Currently viewing the category: "Dragonflies and Damselflies"
What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Strange green cricket spider….
Location: Modesto, CA
September 9, 2015 9:01 pm
I cannot find any images of this bug on the Internet and have thus far been unable to identify it… If you could please help me I would appreciate it. I found this bug in Modesto California, by a pond in late August, on a day that was about 104 degrees outside. The pond had been recently drained.
Signature: Ryan Erwin

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Ryan,
We believe this is the aquatic larva of a Dragonfly, known as a naiad, and finding it near a drained pond is good support for that speculation.  Though it looks quite different from any Dragonfly Naiads we have in our archive, it does look similar to an image posted on the Barrier Island Ecology UNCW website.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug found near Boston, MA
Location: Boston, MA
September 6, 2015 7:10 am
Hello,
We found this bug yesterday at a pond near boston. Haven’t seen anything like it around here before. About an inch in length. Dark brown in color. Head like a preying mantis, some spikes on its back.
Have done some web searches, but can’t find it.
Thank you!
Signature: Matt

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Matt,
This is a Dragonfly naiad.  The larvae of Dragonflies are aquatic, and naiad is a collective term for the larva of winged insects that pass their larval stages aquatically.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Bug in our pond
Location: Central Texas
August 15, 2015 1:26 pm
Ok I have no idea what this bug is but it freaks me out. I’ve looked on all these different websites trying to identify it but have never been able to. It has 6 legs and like a stinger looking thing on its butt.
Signature: Hannah

Dragonfly Naiad

Dragonfly Naiad

Dear Hannah,
You have Dragonfly Naiads, the aquatic nymphs that will eventually metamorphose into the familiar winged adult Dragonflies.  Dragonflies are predators their entire lives.  Adult Dragonflies prey upon flying insects including mosquitoes, and the naiads help to control populations of wrigglers and tumblers, the aquatic larvae and pupae of Mosquitoes.

Dragonfly Naiads

Dragonfly Naiads

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Dragonflies are awesome!
Location: Back Bay National Park, Virginia Beach
August 14, 2015 3:21 am
Hi Daniel!
I absolutely love your site, by the way.
Anyways, my dad and I took a trip to Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, at Virginia beach, at the end of July. My dad and I both love birdwatching, so we go there with binoculars and a camera, in my case. To my delight, the place was filled with many different species of dragonflies!!! Needless to say, I didn’t get much birdwatching done. 😛
I’m attaching three photos and (I think) I’ve identified the first two, but I have no idea what the third might be. Any thoughts?
1- Four spotted pennant
2- Widow skimmer (female)
3- ???
Thank you for all the work you do!
Signature: Al

Four Spotted Pennant

Four Spotted Pennant

Dear Al,
Thanks for the compliment.  We agree with your identification of the Four Spotted Skimmer based on images posted to BugGuide, but we are not certain that the second individual is a female Widow Skimmer.  Often female Dragonflies have less obvious coloration and markings and they can be more difficult to identify.  We are posting your images and perhaps one of our readers will weigh in on an identification while we continue to research the matter.

Unidentified Dragonfly

Unidentified Dragonfly

Unidentified Dragonfly

Unidentified Dragonfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: Swamp Darner attacked by hornet
Location: Rochester, NY
August 10, 2015 1:51 pm
Hi!
While trying to identify the dragonfly in my picture I came across this post of yours:
http://www.whatsthatbug.com/2009/09/03/european-hornet-eats-dragonfly-unknown-darner/
and the comments led me to correctly identify the dragonfly as a Swamp Darner, as it is identical to the photos and descriptions on BugGuide, here: http://www.bugguide.net/node/view/2584 The dragonfly pictured was easily 4-5 inches in length.
I believe the attacker may be a European Hornet, as it look very similar to the insect in the original post?
I took this photo August 8th in Rochester, NY. I noticed a loud buzzing and the sound of the dragonfly hitting the glass door several times as he valiantly attempted to keep flying and fend off his attacker. The efforts became more feeble and the hornet appeared to be crawling around going straight for the underside of the thorax. The dragonfly kept curling his abdomen, but after several minutes he seemed pretty much gone, and I could have sworn I heard crunching- the hornet eating his prize.
It was a pretty incredible sight; the kids I was babysitting had very different reactions. The 9 year old, “it’s probably laying eggs in the dragonfly,” and walked away unconcerned. The 2 year old kept trying to go touch it and seemed very concerned for the dragonfly’s well-being.
I thought you might appreciate the picture. Sorry it’s captioned; it’s the only one I had time to get while keeping a 2 year old away from touching!
Signature: Jamie

Swamp Darner attacked bt European Hornet

Swamp Darner attacked bt European Hornet

Hi Jamie,
Your image is an excellent documentation of this Food Chain scenario, but your written account of the observation is especially interesting.  We agree the predator is a European Hornet, and the long term effect that these top of the Food Chain introduced Invasive Exotic predators is having on the native insect population like this Swamp Darner may or may not be significant.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject: What dragonfly is this
Location: Nazareth, Israel
July 28, 2015 12:01 pm
Help me identify this
Signature: Raed

Dragonfly

Dragonfly

Dear Raed,
Wow, we just responded as an anagram.  We believe this may be a Southern Darter,
Sympetrum meridionale, based on this Getty Images posting.  We don’t read French, but there appears to be some information on the Nature 22 site.

Dragonfly

Dragonfly

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination