Currently viewing the category: "Earwigs"
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Subject: a bug I caught :-)
Location: India,Nagaland
May 19, 2015 12:23 am
While I was curious to know the name of the bug .
Signature: Benjamin achumi

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Benjamin,
This really is a primitive looking Earwig in the order Dermaptera.  We suspect he is a male because of the well developed forceps.  Your individual is quite distinctive and we had hoped to be able to provide a genus and species, but alas, we have not been able to locate any matching individuals online.
  Perhaps one of our readers will have better luck.

Hema Shah, Andrea Leonard Drummond, Rachel Carpenter, Claire Kooyman liked this post
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Subject: Earwig Species
Location: Florida
May 16, 2015 6:57 am
I found this bug at work inside our office the other day. I immediately recognized it as an earwig but it definitively wasn’t a typical one you see everywhere. It was a lot larger and it had very distinct coloring. I tried to identify it online but the closest image I got was tawny earwig but I was still not 100% positive on that identification. Hopefully you will have a better idea of what this exactly is. I live in Florida but we do get a lot of packaging from China so it’s good to keep that in mind as well (previous employees got a scorpion with one of the shipments). Hopefully this will be enough information to ID the species. Thank you.
Signature: Ivana

Shore Earwig

Shore Earwig

Dear Ivana,
We believe we have matched your image to an image of a male Shore Earwig,
Labidura riparia, that is posted to BugGuide.  According to BugGuide, it is:  “Cosmopolitan; introduced in NA, occurs across the southern states” and the habitat is:  “Coastal/riparian (along margins of various water bodies).”  Finally BugGuide notes that the Shore Earwig:  “Preys on various invertebrates, but may occasionally switch to plant material.”

Thank you for the quick responce. That is definitively a match. Very cool species!

 

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Subject: Found a few in and around my house
Location: Austin, TX
January 22, 2015 8:05 pm
Wondering what this bug might be.
Signature: CJD

Ring Legged Earwig

Ring Legged Earwig

Dear CJD,
We believe your Earwig is a Ring Legged Earwig,
Euborellia annulipes, based on images posted to BugGuide where it states:  “A voracious predator, it also eats all kinds of plant material, though it rarely bothers with live plants.”  Earwigs do not pose a danger to you or your home.

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Subject: Eastern Province Saudi Arabia Bug
Location: Al Khobar, Saudi Arabia
November 16, 2014 10:49 pm
Hello, we’d be grateful to know what this is. It was seen last Tuesday, 11th November on a tennis court built on reclaimed land sticking out into the Arabian Gulf at Al Khobar. It was about 2 inches long. It was near where small children play so an idea as to whether it is venomous or not would be helpful. The immediate concern was that it was a scorpion but it has no claws and apparently a double stinger apparatus.
Signature: Catharine

Earwig

Earwig

Dear Catharine,
This is an Earwig in the order Dermaptera and Earwigs are frequently called Pincher Bugs because of the cerci at the tip of the abdomen that resemble forceps.  Your individual is in a threat position, but as Earwigs do not have venom and are not considered dangerous, the threat position is more of a bluff.

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Subject: Unidentified bug in Mulu
Location: Mulu, Sarawak, Malaysia
November 8, 2014 10:24 am
We saw these bugs recently on a rock inside the Deer Cave in Mulu National Park in Sarawak and would be interested to know their name and a little about their lifecycle as the inside of the cave is pitch black.
Signature: John

Cave Earwigs

Cave Earwigs with Hairless Bulldog Bat

Dear John,

Our first thought was that these must be Orthopterans, members of the order that included Crickets and Grasshoppers, but a search brought us to a Flicker posting that identifies these unusual insects as Earwigs, Arixenia esau.  Paul Bertner who posted the image wrote:  “Found during a day walk in Deer cave, Mulu national park, HQ. Notice the reduced cerci, this is due to the earwig’s modified lifestyle in which it has given up its predatory role and instead lives epizootically; which is to say that it lives on or around another animal in either a mutualistic or parasitic relationship. Arixenia specifically feed on the body or glandular secretions of bats (usually Malaysian hairless bulldog bats) in the folds of skin or gular pouch. Unlike other genera of earwigs, some species of Arixenia are viviparous (give birth to live young).”  Images on Discover Life and Science Photo Library support the identification.

Cave Earwig

Cave Earwig

We believe the insects on the bat head are immature Earwigs.

Possibly Immature Cave Earwigs

Possibly Immature Cave Earwigs

Dear Daniel
Many thanks for that information. I also thought that it may have been some kind of a cricket but I am very pleased to now be able to put a name to my photograph.
kind regards
John Medlock

 

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Subject: Creepy scorpiony looking insect
Location: London, England
July 12, 2014 6:21 pm
Hey! I found this weird insect in my bathtub this evening . It’s dead but I got a picture of it because I’ve never ever seen anything like it before ! It looks like a scorpion from one end but a different insect from the other end! It is summer here in England now. Could you please help me identify this bug as i am really curious as to what it is! Thank you very much!
Signature: Ramandeep

Earwig

Male European Earwig

Dear Ramandeep,
This is an Earwig, commonly called a Pincher Bug.  Despite the ominous appearance, Earwigs lack venom and they are perfectly harmless.  In our opinion, this looks like a male European Earwig,
Forficula auriculari, and you may read more about the European Earwig on BugGuide.

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