Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: large wood boring beetle?
Location: Akron, Ohio
July 2, 2015 10:10 pm
I found this 2 inch long bug yesterday crawling through the grass. We at first thought it might be Hardwood Stump Borer, but now I’m thinking it’s a Broad-Necked Root Borer. All my info coming from bug books and the internet.
Today it started laying eggs in the bottom on the jar. The kids were fascinated! I have hardwood trees as well as apple trees and grape vines. I don’t want to release it if it is going to be damaging to my trees, but I don’t want it to suffer either. If I can find what kind of beetle it is, then I can feed it or release it elsewhere. I also, could let it go once it’s done laying eggs, (unless it mates and lays eggs multiple times).
Here is a picture of the top of the beetle, the bottom, and some with the eggs (they look kind of like rice).
Signature: Sharon

Broad-Necked Root Borer

Broad-Necked Root Borer

Dear Sharon,
This is a Broad-Necked Root Borer.  According to BugGuide:  “Eggs are inserted into ground (or under litter) in groups. Larvae tunnel downward to feed on living roots of a variety of trees and shrubs. At first they may feed on bark, but then proceed to hollow out small roots. Pupation occurs in spring, about 10 cm under the ground. Life cycle probably three years.”
  There is no indication that the feeding habits of the larvae compromise the life of a healthy tree as they feed on the small roots only.  Many gardeners feel that trimming roots helps to stimulate new growth.  We would advise you to release this magnificent beetle.  Thank you for supplying an image with the eggs.  Some female insects emerge from pupation so filled with eggs that they release some unfertilized eggs to enable them to fly better.

Broad-Necked Root Borer lays Eggs

Broad-Necked Root Borer lays Eggs

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Subject: What am I?
Location: Pennsylvania
June 5, 2015 10:13 pm
Can’t seem to find what this guy is.
Signature: Heather Cookson

Mystery Thing

Horse Fly Egg Mass

Dear Heather,
Your mystery thing has us quite stumped.  It does not look like an insect, but it appears that it might have been produced by an insect.  We do not believe this is an egg mass, but it might be some type of shelter.  The “scales” look somewhat like seeds.  Could you please provide more details on where it was found and regarding its size.  Perhaps one of our readers will be able to contribute some valuable information.

Update:  Horse Fly Egg Mass
Immediately after posting, we received a comment identifying this as a Tabanid or Horse Fly Egg Mass, and a link to BugGuide.  Mystery solved thanks to a diligent reader. 

Eric Eaton Confirms
Hi, Daniel:
That is a batch of horse fly or deer fly eggs.
Eric
author, Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America
http://bugeric.blogspot.com/

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Subject: what’s this insect
Location: western Maryland
May 27, 2015 7:07 am
Wondering if this was another type of Dobson fly. was laying eggs in clumps on leaves beside the river. North branch Potomac river.
Signature: jordan

Dark Fishfly Laying Eggs

Dark Fishfly Laying Eggs

Hi Jordan,
Your Dark Fishfly in the genus
Nigronia is classified in the same order as a Dobsonfly.  We believe your individual is Nigronia fasciata based on comparing the markings on the wings to individuals posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide:  “Emergence of adults may be synchronized. Adults are diurnal (seen flying near streams) and also nocturnal, so come to lights. Eggs are laid on the underside of vegetation overhanging a stream. Larvae are aquatic, predatory. Perhaps take three years to mature in more temperate areas, such as West Virginia. Pupation occurs in earthen cells on the edge of streams.”

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Subject: Hard Shell Mystery
Location: Silver Lake (Los Angeles)
May 24, 2015 4:39 pm
Hi Daniel
A neighbor noticed this disturbingly large hard shelled , something on my fence this afternoon. About 2 1/2″ long, 3/4″ wide , 1/3″ deep. A pupae perhaps? The neighbor poked w/ a stick & it fell off (although it was stuck to the fence quite well), and we lost it in the leaf matter. There’s something very prehistoric about it. Never seen anything like it before.
Signature: Diane E

Mantis Ootheca

Mantis Ootheca

Hi Diane,
This is the Ootheca or Egg Case of a Mantis, and we believe it might be that of a native California Mantis based on these images on BugGuide.  It looks to us like the Ootheca has hatched, likely releasing several hundred tiny Mantids.

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Subject: Is this Gray Hairstreak laying eggs?
Location: Coryell County, Texas
May 14, 2015 6:17 pm
Hello,
I was filming this little butterfly this afternoon, trying to catch the fascinating forward-and-backwards wing action, when I noticed that it seemed to be laying eggs. Is it another Gray Hairstreak? You kindly identified one for me several years ago. This rather worn and battered butterfly stayed on this native plant, Malvaviscus drummondii, for a long time.
We had a brief dry spell between rain showers, and it’s raining again now, temperature in the low eighties.
Thank you so much!
Signature: Ellen

Gray Hairstreak laying Eggs

Gray Hairstreak laying Egg

Hi Ellen,
We agree with your evaluation that your images are documenting the process of a female Gray Hairstreak laying eggs.  Thanks so much for providing the name of the plant from the family Malvaceae, and according to BugGuide, the caterpillars feed upon:  “Flowers and fruits from an almost endless variety of (usually) herbaceous plants; most often from pea (Fabaceae) and mallow (Malvaceae) families including beans (Phaseolus), clovers (Trifolium), cotton (Gossypium), and mallow (Malva).”  The MrsRoadrunner Photography site has similar oviposition images.  Raising Butterflies has some great information on Gray Hairstreaks, and many images of the caterpillars, but alas, no images of oviposition or of the eggs. 

Gray Hairstreak Laying Egg

Gray Hairstreak Laying Egg

Female Gray Hairstreak

Female Gray Hairstreak

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Subject: Wolf Spider
Location: Ohio, United States
April 30, 2015 1:16 am
I came across this beauty today that I believe to be an H. lenta. She was carrying an egg sack with her. I’m very curious to see the spiderlings and the mother’s care, so I set up a large escape proof terrarium to watch her in for a bit. Confirmation on her species would be well appreciated.
Signature: SillyToadGirl (Lexi)

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Wolf Spider with Egg Sac

Hi Lexi,
The manner with which the female Wolf Spider transports her egg sac is quite characteristic, dragging it about from her spinnerets, so your family identification is definitely correct.  According to BugGuide,
Hogna lenta is found in Ohio, so the species is a possibility, but we cannot be certain.  Perhaps one of our readers can confirm the species identity for you.

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What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination