Currently viewing the category: "Eggs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Can you identify this Grasshopper please.
Location: Minnesota
September 20, 2016 7:56 am
Hello, we were outside at the zoo in Minnesota on 9-19-2016. It was very warm outside and we came across this Grasshopper which had what looked like larve on its back. It was very docile and allowed me to photograph it a few times. Help us solve our curiosity about this odd little critter.
Thanks for an awesome sight,
Signature: Adam Godes

Grasshopper with Fly Larvae

Injured Grasshopper with Eggs

Dear Adam,
This is not a healthy Grasshopper.  We believe it is a Spur-Throated Grasshopper from the subfamily Melanoplinae which is well represented on BugGuide.  The Grasshopper is definitely injured, as it is missing its hind legs, which are the legs used for jumping.  We believe that injury has led to this female Grasshopper’s Eggs being expelled through the wounds.  We have an image in our archives of an Obscure Bird Grasshopper that looks very similar.  We received a comment to that image from Brandon who wrote:  “so I found the same thing when I was feeding my turtle. Pulled off the legs of a grasshopper to feed him and out came these yellow ovals.  I believe them to be eggs too.”

Injured Grasshopper

Injured Grasshopper with Eggs

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Moth?
Location: Northeast Oklahoma
September 18, 2016 3:58 pm
Found this walking into my house on my front screendoor. The bottom looks like hundreds of tiny legs like fibers
Signature: Amber

Asp

Tabanid Eggs

Dear Amber,
This is an Asp, the stinging Caterpillar of a Puss Moth.  Asps should be handled with extreme caution to avoid contact with the stinging hairs.  We love your image through the screen which shows the ventral surface.

Asp

Horse or Deer Fly Eggs

Karl Provides a Correction:  Horse Fly Eggs
Hi Daniel:
The photos provided by Amber are a little fuzzy but this doesn’t look like a caterpillar to me, especially the underside (head, legs and prolegs should be visible). I think this may actually be a Tabanid egg cluster, perhaps ta deer fly. The Bugguide site has an underside photo that looks very similar. Regards Karl

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Looks like an egg sac
Location: South East NC
September 11, 2016 8:14 am
Hi, found this inside the rain deverter on my husbands truck this morning.
Do you know what it is?
Thank you!
Signature: Suzanne

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver Egg Sac

Crablike Spiny Orbweaver Egg Sac

Dear Suzanne,
The first thought that passed through our mind when we looked at your image is that this might be the egg sac of a spider, and we followed that supposition, which quickly led us to the Featured Creatures site and a nearly identical image of the Egg Sac of a Crablike Spiny Orbweaver or Spinybacked Orbweaver Spider,
Gasteracantha cancriformis.  The egg sacs are described on Featured Creatures as being:  “Ovate egg sacs, 20 to 25 mm long by 10 to 15 mm wide, are deposited on the undersides of leaves adjacent to the female’s web from October through January. The egg mass consists of 101 to 256 eggs, with a mean of 169 (based on 15 egg masses). After the eggs are laid on a white silken sheet, they are first covered with a loose, tangled mass of fine white or yellowish silk, then several strands of dark green silk are laid along the longitudinal axis of the egg mass, followed by a net-like canopy of coarse green and yellow threads. Eggs are frequently attacked by specialized predators, primarily Phalacrotophora epeirae (Brues) (Diptera: Phoridae), and occasionally Arachnophago ferruginea Gahan (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae) (Muma and Stone 1971). Eggs take 11 to 13 days to hatch, then spend two to three days in a pink and white deutova stage before molting to the first instar.”  A similar image can be found on Nature Closeups and on BugGuide.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Weird Bug
Location: Sydney, Australia
August 19, 2016 7:19 pm
Hey there,
We found this bug in our garage, any idea what it is?
Signature: Dale

Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs

Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs

Dear Dale,
These are most likely Blue Eyes Lacewing Eggs.  The hatchlings are such fierce and beneficial predators that the species has evolved, indeed many members of the order Neuroptera have evolved, so as to lay eggs in a manner that will help protect the hatchlings from being eaten by one another.  The duration needed for each individual to hatch and climb down the stalk helps to separate it from its siblings in both time and space.  You may verify our identification on the Australian Museum site where it states:  “The larvae are ambush predators with traplike jaws feeding on small invertebrates found in the leaf litter.” 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug/Creature?
Location: Seaside Heights, NJ beach
August 1, 2016 4:55 pm
found a bunch of these washed up on shore from the ocean and was wondering what they are…
Signature: Karen

Shark or Ray Egg Case

Mermaid’s Purse

Dear Karen,
This is a Mermaid’s Purse, the egg case of a shark, skate or ray.  According to About Education:  “Perhaps you’ve found a “mermaid’s purse” on the beach. These mermaid’s purses blend in really well with seaweed, so you may also have walked right by one.   The enchantingly-named structures are the egg cases of skates and some sharks. While some sharks bear live young, some sharks (and all skates) release their embryos in leathery egg cases that have horns and sometimes long tendrils at each corner. The tendrils allow them to anchor to seaweeds or other substrates. Each egg case contains one embryo. The case is made up of a material that is a combination of collagen and keratin, so a dried egg case feels similar to a fingernail. ”  According to British Marine Life Study Society:  “Regular rockpoolers are likely to have come across ‘Mermaid’s Purses’, containing the eggs or young of the Lesser-spotted Dogfish,
Scyliorhinus canicula, lying amongst the debris on the tideline. These egg capsules that have been dislodged after being laid by the adult female dogfish are doomed to perish. Some, if not most, of the capsules are empty. However, on many occasions I have found a live embryo inside, some of them nearly ready to break free from the capsule. ”  According to Shark Trust:  “Each eggcase contains one embryo which will develop over several months into a miniature shark, skate or ray. Once empty, the eggcases often wash ashore and can be found among the strandline on beaches.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: lined bugs along avocado leaf
Location: Tampa Florida
June 9, 2016 2:25 pm
What are these bugs lining an avocado leaf in Tampa, Florda?
Signature: Holly E Huff

Katydid Eggs

Katydid Eggs

Dear Holly,
These are Katydid EggsKatydids are large, usually green insects that are related to and which resemble Grasshoppers, but with much longer antennae.  Like Crickets, Katydids make audible sounds that contribute to the orchestra of sound produced by insects.  Though they feed on leaves, Katydids are solitary feeders who do litter harm to garden plants.  We would encourage you to tolerate them in your garden.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination