10th)
Location: Houston, Tx
Signature: James, Carly and BoBo

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

Dear James, Carly and BoBo,
These are hatchling True Bugs in the suborder Heteroptera, and we believe they are hatchling Leaf Footed Bugs or Big Legged Bugs in the family Coreidae.  Hatchlings can be very difficult to identify to the species level.  Your individuals look like those represented in this BugGuide image. 

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

Coreid Bug Hatchlings, we believe

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth Beauty in Northern AZ w/possible endangered eggs
Location: Flagstaff, AZ
April 8, 2016 12:21 pm
I found this gorgeous moth outside my work building this morning, April 8th, in Flagstaff, Arizona (7000 ft. in a ponderosa pine forest). Unfortunately, I didn’t get a look at the top side of her wings, but was entranced by the eyes and camouflage of the displayed side. Many coworkers reported walking right past her. I believe she’s female due to the string of eggs(?) next to her. My best (extremely novice) guess is that she’s a variety of hawk moth, but I would love a proper identification.
Also, I’m worried about the eggs. I imagine they are typically attached to tree trunks. With the nearest tree about 50 feet away, do you think they’ll find food? Is there anything I can do to help them?
Thank you!
Signature: Moth Lover

Glover's Silkmoth

Glover’s Silkmoth

Dear Moth Lover,
This is NOT a Hawkmoth.  Rather, it is a Giant Silkmoth, more specifically, a Glover’s Silkmoth
, Hyalophora columbia gloveri, the western subspecies of the Columbia Silkmoth.  According to BugGuide, the habitat is “Usually Alpine and Riparian (scattered in and among adjacent suitable habitats incl. foothills of the western prairies)” and the larval food plants include “Several Trees and Shrubs in the Rosaceae esp.. Prunus spp., Willows, and Larch … additional hosts are numerous incl. many other woody plants larvae may eat leaves of alder, birch, Antelope Bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata), buckbrush (Ceanothus spp.), buffaloberry, cherry, rose, Russian Olive (Eleagnus angustifolius), willow.”  It is difficult to speculate on the survival rate for the eggs laid on your brick building.  The first meal for the newly hatched caterpillars include feeding off the egg shell.  The young caterpillars then disperse and they may be lucky enough to find a host plant.  A mated female is heavy with eggs, and she may just be unloading some cargo before flying off the search for an appropriate tree or shrub.  If she is not mated, she will still be quite heavy with eggs, and she may be lightening her load pursuant to flying off the next night.  At any rate, we recommend letting nature take its course unless you can reach the eggs, in which case you can try to transfer the freshly hatched caterpillars to an appropriate food plant.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: My neighbor found this on her fence.
Location: 45° 30′ 34″N 122° 30′ 28″W
April 4, 2016 10:40 am
Im trying to identify a “cacoon like” structure on my neighbors fence i currently have only a picture go by. I would say a moth cacoon off first glance but the striations throw me off a bit. Please help me in figuring if this needs to be gotten rid of or left alone.
Signature: Jeff Homsley

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Dear Jeff,
This mantis ootheca will hatch several hundred beneficial predators.

Thank you sooo much…thats incredible

Update:  April 6, 2016
Though we originally responded to this request, we did not create a posting.  Since posting our own images of a California Mantis hatchling and the ootheca from which it emerged, we decided to turn this submission into a bit of a public service message for home gardeners.  It is frequently necessary to prune plants in the garden, but it is always a good idea to look closely to see if there are any beneficial critters, possibly in the form of immobile eggs or pupae, in the trimmings.  We make it a habit to toss branches into the green bin, but to leave the lid open in the event that anything needs to escape.  Just last summer, while trimming the guajes, we found two California Mantids, so we relocated them elsewhere in the garden.  We encountered more Mantids last year than any other year, and we credit that to becoming more aware while cleaning up the yard.  About a month ago, we removed a broken branch from the butterfly bush and found three California Mantis oothecae, so we tied them securely to other plants, and we have now been rewarded with a sighting of a hatchling Mantis.  The ootheca in this image looks to be a native species in the genus
Stagmomantis.  According to the 4H pdf, the California Mantis is reported from Oregon.  Though we are in favor of organic gardening, we like to caution our readers about the potential problems of purchasing commercially available Mantis oothecae from dealers as those are generally not native, and introducing non-native predators can have a negative effect on native species.  Non-native Mantids are larger and more aggressive than our native species, and we suspect our natives are being eaten by Chinese and European Mantids.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  California Mantis Ootheca hatches in Mount Washington
Location:  Mount Washington, Los Angeles, California
April 5, 2016
Last August, we created a posting for a lost photo opportunity of a California Mantis and a Figeater together on a butterfly bush that we missed when the camera malfunctioned.  A few weeks ago, a branch on the butterfly bush was broken, and when we cut it free from the plant, we noticed three California Mantis oothecae, obviously deposited by the female we observed there.  We tied two of the oothecae to a nearby palo verde and the third to a plum tree in the back yard.  While out in the yard, we inspected the oothecae, and noticed that one appeared to have hatched out its brood.  Luckily we spotted one little Mantis hatchling, a mere 1/4 inch in length, scuttling away.

California Mantis Hatchling

California Mantis Hatchling

Hatched Ootheca of a California Mantis

Hatched Ootheca of a California Mantis

Update:  April 11, 2016
We did some gardening yesterday, and though we couldn’t be bothered getting the camera, we did find two additional oothecae on the butterfly bush, and as we were pulling weeds, we found two green 1/4 inch long green mantids scuttling around the low grass.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dobsonfly laying eggs
Location: Southwestern Maine
April 5, 2016 4:46 am
Dear Bugman,
This photo was taken last year at a river in Maine. Our family is fascinated by all creatures, great and small. So I was thrilled to be lucky enough to come across this Mama laying her eggs.
Signature: The Cartwrights, NH

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

Dear Cartwrights,
Your images are awesome, however we need to make a slight correction.  This is not a Dobsonfly.  This is a closely related Dark Fishfly in the genus
Nigronia.  According to BugGuide:  “Emergence of adults may be synchronized. Adults are diurnal (seen flying near streams) and also nocturnal, so come to lights. Eggs are laid on the underside of vegetation overhanging a stream. Larvae are aquatic, predatory. Perhaps take three years to mature in more temperate areas, such as West Virginia. Pupation occurs in earthen cells on the edge of streams.”  Your images illustrate an option to laying eggs on vegetation.

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

Dark Fishfly Ovipositing

And we learned something new!  Thank you so much :)

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination