Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug Identification
Location: Findlay, OH
May 28, 2014 7:15 pm
This bug was found in a Findlay, Ohio pond. No one knows what it is. I live in Florida and have no cue, either. Can you help?
Signature: Lynn

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Lynn,
This is a naiad or aquatic nymph of a flying insect, and we believe it is a Dragonfly Naiad.  Each species of Dragonfly has a different looking naiad, but we haven’t the skill to identify most to the species level.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What’s this bug?!
Location: Minden Ontario
May 16, 2014 10:08 am
Found this gem in the water. Tried to google around. Could use your help to identify this bug please! :)
Signature: Thanks from cottage country

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dragonhunter Naiad

This is the naiad or aquatic nymph of a Dragonfly known as a Dragonhunter, .  The Dragonhunter naiad resembles a dead leaf on the bottom of a pond, affording some degree of camouflage protection.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Fancy Peruvian Dragonfly?
Location: Loreto region, Peru
May 11, 2014 10:22 pm
Hi Mr Bugman,
I saw this very cool dragonfly in the Loreto region of Peru a few years back. I’m stumped as to what it might be. Any Ideas?
Thanks
Signature: Katie

Unknown Dragonfly

Unknown Dragonfly

Hi Katie,
This truly is a stunning Dragonfly.
  It appears to be Diastatops intensa, based on images posted to American Dragonfly.

Hi Daniel,
Thanks for such a quick reply! That is exactly what it looks like.
Cheers
Katie

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Anax junius (?) and some bug art
Location: Niagara
April 27, 2014 6:36 pm
Hello,
Enjoying your site as always. I rescued this dragonfly from the roadway when I was out for a run today– surprisingly, he was alive and in good shape! He rode along on my finger for a while until I found a nice sunny–and safe– fence post for him to rest on. I suspect he was trying to soak up some heat from the asphalt. I think he’s a green darner (ajax junius), although I’m not sure he perfectly matches the pictures on your site. I didn’t think to measure him before I left him, but hopefully my hand gives enough sense of scale. He’s my first dragonfly of the season, so I’m very excited that he let me give him a lift!
I’ve also attached a dragonfly doodle I recently finished–thought you might enjoy.
Thanks!
Signature: Alison

Green Darner

Green Darner

Dear Alison,
Your Green Darner image is beautiful, but we really love your Dragonfly doodle, which would make gorgeous fabric print.

Update:  April 28, 2014
Oops.  We forgot to post the image of your art.

Dragonfly Doodle

Dragonfly Doodle

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonfly
Location: Central Oklahoma USA
March 30, 2014 9:26 am
I cant find this one anywhere Can you help to ID. this one?
Signature: name

Variegated Meadowhawk

Variegated Meadowhawk

Our Automated Response
Thank you for submitting your identification request.
Please understand that we have a very small staff that does this as a labor of love. We cannot answer all submissions (not by a long shot). But we’ll do the best we can
!

I am thinking a Variegated Meadowlark

Male Variegated Meadowhawk

Male Variegated Meadowhawk

Hi name,
We agree that this is a male Variegated Meadowhawk, and you can compare your individual to this image posted to BugGuide.

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Found odd bug in youth
Location: Shallow water in a lake
March 17, 2014 8:44 am
When I was younger I found an odd aquatic insect when I went to a local camp. I caught it and put it into a bucket of sand and water. Later It was preserved as part of an insect collection I used for 4-H under the most-likely false name “Water Cockroach”. I recently discovered my old insect collection when moving and noticed the insect once more. I tried looking it up based on what little I could describe it by. It appears to be a nymph, but of what I’m completely uncertain. It would be great if I could learn what it was if only to rectify it’s label after all these years.
Additional description of the insect portrays the insect to be roughly the size of a quarter, brad and flat, about as thick as one. Mud colored, most likely for camouflage. Adept at burrowing under the mud/sand as it attempted to do so when confined in the bucket (though it was a 5 gallon bucket).
I do so apologize for the terrible resolution of the pictures but I did not have a proper image capturing device at the time and was forced to use my webcam.
Signature: Spars with Mantids

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dragonhunter Naiad

Dear Spars with Mantids,
The larval nymphs of many flying insects live in water, and they are collectively known as Naiads.  These include Mayflies, Stoneflies, Damselflies and Dragonflies.  This is a Dragonfly Naiad, more specifically, the Naiad of a Dragonhunter,
Hagenius brevistylus.  Dragonhunter Naiads are very well camouflaged among fallen leaves at the bottom of ponds.

Thank you ever so much for you kind help. I’m glad to finally be able to put a name to this odd little guy after all these years.
Sincerely,
Spars with Mantids

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination