Currently viewing the category: "Earwigs"
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Subject: Creepy scorpiony looking insect
Location: London, England
July 12, 2014 6:21 pm
Hey! I found this weird insect in my bathtub this evening . It’s dead but I got a picture of it because I’ve never ever seen anything like it before ! It looks like a scorpion from one end but a different insect from the other end! It is summer here in England now. Could you please help me identify this bug as i am really curious as to what it is! Thank you very much!
Signature: Ramandeep

Earwig

Male European Earwig

Dear Ramandeep,
This is an Earwig, commonly called a Pincher Bug.  Despite the ominous appearance, Earwigs lack venom and they are perfectly harmless.  In our opinion, this looks like a male European Earwig,
Forficula auriculari, and you may read more about the European Earwig on BugGuide.

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Subject: Bug in colorado
Location: Colorado
March 16, 2014 4:37 pm
These bugs have prongs in front and move fast. They kind of look like big ants.
Signature: Doesn’t matter

Male European Earwig

Male European Earwig

The “prongs” are actually pincers or cerci on the abdomen, and they are in the back of the insect.  This is an Earwig in the order Dermaptera, and we believe it is a male European Earwig, Forficula auricularia, a species introduced to North America from Europe in about 1910 according to BugGuide, and now well established coast to coast.

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Subject: Mystery bug
Location: Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada
December 31, 2013 11:56 am
Hi!
I dropped a box of strawberries on the floor and as I was picking them up I noticed this little guy. Not sure if he was a stow away from somewhere in California or not. I live in Saskatchewan, Canada, where currently winter is just beginning and it’s -40 Celsius with wind chill. I have never seen a bug like this around here so any ideas are much appreciated! Thanks for your time.
Signature: Jess from SK

Earwig:  Doru species

Earwig: Doru species

Hi Jess,
This Earwign appears to be in the genus
Doru, and according to BugGuide:  “Back edge of the forewings is black, with the other two thirds yellow. With wings folded this gives the appearance of a black stripe down the middle of the back.”  Though most of the sightings on BugGuide are from the south, it is indicated that these Earwigs are found in Ontario.  So, it may have been a stowaway on the strawberries, or it may have been a local species for you, though we would favor the stowaway possibility.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: creepy bug
Location: santa barbara
November 22, 2013 10:39 pm
Hello,
I found this bug in my kitchen. I live in Santa Barbara Caliornia. Any idea on the type of bug this is?
Thanks,
Signature: LG

Earwig

Earwig

Dear LG,
This is an Earwig, and judging by the size of the cerci or pincers, this is a male.  Earwigs are basically harmless, though when they are numerous, they can do some damage in the garden, eating such things as rose buds.  According to BugGuide:  “Earwigs are sensitive to heat and dryness, so they usually hide in cool, dark places during the day and come out at night.  Some species hide mostly under leaves, rocks and other debris, while others hide under the bark of trees. An important habitat in the deserts of the southwest US is inside rotting cactus- one of the few places with constant moisture even in the driest parts of the year.  Winged species are often attracted to light at night.”  The name Earwig is allegedly derived from the Anglo-Saxon word earwicga, which according to Charles Hogue in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin, refers to the notion that the Anglo-Saxons slept in sod huts with straw mattresses and “the warm and tight ear opening of a slumbering person might well have been a snug hiding place for these crevice-loving creatures.”

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Unknown… wasp?
Location: California
April 3, 2012 7:41 pm
I’m the first to admit I know nothing about bugs and ID-ing them in general, but this little fellow was a complete mystery to me. Never seen one like him before! He was found near the site of what we think was a small (empty) wasp’s nest… is he (she?) one?
Signature: Confused in California

European Earwig

Dear Confused in California,
Your insect is an Earwig, not a wasp.  Earwigs often seek tight spaces in which to take shelter, and the origin of the name Earwig, according to Charles Hogue in Insects of the Los Angeles Basin, is Anglo-Saxon
earwicga, which means “ear beetle or worm”.  Hogue writes that the Anglo-Saxons:  ” who lived in sod huts, where these insects also lived, occasionally found them in their ears upon waking from a sound sleep on a straw mattress.  The warm and tight ear opening of a slumbering person might well have been a snug hiding place for these crevice-loving creatures.”  Based on its coloration, we believe your Earwig is a European Earwig, Forficula auricularia, and you may compare your photo to this image from BugGuide.

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Earwig?
Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico
December 1, 2011 12:15 pm
I first saw this bug in my bathroom floor and posted it on facebook, noone knew what it was. It measured 1cm in lenght with its tail straight back. This time it kept its tail rolled up and forward like a scorpion even when running wild. It was very fast. Its back legs are bigger. 6 feet total. Last time I had played with it a little and felt its back with a metal pick and it felt hard. I would like to know if it is a dangerous bug or not. I also looked it up here and saw a similar one but the tail is different. The one in your site, also from Puerto Rico is from the west coast of the Island. This one is from the Northeast side. Nearby is a river. I let it go outside, even though a couple people said I should kill it.
Signature: Samuel

Earwig from Puerto Rico

Dear Samuel,
You are correct that this is an Earwig, and it does look like the same species we posted previously from Puerto Rico that Karl identified as
Doru albepes.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination