Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Beautiful Eastern Amberwing
Location: Sarasota, FL
July 25, 2013 9:00 am
Hey,
I caught a rare glimpse of a gorgeous female Eastern Amberwing perched on my lanai!! I’ve included a couple of pictures here, I’ve got some very nice close ups if you want them, I’ll be happy to send them since I’m sure the site reduces pictures a lot. When I first saw it from across my lanai, I thought it was a wasp, here in this part of Florida, wasps look very similar at a glance. It wasn’t moving, and a closer look made me suspect it was possibly getting ready to lay eggs. Very pretty!!
Thanks, love the site!!
Signature: Michelle

Eastern Amberwing

Female Eastern Amberwing

Dear Michelle,
Thank you for sending your lovely photos of a female Eastern Amberwing,
Perithemis tenera, a species with pronounced sexual dimorphism that is also pictured on BugGuide.  Clicking on the photos on our site will enlarge the image in a new window.

Female Eastern Amberwing

Female Eastern Amberwing

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Western Flying Adder? (also, dragonfly eyes)
Location: Fairbanks Alaska
July 21, 2013 10:53 am
Thank you again for your wonderful site. I have spent way too much time, following paths of links through your interesting pages. But that isn’t why I’m writing.
It seems that we have just a could of kinds of dragonflies that we see frequently around our house, so I thought it might be nice to be able to identify them. Here is a photo of one of them that my son managed to have perch on his hand. From what I could find I thought it might be a Western Flying Adder (Cordulegaster dorsalis) but I’m NOT an expert yet!
The other thing that I think is really cool about several of these photos is the way that you can see hexagonal reflections on the eyes. That isn’t just in the photos – we saw that in ”real life” too. Is that because of the hexagonal structure of the ommatidium that the eyes are made up of?
Signature: Mother and Son Bug Fans

Dragonfly

Dragonfly

Dear Mother and Son Bug Fans,
Thanks for your compliment.  Alas, we often have difficulty with species identifications for Dragonflies, but this might be
Cordulegaster dorsalis which BugGuide calls a Pacific Spiketail.  We like the name Western Flying Adder, but we don’t know where you learned that name.  Perhaps one of our knowledgeable readers can assist with this species identification.  We believe individual facets of the eyes are hexagonal.

Dragonfly

Dragonfly

 

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Blue Dasher with — eggs?
Location: NH, USA
July 20, 2013 9:01 pm
Dragonfly (I think it’s a Blue Dasher). I’m wondering what the little red spheroids are. Are they insect eggs? Was it parasitized by something?
Signature: Joel Stave

Water Mite Larvae on Dragonfly

Water Mite Larvae on Blue Dasher

Dear Joel,
Dragonflies are frequently hosts to Ectoparasitic Water Mite larvae that attach themselves to the Dragonfly while it is still an aquatic naiad.  The Northwest Dragonflier website maintains that when the naiad molts into a winged adult, the larval Water Mites in the genus
Arrenurus crawl from the cast off exuvia onto the still soft body of the winged adult and attach themselves as ectoparasites.  They derive both nourishment from this and the advantage of transportation to a new body of water where they can drop off and mature.  Light infestations do not negatively impact the Dragonfly much, but heavy infestations can be very detrimental to the adult Dragonfly.  Here is another simple explanation on Taos Telecommunity.  We believe you are correct that this is a Blue Dasher, Pachydiplax longipennis, based on photos posted to BugGuide

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Ebony Jewelwing, wings spread
Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
July 20, 2013 4:02 pm
Thanks to you and your readers’ submissions, I have figured out this sweet backyard guardian is an ebony jewelwing damselfly (and a guy). He seemed to be making sure I didn’t steal the silver from the table, but when I brought out the camera, he turned into a ham. This sort of ”curtsey” is a kind of warning or territorial display, isn’t it?
Signature: Elfie B.

Ebony Jewelwing

Ebony Jewelwing

Dear Elfie B.,
Thanks for sending this interesting angle on an Ebony Jewelwing.  We will try to research your question about warning or territorial display.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Pretty Dragonfly??
Location: Dunedin, Florida
June 19, 2013 3:32 pm
Just wondered what this might be. I posted it to your Facebook page but never got a response. Is it just a pretty dragonfly?
Thanks!
Signature: Carol Borrelli

Possibly Scarlet Skimmer

Possibly Scarlet Skimmer

Dear Carol,
We are not certain, but this red Dragonfly looks to us like it might be a Scarlet Skimmer,
Crocothemis servilia.  According to BugGuide:  “Native from southern Japan and China to northern Australia. Introduced accidentally to south Florida and to Oahu, Hawai’i.”
P.S.  We do not respond to postings on the Facebook page as we have our hands full with the submissions that come directly to our website.  On busy days, we are only able to respond to a small fraction of the identification requests and submissions we receive.

Thanks!! You guys are the best!!
Carol

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What is it?
Location: Allentown, PA
June 13, 2013 6:39 am
I found this sitting on my bricks on my front porch this morning.
Signature: Trina

Green Darner Dragonfly

Green Darner Dragonfly

Dear Trina,
It seems we don’t get enough photos of the magnificent Green Darner Dragonfly,
Anax junius.  During the research of his book, Daniel unearthed 13 Maleficent Names for Dragonflies, and they include Devil’s Darning Needle, Ear Sewer, Ear Cutter, Water Witch, Snake Doctor, Devil’s Little Horse and Evil Old Hag’s Horse.  Green Darners are a migratory species.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination