Currently viewing the category: "Earwigs"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Unknown
Location: Columbus ohio
June 7, 2016 2:30 pm
What kind of big is this? A nest is in the dirt under our tree
Signature: Thanks jenny

Male European Earwig

Male European Earwig

Dear Jenny,
We believe your Earwig is a male European Earwig based on this BugGuide image.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: this bug is in my house and yard
Location: Los Angeles, CA
May 15, 2016 10:50 am
hi
I was wondering if you can confirm that this bug is a European Earwig? (and not a termite).
they seem to be prevalant lately inside and around the outside of my house since we moved in a few weeks ago.
I want to make sure it is not a termite. thanks in advance for your help.
Signature: With much thanks and gratitude, Bill Cowan

European Earwig

European Earwig

Dear Bill,
This is an European Earwig, not a Termite, and though they can be a nuisance indoors, they are basically outdoor insects that enjoy the garden, but since they can be attracted to lights, they are frequently found indoors.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this?
Location: Los Angeles
May 6, 2016 8:57 am
Hi there, wondering if you can identify this, and know how to keep them at bay.
Thanks!
Signature: David

Earwig

Earwig

Dear David,
This is an Earwig, a common insect in the garden and they readily enter homes.  We believe your individual is a male European Earwig,
Forficula auricularia, based on images found on BugGuide.  According to Penn State Department of Entomology:  “Earwigs are active at night and hide during the day in cracks and crevices. They are mainly scavengers and occasionally feed on plants. The eggs are laid in burrows in the ground and most species overwinter as adults.”  The site further elaborates:  “Because large numbers may seek shelter in and around homes, the European earwig also has become a notorious household pest in some areas. Although population explosions of this insect are not as intensive as those following its initial introduction into the United States, it is not uncommon to have isolated areas with high populations during periods of warm and humid weather.  When earwigs do invade homes, they can get into everything, including laundry, furniture, loaves of bread, and even clothing and bedding. They hide in cracks and crevices throughout the home and are difficult to keep out, even with the use of screens and other mechanical barriers.”  We do not provide extermination advice, but the Penn State site does provide this management strategy:  “Modification of surrounding areas – Earwigs can be found in large numbers under boards, in tree holes, under decaying bark, or wherever it is moist and dark. The first step to controlling earwigs is to eliminate these and other breeding and nesting places. Homeowners should remove decaying vegetable matter around the home, such as piles of leaves or grass clippings. They should also repair poorly placed rain downspouts and broken irrigation systems, which contribute to moist, dark areas that are attractive to nesting females.”

Ah, brilliant!  That’s definitely it. Thank you so much!!!

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?
Location: Philadelphia
April 24, 2016 11:59 am
I have been getting small bites on my hands sporadically since January. I had bed bugs in September of 2015 and got treatment for them and everything seemed to be fine until January. In January, I found another bite on my hand so I had the treatment again, although this time the exterminator said he did not see any signs of bed bugs. In March 2016 I found another bite on my hand so I called a new exterminator and although he said he didn’t see any sign of bed bugs, he treated my apartment anyway. I found a new bite on my thumb last week (April 2016) and a second bite on the same hand this morning (4 days later). I found this bug dead on the floor at the foot of my bed and immediately called my exterminator, who said it is not a bed bug. Do you know what this insect is?
Signature: Totally Losing It!

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Totally Losing It!,
This looks like an Earwig.  They are considered more of a nuisance than a pest.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Western Australia Bug
Location: western australia
January 12, 2016 7:23 am
Just saw one of these little guys in my living room and wife got panicked…
couldn’t find anything similar on-line… initial thought was that it is a centipede or a small scorpion.
would love to know what it is, as we already stumbled across them in the yard, and if it is poisonous or not.
cheers
Signature: creepy insect terrorize

Earwig

Earwig

This is an Earwig and you have no cause for alarm.  You may read about Australian Earwigs on Bunyipco where it states:  “Earwig biology can be complex. Females of some species look after the eggs and young. Males have pinchers that are larger than those of the females that are probably used in male combat. Although earwigs live in tight places, the chances of one entering a persons ear while sleeping at night, are very slight. But it can happen!  Briefly there are 85 described Australian species in seven families. It is estimated that three times that number probably exist on the continent. Australia is a hotspot for earwigs but generic endemism is low with only about 10% of the genera endemic to the continent.”  According to the Queensland Museum:  “Earwigs are easily identified by the stout pair of pincers at the tip of the abdomen. These are used to capture prey, for defense and also to help fold up the semicircular hindwings under the short, hard wing covers. Some species are predatory, others are herbivorous. They live in concealed places during the day.”

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is this bug ?
Location: Bathroom
January 10, 2016 7:59 pm
I have been seeing these bugs in my bathroom and it is freaking me out since I have a two year old can you tell me what it is ?
Signature: Taryn mcdermott

Ring-Legged Earwig

Ring-Legged Earwig

Dear Taryn,
We believe this earwig is a Ring-Legged Earwig,
Euborellia annulipes.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “A voracious predator, it will also eat all kinds of plant material, though rarely bothers with live plants” and “Not uncommon in homes and gardens, though often displaced by other species, esp. the European Earwig. Whatever damage it does to crops like lettuce and strawberries is usually more than made up for by destroying small slugs, caterpillars, termites, and many other pests.”  Earwigs may pinch with their forceps, but they are not considered a threat to humans.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination