Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Bug
Location: Sydney, Australia
August 19, 2016 7:19 pm
Hey there,
We found this bug in our garage, any idea what it is?
Signature: Dale

Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs

Dear Dale,
These are most likely Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs.  The hatchlings are such fierce and beneficial predators that the species has evolved, indeed many members of the order Neuroptera have evolved, so as to lay eggs in a manner that will help protect the hatchlings from being eaten by one another.  The duration needed for each individual to hatch and climb down the stalk helps to separate it from its siblings in both time and space.  You may verify our identification on the Australian Museum site where it states:  “The larvae are ambush predators with traplike jaws feeding on small invertebrates found in the leaf litter.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug/Creature?
Location: Seaside Heights, NJ beach
August 1, 2016 4:55 pm
found a bunch of these washed up on shore from the ocean and was wondering what they are…
Signature: Karen

Shark or Ray Egg Case

Mermaid’s Purse

Dear Karen,
This is a Mermaid’s Purse, the egg case of a shark, skate or ray.  According to About Education:  “Perhaps you’ve found a “mermaid’s purse” on the beach. These mermaid’s purses blend in really well with seaweed, so you may also have walked right by one.   The enchantingly-named structures are the egg cases of skates and some sharks. While some sharks bear live young, some sharks (and all skates) release their embryos in leathery egg cases that have horns and sometimes long tendrils at each corner. The tendrils allow them to anchor to seaweeds or other substrates. Each egg case contains one embryo. The case is made up of a material that is a combination of collagen and keratin, so a dried egg case feels similar to a fingernail. ”  According to British Marine Life Study Society:  “Regular rockpoolers are likely to have come across ‘Mermaid’s Purses’, containing the eggs or young of the Lesser-spotted Dogfish,
Scyliorhinus canicula, lying amongst the debris on the tideline. These egg capsules that have been dislodged after being laid by the adult female dogfish are doomed to perish. Some, if not most, of the capsules are empty. However, on many occasions I have found a live embryo inside, some of them nearly ready to break free from the capsule. ”  According to Shark Trust:  “Each eggcase contains one embryo which will develop over several months into a miniature shark, skate or ray. Once empty, the eggcases often wash ashore and can be found among the strandline on beaches.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: lined bugs along avocado leaf
Location: Tampa Florida
June 9, 2016 2:25 pm
What are these bugs lining an avocado leaf in Tampa, Florda?
Signature: Holly E Huff

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Dear Holly,
These are Katydid EggsKatydids are large, usually green insects that are related to and which resemble Grasshoppers, but with much longer antennae.  Like Crickets, Katydids make audible sounds that contribute to the orchestra of sound produced by insects.  Though they feed on leaves, Katydids are solitary feeders who do litter harm to garden plants.  We would encourage you to tolerate them in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug identification
Location: Huntsville, Ontario, Canada
June 14, 2016 3:39 pm
Hello,
I noticed this interesting horsefly-like bug laying these green eggs on our car mirror in late spring (June 14th) in Huntsville Ontario. I was hoping you could help identify? It seems like a horse fly, but the eggs are green rather than milky white as many sites have suggested they would be. I wondered if it was a bee at first? I appreciate any help.
Thanks!
Signature: Matt

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Dear Matt,
We believe we have correctly identified your ovipositing Soldier Fly as either
Stratiomys adelpha or Stratiomys discalis based on images posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “S. adelpha and S. discalis are very similar and may turn out to be the same species. The taxonomy of the Nearctic Stratiomys is a mess. There are a few easily distinguished species, but several spp. are defined based on coloration which is variable. The male genitalia have never been examined carefully, and they could be helpful. –N.E. Woodley, pers. comm.”

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

Ovipositing Soldier Fly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: moth & eggs identification!
Location: bellingham, washington, usa
May 30, 2016 3:11 pm
hi! i found this moth laying eggs in my dorm building today. i live in bellingham, washington. i want to know what kind she is so that i can put her eggs somewhere safe where they’ll find something to eat- i know some moths only eat certain plants. please write back soon, i love moths and i want these babies to grow up safely. thank you!
Signature: tessa f.

Omnivorous Looper

Omnivorous Looper

Dear Tessa,
Eggs can be very difficult to identify, so having images of the female insect laying the eggs is one way to ensure the identity of the eggs.  This moth is an Omnivorous Looper,
Sabulodes aegrotata, a species found in the western states.  Here is a BugGuide image for verification.  According to BugGuide:  “The larvae feed on a large variety of herbacious and woody broad-leaved angiosperms. Plants in 27 familes have been reported as hosts, and the species’ feeding occasionally causes damage to to orchard trees such as avocado, citrus, and walnuts.”  Many moths that are general feeders do not concern themselves with laying eggs on an actual host plant as the young can forage once they hatch.  Because we will be away from the office for a spell in June, we are postdating your submissions as well as other postings to go live during our absence. 

Omnivorous Looper Lays Eggs

Omnivorous Looper Lays Eggs

Eggs of an Omnivorous Looper

Eggs of an Omnivorous Looper

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pink slug looking
Location: Southeast Florida
May 31, 2016 5:22 pm
What is this
Signature: Scared

Eggs of an Apple Snail

Eggs of an Apple Snail

Dear Scared,
These are the Eggs of an Apple Snail which we identified on Nature Time.  According to the Apple Snail Website:  “It is remarkable how visible the egg clutches of many apple snail species are. The pinkish to reddish eggs are attached on the contrasting green vegetation submerging from the water (in the genus Pomacea). This makes them visually inconspicuous from many meters away for predators. This suggests a possible warning function for unpalatability. Field evidence of this unpalatability is provided by the fact that almost all animals foraging in habitats where the apple snails live, ignore these eggs: from fish to birds, they all leave them alone. Also when apple snail eggs are offered to captive predators, they often try to eat them at first, but refuse them after repeated feeding.”  According to My Florida Backyard:  “Apple snails (family Ampullariidae) are freshwater snails that are able to survive both on water and on land. By laying their eggs above the water line, apple snails protect the eggs from predation by fish and other water dwellers.”  

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination